Tag Archives: Girl Scout Cookie Program

New resources from Little Brownie Bakers

Little Brownie Bakers has a variety of new and exciting resources to help you successfully manage and navigate the 2018 Girl Scout Cookie Program. This includes more than a dozen eBudde training videos, which you can find of LBB’s YouTube page: https://www.youtube.com/user/LittleBrownieBakers/videos Topics range from troop initial orders to troop booth signups to troop sales report.

The eBudde Troop App is also now LIVE and available for download in the App Store and for Google Play. This app brings the power of eBudde desktop technology to phone and tablet devices. With this free mobile app, you can:

  • Track and submit girl cookie orders for both traditional and digital sales
  • Easily track amounts due and paid
  • Order girl rewards and never miss a deadline
  • Monitor troop sales data and generate troop sales reports
  • See when and where cookies will be delivered
  • Stay in the know with access to calendar dates and messages
  • Many other capabilities are built right into eBudde!

The eBudde Troop App is exactly what volunteers need to manage the cookie season—wherever they are, on the go. As your baker partner, LBB has exactly what you need to get the word out. LBB’s eBudde Instructional Video gives volunteers a quick overview of the app and its capabilities. For a complete list of capabilities, volunteers can download our eBudde App Flyer.

 

Cookie University is coming

Girl Scouts of Colorado is excited to announce additional training for troop cookie managers for the 2018 Girl Scout Cookie Program. If you’re planning to serve as a TCM this year, THANK YOU! We understand the time, commitment, and heart this volunteer role requires and we truly appreciate it. We will host a variety of Cookie University training sessions throughout the state.

Cookie University is an excellent opportunity for you to spend time with other troop cookie managers, get your required basic cookie training, and most importantly, ensure your troop’s Starting Inventory Order is well thought-out and meets the needs of your girl and troop. You can also participate in some exciting enrichment sessions, including Inventory Management, Digital Cookie, eBudde, and Sale Etiquette.

You can register for Cookie University by going to the Events page (http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/events/training-events.html) on the Girl Scouts of Colorado website. If you can’t attend the training session in your area, feel free to attend one in another area.

2018 Cookie University Flyer

Save the date: Pajama Jam with the Denver Nuggets

Save the date for this year’s Girl Scout Pajama Jam with the Denver Nuggets on February 23, 2018! Join us for this annual game and sleepover at the Pepsi Center and cheer on the Nuggets as they take on the San Antonio Spurs. After the game, participants will enjoy a post-game shoot on the Nuggets court, midnight snack, movie screening on Pepsi Vision, and breakfast. Girl Scouts will also get a special event patch.

This year, the Nuggets has expanded their prizes to include TWO cookie booths, giving another troop an additional chance to sell cookies after the game at the Pepsi Center. The top three troops that refer the most participants can choose from these booths or additional fan experiences.

Prices and more information are coming soon. To be notified when registration opens, please contact Lori Thompson at lori.thompson@gscolorado.org to be added to the event information list. We hope to see you and your Girl Scout there!

Gold Award Girl Scout gives featured speech at Thin Mint Dinners

Gold Award Girl Scout Emma Albertoni of Arvada was a featured speaker at Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Women of Distinction Thin Mint Dinners in both Denver and Colorado Springs.  She told the audience of Girl Scouts and supporters how Girl Scouts helped her find her voice.

As a 2017 Gold Award recipient and winner of the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize for Gold Award Excellence, I am excited to share not only the work I have done through Girl Scouts, but the work that Girl Scouts has done for me.

I started Girl Scouts in first grade – a whopping 12 years ago. I joined Troop 1721 of Arvada, which met in the teacher’s lounge at my elementary school. All 17 girls in that troop would run around playing games, make a mess on the table doing crafts, and discuss cookie season with mouths full of snacks. I went to camps in the summer, learning a lot about myself along the way.  After a rainy mother-daughter camp experience, I learned my mom and I are more of a “spa-day and hotel” kind of campers than the “soggy sneaker and cold tent” kind of campers. I remember how I sold cookies, setting goals for the number of packages that I wanted to sell, and making posters for our booth– all while strategizing how placing cookie packages in the ROYGBV order would make our booth look enticing to customers. I remember making very… unique… outfits for World Thinking Day on my troop leader’s sewing machines, hoping that we didn’t mess up with the limited fabric we had. But the ‘fun’ things were not all that I did in all my years of Girl Scouts. Of course, I sold cookies, earned badges, and went to camp, especially when I was younger. But, these ‘fun’ things helped me later on, and I have come to realize the magic of Girl Scouts is how the things you do impact you on a deeper level.

My Girl Scout experience evolved as I got older and my troop began working on our Highest Awards. So you can understand the scale of each award, I’ll compare them to a body of water. First, the Bronze Award. Think Lake Michigan. For the Bronze Award, my troop paired up to do a “Charity Convention.” Each pair picked and researched a charity. We made posters, so our guests could learn about each one, what to donate, and how to donate. Next up, the Silver Award, which is like the Gulf of Mexico. Unlike other girls, my troop and I had difficulty coming to an agreement over what our project should be, so to appease everyone, I split off and did my project on my own. To earn my Silver Award, I collected more than 150 old t-shirts and upcycled them into bags. I gave these bags to an organization that was providing sanitary supplies to homeless women so it would be more private. I also gave some to a food bank in Arvada, and one in San Diego.

Last, but definitely not least (in any sense of the word), was the Gold Award. My Pacific Ocean. The Gold Award is the highest honor in Girl Scouting. It requires you to find an issue in your community and develop a solution. The Gold Award must be sustainable, connected nationally and globally, show leadership, and educate the public. Daunting, right? Ideas came and went, but nothing panned out. I finally found my project by looking at my own life. I was 16- years-old, buying my first car, looking at college tuition, and working a summer job. I was dealing with larger sums of money than ever before and I realized, I didn’t know anything about using it wisely. Talking with my parents about credit scores, loans, and budgeting made me wonder, where did they learn it all?

My project began by researching financial education in Colorado. I found fiscal topics are “woven” into K-12 classes, but the curriculum does not teach the students how to apply this knowledge. I discovered, through surveys and interviews, students didn’t even realize these principles were being taught. Since students weren’t learning the practical application, they would just leave the information behind. I didn’t believe this was right. Everyone needs to understand how to be responsible with their money, and that was not being addressed in Jefferson County schools.

I started by meeting with the principal and Family Consumer Sciences (FCS) teacher at Ralston Valley High School. The FCS class covered some financial literacy topics. But, it was an elective course taught to only 30 students/year. The teacher allowed me to create a new unit on financial safety online. It included PowerPoints, videos, discussions, and quizzes about things like identity theft, hacking, and password security. The teacher is now teaching my unit every year. I didn’t stop there. I proposed to the JeffCo School Board to make financial literacy a required class. The school board is now taking a closer look at how financial literacy is taught. Finally, I began working with Colorado legislators, including State Representative Lang Sias. They are interested in providing guidelines for educators on teaching financial literacy, as well as hosting a Financial Literacy day at the state capitol.

Finally, my brother and I started Down With Dough, a 501(C)(3) organization that seeks to inspire and advance knowledge of financial literacy through supporting, sharing, and improving education. Down With Dough will continue to partner with legislators, as well as other sponsors in order to one day see the improvement we need in education surrounding financial literacy. We have received tax exemption status, and are now looking for donors to help us fund curriculum development and further our work.

As I now look back, I see that Girl Scouts taught me skills that I never would have learned elsewhere. The magic of Girl Scouts is how the things you learn when you’re younger amidst all the fun, build on each other until you can accomplish a Pacific Ocean sized goal. The crafts we made in the teacher’s lounge helped me find individuality and creativity. The camps taught me how to make friends, be confident, take risks, and work as a team. I learned leadership through the Girl Scout Cookie Program, which included getting myself out of my comfort zone to sell a product by developing marketing strategies.  The Cookie Program also taught me how to be a go-getter by setting small goals in order to achieve a large goal. And, sewing outfits taught me how to solve problems and be an innovator. All these qualities I learned through the fun of Girl Scouts, and they all helped me get to where I am today.

Before Girl Scouts, I was very shy. In fact, I was talking with my troop leader the other day. We joked about how out of the five girls still in our troop at graduation, no one would’ve guessed it would be me standing here today. But, Girl Scouts brought me out of my shell. I was awarded the Prudential Spirit of Community Award in Washington, D.C. earlier this year. I met amazing young men and women from all across the country who are doing great things for their communities, just like I am. They taught me about different subjects like nonprofit classification, grant writing, and each other’s passions. I was awarded the Veterans of Foreign Wars Scout of the Year Award, where I stood in awe as veterans stood and applauded my hard work and dedication. I stood in front of Olympic Gold medalist Michael Phelps and Colorado Senators Cory Gardner and Michael Bennett with a confidence I would not have had, had I not been a Girl Scout. Because of Girl Scouts, I had the drive, passion, and confidence to audition for the University of Denver Lamont School of Music, where I am now a Classical Violin Performance major. I look forward to going through school, into my career field, and my future with Down with Dough with passion and leadership skills to be successful. Girl Scouts gave me a safe place to speak my mind and share ideas – it gave me the opportunity to find my voice.

G.I.R.L. Stories: Berthoud Girl Scouts travel to Washington, D.C.

Submitted by Genia Babyak

Northern & Northeastern CO

Berthoud

Troop 71126 has seven girls (high school freshmen and sophomores) and was busy this past year with the Fall Product and Girl Scout Cookie programs. Our girls worked very hard and earned enough money to fund their own trip to Washington, D.C. That trip was a great cultural, educational, financial, travel, and bonding experience. After hosting the “Mission Sisterhood” and “Cadette Amaze!” Journeys on October 29, 2017, the girls of Troop 71126 will each be focusing on their Gold Awards and building up their travel funds.

Most of the girls are passionate about performing and are involved in their upcoming high school musical, “The Wiz,” and the Berthoud High School Bridge Between Show Choir. Two girls are members of the Berthoud Youth Advisory Commission and all are actively involved in sports and community service projects.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Save the date: Party at Skate City in Colorado Springs

Submitted by Rose Rundell

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

When: March 22, 2018 from 6 – 8 p.m.
Where: Skate City
4575 Austin Bluffs Pkwy.
Colorado Springs, CO 80918

Girl Scouts are taking over Skate City on Austin Bluffs! We’re having a party to celebrate Girl Scouts’ 106th Birthday and the end of  the Girl Scout Cookie Program. The girls and adults worked hard!

This is a private event, only open to Girl Scout individuals, troops, friends, and family. (Sorry, no drop offs. Girls need to bring their own adults to look after them.)

SU13 will be collecting non-perishable food to donate to Care and Share.  The cost is $5 for admission and $2.50 for skate rentals (if needed)

We will have cake and door prizes!

Special custom patches will be available that night to purchase or order.

Please try to RSVP to Rose sometime between March 1- 20. We would like to make sure we have enough cake for everyone.
email: froggerrr@hotmail.com

We would love to see all the Girl Scouts, so try to wear green and your GS swag!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

I am a G.I.R.L.

Submitted by Charlotte H., G.I.R.L.  Media Star

Metro Denver

Highlands Ranch

I’ve been in Girl Scouts for four years and I love it! I love Girl Scouts because I enjoy the crafts, activities, (especially camping), and I love the life lessons that go with it. But, what I love the most is friendship and meeting new friends.

I’m a go-getter because I set big goals and work hard to achieve them. In 2017, I sold over 2,000 packages of Girl Scout Cookies and was the top seller of my service unit and in the Top 100 sellers in Colorado. I’m proud of the many badges I’ve earned including the Daisy and Brownie Summit Awards, and it’s my goal to someday earn the Gold Award.

I’m an innovator by brainstorming ideas for new and extraordinary activities to earn badges with my troop. I also helped motivate my troop during cookie sales so that we qualified for Cookie Camp. Despite being a troop with 16 girls, we made it!

Girl Scouts has helped me be a risk-taker by giving me courage to approach new students and welcome them while building new friendships. It’s given me confidence to take risks that others might not.

I have been a leader at school by standing up for other students when I felt they were picked on or in an unfair situation.

How has Girl Scouts helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, or leader)? Share your Girl Scout story and photos using the Share Your Stories form.

Silver Award project: Jared Box for Children’s Hospital and baby hats for Memorial Hospital

Submitted by Emma C.

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

13-year-old Girl Scout Cadettes from Troop 4523 Emma, Dori, and Kate would like to share our story about our great Silver Award project.  For this mission, we wanted to make a difference in children’s lives. We contacted Children’s Hospital to see how we could help. They told us that the Jared Box program was well needed and appreciated by the children having extended stays in their hospital rooms with no access to any playroom. To find out more about the Jared box project, please visit http://www.thejaredbox.com. We also made baby hats for newborns to be distributed at Memorial Hospital.

We first had to earn funds to purchase the items to put in the boxes. We used the money we earned from selling Girl Scout Cookies to fund part of this project. But, we did not stop there. We made ice cream sandwiches (we baked chocolate chip cookies and added vanilla ice cream in the middle) and sold them at a park during a hot sunny summer day. Then, we all made lists of items we wanted to purchase and each prepared a certain amount of boxes to meet the needs of girls and boys between the age of 3 to 14. We decorated the boxes and also added a nice note to personalize each package.

On September 5, 2017, we delivered 71 boxes to Children’s Hospital and dropped off our handmade baby hats to Memorial Hospital. We all learned a lot from this experience from budgeting to time management and accountability. Working in a team was also a great part of this project.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

G.I.R.L. Stories: I am a risk-taker

Submitted by Cassidy C., G.I.R.L.  Media Star

Metro Denver

Highlands Ranch

This year will be my 11th year as a Girl Scout. Throughout my Girl Scouting career, I have learned how to be a respectful, honest, and confident individual. Even though I’m an outspoken person now, I used to be shy. I would never share my opinions during class or talk about my day once I got home. When my mom told me I had to sell Girl Scout Cookies to complete strangers, I almost lost it!  Even though I was frightened, my mom did the right thing.  I was able to gain confidence by just asking “Would you like to buy some Girl Scout Cookies?” By gaining this needed skill, I have become more talkative and outgoing.

I would consider myself to be a risk taker. When I was younger, I didn’t like trying new things. Now, I love going on exciting adventures. In seventh grade, I took the risk of trying out to be a local Girl Scout Media Star. I was nervous for my interview, but I was able to memorize all the information. Once I got there, I knew I was well-prepared and ready to take on the challenge. Now, three years later, I have been selected to be one of the six older Girl Scouts across the country to be on the G.I.R.L. Media Team for the Convention in October 2017. I’m excited to see where my next risk-taking adventure goes.

How has Girl Scouts helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, or leader)? Share your Girl Scout story and photos using the Share Your Stories form.

Colorado Girl Scouts spotlighted as the future of the Girl Scout Cookie Program®  

Colorado Girl Scouts are unleashing the power of G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader)™ to accomplish amazing things.

In fact, Colorado Girl Scouts were so successful during the 2017 Girl Scout Cookie Season that Little Brownie Bakers® plans to feature the girls in its national promotional campaign for the 2019-2020 season. The girls will be spotlighted in marketing materials ranging from informational brochures to motivational videos.

In 2017, through the annual Girl Scout Cookie Program, 16,000 Girl Scouts® in Colorado sold about 4.5 million packages of cookies. Of this total, 357,409 were sold online through the Girl Scouts Digital Cookie™ platform, an easy-to-use online tool that helps girls superpower their sale.

Determined to succeed, and supported by volunteers, Colorado Girl Scouts met their cookie goals early on. Once girls delivered on their goals, they set new milestones and accomplished even more.

Colorado Girl Scouts achieved a per-girl average of 273 boxes sold. The top seller in the state moved more than 7,000 packages of cookies.

Add up all the numbers, and it’s easy to see Colorado Girl Scouts are true cookie entrepreneurs who shine as present and future leaders.

The Little Brownie team appreciated how many girls took the lead and used both traditional and digital marketing strategies to reach high goals.

Over the next few months, LBB marketing representatives will travel to Colorado, with their video/photography crew, to interview Girl Scouts statewide about how they use five Girl Scouting skills to reach their cookie goals and fund their big adventures. Girl Scouts of Colorado will be looking for girls to participate in this special opportunity and others. If you’re the parent or guardian of a Colorado Girl Scout who might be interested, please email GSCO Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

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Girl Scouts of Colorado (GSCO) is part of Girl Scouts of the USA, the preeminent leadership development organization for girls. As one of 112 Girl Scout councils across the country, GSCO has a 100-year history of building girls of courage, confidence and character who make the world a better place.

Little Brownie Bakers is one of two bakers licensed by Girl Scouts of the USA and has been baking Girl Scout Cookies since 1973. Little Brownie Bakers’ mission is to provide cookies and support services of the highest quality to Girl Scout councils to help teach girls a wide range of life skills and generate income for Girl Scout troops and councils via the annual Cookie Program.

The Girl Scout Cookie Program® is the largest girl-led entrepreneurial program in the world and helps girls earn money for educational activities, community projects and travel opportunities. All net revenue raised from cookie sales (100 percent) stays with the local councils and troops.