Tag Archives: Monument

Gold Award Girl Scouts impact Colorado communities and beyond

Twenty-five Girl Scouts from across Colorado have earned the distinction of Gold Award Girl Scout, the highest honor in Girl Scouting, after completing take action projects benefiting their local communities and those around the world.

  • Meg Bleyle from Highlands Ranch, Highlands Ranch High School, worked to increase the bee population by teaching children about how people need and depend on bees.
  • Beth Bolon from Longmont hosted a workshop for sixth grade girls to help them improve their communication skills and bolster their confidence when interacting with others.
  • Cheyanne Bridges from Colorado Springs, Liberty High School, partnered with the Pikes Peak Humane Society to support their animal medical fund by providing a sustainable source of donations from her school.
  • Tara Butler from Denver, Overland High School, created a course and curriculum specifically for senior citizens to educate them on how to use their smartphone and better understand the technology.
  • Kayleigh Cornell from Aurora, Grandview High School, started the Colorado Book Bank and collected more than 1,300 new and gently used books for students in a summer lunch program.
  • Victoria Delate from Centennial, Cherry Creek High School, created a four-week self-defense course to give her fellow students the knowledge and skills to protect themselves from sexual assault.
  • Emma Deutsch from Denver, Rocky Mountain School of Expeditionary Learning, improved the cat rooms at the Denver Animal Shelter. By creating a more welcoming and colorful space, she encouraged more people to adopt cats.
  • Kamaryn Evans from Castle Rock, Douglas County High School, worked to raise awareness for victims of domestic violence and for the Crisis Center, which works to end domestic violence through advocacy, education, and prevention.
  • Rose Goodman from Boulder, Boulder High School, created a lesson plan, which meets common-core standards, to educate second grade students about the declining bee population and how they can help bees.
  • Elizabeth Hoelscher from Aurora, Grandview High School, partnered with Avanti House, which houses teenage victims of sex trafficking, to build a new library for the home and create welcome baskets for the girls.
  • Ashlin Hult from Niwot, Niwot High School, created a series of materials for middle-school girls to encourage healthy body image and increase self-esteem.
  • Zoi Johns from Golden, Lakewood High School, coordinated the installation of three 10,000-liter water filtration tanks in a school in rural Uganda.
  • Makayla Kocher from Monument, Colorado Springs Christian School, created an art program for nursing home residents.
  • Kayleigh Limbach from Niwot, Niwot High School, wrote aguidebook for incoming International Baccalaureate students to help them weigh their options for their academic future.
  • Alexis Montague from Castle Rock, Castle View High School, hosted a panel discussion so girls could learn more about career opportunities in STEM.
  • Sarah Ness from Centennial, Eaglecrest High School, hosted nearly two dozen after-school art therapy sessions to help kids at her school relieve and manage stress.
  • Gwyneth Ormes from Centennial, Cherry Creek High School, organized a series of after-school workshops to teach elementary school girls Processing (a basic programming language), along with the foundational concepts of computer science.
  • Emma Parkhurst from Centennial, Littleton High School, revitalized The Lions Cupboard, a local clothing closet, to make the space more accessible for families in need.
  • Makala Roggenkamp from Arvada, Faith Christian Academy, partnered with Hope House and created book templates for children to develop a love of reading.
  • Abagail Sickinger from Castle Rock, Douglas County High School, developed a curriculum to help high school students get a job. Topics included: resume writing, what to wear, conducting yourself during an interview, and how to answer interview questions.
  • Katrina Stroud from Boulder, Niwot High School, created an activity booklet for The Butterfly Pavilion to teach children about Monarch butterflies and bumble bees.
  • Grayson Thomas from Lyons, Lyons High School, designed a mural of diverse and significant members of the STEM community for Lyons Middle/Senior High School.
  • Marieke van Erven from Brighton partnered with the Adams County Elections Department to create VOTE (Voter Outreach Through Education), which takes education about the elections department into high school government classes.
  • Melissa Wilson from Castle Rock, Castle View High School, developed several materials to educate people who can hear about how to interact with those who are deaf.
  • Inspired by her mother’s battle with cancer, Susan Wilson from Aurora, Grandview High School, created a media center for cancer patients undergoing treatment at Parker Adventist Hospital.

The Girl Scout Gold Award culminates with a project led by one young woman between 9th and 12th grades who builds a purpose-based team to work with the larger community to meet a need. The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project.

“Earning the Girl Scout Gold Award designation is truly a remarkable achievement, and these young women exemplify leadership in all its forms,” said Stephanie Foote, President and Chief Executive Officer of Girl Scouts of Colorado. “They saw a need and took ownership of helping to develop a solution and took action to make it happen. Their extraordinary dedication, perseverance, and leadership is making the world a better place.”

About Girl Scouts of Colorado

Girl Scouts of Colorado is 32,000 strong—more than 22,000 girls and 10,000 adults who believe in the power of every G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader)™ to change the world. Our extraordinary journey began more than 100 years ago with the original G.I.R.L., Juliette Gordon “Daisy” Low. On March 12, 1912, in Savannah, Ga., she organized the very first Girl Scout troop, and every year since, we’ve honored her vision and legacy, building girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. We’re the preeminent leadership development organization for girls. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org.

Girl Scout Gold Award project: Makayla Kocher, Monument, “Art for the elderly”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award project, I created an enjoyable program for the elderly at a nursing home. I developed a resource book of painting and craft activities. Also, I conducted and coordinated classes once or twice a month for all levels of care such as skilled nursing, independent, and assisted living.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I knew my project made an impact because of the constant increase in participants and the strong desire to have more classes for different levels of care throughout the facility.  Also, many families began to schedule their visit in order to come and participate in the classes.  Due to the popularity of the classes, the nursing home began to offer more variety of activities for the elderly.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project will be sustainable because the nursing home I volunteered has added more resources, such as Programs Director and Assistant Direct, who will carry out and plan activities for the elderly to enjoy. Also, the nursing home’s community room, which is where most of the activities for the elderly take place, is now equipped with more supplies than before. The nursing home has many different volunteers, some of which who have visited my classes and even partook in classes. In this way, my project will continue to impact after my involvement because the volunteers have seen how an arts and craft class is carried out. Along with my resource book, the volunteers and Programs Director and Assistant Director will be able to conduct classes and activities for the elderly.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My project has expanded beyond one nursing home. There are currently four other nursing homes interested in my resource book. I have reached out to different nursing homes through friends and the volunteers at the current nursing home. Also, I plan to give some of my resource books to other facilities in Colorado Springs and out of state.

What did you learn about yourself?

Through my Gold Award project, I have learned a great deal. I have learned that I am able to take on tasks that may seem difficult and terrifying. I know I can take charge of a project and keep it on track until it is complete. This experience has strengthened my love for the elderly. It has shown me that I have the ability to teach others. Ultimately through my project, I have gained a new sense of self-confidence.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

The Gold Award will impact me in the future because it has made me more aware of my community and issue within. It has also given me the confidence to take on an issue and make a difference. As a result of my Gold Award project, I hope to always have time to volunteer and give back to others.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I feel the Gold Award was an important part of my Girl Scout experience. It gave me the ability to take on a community issue and make a difference. I was able to take my love of art and share it with others. The Gold Award was truly a highlight of my Girl Scouts experience.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

By earning my Gold Award this helped me to become a go-getter. I identified an issue in nursing homes and developed a plan of action. By implementing my plan I was able to make a difference in the lives of others. My classes brought joy and new creative activities to the lives of the elderly, their families, friends, and the facility.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Zoe’s Silver Award project: Help for the homeless

Submitted by Melissa H.

Pikes Peak

Monument

For Zoe’s Silver Award project, she hand-sewed and filled 60 bags of basic necessities for homeless people in the Colorado Springs/Monument area. Each bag contained a toothbrush, tube of toothpaste, dental floss, deodorant, bar of soap, washcloth, lip balm, granola bar, bottle of water, shampoo, and sunscreen.

Zoe solicited local businesses, family, and friends for donations of all materials.

After sewing and filling the bags, Zoe and her friends and family kept the bags in their cars to hand out to people in need they see along their way.

Everyone associated with this project thought a lot about the many struggles of living out on the streets. There are so many things that we take for granted, but for someone who doesn’t have such basic necessities, they can seem like extravagant luxuries. Even a simple bar of soap can be extremely helpful.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Monument Girl Scouts among Cookie Troop 100 winners

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Congratulations to Troop 41625 from Monument! These Girl Scouts are among the winners in Girl Scouts of the USA’s Cookie Troop 100 Challenge.

In celebration of 100 years of Girl Scouts selling cookies, nearly 5,000 troops participated in GSUSA’s Cookie Troop 100 Challenge.

Go-getting troops set their goals and told GSUSA how they planned to put their cookie money to good use. Girl Scouts earned their Cookie Business badge and asked 100 new customers to buy cookies. And to make things extra fun, troops blinged their booths and shared photos of their creativity!

Now that the entry period has closed, GSUSA has randomly selected one troop from each participating council to receive $100 toward its awesome Take Action or service project. And one VERY lucky troop will win $3,000 to superpower its project!

To see all of the 2017 Cookie Troop 100 winners, go to the GSUSA blog.

Power of cookie: Taking action

Submitted by Troop 41625

Pikes Peak

Monument

Junior Girl Scout Troop 41625 from Monument, Colorado took some of their cookie money from previous years to help create a garden at the local elementary school. The girls started off by learning what pollinators can do.

Next, the  girls prepared a “lasagna” of cardboard and soil to plant seeds. They helped condition the soil and make it so the seeds they planted wouldn’t blow away.

Last, the girls planted local wildflower seeds that will support local bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

11 Colorado Girl Scouts earn Gold Award, the highest honor in Girl Scouts

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11 Girl Scouts from across Colorado have earned the Gold Award, the highest award in Girl Scouts.

  • Emma Albertoni from Arvada, Ralston Valley High School, took action after noticing that many of her peers lacked financial literacy. She wrote a curriculum that will be implemented in her school and proposed to the Jefferson County School Board to add a required Financial Literacy class.
  • Megan Beaudoin from Monument, St. Mary’s High School, created a ten-minute video for middle school students to help ease the transition to high school. Topics covered included: academics, social interactions, and self-esteem.
  • Megan Burnett from Colorado Springs, James Irwin Charter High School,worked with community leaders and businesses to build a softball practice field at the school. The project would have cost the school $25,000.
  • Michayla Cassano from Colorado Springs, Pine Creek High School, created a memorial to recognize the sacrifices made by women who have served in the military.
  • Kelsey Collins from Aurora, Grandview High School, created a curriculum to teach preschool and elementary school children about park safety and Colorado history.
  • Carissa Flores from Westminster, Broomfield High School, shared her knowledge and passion for Taekwondo by creating, coordinating, and leading self-defense seminars for children, teens, and adults.
  • Baily Holsinger from Larkspur, Castle View High School, not only crocheted hundreds of beanies for newborn babies at Denver Health Medical Center and Baby Haven in Fort Collins, she also held classes to teach people of all ages how to make the beanies.
  • Kathleen Otto from Fort Collins, Fossil Ridge High School, worked to increase awareness for dyslexia by hosting a viewing of “The Big Picture: Rethinking Dyslexia” and leading a panel discussion afterwards.
  • Daniell Plomodon from Erie, Niwot High School, organized several “Disability for a Day” presentations to educate others about living with a disability. Activities included: trying to button a shirt while wearing mittens, playing patty cake while wearing Vaseline covered glasses, and using person first language.
  • Anastasia Rosen from Fort Collins, Rocky Mountain High School, created a workshop to educate others about human trafficking, tactics recruiters use, and how to prevent it.
  • Debra Zerr from Arvada addressed the problem of the lack of connection between the military and general public. Through a series of events, she worked to educate the public about the importance of the military and the men and women who serve.

These young women have demonstrated exceptional commitment to taking action to make their world a better place. By earning their Gold Award now, these Girl Scouts will also be part of this spring’s celebration of Girl Scouts’ highest honor. Since 1916, Girl Scouts have been making meaningful, sustainable change in their communities and around the world.

The Girl Scout Gold Award culminates with a project led by one young woman between 9th and 12th grades who builds a purpose-based team to work with the larger community to meet a need. The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others and providing sustainability for the project.

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Cailin Foster, Monument, “Re-Imagining Legos: Robotics for Kids”

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What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award, I went to various schools and started Lego Robotics Teams. I wanted to help mentor and expose kids to engineering and robotics at a younger age, so I targeted Elementary and Middle Schools. I would teach the students basic programming and building with Lego Mindstorm Kits as well as teamwork skills. I also tried to get more girls involved in Robotics and STEM by creating an informational pamphlet for girls which were distributed to various local school districts. These pamphlets encouraged girls to get more involved in STEM and included various programs to do so.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured my impact by having the kids take surveys about their experience afterwards. All the surveys came out positive and all the kids now want to pursue STEM fields! Also, pamphlets were taken very quickly at each of the schools.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project is sustainable because the Robotics Teams can last year after year. It has become an established club at all the schools. To really ensure that the teams continue, I partnered the elementary/ middle school teams up with high school teams so high school students can come back every year and mentor the Lego Team students. This way, both the middle/elementary school and high school students both learn from each other as they grow as STEM workers! Both teams have a lotto learn from each other, and the high school students provide as great role models for the younger kids.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

The global connection of my project is the pamphlet as well as my “how-to guide” for starting robotics teams. The pamphlet is designed to spark interest in girls all over the world, and the guide is to help people around the world start their own teams. Also, the robotics teams have sister teams in countries across the globe, so they get to share world-wide experiences and ideas! They get to see how robotics affects people from all over!

What did you learn about yourself?

From my project, I learned that I really love engineering. I love collaborating with people and guiding others. It taught me that STEM has endless possibilities. But, my favorite thing learned was seeing how positively kids react to STEM and robotics when it is put in a fun, creative, and competitive environment. They don’t realize they are learning while having fun!

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

My Gold Award taught me a lot about kids and engineering. Kids love to be creative and don’t mind learning when it is given a fun twist! My Gold Award will impact my future because I plan to continue to find ways to get kids involved in STEM. I think introducing kids to the ever growing and prevalent STEM field at a younger age will be critical to the progress of our society. Just imagine what kids can invent when they know all the basic skills at a younger, more creative age?! The possibilities are endless!

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I feel like my Gold Award was the culmination of everything Girl Scouts taught me. It took initiative, cooperation, and kindness. It put all my skills gained by Girl Scouts to the test. It felt like a big wrap up to everything in my life Girl Scouts, and my Gold Award felt like everything I learned was worth it. I don’t think my Girl Scout experience would have been complete if I didn’t achieve my Gold Award.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Monument Troop honors its Hometown Heroes

Submitted by Heidi Hayes

Monument

Pikes Peak

The Hometown Hero for our Monument Troop 1625 is the Ronald McDonald House in Colorado Springs. Some of our members were available to deliver them cookies yesterday.  Our troop leader, Christine, does a great job keeping our girls in touch with the local community!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Ashlin Gray, Monument, “Laughing & Learning”

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What did you do for your Gold Award project?

My Gold Award project was a three-ponged project. I designed and created a children’s center at the Marian House Life Support Services Center; redesigned, reorganized, and stocked the book and stuffed animal pantry in the Family Dining Area of Marian House; and supported the art, developmental play, and literacy initiatives at Marian House’s pilot program Family Day Center.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

The eating area design has been followed and provided many stuffed animals and books to children. The Family Day Center has provided a place for families to gather, so they are not on the streets. The children’s area has given children a safe place to play and learn, and the space is used on a daily basis.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement? 

The learning activities set up in the children’s area will last well past the next 5 years, and will be available to children to continue to grow and learn. I supported the new initiatives at the new Family Day Center, which is a pilot program that will now grow into an influential program. The children’s area that I created can be built upon. I set up a system in the Eating Area that can be continued to ensure the most effective distribution of stuffed animals and books. Also, there are new volunteer opportunities through the children’s area that can be set up to keep children engaged and learning.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

Homelessness is a global issue that can be best addressed on the community level. I spread awareness for childhood homelessness outside of Colorado Springs by presenting to my psychology class, a local missions organization, and National Honors Society. Also, I put together an Implementation Plan about how to set up a successful project and distributed to the PRHS Chapter of National Honor Society, the Deerfield Hills Community Center, the Hillside Community Center, and the Meadows Park Community Center. This portion of my project serves a diverse group of people across many different communities and I hope the plans will inspire others to make a difference.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned to be assertive and reach out to organizations within in the community to offer them my project and partner with them. This has made me a more confident leader and better listener. I began my project with an idea in mind, but it didn’t necessarily address the specific need of the population. By listening to the people at Marian House, I molded my project into something that could best address the need.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Earning my Gold Award has given me confidence to tackle community and global issues in the future. I have grown in my leadership skills and gained valuable experience with planning and executing community service projects. I have learned so much throughout my project and I am humbled by all of the people who serve selflessly within the homeless community and within all communities.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

Ever since I was a Brownie Girl Scout, I have looked up to the older girls and Gold Award recipients. This has always been a goal of mine. Actually taking on and completing the Gold Award project instilled in me confidence in myself and my ability to make a difference in important issues. I have grown as a leader and as a part of my community, and I wouldn’t trade this experience for anything.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Monument girl earns Bronze with Fourth of July float

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Submitted by

Melissa Hinton
Monument
To earn Bronze Award, the highest award a Junior Girl Scout can earn, Haley Henderson, an incoming 5th grade Junior from Troop 43107 in Monument planned and implemented the Girl Scout float in the Monument 4th of July parade.
Haley is from a military family and knew she would be moving to Arkansas this summer but she really wanted to earn Bronze Award with her beloved Colorado troop so she volunteered to do the 4th of July float. Haley’s father serves in the Air Force and after Haley volunteered he got his final transfer orders; he had to report to his new job 7/7/14. Haley’s family lived in their camper for over a month and left town shortly after the parade ended for the long trip to Arkansas.
Haley approached local businesses for the use of a trailer for the float. She designed and made the decorations, shopped for supplies, came up with a craft for the girls to do while waiting, filled out the parade application form and sent multiple emails to our local service unit to ask for volunteers to walk in the parade.
We had 22 Daisy, Brownie, Junior and Cadette Girl Scouts participate in the 2014 parade, all singing camp songs and handing out candy and little bears. A fun time was had by all! Haley (and her family) earned Bronze Award with courage, confidence, and character by stepping up to represent Girl Scouts in the community while making personal sacrifices along the way. –Melissa Hinton, Troop Leader (Troop 3107)