Tag Archives: Gold Award

the highest award a Girl Scout can earn. It is something that a girl can be passionate about—in thought, deed, and action. The project is something that fulfills a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global), creates change, and hopefully, is something that becomes ongoing.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Cassandra Sterns, Arvada, “Simply Technology”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award project, Simply Technology, I created and taught six technology classes for independently living seniors in Arvada, Colorado that helped them learn how to use their Android smartphone. Each class taught the attendees how to use different apps on smartphones such as messages, camera, email, and Internet. Knowing how to use technology is a huge part of today’s society, and not knowing how to use it often ostracized people, namely senior citizens.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured the impact of my Gold Award through a survey I had each of the members of my class take, and by the appreciation I received personally from the attendees. Many of the seniors approached me to tell me how helpful the class was and that they are no longer afraid to try new things on their phone. Additionally, my project was requested again, which showed that people thought it was helpful and successful enough that other people should take the class too.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project is going to be sustained in two ways beyond my involvement. The first way that my project will be sustained is that the Jefferson County Public Library System will continue to hold classes that teach seniors about their smartphones. The second way is that I will have a website that can be accessed by anyone with the materials that I created for my classes and more cool tricks that I hope will encourage seniors to use their phones more often. The web address is https://sites.google.com/a/jeffcoschools.us/simply-technology.

What is your project’s global/or national connection?

I grew my Gold Award project from the original location at Stanley Lake Library to a second location, Brookdale Meridian Center in Boulder. The Brookdale Meridian Center is an independent living community for retired citizens (most are in the late 70s to 80s). At Brookdale Meridian, I taught a class to the residents and helped them to understand how their phones worked.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that I could have a voice that people pay attention to in a crowd and that I didn’t need to be handed a microphone when I wanted to talk to a crowd. I have always had a quieter voice and it gets overpowered a lot in discussions and conversations. I struggled during the first few classes to get my voice heard, but by the end, I was able to captivate my audience with a louder voice.

How will earning your Gold Award Impact you in the future?

Earning my Gold Award is going to impact my future because it allowed me to grow and learn more about myself. My project challenged me to overcome some of my reservedness and helped me to develop as a leader. In the future, I will be able to use the skills I learned during my Gold Award project to impact the world in other and hopefully, larger ways.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

Earning your Gold Award is an important part of your Girl Scout experience because it proves that you have learned something applicable through the organization. Additionally, it shows you that you can be an empowered young woman all by yourself and you can take on some of the problems of the world. The Gold Award is important because it culminates all that you have learned as a Girl Scout and focuses it into one project that you can be passionate about the rest of your life.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Through earning my Gold Award, I became a go-getter and a risk-taker. Taking on the project pushed me to pursue some of my own dreams and help the world around me; it enabled me to become purposeful. Additionally, putting myself up there in front of a group of people made me realize that taking risks aren’t so bad, in fact, my Gold Award made me more confident to put myself out there for people to see.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Gold Award Girl Scout: Lauren Kettler, Thornton, “Popsicles of Positivity”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

Popsicles of Positivity is a program that was created to help teach middle school-aged students about the need for kindness.  But, why is there a need for kindness?  One in seven students from K-12th grade are bullied, according to the http://antibullyinginstitute.org.  To defend these students from the threat of bullying, they need to learn kindness and perspective.  Popsicles of Positivity is a program that is designed to be a short activity that can be integrated into other programs.  The reason behind this theory is to help better fit into a class period or the time period of club or group.  While working on other programs, I have found that long programs have little effect on middle school-aged students, and they learn better when the subject matter is consolidated.  Through this program students will be focusing on dignity, bullying, self-kindness, and external kindness.  This program is a stepping stone to help students develop understanding and create habits of kindness.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured impact mainly through pre and post surveys to see how well each student understood the concept presented. After each presentation, I reworked Popsicles of Positivity to make the program better.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

I have two confirmation letters from Immaculate Heart of Mary and Tomahawk Ranch saying that they will continue Popsicles of Positivity and implement the program into their curriculum. But, also the lessons in Popsicles of Positivity were created to make life long habits which will extend past the program into the student’s daily lives.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I was able to create a website that has all of my teaching outlines and other resources called https://popsicleofpositivity.weebly.com/. I have also been able to share my project with my service unit, Immaculate Heart of Mary, Tomahawk Ranch, and Rocky Top Middle School.

What did you learn about yourself?

I am a perfectionist.  I had the assumption before my Gold Award that I wanted my work to be better than most people’s work.  But, the realization didn’t really hit me until I flat out didn’t want to do my Gold Award project anymore, because in my head it would not be good enough.  I was so hesitant to start and finish my project, because I felt like if I didn’t do it right the first time, then what was the point in trying at all?   After my first presentation to the Kindness Club at Rocky Top Middle School, I felt like even more of a failure, because to me what I was saying did not feel inspirational.  After speaking with my youth group, I felt dismayed that the middle school students were giving me blank stares the whole time.  https://popsicleofpositivity.weebly.com/  felt too simple to me and not good enough for anyone to actually use.  After looking at another girl’s Gold Award project in my troop, in my mind, mine did not seem like it was showing any significant signs of change. Explaining the idea of Popsicles of Positivity to friends did not sound inspirational enough.  In my mind I felt like if someone else were to do my project, they would have easily been able to do it in a week or two.  I was working in an environment that constantly made me feel like I was not good enough to earn my Gold Award. Ironically, I was going against the ideas that I was preaching to the students.  I was being such a hypocrite and I was acting in this way until I took a step back and asked for help.

It is extremely hard for me to ask for help.  I have always been the person with the answers and level-headed solutions.  But my own head was spinning so much that having an unbiased idea about my project and how to define success was extremely hard, almost impossible.  Sitting down and telling my mom all my struggles was tedious.  I came to the realization that I had so much misery connected with my project that even explaining my situation was difficult.  It took multiple days of thinking and processing my struggles to conclude that I was over critiquing myself.  But it took even longer to believe that my project was impacting other people’s lives.  Only after having talks with my Gold Award  Advisor and Tomahawk Ranch Camp Director Monica Gray, did I realize that my project could flourish into something grander than what my imagination could create.  They were both able to explain to me that any project or idea is a process, of course nothing will be perfect at first, but that is the beauty of imperfection.  The lack of perfection, the first time through shows how much we learn the second and third time through.  I know now that if my project did not affect anyone else, it at least changed me for the better.  It taught me that I am not perfect, nor will I ever be.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

I have learned many skills through my Gold Award including risk-taking, understanding perfectionism, and perseverance. Each skill is very important to shape me in the future. Being able to explore new ideas while embracing the unknown. Understanding myself as I become an adult. And understand what it means to try and try again because that is more important than perfection.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I think sometimes people don’t take Girl Scouting seriously, people are very surprised when at the age of 18, I say that I am still in Girl Scouts. The most common response that I get is that “Isn’t Girl Scouts for little girls?” The common assumption is that Girl Scouts if for elementary-aged girls not for middle, high school, or adult aged women. As I grew up through Girl Scouting, I learned many skills and had a lot of experiences, yet none of my peers took the idea of Girl Scouts seriously. Once I started working on my Gold Award, the title of a Girl Scout gained some weight. I was now changing my community past selling cookies, I was able to work with students to make them better people, teach them how to be kind and trustworthy people. I hope that my small impact may change at least a few ideas of what Girl Scouting is and the true meaning of what we do.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

The main skill that I learned through my Gold Award is risk-taking. Seeing that I am a perfectionist I constantly strive to make everything right the first time around. I get very nervous and disappointed when things don’t turn out how they are supposed to the first time around. So when my first presentation didn’t go how I wanted it to I wanted to quit right there. To me there was no point in trying again because the next presentation would end up the same way. I had to get over my fears of failure, take a risk, and try again. Without my decision to take risks, I would not have earned my Gold Award.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Gold Award Girl Scout: Amy Tomshack, Northglenn, “First-Aid and CPR in the classroom”

What did you do for your Gold Award project? 

For my Gold Award project, I addressed the topic of emergency preparedness in schools. I did this by organizing and running a Hands-Only CPR and Stop the Bleed first-aid class, as well as organizing and running a supply drive to collect supplies to expand the first-aid kits that are seen within my school (Northglenn High). The reason why I chose to address emergency preparedness the way I did was for two reasons. First of all, emergencies can take place anytime, and anywhere. With that said, knowing how to efficiently and effectively handle an individual bleeding profusely or unconscious with no pulse can mean the difference in their quality of life post emergency. Secondly, 17 students and faculty members at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School lost their lives on Valentine’s Day in 2018. To me, this was unacceptable, even losing one person’s life in a school was unacceptable, which prompted me to encourage individuals within a school to learn how to properly handle an emergency that involves bleeding and/or a lack of pulse.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured the impact that my project had on my target audience, the students and staff of Northglenn High School, through what they were able to learn about the importance of Hands-Only CPR, how to Stop the Bleed, as well as how to perform both life saving actions. The staff and students at Northglenn High School when they see someone lying on the floor, unconscious, and unable to breathe, they know to immediately begin chest compressions. This is because both students and staff are able to understand that a medical condition is causing that individual to be unconscious, and while the students or staff member may not know what exact condition is causing the state of unconsciousness, they are able to provide some help before paramedics arrive.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

I am passing this project onto Northglenn High School’s HOSA (Health Occupations Student Association) chapter by providing them with access to my website, which has the process that I went through with completing my project: contacting the fire department, posting videos of applying tourniquets and hand compressions, as well as collecting emergency supplies contained a list provided on a website created for my project. I also obtained a letter of commitment from HOSA and North Metro Fire Department to make sure that Northglenn High School (my school) will continue to have the supplies to handle emergencies, and students and staff that have the knowledge fresh in their minds to be able to handle emergencies the best that they can.

In addition, anyone who views my website can have 24/7 access to life-saving information in the time after the most recent Stop the Bleed and Hands-Only CPR class and the next class through videos and infographics on my website.  Link to my website here: https://firstaidcprintheclassroom.weebly.com/

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My national and global connections are with the national HOSA (Health Occupations Student Association) organization, of which one chapter is at the school I graduated from, and through my website, which is free for anyone to check out. After speaking with the national HOSA organization, the representative that I spoke to via e-mail informed me that they are partnering with the American Red Cross and the U.S. Public Health Service to begin a program called Stop the Bleed. HOSA has state, national, and international competitions every year, which means students around the state of Colorado and the United States participating in the Stop the Bleed event (upon release) will be studying and practicing the skills needed to perform the best at the competition they attend, and be able to have the skills necessary to save lives. Also, with just over half of the world’s population being able to access the internet, anyone in the world can access my website, which contains videos of how to perform life saving skills, such as applying a tourniquet.

What did you learn about yourself?

What I learned about myself as I completed this project is that I am quite persistent when I want something to get done, and I try to do everything within a timeframe and my ability to do so. This is because when I am really passionate about a subject, such as medicine, I really focus on what is going on, and I become more motivated to complete the task. I also was able to tune in to my caring personality with this project, because my biggest motivator throughout my project was how fed up I was that fellow students at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, as well as other schools around the country, were dying from wounds that could have been easily treated on scene, possibly saving their lives. However, since I cannot change what has happened in the past, this project has made at least my school proactive, should the unthinkable happen.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Earning my Gold Award will impact my future because I will be able to have the confidence in leading a group of people to accomplish a goal. Before I had started and while working on my Gold Award, being a group leader had been a little ways beyond my comfort zone. However, since the Gold Award is girl-led, it was able to push me beyond my comfort zone since I was in charge of everything that would take place during my project. Now that I have completed my Gold Award, I am now confident in my leadership abilities, especially when it comes to providing emergency first-aid and CPR because I can direct the people around me what to do to help in an emergency until the paramedics can take over.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

Earning the Gold Award has been an important part of my Girl Scout experience because as I have already mentioned, the project gave me the confidence to be able to lead something that I am passionate about. I love anything to do with medicine and helping people, and I was able to do both of those when I taught (the EMTs did the actual teaching) my classmates and teachers how to stop bleeding and perform chest compressions, should they need to perform one or both of those actions.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Earning my Gold Award helped me become a go-getter in G.I.R.L. because I had to reach beyond what I knew before earning my Gold to be able to communicate effectively, meet deadlines, and to put my project into motion. Also, since there was no adult to tell me how my project should be completed, meaning no one to “grade” my work, I had to take initiative and plan out my project myself. Of course, I did have some friends and adults helping me complete my project, but ultimately it was up to me to plan things out and get them done. I wanted my Gold Award with a burning passion, and I am so thankful that the Gold Award encouraged me to go get what I wanted, and ultimately make me a more confident person.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Gold Award Girl Scout: Kyra TerLouw, Grand Junction, “Container Gardening Initiative”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I created vegetable container garden kits which included soil, seeds, nutritional information, and a bilingual “how-to” brochure, after experimenting with container gardening myself. I partnered with Community Food Bank to distribute the kits to low-resource families, with the hope of inspiring them to eat healthy produce at low or minimal cost, as well as teach their kids about good nutrition.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I kept track of the number of kits distributed and collected personal testimonies from family members who received them, as well as gathered feedback from food bank volunteers. A total of 39 kits were given to families in the community.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

Families can continue and expand upon the container garden idea, so that friends, neighbors, and future generations will be positively impacted. My container garden brochure will also be distributed to future Community Food Bank families to inspire a greater number of people. A local church plans to duplicate my garden kit project next year. Library displays placed in Grand Junction High School and Central High School were donated for future educational use.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

Healthy eating and living on minimal resources are global issues. People all over the world, not just in my community, struggle with limited access or affordability of healthy food choices.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned to believe in myself and ask for what I need, that organization is a strength of mine, and communication is very important to getting things accomplished on schedule. I learned that an idea can become a reality with hard work and perseverance. I also learned how to project my voice… becoming more confident and believing in myself helped.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

The Gold Award helped strengthen my leadership and communication skills, both of which are needed in the “real world.” Opportunities to take charge, speak publicly, and help others are everywhere. Earning my Gold Award has made me more self-confident.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award personalized my Girl Scout experience. I was able to work on a project that I was passionate about, while making a difference in the community on a much larger scale than I had ever done before.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

Earning my Gold Award helped me become an innovator. Using vegetable container gardens to address the need for low cost, healthy eating options among families with minimal resources was a new idea in my community. I took my love for gardening and shared it with others who could benefit from growing fresh produce. Another way I became an innovator was through the process of searching for support materials. I realized that much of the published materials about container gardening were for flowers, not vegetables. This discovery led me to develop my own informational brochure.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Gold Award training webinar

Attention all 8th grade Cadettes, Seniors, Ambassadors, troop leaders, and parents across Colorado! If you (or your girl) is thinking about going for her Gold Award, don’t miss out on the upcoming training webinar on Tuesday, August 6, 2019 from 5 – 7 p.m.

This is a free training. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the highest achievement in Girl Scouts. In this training, girls will learn the requirements, council procedures, and tips for making her Gold Award experience successful and rewarding.

Gold Award training is mandatory for any girl interested in pursuing her Gold Award. Troop leaders, co-leaders, and parents are encouraged to attend.

To register, go to the Girl Scouts of Colorado website.

If you have any questions, contact GSCO’s highest awards manager Kaitie LoDolce at highestawards@gscolorado.org.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Lakin Altman, Colorado Springs, “Baby Bundles”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I created a Baby Bundles program. Baby Bundles are to provide low-resource families and single/teen moms, clothes and necessities for their babies. Most of them cannot provide the basic supplies for their babies. My project provides mothers the materials needed to help their growing family. A few of the essential, and non-essential, baby items needed to raise a healthy baby are: washcloths, diapers, blankets, clothes, bibs, baby wipes, bottles, socks, baby toys, and baby books. I created and distributed donation flyers and then continued to hold multiple donation drives in order to acquire these items. After I collected the donations, I made a resource guide for new mothers so that they could know where to go if they are seeking help. I compiled the bundles, delivered them to Family Life Services and Life Network, and distributed my resource pamphlets to the women and families there. I led a team of volunteers on the distribution of the bundle and they also distributed the resource guides to hospitals and OBGYN clinics in the greater Colorado Springs area. I also created a how to guide for my project, to include an example donation flyer and resource guide, which has been sent to Girl Scout leaders around the world.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

The joy of seeing moms’ reactions to receiving a Baby Bundle: I had a mom dancing/full of joy when she saw size six diapers. That is when I knew I had changed the life of this mom and her baby!

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project will be sustained beyond my involvement by, three things, one being that Family Life Services and Life Network can continue on this project using the instruction guide I provided. Another way it will be sustainable is I have given local hospitals and organizations my resource pamphlet so that they can print copies and hand them out to mothers so that the mothers will know where they can go to get help if needed, especially if they don’t have access to a computer to look up places. The third way this project can be held sustainable beyond my involvement is that, with the help of my Girl Scout leader, Leader Laura, my pamphlet and how to guide has been handed out to Girl Scout leaders all around the globe so that they can also do a similar project if they would like to.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My project helped to address the basic need of baby supplies to help mothers and families who are struggling to know how to provide for their babies. When babies don’t have the right supplies, resources and organizations available and basic necessities to use, there would be more sicknesses, and diseases because they wouldn’t have the right supplies, leading to makeshift supplies, which can lead to sickness and possibly death, babies do not have strong immune systems. Not having enough money to provide babies with what they need is common around the world. Baby Bundles help relieve some of the stress financially, because it provides essential supplies so that mothers can get a head start without the additional stress when bringing a baby home.

What did you learn about yourself?

Throughout this project, I feel as though I have grown more as a leader, because this project has made me come out of my comfort zone. And, it has also made me more confident in myself as a leader. I love helping people and I love children. However, I can be very shy and quiet. In doing my project I had to make phone calls, talk to and even lead complete strangers. I have learned that I may be a shy and quiet teen, but I can plan a project, manage a team and be successful in carrying that project out I learned to overcome obstacles and challenges that I was faced with and to re-group and fine a new organization that believed in my project and understood the need.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Earning my Gold Award helped me put many skills together and taught me confidence in myself, that I can overcome obstacles, lead a team, and complete a project with impact. All these skills will further help me in the future whether in school or the workforce.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I feel that it helped to teach me to put all the skills I have been building through the years in Girl Scouts together. It showed me to believe in myself and all thing are possible no matter what age.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

I believe this project has set the stage for my leadership skills, because it has taught me so much. And because of it, I have learned what is need to raise a healthy baby. Which I can use in the (distant) future. This project has also made it so that I am more comfortable with talking to strangers to get information and leading a group. In the future, I will be able to lead with a better understanding of others, and how to organize/manage a group/project.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award Girl Scouts honored at Highest Awards Celebration in Silverthorne

Nearly 30 Girl Scouts, along with their friends and family, gathered at Silverthorne Pavilion in Silverthorne on May 9, 2019 to honor the more than 1,200 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2018-19 Girl Scout awards program year, 26 Girl Scouts in the Mountain Communities region earned the Bronze Award. 18 girls across the Mountain Communities region earned the prestigious Silver Award. 42 girls across Colorado earned the prestigious Gold Award.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

Highest Award recipients are perfect examples of girls who lead the Girl Scout way. Taking the lead like a Girl Scout means being a go-getter who is bold, honest, and determined to succeed; an innovator who thinks outside the box; a risk-taker who is willing to try new things; and a leader who leads with empathy,” she said.

2018 Gold Award Girl Scout and winner of the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize for Gold Award Excellence Riley Morgenthaler served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about how earning the Girl Scout Gold Award has impacted her life.

Every time I think that the Gold Award has given me everything it possibly can, I get a new, amazing opportunity; use the tremendous number of skills it taught me; or receive unexpected feedback from the community I targeted with my project. I am so amazed to see how my project has continued to grow wings and impact even more people, ” she said.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Gold, Silver, and Bronze Award Girl Scouts honored at Highest Awards Celebration in Colorado Springs

More than 75 Girl Scouts, along with their friends and family, gathered at the Penrose House at El Pomar in Colorado Springs on May 3, 2019 to honor the more than 1,200 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2018-19 Girl Scout awards program year, 126 Girl Scouts in the Pikes Peak region earned the Bronze Award. 53 girls across the Pikes Peak region earned the prestigious Silver Award. 42 girls across Colorado earned the prestigious Gold Award.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

Highest Award recipients are perfect examples of girls who lead the Girl Scout way. Taking the lead like a Girl Scout means being a go-getter who is bold, honest, and determined to succeed; an innovator who thinks outside the box; a risk-taker who is willing to try new things; and a leader who leads with empathy,” she said.

2018 Gold Award Girl Scout and winner of the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize for Gold Award Excellence Riley Morgenthaler served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about how earning the Girl Scout Gold Award has impacted her life.

Every time I think that the Gold Award has given me everything it possibly can, I get a new, amazing opportunity; use the tremendous number of skills it taught me; or receive unexpected feedback from the community I targeted with my project. I am so amazed to see how my project has continued to grow wings and impact even more people, ” she said.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

A special thank you to News5/KOAA-TV for airing photos of the event.

Gold, Silver, and Bronze Award Girl Scouts honored at Highest Awards Celebration in Denver

More than 300 Girl Scouts, along with their friends and family, gathered at the Denver Marriott Tech Center on May 5, 2019 to honor the more than 1,200 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2018-19 Girl Scout awards program year, 565 Girl Scouts in the Metro Denver region earned the Bronze Award. 196 girls across the Metro Denver region earned the prestigious Silver Award. 42 girls across Colorado earned the prestigious Gold Award.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

Highest Award recipients are perfect examples of girls who lead the Girl Scout way. Taking the lead like a Girl Scout means being a go-getter who is bold, honest, and determined to succeed; an innovator who thinks outside the box; a risk-taker who is willing to try new things; and a leader who leads with empathy,” she said.

2018 Gold Award Girl Scout and winner of the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize for Gold Award Excellence Riley Morgenthaler served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about how earning the Girl Scout Gold Award has impacted her life.

Every time I think that the Gold Award has given me everything it possibly can, I get a new, amazing opportunity; use the tremendous number of skills it taught me; or receive unexpected feedback from the community I targeted with my project. I am so amazed to see how my project has continued to grow wings and impact even more people, ” she said.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Gold, Silver, and Bronze Award Girl Scouts honored at Highest Awards Celebration in Loveland

Nearly 80 Girl Scouts, along with their friends and family, gathered at Embassy Suites in Loveland on April 28, 2019 to honor the more than 1,200 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2018-19 Girl Scout awards program year, 145 Girl Scouts in Northern and Northeastern Colorado earned the Bronze Award. 100 girls across Northern and Northeastern Colorado earned the prestigious Silver Award. 42 girls across Colorado earned the prestigious Gold Award.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

Highest Award recipients are perfect examples of girls who lead the Girl Scout way. Taking the lead like a Girl Scout means being a go-getter who is bold, honest, and determined to succeed; an innovator who thinks outside the box; a risk-taker who is willing to try new things; and a leader who leads with empathy,” she said.

2018 Gold Award Girl Scout and winner of the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize for Gold Award Excellence Riley Morgenthaler served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about how earning the Girl Scout Gold Award has impacted her life.

Every time I think that the Gold Award has given me everything it possibly can, I get a new, amazing opportunity; use the tremendous number of skills it taught me; or receive unexpected feedback from the community I targeted with my project. I am so amazed to see how my project has continued to grow wings and impact even more people, ” she said.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.