Tag Archives: Gold Award

the highest award a Girl Scout can earn. It is something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action. The project is something that fulfills a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global), creates change, and hopefully, is something that becomes ongoing.

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Sarah Ness, Centennial, “Destressing Art Sessions”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

My Gold Award project was created to address the high amount of stress seen in the student body at my high school, Eaglecrest High School. I held art sessions after school in the art rooms in order to help kids at my school be able to relieve stress. I worked with the National Art Honor Society and Art Club, along with the teachers that sponsor both of those clubs, in order to hold the art sessions. At the end, I had held 23 sessions.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured my impact by giving students a survey I had made and asking them if they were feeling stressed and if they thought that the session helped to relieve their stress. In the surveys, 100% of the people surveyed answered that they were feeling stressed, with the reasons why being “family,” “schoolwork,” “work,” “sleep or the lack thereof,” and “expectations for the future.” Along with that, 100% of the survey takers said that the session did help them feel less stressed.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My global/national connection is made through the access to free downloads of a manual for the sessions, and some project examples, on the website teacherspayteachers.com. I’ve also created an Instagram account that is dedicated to examples of project ideas and step-by-step instructions for how to do the projects.

What did you learn about yourself?

I’ve learned that I’m a lot more adaptable to situations that I wasn’t expecting and that I’m more capable of being a leader than what I was expecting.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

I think earning my Gold Award will help show others that I am a hard worker and very dedicated. It has also taught me better ways to deal with stress around me and to help others around me deal with their stress in a healthier way.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I think the Gold Award was an important part of my Girl Scout experience because it allowed me to use all of the skills that I have gained through my years of being a Girl Scout, along with helping me gain new ones, to make a lasting difference in the world. It helped me draw on all of my past experiences and really make the most out of everything that Girl Scouts has taught me.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

My Gold Award helped me become a

-G (Go-getter): by forcing me to do what I needed to do right now and not allowing me time to procrastinate or not try and do something that was needed.

-I (Innovator): by making me come up with ways to describe every step of an artistic process so that even someone who might think he or she isn’t artistic is able to do the same project as everyone else.

-R (Risk Taker): by causing me to step out of my comfort zone with talking to large groups and teachers, even though I knew that there was a chance that no one would want to help me. I also took a risk with doing an art-centered project because many people aren’t interested in the arts or don’t believe that they could do any projects, so I was taking a risk in the possibility that no one would even come to my sessions.

-L (Leader): by making me step into a leadership position and have to become a kind of teacher to the other students in the sessions along with having to come up with all of the projects and getting ready all of the materials that might be needed to do each of the projects.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Gold Award and Highest Awards & Take Action trainings at Leadership Summits

Girl Scouts of Colorado is thrilled to offer both Gold Award and Highest Awards & Take Action trainings at the Leadership Summits across the state this summer and fall!

You may be asking, “What is a Leadership Summit?” Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Leadership Summits are learning conferences that offer volunteers (and girls!) the opportunity to get energized for the new membership year and check required trainings off the “to-do” list. In addition to offering trainings for new and experienced volunteers, we are offering Gold Award training for girls who are getting ready to “Go Gold”.

Gold Award training is required for any girl interested in pursuing her Gold Award. Parents and troop leaders are encouraged to attend as well.

Highest Awards & Take Action is the perfect opportunity to connect with other troop leaders about successful service projects and learn how to let girls take the lead in making a difference in their community with “Take Action” projects that girls will complete in their Journeys, Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award projects.

August 26, Colorado Springs
September 16, Denver Metro
September 23, Northern Colorado
September 30, Grand Junction
October 14, Pueblo (Gold Award and Highest Awards Training TBD)

The full schedule for each event will be posted soon along with links for registration.

Questions about Highest Awards? Email highestawards@gscolorado.org

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Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Kayleigh Cornell, Aurora, “Colorado Book Bank”

What did you do for your Gold Award project? 

In my project, Colorado Book Bank, I collected gently used children’s books from families in a local middle school. The middle school’s chapter of National Honor Society helped collect, sort, count, and box the books I collected.  I received even more books from an elementary school after their used book sale, which NJHS helped sort. After taking the books to the food bank I partnered with to give kids a lunch and a book over the summer, I received 1,360 books.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

By counting how many books I donated I determined that I could reach 1,360 kids as each kid got their own lunch and book. While I can’t see how my program affected their education level, I can impact kids right now by giving them a book to read.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement? 

Colorado Book Bank collected books from several different schools. The largest donor was an elementary school who has an existing used book sale that has always searched for a good donor partner to gift their leftover books to each year. I also worked with a local middle school to kick off the project. They are considering the project into another food bank they work with for an existing food drive they already conduct. The elementary school, Peakview, plans to continue donating books to JFS to support the lunchbox program. For the past decade, they have held a spring used book sale with a large number of books left over. The librarian has agreed to donate all leftover children’s book after each book sale to JFS to continue the project. JFS has agreed to pick up the books from the school since that has been the main stumbling block for book donations in the past. Peakview’s librarian also plans to share about the option to donate book sale leftovers to JFS.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

During my project, the chapter of National Honor Society at my school agreed to help move the books to JFS. They also helped me get in touch with the organization as a whole to get my project open on a wider scale. I connected several parts of my project by working with different National Honor Society (NHS) groups. One of the membership requirements of NHS is to provide community service. In support of this work, NHS has a national website that includes a searchable database of project ideas. Club sponsors and student members use the database to find new projects for their club. My project is being listed on that database with a link to my website so other chapters of NHS can create their own Book Bank in their community. In addition, NHS publishes an e-newsletter and have expressed interest in promoting Colorado Book Bank through that publication. Finally, I have created a website to provide supporting documents for other groups who would like to replicate the project.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned a lot about planning and how while it’s challenging, it has to be done. I also learned that leading a team of other people can be very tricky because you have to pull together the best parts of everyone and make sure all the parts you have work together seamlessly.  I’ve always known I like doing things, but during my project I learned how important it was to delegate tasks to my team to get everything done.  One of the biggest things I learned was that good communication played a key role in my project.  It’s important to ask for help because that is the only way people know you need it and it is important to be clear in written emails and phone calls.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

In the future, I want to be able to lead my own team of scientists and study the formation of planets. I need to be able to work with multiple teams to do this and pull together many different resources to achieve top-notch results from my team. Because of my project, I know how to contact different organizations and pull together people who wouldn’t have worked together otherwise.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I learned so much about myself and how to help others. I wouldn’t have been able to learn the same skills I did if I hadn’t done my Gold Award. I could learn how I could help my community and make a difference beyond what I thought possible.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

I became a go-getter because I saw a problem in my community that I wanted to solve, so I found a way that I could start solving it.

I was an innovator because I found a new way to try to start lowering rates of poverty while including people in my community.

A risk-taker meant being able to start something and talk to people that could have become a lot less popular than it actually did. But I wanted to try my project and it paid off in the end.

I became a leader because I created a team of people I relied on as they simultaneously relied on me. I took their strongest skills and combined them to form an amazing project and amazing team.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Emma Deutsch, Denver, “Feline Family Fix-Up”

 

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

The Feline Family Fix-Up project was designed to draw greater attention to, and promote adoption, of the adoptable cats at the Denver Animal Shelter. Every year approximately 6-8 million animals are brought into shelters. Of those, about 25% will be adopted, but about 70% of the cats will be euthanized. Of those euthanized, approximately 80% are healthy, treatable, and could have been adopted into new homes. (Source: American Humane Society, 2013) By highlighting the cat rooms with bright decorations, I will be able get more people to notice and look closer at the cat rooms. Some people will choose a cat quickly based on looks alone. Color can be attractive and can greatly affect people’s moods and actions. By creating inviting and happy environments, I could help potential adopters fall in love. The playful decorations will allow people to visualize the cats in a more positive light, and even imagine the cat in their own home. This helps more cats find their forever home by increasing the number cat adoptions and ultimately save more cats lives.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I looked at the adoption data reports from the Denver Animal Shelter over the course of three years. Each report showed how many cats were adopted out of the shelter over the course of three years since I did my project. For example, in the first year the adoption rate increased 12.38%. While the following year it increased by 33.89%. There seemed to be a more positive view on cats.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

Other volunteers and interested community members learned how to continue to decorate and brighten up other rooms/areas of the shelter to increase adoptions. By sharing information and pictures on how to improve other rooms, there have been increased animal adoptions at the Denver Animal Shelter. I extended my reach out to a wider community by sharing my project, including information on how to create rooms in other facilities. Community education and inspiration was done during a presentation at school during Academic Showcase. I created tri-fold display board, included pictures, and prepared and delivered a speech about my project, needs, and the good work of the DAS. I created a detailed instruction sheet on how to apply the decals.  Also, the volunteer coordinator at the shelter helped spread the word via social media and other methods.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

Homeless animals exist in every community, every city, every state, and every country in the world. Homeless animals are uncared for and do not receive the medical care they need to live healthy lives. They are also freely able to breed at will, creating and multiplying the problem exponentially. If more people are made aware of adoptable animals at neighborhood shelters, they are less likely to buy pets. As people are made aware, they will look to do the right thing and adopt. This will decrease the sheer numbers of homeless and sickly animals. It also helped to increase personal wellness in the owners as it has been proven that pets decrease stress and increase happiness and content feelings in people. I also connected my project to other shelters with the help of the volunteer coordinator at DAS.

What did you learn about yourself?

From this project, I have learned that when I set out to help someone, I will not stop until it is done. If what I am doing is meaningful to me, then chances are the cause will be meaningful to others. Because of this project, I have learned that I am a strong leader. I advocated for myself and I can get a task done on my own, as well as being able to talk to other people and tell them my ideas.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Because of this project, I can talk with more confidence when speaking publicly.  While leading a project, I learned how to be more adaptable and work within changing time frames and demands from complete strangers. I discovered a new determination within myself that I did not know I had.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I feel like the Gold Award was an important part of this journey because it not only had me step out of my comfort zone on multiple occasions, but it also helped me find who I am as a person and know what my role is not only in Girl Scouts but in other parts of my life as well.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

Earning the Gold Award has helped me to become a go- getter. I had to become persistent when talking to people to get the permission that I needed to start the project. Learning to become a go-getter has taught me that I can get anything done if I put my mind to it.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Gold Award Mentors needed for Northern CO and Pikes Peak regions

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Submitted by GSCO Highest Awards Manager Aimee Bianca

Arguably, the most impactful part of Girl Scouts is the earning of the Girl Scout Gold Award. This prestigious award represents the highest achievement in Girl Scouts and challenges high school girls to initiate meaningful, sustainable change locally, nationally, and/or globally through unique “Take Action” projects of their own creation.
In Colorado, girls work individually with a Gold Award Mentor throughout their Gold Award journey to ensure they are well supported and their projects meet all the standards and expectations of a Gold Award. Mentors are all volunteers who are experts on the Gold Award and sit on their region’s Gold Award Committee in addition to working one on one with Gold Award candidates.

If you are strong woman with project management skills who is interested in building leadership skills with a young woman, you might be the perfect Gold Award Mentor!

Girl Scouts of Colorado needs new Gold Award Mentors in Northern and Northeastern Colorado and the Pikes Peak regions. With more and more girls “going Gold”, we need more mentors to work with candidates one-on-one!

Download and review the full position description and email highestawards@gscolorado.org if you are interested in this exciting volunteer position with Girl Scouts of Colorado.

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Gold Award project: Entrepreneural Development in Haiti Part Two

Submitted by Lilli T.

Mountain Communities

Breckenridge

Through Girl Scouts, girls learn a plethora of skills including the encouragement to reach higher. My name is Lilli and I am no exception to the adoption of these skills as through Girl Scouts I was able to accomplish an honor I never sought possible.

Last year, I connected with the Haitian school of St. Paul’s and in doing so I began to learn about the education climate in Haiti. Haitian education rates are among the lowest in the western hemisphere with a literacy rate of 61% compared to America’s 86%. 88% of eligible Haitian students are enrolled in primary school while 20% are enrolled in secondary school. The Haitian government provides very little funds for public schools, with only 10% of the government’s budget spent on public schools. 21.5% of the population, age 5+, receive a secondary education, and 1% receive a university level education. 33% of children (ages 6-12) do not attend school. In acknowledgment of these statistics, and with an interest in business, I wanted to provide an extension to the 8th grade curriculum at the Haitian School of St. Paul’s by incorporating a business component into their education.

This past month, I partnered with the Colorado Haiti Project and from May 29-31, 2017 I conducted a three day business workshop for the 8th grade class of St. Paul’s Episcopal School in Petit Trou de Nippes, Haiti. During the workshop the ten students learned the five fundamentals of business: how to create a business plan, what loans are, how to design a product, how to advertise it, and ultimately how to earn a profit. Through the workshop, the students learned about the concept of supply and demand, economic competition, etc. There were five product options in which the students were able to choose from; dominos, checkers, sak through, friendship bracelets, and a home garden bed. Students were able to work in groups of two, or individually. In an effort to manage the competition, no more than three groups, or people, were able to make a product. The students began by choosing a product and proceeding to fill out a business plan and create advertisements. The following day the students took out loans from the “Monopoly Bank” and then proceed to the wholesale store in which they purchased the necessary materials to make their product(s). For the duration of the second day, students sewed, painted, colored, and braided their products. On the final day, the students finished their products and a moc-market was held in which the administration of St. Pau’ls and I purchased the students product with Monopoly money. Following the market, the students payed back half of their loan and then were able to purchase the leftover materials from the wholesale store.

The aspect of the business workshop that was most humbling was the following day when St. Paul’s hosted a community wide agricultural festival. At the festival, the students that participated in my workshop sold friendship bracelets and other products that they had made the previous night from the material they were able to purchase with the profit they had made. Through the information and encouragement provided during the business workshop students were able to make a real profit. My primary goal in working to earn my Gold Award is to provide these 8th graders, whom some will not continue school after this year, with an enriched education that will help them in the workforce. Witnessing these 8th graders using the fundamentals that we focused on in class and putting them to use so quickly and successfully was a true accomplishment.

Another aspect I hope to cover in earning my Gold Award is to educate those in the United States and elsewhere about the education climate in Haiti and encourage them to get involved!

Donations needed for Gold Award project

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Hello! My name is Aubree, and I am currently working on my Girl Scout Gold Award project, which is the highest award in Girl Scouting. In order to achieve this honor, I have chosen to examine a week in the lives of people from all over the world using photography, interviews, and their stories. The purpose of this project is to teach people about other cultures, daily challenges people face, as well as highlight what makes them happy. The goal for participants is to create understanding and acceptance of self and others, to see needs and take action in their communities, and inspire others to do the same.

To achieve my goals, I need your help. I am looking for people to donate digital and disposable cameras, SD cards, and batteries. These items are needed to bring my project to developing areas around the world who may not have the resources necessary to share their story. I have been working with Compassion International to deliver cameras to countries all over the world. You can see the stories and photos on my project FB page at: facebook.com/aweekinourlives. As of now, I have responses from six countries and the goal is to put everything in a book after I receive enough responses from a diverse group of participants. If you know someone who lives in another part of the world and would like to participate, please contact me.

My participant target this month is closer than you may imagine. I am working with the Rapid City, SD Girl Scouts to deliver cameras and supplies to the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. This is one of the poorest places in the nation and where your generous donations would be going as I join them on June 18, 2017. With your help, the kids will not only get to participate in my project, but they will also get their very own camera to use after my project is over.

If you can donate the listed items, or have questions, I can be contacted at: aweekinourlives@gmail.com. I hope to gather all donations by June 16, 2017.

Thank you for your consideration!

Gold Award project: Entrepreneurial development in Haiti

My name is Lilli T. and I live in Breckenridge. I am currently working on my Girl Scout Gold Award, which will take place in the Haitian school of St. Paul’s.

Haitian education rates are among the lowest in the western hemisphere with a literacy rate of 61% compared to America’s 86%. Haiti has 15,200 primary schools, 90% of which are non-public and run by religious affiliations. The United States has 66,718 public primary schools. 88% of eligible Haitian students are enrolled in primary school, while 20% are enrolled in secondary school. Secondary and higher level education in provided by public and private institutions. The Haitian government provides very little funds for public schools, only 10% of the government’s budget is spent on public schools. Out of the 67% enrollment rate for primary school, 70% continue to the third grade. 21.5% of the population, age 5+, receive a secondary education, and 1% receive a university level education. 33% of children (ages 6-12) do not attend school.

The school where I will be completing my Gold Award at is named St. Paul’s. St Paul’s school is located in Petit Trou de Nippes, Haiti, a rural coastal town located 80 miles west of the capital, Port-Au-Prince. It was founded in 1990 and began as a one room schoolhouse educating all ages and boys and girls together. It has since grown to a co-ed fall 2016 enrollment of 400+ students ranging from grades K-8. St. Paul’s enrollment fee is $350 per student or $7,000 a class. However, due to the devoted Colorado Haiti Project and its partners, tuition is nearly free to all students.

For my Gold Award, I am partnering with the Colorado Haiti Project and heading their new youth entrepreneurial program for the 8th grade class at St. Paul`s Episcopal School in Petit Trou. I will be organizing a three-day hands-on business workshop that is an opportunity for 8th grader students to “start” small businesses. The students will learn a simplified version of the five fundamentals of business – creating business plan, product, loans, advertising, and how to earn a profit. They will start with thinking about their markets, design, advertising and create a budget. They will then go to the “bank” and take out a loan with which they will visit the “wholesale store” where they will buy the materials for the products they will make. The students will spend a day or two making their products and on the final day a market will be held where they will sell their products. After the sale, they will pay back their loan to the “bank” and are then allowed to visit the wholesale store to buy materials, or candy, to make more products for fun!

My primary goal in completing my Gold Award is to provide these 8th graders, whom some will not continue school after this year, with an enriched education that will help them in the work force. I also hope to educate those in the United States and elsewhere about the education climate in Haiti and encourage them to get involved in making a change!

 

 

 

2017 Highest Awards booklet: Now available online

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Nearly 1,800 Girl Scouts, families, and friends celebrated this year’s 1,400 Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award recipients at five regional celebrations across the state throughout late April and early May. These young women have taken charge to identify issues in their community and develop and implement original plans to create positive change. We couldn’t be more proud of their accomplishments!

Stephanie Foote, President and Chief Executive Officer of Girl Scouts of Colorado, spoke at all five celebrations. These are some of her favorite events of the year because they are the only times she gets to be in the room with so many Highest Awards recipients at once.

Sarah Greichen, a 2016 Gold Award recipient, Stephanie Foote Leadership Prize winner, and National Young Woman of Distinction, was the emcee in Pueblo, Loveland, and Denver and a keynote speaker in Pikes Peak.

Jessica Mills, a 2016 Gold Award recipient, was the emcee in Pikes Peak while Shauna Clemmer, a Gold Award recipient and current member of the Western Slope Gold Award Committee, was the emcee in Grand Junction.

The Highest Awards Celebrations are incredibly special events where girls are recognized among their family and fellow Girl Scouts for their achievements. Additionally, this is a special time for younger girls to see older girls in action and get inspired to go for their Silver and/or Gold Awards.

Check out the electronic version of our 2017 Highest Awards booklet online (http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/content/dam/girlscoutsofcolorado/documents/GSCO_2017_HA_Booklet.pdf) and view our “Best of Highest Awards 2017” photo album on Flickr (https://www.flickr.com/photos/gscolorado/albums/72157679203803063/page1).

Gold Award recipient honored for volunteerism at national award ceremony in Washington, D.C.

Olympic gold medalist Michael Phelps congratulates Emma Albertoni, 18, of Arvada (center) and Breanna Remigio, 14, of Aurora (right) on being named Colorado's top two youth volunteers for 2017 by The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards. Emma and Breanna were honored at a ceremony on Sunday, May 7 at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History, where they each received a $1,000 award. (PRNewsfoto/Prudential Insurance)
Olympic gold medalist Michael Phelps congratulates Emma Albertoni, 18, of Arvada (center) and Breanna Remigio, 14, of Aurora (right) on being named Colorado’s top two youth volunteers for 2017 by The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards. Emma and Breanna were honored at a ceremony on Sunday, May 7 at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, where they each received a $1,000 award. (PRNewsfoto/Prudential Insurance)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Girl Scout Gold Award recipient Emma Albertoni of Arvada was honored in the nation’s capital on May 7, 2017 for her outstanding volunteer service during the 22nd annual presentation of The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards. In February, the Prudential Spirit of Community Awards named Emma one of Colorado’s top youth volunteers of 2017 and awarded her the title of State Honoree. Emma – along with more than 100 other top youth volunteers from across the country – received a $1,000 award and personal congratulations from Olympic gold medalist Michael Phelps at an award ceremony and gala dinner reception held at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. Emma also received an engraved silver medallion, which Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie A. Foote presented to her at last month’s Highest Awards Celebration in Loveland. 

Emma, a senior at Ralston Valley Senior High School, earned the highest honor in Girl Scouting for her work to improve financial literacy education and ensure students across Colorado are prepared to make sound financial decisions when they graduate. The idea hit Emma one summer when she was working at a summer job, shopping for her first car, and looking at college tuitions. “I was dealing with larger sums of money than ever before and I realized I didn’t know anything about using it wisely,” she said. After discussing with her parents such foreign concepts as credit scores, loans, budgeting and taxes, Emma decided she and her peers needed help.

She began by researching financial education in Colorado and found large gaps. For example, “In Algebra II, students are taught how to calculate interest; what they are not taught is how interest could affect their credit scores or how to figure interest into the cost of a purchase,” she said. Emma discussed her concerns with her principal, who put her in touch with the teacher of her school’s Family Consumer Science class. Emma offered to develop a unit on financial safety online for the class, and then created presentations, videos, discussion outlines, and quizzes to use in the classroom. Next, she persuaded the local school board to strengthen the teaching of financial literacy throughout the district, and she is now working with state legislators on guidelines for educators across the state to follow in teaching students about financial topics.

Youth volunteers in grades 5-12 were invited to apply for 2017 Prudential Spirit of Community Awards last fall through schools, Girl Scout councils, county 4-H organizations, American Red Cross chapters, YMCAs and affiliates of the HandsOn Network. More than 31,000 middle level and high school students nationwide participated in this year’s program.

The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards program was created in 1995 to identify and recognize young people for outstanding volunteer service – and, in so doing, inspire others to volunteer, too. In the past 22 years, the program has honored more than 120,000 young volunteers at the local, state and national level.

For more information about The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards and this year’s honorees, visit  http://spirit.prudential.com or www.nassp.org/spirit.