Tag Archives: Fort Collins

Service Unit 747 summer camp

Submitted by Lily Barkau

Northern & Northeastern CO

Fort Collins

Service Unit 747 will be holding its first-ever service unit camp this summer from August 3-5, 2018 at Meadow Mountain Ranch in Allenspark. Registration is open to Brownies and older, but if you have a Daisy troop that is interested, please contact us for more information. Registration information is on the flyer above.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Beginning of summer = Beginning of outdoor adventures

Submitted by Ariella Wells

Northern & Northeastern CO

Fort Collins

Troop 70720 kicked off the summer break by going on a hike up through Lory State Park. It’s always so fun to be able to get outdoors and connect with each other and nature. This was first outing of many planned for summer.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Field day fun

Submitted by Ariella Wells

Northern & Northeastern CO

Fort Collins

Cadette Troop 70720 had some field day fun while earning their “Field  Day” badge. We were joined by a younger Brownie troop. The badge was entirely planned by one of our Cadettes. She did a great job and the girls had an amazing time!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Working to earn the “Primitive Camper” badge

Submitted by Ariella Wells

Northern & Northeastern CO

Fort Collins

We got the girls together outdoors to start working on the “Primitive Camper” badge. The girls learned about plants that could be edible in the wild and also primitive shelter building. They built two very different structures based off what they could find around them. They had an amazing time and are talking about more they want to do outdoors!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Making the Robots badge easy for leaders and fun for girls

Submitted by Bonnie Bell

Northern & Northeastern CO

Fort Collins

Troop 76059 recently completed the Programming Robots badge without actually using a computer. As a software engineer, I think the more interesting part of programming is figuring out how to instruct a robot to do a job rather than the specific mechanics of any one language. I printed out some basic maze diagrams, and reproduced them on a sheet using painters tape for the lines, so that we could have a quick set-up and take down for our meetings. At the meeting, we had a discussion about robots, then the girls proceeded to the programming part. First, they solved the maze themselves. Then, they wrote a “program” of instructions for a robot to complete the maze. Our programming language had three instructions: go forward, turn right, and turn left. Next, they paired up and each got a chance to be the robot and execute a friend’s program. If the friend was able to follow the program and get out of the maze, they were done. If not, they went back and reworked their program. Some of the girls needed just one more pass, some of them needed to finally work through the program in real time (like you would using a debugger). All of them eventually got their robots through the maze. They have consistently listed the robot activity as one of their favorite things for the year.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

281 packages of cookies delivered to Hometown Heroes

Submitted by Ariella Wells

Northern & Northeastern CO

Fort Collins

Thank you Fort Collins for supporting our Girl Acout troop and their Hometown Hero! Thanks to you 281 packages of cookies were delivered to the Fort Collins Mission to help give some goodies to our local homeless population. While we were dropping off the cookies, the girls saw a man and his son waiting in line for food. Homelessness can impact anyone and we were thankful for the opportunity to give to those less fortunate in our local community.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Jaden Scott, Fort Collins, “Get Up and Dance”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

Through the Before and After School Enrichment program in Northern Colorado, also known as BASE Camp, I taught dance classes to 230 kids over the course of a year and made a program where dancers in the area can volunteer, if they are over 15-years-old, to teach dance to kids at elementary schools. My goal was to get kids physically moving where they may not have had the opportunity to do so, while sharing my passion for dance. I also wanted to inspire others my age to teach dance and inspire children as well.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured my impact in the way the children responded to me being there and what they did following my time with them. Each time I went to teach, I could see the kids’ faces light up and get really excited to start dancing. Two girls from one of the schools I taught ended up dancing my choreography at the BASE Camp Family Fun Fair while wearing the “Get Up and Dance” t-shirts I gave out to the students. During spring break, I taught a few of the same children twice and the second time they saw me, they immediately recognized me and got extremely excited. The Group Leaders from each school where I taught, provided me with feedback on how much the kids enjoyed it.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

This project is sustainable because it is a program that dancers will be able to volunteer through for years to come. By having more and more volunteers each year, all of the BASE Camp students will get more of the exercise they need and the enjoyment of dance.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

After finishing this project, I moved to New Hampshire and was able to continue teaching dance to kids in an after school program. I have also shared my story on Facebook with a worldwide group of dancers in hopes of inspiring more to follow my path.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that I have all of the qualities to become a great teacher and can be an inspiration to the younger generation. When I started teaching at the first school, I was shy and not very confident while teaching, but when it came time to teach at the last school, my confidence grew and I became much more comfortable in front of all the kids.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

It will impact my future because it is something I can look back on and be proud of as a self-accomplishment. To be able to impact this many kids and more to come in the future, all on my own, is something not many people can say at my age.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award for me has always been a finish line towards the end of someone’s Girl Scout career and a beacon to look to. By having this goal right from the start, now achieving it feels like you’ve made it to the top and have finished it.  It gives me a great sense of accomplishment.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

Earning my Gold Award helped me become a risk-taker and a leader. I was shy and not very confident in myself when I first started teaching, but now I have become a teacher for my dance club at my high school as well as helped the theater director at school teach the dance choreography for the spring play.  I feel more comfortable and confident about it each time I teach. I would’ve never imagined that I would teach this many kids, become a source of inspiration at my age, and have taken this kind of risk before this project.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Gold Award Girl Scout: Emelie Knitz, Colorado Springs, “FoCo Cafe Cookbook”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I created a cookbook for FoCo Cafe in Fort Collins to help educate people about community cafes and how they positively impact their community. Not only did I include information and recipes from FoCo Cafe, but I also included a recipe and information from 13 other community cafes around the United States. I also did a presentation at a club at my school to further educate people in my community about community cafes.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

One way I measured impact was by handing out surveys to the people I presented to. Before the presentation, they answered the questions, “Do you know what a community cafe is?” and “Do you know why community cafes are important?” on the survey. Most people did not know the answers to these questions. However, the majority of people were able to answer both of the questions after the presentation, showing improvement and that my goal of educating people about community cafes was reached.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

I have given the template for FoCo Cafe’s cookbook to FoCo Cafe so they can continue to print the cookbooks and change information if needed. I have also given the template of the cookbook to the 13 other community cafes so that they can print the cookbooks for their cafes as well.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

In the cookbook, I have included a recipe, photo, and information from 13 other community cafes in the USA. The 13 cafes are Oakwood Soul Cafe (NY), Tulsa’s Table (OK), Take Root (MO), One Bistro (OH), SAME Cafe (CO), CAFE 180 (CO), Mustard Seed Cafe (TX), Stone Soup Cafe (MA), One Acre Cafe (TN), Grace Cafe (KY), Knead Community Cafe (PA), Fair Trade Cafe (AZ), and Table Grace Cafe (NE). I sent the cookbook template to the cafes as well so that they will be able to print them for their own cafe.

What did you learn about yourself?

I definitely learned from my poor time management skills in the duration of this project and improved my organization skills because I had to manage all of the information and recipes from multiple cafes. One thing I really learned about myself during this project was how I handled panic. Once the community cafe I was originally working with closed, I started to panic because I thought that I would have to create a whole new project, but I just had to breathe and reflect upon what I had done so far in order to move forward.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

This project will impact me in the future because of the confidence I have gained in myself as a person and my abilities as a leader. I now know that I can persevere through a big project that I planned myself, and I believe I will be more confident in leading other people and projects, whether they are big or small. In this project, I also learned how important it is to have the help of other people because it is difficult to go through life and achieve your goals all by yourself. I am thankful that I have experienced planning and executing a big project like this now because I can learn from the mistakes I made and utilize my new skills in future projects in college and beyond.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award is important to me, not just because it is the highest award Girl Scouts can earn, but because of the experience I gained. I got to put together all of my leadership skills I had gained until this point and plan, organize, and execute a project. Not only did I succeed with this project, but I also helped my community in ways I never knew I could. I will always remember this project and the things I learned from it.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Earning the Gold Award helped me to become a go-getter because I had to dive right into this project. When the community cafe I was originally working with closed, I didn’t think about quitting, but wanted to continue the project because I had already put forth so much effort. Now that I know I can execute projects, I will be more willing to take them on in the future.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org