Tag Archives: Parker

Celebrating World Thinking Day

Submitted by Troop 65857

Metro Denver

Parker

Our troop did World Thinking Day activities at our meeting on Saturday, February 20, 2021. We had an awesome, in-depth discussion with their guest peacebuilder about what peacebuilding looks like and how they can take some peacebuilding ideas to their everyday lives. They worked together on their Peace Pledge.

I am a peacebuilder because I’m stronger than the dark.

I am making this peace pledge to relax.

I believe we should have respect and no war in the world.

I want to help make a difference for peace by stopping the drama.

It’s important to respect and listen to others because everyone has their own opinion.

I plead to be a peacebuilder every day in my home, school,

community, and the world.

Signed, Troop 65857

Happy World Thinking Day!

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

2021 Day of Service

Submitted by Amber Biviano

Metro Denver

Parker

Genevieve and Mackenzie collected winter gloves/socks, snacks, and toiletries to support a local cafe’s efforts to feed and provide essentials for those experiencing homelessness in our community throughout the winter.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scout from Parker is Crocheting 200 “Ear-Savers”

Girl Scout Juliette H. is crocheting as many as 200 “ear-savers” for the deaf and hard of hearing. She hopes her “ear-savers” will make it easier for the deaf and hard of hearing to wear masks during the COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic because their hearing aid(s) would be less likely to fall out when they remove their mask. In researching ways she could contribute to preventing the spread of COVID-19, Juliette learned deaf and hard of hearing students struggle with keeping their masks on because the ear pieces fall off their hearing aid(s). “Deaf and hard of hearing students would benefit from an ‘ear-saver’ for their mask because the string isn’t touching their hearing aid(s). During mask breaks, students could pull the face mask down to hang around their neck with the ‘ear-saver’ still attached,” she wrote.

Juliette, a Girl Scout Junior from Parker, plans to donate the “ear-savers” to deaf and hard of hearing students in Denver Public Schools, along with community groups that work with the deaf and hard of hearing. She also hopes to earn the Bronze Award, the highest honor for Girl Scouts in fourth or fifth grade.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Gold Award Girl Scouts impact Colorado communities and beyond

In the face of the global coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, Girl Scouts continue to do all they can to make our world a better place by taking action to address issues facing their local communities. There are no better examples of this Girl Scout spirit and resiliency than the 16 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who recently earned the distinction of Gold Award Girl Scout, the highest honor in Girl Scouting. They include:

  • Sidney Barbier from Steamboat Springs, Steamboat Mountain School, tackled the issues of waste and recycling, particularly at Colorado state parks. She designed signage for state parks, hosted events to educate others about waste diversion, and even created a Junior Ranger curriculum.
  • Charlotte Blish from Arvada, Arvada West High School, started a nonprofit, Watering Communities, to teach elementary-aged students about how the lack of clean water impacts socio-economic and education resources in parts of Africa.
  • Clare Bolon from Longmont, Apex Homeschool Enrichment Program, developed and taught a week-long online course about how to write and read cursive. She also created resources to help students continue to practice their cursive after completing the course.
  • Kayla Fairweather from Parker, Ponderosa High School, developed a video curriculum on Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) to supplement the T1D training that teachers currently receive. It features the perspectives of diabetic students, parents, a professional athlete with T1D, an endocrinologist, and a diabetes resource nurse.
  • Zoe Johnson from Monument, Palmer Ridge High School, created a handbook and video about horse care and safety to educate new or inexperienced horse owners, as well as barn staff at summer camps.
  • Beatrice Lin from Longmont, Silver Creek High School, developed a workshop and handbook for Girl Scout Daisies and Brownies called “Bringing Global to Girls” (BGtG). The goal is to help younger Girl Scouts develop a sense of connection to the rest of the world and appreciation for other cultures.
  • Ellie McWhirter from Denver, East High School, developed a series of educational materials, including a website, to decrease plastic bag usage in her community and increase the knowledge of plastic bag pollution.
  • Isabella Mendoza from Longmont, Silver Creek High School, designed a cheap and sustainable habitat for solitary bees to lay eggs in and distributed more than 350 habitats around Colorado and the world. She also hosted a community event for people to make their own habitat.
  • With the help of local Girl Scout troops, Ashlyn Morrill from Parker, Chaparral High School, created a pollinator garden that attracts various pollinators, including hummingbirds, butterflies, bees, etc. Girls learned the importance of pollinators and were inspired to do their part to help conserve the pollinator populations.
  • Opal Mosbarger from Peyton, Falcon High School, addressed the issue of animal displacement during emergency situations. She collected kennels and blankets for Perfect Fit Wellness Center, so people can keep their pets safe during natural disasters and other emergencies.
  • Wren Murzyn from Fort Collins, Poudre High School, partnered with doctors, nutritionists, and others to create a guidebook to assist individuals who are wanting to get healthy, but don’t know where to start.
  • Meredith Neid from Denver, George Washington High School, started a self-care club at her high school to healthily address rising levels of stress amongst her peers. After the start of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, she adapted her project to include Zoom conversations with high school seniors about processing the pandemic and what it means to grow up during this time.
  • Anna Rahn from Colorado Springs, Pine Creek High School, created 17 STEM activities for schools and after-school programs. Due to the pandemic, she was unable to distribute them to local schools, so she developed a website where PDFs of the activities are available.

The Girl Scout Gold Award is the mark of the truly remarkable— earned only by a high school Girl Scout who works to address an issue she’s passionate about in a way that produces meaningful and lasting change. Whether it’s on a local, national, or global level, Gold Award Girl Scouts provide innovative solutions to significant challenges. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award Girl Scouts, and girls are entitled to enlist at a higher pay grade if they join the military.

“Gold Award Girl Scouts don’t just change the world for the better, they change it for good—and these Girl Scouts embody everything this achievement stands for,” said Leanna Clark, Chief Executive Officer of Girl Scouts of Colorado. “Each of these young women addressed an issue that’s important to her in order to earn her Gold Award, and we congratulate each of these Gold Award Girl Scouts on this momentous accomplishment.”

You can learn more about these Gold Award Girl Scouts and their projects on the Girl Scouts of Colorado blog.

Bronze Award Girl Scouts Deliver Birthday Kits to Local Food Pantry

Bronze Award Girl Scouts from Troop 65346 in Centennial assembled 300 birthday kits for low-resource families. On Monday,  November 16, 2020, they delivered a hundred of the kits to SECORCares, a food pantry in Parker.  The Girl Scouts made the 300 kits earlier this year. They are packaged in a disposable cake pan and include boxed cake mix, canned frosting, birthday candles, balloons, favors, party hats, and a handmade card. The first hundred kits were delivered last month. On Monday, the girls delivered a hundred more with the remaining hundred kits to be delivered when SECORCares has space to store them.

The Girl Scouts began working on this project in February. They set up a donation box at their school, Creekside Elementary, and collected items at the school’s book fair. When the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic began, the girls pivoted to collect donations online. While unable to meet in-person this summer, each girl made cards for the kits. Through this project, the girls earned the Girl Scout Bronze Award, which is the highest award for Girl Scouts in fourth or fifth grade.

Special thanks to CBS4/KCNC-TV and Colorado Community Media for attending the event and sharing the story with their audiences.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Centennial Girl Scouts Earn Bronze Award

Submitted by Colleen Dooley

Metro Denver

Centennial

Congratulations to Ali, Josey, Maisie, Paige, and Samantha from Troop 65346 in Centennial! They earned the Girl Scout Bronze Award for a project that provides birthday kits to low-resource families.

In February, the girls toured SECORCares, a food pantry in Parker, to learn about the needs of their community and where they could make a difference. They decided to put together birthday kits so that families who are faced with food insecurities could still celebrate their child’s birthday.

After compiling a list of what could be included in each kit, they collected donations to supply: a boxed cake mix, canned frosting, birthday candles, balloons, favors, party hats, and a homemade card; packaged together in a disposable cake pan. The girls made posters and handed out flyers during their school’s Family Night Book Fair to share information about their project and raise awareness about suburban poverty in their community.

The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic required them to move to an online donation drive in the spring, but they continued to spread the word and collected enough donations to build more than 300 birthday kits! Once the girls were permitted to gather again, they assembled and delivered kits to SECORCares, where families can shop their free food market – and now easily pick-up everything they need to celebrate a birthday!

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Gold Award Girl Scout Ashlyn Morrill, Parker, “Protect the Pollinators”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I created a pollinator garden that attracts various pollinators, e.g. hummingbirds, butterflies, bees, etc., with the help of local Girl Scout troops to show how important pollinators are to the community and what they provide, and to inspire them to do their part to help conserve the pollinator populations. I also created a website and presentation for various classes at my high school to encourage others to create their own pollinator garden.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

My target audience was middle school and high school students because they are the future of the world. They will be the generation that will have to deal with the consequences of climate change, for instance, the decline in pollinators. I measured my project’s impact by creating an Instagram page for people to interact with. I also put free milkweed seed packets in the school library along with a flyer to explain their purpose.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

The first way I made my project sustainable is the plants themselves are perennials, so they will come back every year. Second, I created the presentation describing the issue and what the purpose of the garden is. The Interact Club at Chaparral High School will be continuing the presentations for various classes. I also created an Instagram account @chap.pollinator.garden, which I have posted various statistics and pictures from planting day. I also created a website, chapgarden.wixsite.com/chap, which explains the purpose of the garden and why this is an important issue that needs to be addressed. There is an email as well, it is chap.pollinator.garden@gmail.com, for anyone to contact if they have any questions at all.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

The national/global link is that this pollinator decline does not only affect the food supply of Parker, CO, it impacts the whole world. I linked my project to a national organization called Save Our Monarchs by receiving seed packets from them to share with my community. Globally, the Instagram page and the website could reach other countries and inspire others in different areas of the world.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that when plans change, I cannot get stressed out or worried because I will not get anywhere. The only way to overcome failures is to persevere through them and stay focused on the overall goal. Also, plans change all the time, and it is always good to plan ahead and almost expect the plans to change so I am prepared for anything.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

I learned and improved upon many skills including leadership and communication, which I will need in the future for my career. It is also a good experience to include on resumes and applications because it shows your potential and what you can do as a leader.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

My Gold Award was an important part of my Girl Scout experience because it gave me an opportunity to apply the skills I have learned and developed throughout my years as a Girl Scout.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I would consider myself very innovative after this project. I ran into plenty of challenges including spontaneous snowstorms, rescheduling, and a global pandemic. I had to reschedule a dozen times and not panic because if the leader loses control, then the whole project could fall apart.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Kayla Fairweather, Parker, “E.N.D. T1D – Educating Non-Diabetics About Type 1 Diabetes”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award project, I created a video curriculum on Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) to supplement the T1D training that teachers currently receive. The video featured the perspectives of diabetic students, their parents, a professional athlete with T1D, an endocrinologist, and a diabetes resource nurse. Together, these perspectives offered a more personal view of the challenges faced by diabetic students and insights on the emotional burden of managing this condition in the school environment. I also made a video specifically for diabetic students and their parents to show them that they’re not alone with their condition, and many of the feelings they experience are completely normal and shared by others. I presented my video at two sessions during Type One Nation, a T1D educational event, and at a statewide diabetes resource nurse meeting.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

When presenting my video, I provided before and after surveys to every attendee. I received great feedback from parents of diabetic children, many stating that they related to the video’s message. Comments were left including a new understanding that, “everyone associated with diabetes have the same thoughts/concerns” and “T1D does not prevent one from doing anything.” Every diabetic teen who viewed the video responded that they believe teachers and other students need to learn more about T1D, especially how to relate to diabetic students and to not joke about it or confuse it with Type 2 Diabetes. Most responded that they felt more comfortable talking with their teachers about T1D after watching the video and had takeaways such as “you are not alone” and you “have many peers supporting you.”

The impact of my video was especially profound on the diabetes resource nurses. Before watching the video, about 67% responded that the emotional challenge of living with T1D was only a small or medium part of their current curriculum. After watching the video, about 90% responded that the emotional challenge should be a large part of the curriculum. I received comments such as “very well put together video and very helpful having the perspective of the patient/student,” “the importance of including the student perspective,” “how important it is to share with staff the challenges that kids with T1D face and what their thoughts are about needing help in the classroom,” and “I appreciated the statement that every student with diabetes is different.” Diabetes Nurse Educators from both JeffCo Public Schools and Pueblo County District 70 commented that they would love to share the video within their school districts.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project advisor, Kelly Driver, is including my video in the Type 1 Diabetes curriculum for the Douglas County School District. All new teachers and nurse assistants in Douglas County will watch the video along with the standard T1D curriculum they already receive. The video will additionally be shown by nurses in middle school health classes in Douglas County schools. My video is also being shared with diabetes resource nurses from school districts across the state. I have had several of these resource nurses express an interest in continuing to share my video with the nurses, teachers, and coaches within their school districts.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

Diabetic students across the world are met with a lack of education about Type 1 Diabetes within the school setting. I reached out to several global and national organizations that work to share resources with all diabetics facing these common issues. I have spoken with a media coordinator from Beyond Type 1, an online diabetes education, advocacy, and support organization that works with T1D on a global level. I shared my video with her, and she is trying to have it featured on the Beyond Type 1 website. I also shared my video with the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, and they featured it on their Rocky Mountain Chapter Facebook page. This social media account has 2,747 followers.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned a great deal about how I work with others and tackle challenges. First, I learned that although I am typically more shy, I felt comfortable talking with my team members and other large groups over the course of my project. Since my project was something I felt passionate about, I wasn’t extremely nervous to share it with others. I also learned that the goals I set in my head are sometimes a little overly ambitious. With my Gold Award, I realized quickly after starting that my project plan was too complex for the time frame I had to work with. Fortunately, I was able to work with my project advisor and Gold Award mentor to revise my plan. Additionally, I learned that I am fairly good at balancing various tasks, whether that was different parts within my project or other school and extracurricular commitments during the course of my Gold Award. Finally, I learned that I am usually open to new perspectives and was able to be flexible with sudden changes and obstacles during my project, especially the shift to virtual presentations with the start of the COVID pandemic.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Earning my Gold Award helped me realize that I have the capability and support from others to change my community for the better. My Gold Award experience was the first time that I really set out to address a large issue of personal importance to me. During my upcoming years in college and my future career, I have more confidence to tackle challenges and seek help from others who share in a desire to make a change. I am also much more aware of the extensive planning that goes into large-scale projects. With this, I think I will be better prepared to manage my time and put forth the effort needed to prepare for and complete the task at hand. I have also grown tremendously in my communication skills which will help me in any career.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

Most of my Girl Scout experience was centered around learning to be a leader in my community. The Gold Award was the culminating experience that allowed me to apply that learning and actually make an impact that was especially meaningful to me. My Gold Award helped me realize how many skills I had acquired over my years as a Girl Scout. It really put into perspective how valuable this whole journey has been in shaping the person I am today.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Earning my Gold Award helped me grow as a risk-taker. Before this project, I had very little experience with conducting formal interviews and creating a final video product. My Gold Award really took me out of my comfort zone while learning these new skills. I also took risks in contacting new people over the course of my project and taking the initiative to try to form connections that would last beyond the project itself. I faced numerous obstacles over the course of my project with things not going as planned. From having to rethink my main project focus to rescheduling presentations and sharing my project through virtual platforms, I learned to be flexible and creative with finding solutions to a wide range of problems.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org.

I 💚 Fall Product Program: Juliette from Parker

Girl Scouts of Colorado’s 2020 Fall Product Program is now underway, and there’s still plenty of time for you to get started! Fall Product Program is a great way for troops (both new and existing) to earn proceeds to use for Girl Scout activities throughout the year or to get one step closer to reaching their next goal. All troops receive 13% of their magazine orders as troop proceeds, plus $1/per item for nuts and chocolates sold.

GSCO Media Star Juliette from Parker told us what she likes about this program:

How many years have you participated in Fall Product Program

This is my fifth year participating in the Fall Product Program.

Do you like creating an avatar that looks like you? Do you record a message too?

I like to express how I look at myself when creating the avatar.

What do you like about having an online storefront? Is it easy to connect with family, friends and other customers? Is it fun to use?

It’s easier to use the online storefront since family and friends can order on their own time, and  they can also take their time in deciding what they want.

What tips for success would you share with girls who are participating for the first time?

Those that aren’t interested don’t have to say no directly to you, but (they can) feel free to continue sharing your personalized shopping link.

What nut or candy item (s) do your customers like best?

Nana really likes the Pecan Supremes and Pa enjoys anything with peppermint. You can’t go wrong with chocolate.

What has your troop done with Fall Product Program troop proceeds that you’ve earned?

My troop uses the funds we earn to go on camping trips.

What’s the coolest reward that you have earned?

I like to earn rewards for a plush animal. This year’s theme is the sloth.

Thank you, Juliette, for sharing your experience and tips with other Girl Scouts!

Want to participate? You’ll find the M2OS log-in instructions and set-up instructions, family guides, and an order card that shows all girl rewards are on the Fall Product Program page of the GSCO website. Parents/caregivers can also watch the How to Get Started in M2OS – For Families video and learn how to help their Girl Scout.

Need more information? Go to the Fall Product Program page on our website: https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/cookies/fall-product-program.html and check out the Fall Product Program weekly update videos posted to GSCO Facebook page and YouTube channel.

Questions about Fall Product Program or need assistance? We are here to support you! Contact GSCO customer care at 1-877-404-5708 or email inquiry@gscolorado.org.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Juniors Explore The Scientific Method with Petri Dishes

Submitted by Karen Grealy

Metro Denver

Parker

Our Girl Scout Junior Troop explored The Scientific Method by forming a question and hypothesis about bacteria in their homes. Once they formed their hypothesis, they used agar plates to test and analyze their results. To the surprise of the Girl Scouts, the remote controls they tested grew more bacterial and mold colonies than the toilet, cat box, and boot samples. One girl had a tough time growing any bacteria. Her conclusion was that because she stored her petri dish in a windowsill, the UV rays killed her bacteria. The Girl Scouts are eager to start placing their remote controls in the sun to see if they get fewer bacterial colonies when they test again.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.