Tag Archives: Gold Award

the highest award a Girl Scout can earn. It is something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action. The project is something that fulfills a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global), creates change, and hopefully, is something that becomes ongoing.

Gold Award and Highest Awards and Take Action trainings

We are thrilled to be offering both Gold Award and Highest Awards and Take Action trainings at Leadership Summits across the state for the summer and fall of 2018!

You may be asking, “What is a Leadership Summit?” Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Leadership Summits are learning conferences that offer volunteers (and girls!) the opportunity to get energized for the new membership year and check required trainings off the to-do list. In addition to offering trainings for new and experienced volunteers, we are offering “Older Girl Leadership Summit” tracks at each event where older girls can participate in training all day.

Gold Award Training is required for any girl interested in pursuing her Gold Award.

Highest Awards and Take Action is the perfect opportunity to connect with other troop leaders about successful projects and learn how to let girls take the lead in making a difference in their community with Take Action projects that girls will complete in their Journeys, Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award projects.

Colorado Springs, Saturday, August 25
Older Girl Leadership Summit: https://gscolorado.formstack.com/forms/older_girl_leadership_summit_pp_08_25_2018
Leadership Summit (for adults): https://gscolorado.formstack.com/forms/leadership_summit_in_colorado_springs_pp_08_25_2018

Loveland, Saturday, September 8
Registration links coming soon!

Denver, Saturday, September 29
Registration links coming soon!

Grand Junction, Saturday, October 20
Super Saturday event, Gold Award training only.
Registration link coming soon!

Questions about Highest Awards? Email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Gold Award Girl Scout Bailey Stokes awarded Johanna Farrar Girl Scout Memorial Scholarship

Gold Award Girl Scout Bailey Stokes of Buena Vista is the 2018 recipient of the Johanna Farrar Girl Scout Memorial Scholarship. She earned her Gold Award, the highest honor in Girl Scouts, earlier this summer for creating a nature program that will be sustained by teachers in her community.

Johanna Farrar’s husband and children started this scholarship in 2015 to celebrate all of her accomplishments, particularly those within the Girl Scout community. Born in London, England and raised in a small village on the south coast of England, Johanna was a Girl Guide in her childhood. She was also the youngest ever to have achieved the Queen’s Guide Award at that time, the English equivalent of the Girl Scout Gold Award. After earning a software engineering degree from Loughborough University, Johanna moved to New Jersey to work for Bell Labs. In 1985, she accepted a position with FedEx in Colorado Springs, where she met and married Gene Farrar in 1990. Johanna and Gene lived and worked in the Colorado Springs area, moving to Monument in 1992 when their oldest daughter, Hannah, was born. In 1995, after their second daughter, Rachel, was born, Johanna retired from a successful career as a Technical Advisor at FedEx for an even more successful and rewarding career as a dedicated full-time mother.

Johanna introduced her daughters to Girl Scouts at the first opportunity and became a local leader in Monument, then again after relocating to Buena Vista. When Johanna first arrived in Buena Vista, she learned Girl Scouts had all but disappeared in Chaffee County. Johanna believed so strongly in the values and skills that Girl Scouts develops, it became a passion to reestablish Girl Scouts for girls in the high Rockies. Known to many of her friends as the “Engergizer Bunny” because of her seemingly never-ending energy and indomitable spirit, Johanna provided the leadership and drive to rejuvenate Girl Scouts in the valley. Now, for the first time, there are troops for all ages.  Additionally, Johanna loved the outdoors, including skiing, hiking, biking, mountain climbing, and especially gardening – passions she loved to share and instill in young women.

 

 

Gold Award Girl Scout Zoi Johns named VFW Colorado Scout of the Year

Gold Award Girl Scout Zoi Johns of Golden was honored by the Veterans of Foreign Wars as the Colorado Scout of the Year in June 2018. VFW recognizes the impact scouting has on not only the nation but the world. Zoi told Girl Scouts of Colorado, “Thank you for being a part of my story and my success. THIS is why we do what we do.”

Learn more about Zoi’s Gold Award project on GSCO blog: http://gscoblog.org/2017/10/girl-scout-gold-award-project-zoi-johns-golden-project-waterwise/

Gold Award Girl Scout: Katherine Walden, Larkspur, “BeeBoxin’”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

My project addressed the decline in local bee species, such as the leaf cutter and mason bee. Over the past several decades, local bee species have been quietly slipping into extinction leaving the ecosystem a step behind in facing such a large issue.

While bees themselves may be small, the impact and power they hold on our ecosystem is immense. However, too often their role is overlooked and not taken into consideration by much of the population. Before I started this project, eating meals was no more than a passing thought and I never thought where the food was coming from that I was ingesting. Once I began my project though, I discovered that 1/3 of every bite of food comes from the bees and the plants and crops they pollinate. Simply put without the bees, we would starve, and be forced to find expensive and alternative solutions for feeding the population.

The focus of my project was to go to elementary schools and teach about bees and install bee boxes that local bee species and other pollinators can call home. Most people don’t know a lot about bees especially local bees. Commonly people think of honeybees, however these are not included in the local bee species. Going into these schools and teaching allowed me to clear up the distinction and show just how important the local bee species are. In addition, I was able to highlight some of the factors that are causing local bee population decline including habitat destruction from wildfires and development.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

My presentations were interactive and engaging, which allowed students to ask and answer questions. Following the presentation, we were able to go outside and pick a spot to hang the bee box and using what they learned in the presentation, were able to pick out a location for the bee box. Before every presentation I would ask the kids, “What do you already know about bees?”

Being kids, I would always receive crazy ideas and stories, but then to watch the shift from general awe, to impactful interest was truly amazing. When kids start to realize that they can make a difference is something that can’t be under-appreciated.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

There are two main project impacts that are foreseeable in the future. The first being a less drastic decline in local bee populations. With the bee boxes now in place, local bees now have an additional location to nest and work. Another impact would be that now kids have learned about the importance of bees in the community and can go spread this knowledge to others to hopefully continue to spread the word on bees.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My plan started in Larkspur and spread along the Front Range ranging from Monument to Sedalia. These three different locations were sought out because they allowed for different groups of students to come in and learn about the bee boxes, but also were placed so that they could hold an impact on the surrounding area. All three locations are somewhat rural and have gardens and the boxes should be utilized by local bees the area to increase pollination. On a national level, people from across the nation come to the Stone Canyon Discovery Ranch and will be able to learn about the bee boxes and what they provide. There is potential if there is interest for them to take a box back to their home because extra boxes were provided to the ranch so that they can be spread across the country.

Although I did complete the national requirement, I would have liked to been able to deliver the boxes to other states myself however, the time and resources needed were not achievable. Regardless, I am excited to hear from the people who take boxes from Stone Canyon and where they end up.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned to communicate more effectively with a broad range of individuals of all ages. As I begin my career as a cadet at the United States Air Force Academy, it is vital that I be able to communicate and be confident in what I am talking about. This project taught me to do just that, as people expected that I know the content of my project and be able to answer and questions and solve and issues that arose with the project. Whether it be teaching about bees, or guiding a plane to take off, I know that I am now better equipped to be assertive and knowledgeable in whatever role I fill.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Before this project, I tended to be more passive and not want to go against the crowd of what people were saying. However, it has become apparent, especially in society today, that change will not occur if you are passive or refuse to share out. It is of the upmost vitality that individuals speak up and project issues that otherwise might continue to go unnoticed. By not only pointing out an issue, but being able to do something to resolve such has provided me with the experience of being able to instill change and reflect on how action caused resolution. This realization and viewpoint will propel me into my career as a military officer, whose duty is to solve and address issues that face our nation and military.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award was a closing step on my Girl Scout career and brought all the skills I had acquired over the years full circle. It was very exciting to be able to come up with an idea and then put in into action. Had I not done my Gold Award, I think I would have felt like I didn’t finish something and that there was stuff left to do.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

Not only did I discover a lot about bees with this project, but I also discovered a lot about myself. I learned that I enjoy teaching and being able to answer questions that people have. Of course, this seems like a common practice especially in high school, however, teaching about it to a younger generation was something special that I enjoyed. In addition, it allowed me to better understand what it means to truly be a Girl Scout- bringing about change and inspiring others to do the same.

Each one of my presentations was done with a new set of students and teachers. This allowed me to work with so many different people of all ages and understanding which bettered how I could teach about bees and make it so it had the most impact on each audience member. In addition, I learned how to communicate with staff so their classes benefitted and the content I was teaching could be incorporated into their lessons plans. By going to different locations and teaching, I was able to see how each site was going to be impacted differently.

The issue that I addressed was the decline in local bee species. My resolution to this problem was to build bee boxes and place them at different locations so that bees could now have a place to live. And while I can’t completely reverse what has already happened to the population, I can help reduce the negative impacts and assist the bee populations return. Most importantly, though I was able to educate and teach others about the issue our community faces. When kids got excited to go outside and place the bee box and paint their garden bee rocks was exciting and showed how I was able to create an impact.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

New Resource: Gold Award rubrics

Girl Scouts of Colorado is thrilled to publish new Gold Award rubrics for girls around the state to use to make their Gold Award journey successful and rewarding. The document includes a rubric for initial proposal approval and final approval, so girls can understand exactly what is expected of them throughout their Gold Award journey.

All Gold Award mentors across the state worked to develop and revise the rubrics over the last year to ensure that a wide variety of perspectives and experiences were considered.

Each girl working to pursue her Gold Award should “meet minimum standards” or above on each criterion listed on the rubric. The rubric also lists the corresponding questions on the Gold Award project proposal and final report to help understand where the information expected of each criterion is coming from.

Questions about the Gold Award process in Colorado? Email highestawards@gscolorado.org. 

Ten reasons Girl Scouts is (still) the best place for girls

From Girl Scouts of the USA

Every girl deserves a place where she can be her best self and unleash her inner G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader)™. And that place is Girl Scouts! 

Girl Scouts has a track record of more than 100 years of providing extraordinary experiences just for girls. And although girls can choose from many activities and youth programs, there’s only one that’s proven to grow girls into the leaders we need today, tomorrow, and always.

Here are our ten favorite reasons (because we have many!) why all girls deserve a Girl Scout experience.

1. Girl Scouts is a girl-only space, and while that sounds obvious, we mention it because there’s a good reason! Girls have unique developmental needs, and participating in a program tailored to those needs has well-documented benefits. Girl Scouts is, and always has been, the expert on girls.

2. Girl Scouts is SO much more than a single-gender youth program; it’s the only one that’s girl-led! Girls choose the exciting, hands-on activities that interest them most—whether that’s earning badges, exploring the great outdoors, learning business skills while selling Girl Scout Cookies, or making a difference in their community. And together, they learn by doing. 

3. All girls deserve the opportunity to participate in fun, confidence-boosting activities in a judgment-free space, and that’s why Girl Scouts will always be an inclusive, supportive community where girls are free to be who they want. There’s a place for every girl in Girl Scouts, and that’s why you’ll find us in urban, suburban, and rural communities in schools, community centers, and places of worship. 

Our CEO Sylvia Acevedo said it best: “Our role is to support and encourage every girl, not insert ourselves into her spirituality, question her birthplace or family’s country of origin, or concern ourselves with her economic status. We’re not interested in her family’s political beliefs. No matter who she is, she has a home and a safe place at Girl Scouts.”

4. Girl Scouts offers hands-on, girl-centered learning in STEM, which can be a game-changer for many girls. Research shows that Girl Scouts who said they didn’t like math or science at the start of their STEM programs became more positive about these subjects after participating, and 77 percent said that because of Girl Scouts, they’re considering a career in technology. 

5. It’s a fact: companies today seek employees with essential people skills who are prepared to be inspirational, empathetic leaders. Through Girl Scouts, girls discover the importance of teamwork, become creative problem-solvers, and glow with positivity, empowering others to be their best G.I.R.L. selves too—the kind of leader every workplace deserves. 

6. Girl Scouts believe in leaving a place better than you found it, and becoming civically engaged is the first step in fighting injustice and making positive change a reality. There’s nothing more empowering than being a catalyst for change, and through the G.I.R.L. Agenda, girls learn to make their voices heard and to mobilize their community to make the world a better place. 

7. That all-girl environment we mentioned earlier? It’s the most inspiring sisterhood she’ll be part of! Girl Scouts are continually leading amazing initiatives that improve their communities, whether they’re championing ocean conservationfighting child marriage, or enacting a smoking banin their home state. With 1.8 million fellow change-makers to join her, she’ll discover there’s nothing she can’t accomplish!

8. The Girl Scout Gold Award is her chance to make a sustainable, positive impact on her community. But the experience also directly benefits her as she learns valuable community organizing and project-management skills, making her stand out on college applications, earning her scholarships, and enabling her to enter the military one rank higher. Talk about paying it forward!

9. Girl Scout alums break glass ceilings, and it’s easy to see why: the confidence and persistence needed to smash through barriers in the workforce and bust gender stereotypes is rooted in having a girl-only space where girls know anything is possible.

10. Building girls of courage, confidence, and characterisn’t just mission statement fluff; it’s what we live and breathe at Girl Scouts, and the outcomes speak for themselves. Research shows that, compared to their peers, Girl Scouts are more likely than other girls to be leaders.

Bottom line? Girl Scouts is the best leadership development organization for every girl because it’s the place for her to do more than just well—it’s her place to thrive!

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award Girl Scouts honored at Highest Awards celebration in Silverthorne

Nearly 100 Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at the Silverthorne Pavilion in Silverthorne on May 11, 2018, to honor the more than 1,300 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2017-18 Girl Scout awards program year, nearly 1,000 girls across the state and 25 in the Mountain Communities region earned the Bronze Award. 10 girls in the region earned the prestigious Silver Award and three became Gold Award Girl Scouts.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts gives girls the skills and experiences they need to thrive and lead in today’s world. The world needs female leaders now more than ever. You’re making a difference,” she said.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Gold Award project helps bring computers for all

Submitted by Angela F., Girl Scout Gold Award candidate

Metro Denver

Centennial

Hello, my name is Angela and I am working on my Gold Award project, “Computers for All.” My project is providing computers to those with few resources. I chose to work with Family Promise to help provide them with computers for the families they work with who are currently homeless or have recently found a home.

I learned about Family Promise through my church. Our church hosts families four times a year. I volunteer for them by making meals and by providing babysitting. I have met several homeless teens going to school without a computer. I couldn’t imagine not having a computer for school. This is what has helped me identify the need for my project.

In my search for computers, I found another non-profit, Denver Tech for All. Their mission:

Tech for All makes available to individuals in the community the means to become skilled and competent in computer use; we do this by gathering donations, collecting and reconditioning used equipment, identifying qualified recipients and placing the appropriate equipment with them solely for their use and at no charge.

Denver Tech for All has agreed to provide the computers to Family Promise families in need. Currently, more than 30 computers have been distributed since January.

I am also looking for additional teens in need by reaching out to local schools. Please email highestawards@gscolorado.org if you know others in need.

Additionally, I wanted to help Denver Tech for All by obtaining computer equipment for them. To date, I have found 80+ monitors, 30 desktops, several laptops, keyboards, and mouses. My goal is to collect more than two tons of equipment for them.

On June 2, 2018 I will be collecting computer equipment at Arapahoe High School for Denver Tech for All. Arapahoe High School is located at 2201 E. Dry Creek Rd Centennial, CO. The drive is between 10 a.m. – noon in the east parking lot. Please consider donating any computer equipment you are no longer using. Even if the equipment doesn’t work, we will accept it.

Below is a flyer listing all the computer equipment needed.
Thank you so much for your support!

40963114_computer_drive_flyer

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award Girl Scouts honored at highest awards celebration in Colorado Springs

More than 300 Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at the Penrose House at El Pomar in Colorado Springs on May 4, 2018, to honor the more than 1,300 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2017-18 Girl Scout awards program year, nearly 1,000 girls across the state and 191 in the Pikes Peak region earned the Bronze Award. 105 girls in the region earned the prestigious Silver Award and six became Gold Award Girl Scouts.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts gives girls the skills and experiences they need to thrive and lead in today’s world. The world needs female leaders now more than ever. You’re making a difference,” she said.

2016 Gold Award Girl Scout Megan Burnett served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about her journey to earn the Gold Award and how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

“All the skills you learn in Girl Scouts, through the meetings you plan and the badges you earn, are all intended to prepare you for the future,” she said.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award Girl Scouts honored at Highest Awards celebration in Denver

More than 1,000 Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at the Denver Marriott Tech Center in Denver on April 29, 2018, to honor the more than 1,300 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2017-18 Girl Scout awards program year, nearly 1,000 girls across the state and more than 400 in the Denver Metro region earned the Bronze Award. Nearly 200 girls across the Denver Metro region earned the prestigious Silver Award. 23 girls across the region earned the Gold Award.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts gives girls the skills and experiences they need to thrive and lead in today’s world. The world needs female leaders now more than ever. You’re making a difference,” she said.

2017 Gold Award Girl Scout and winner of the 2017 Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize for Gold Award Excellence Emma Albertoni served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about her journey to earn the Gold Award and how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

“I learned how to be responsible for what I said and did. I found something I believed in and learned how to speak up for my beliefs. The Gold Award also taught me how to not only work with a team, but lead a team,” she said.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.