Tag Archives: Girl Scout Junior

Girl Scout Exploration Day for Juniors

Submitted by Melissa Gula

Metro Denver

Denver

Calling all aspiring gardeners! Join us at Denver Botanic Gardens on September 21, 2019 for our fourth annual Junior “Gardener” Girl Scout Exploration Day. Girl Scout Exploration Days offer girls the opportunity to explore plant-based themes through a variety of hands-on activities and take-home projects. Each Exploration Day offers several activity stations set up throughout the Gardens for groups to explore at their own pace. Pack a picnic lunch and make a day of it!

When: Saturday, September 21, 9:30 a.m. – 2 p.m. To accommodate a larger number of Girl Scouts and improve your group’s experience, we are offering two admission times: 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Activity stations will be available to your group from the admission time you choose until 2 p.m.

Where: Denver Botanic Gardens, activities will take place outdoors. In the event of inclement weather, activities will be moved indoors.

Who: This program is designed for Girl Scout Juniors.

Through hands-on activities and explorations Girl Scouts will:

  • Explore the principles of garden design.
  • Design a seed experiment to take home.
  • Explore the practice of companion planting.
  • Plant and decorate an indoor garden planter to take home.
  • Explore the Gardens’ diverse showcase of plants.

Follow the link below to register either as an individual or as a troop. We look forward to seeing you at our Girl Scout Exploration Day!

Registration Link: https://catalog.botanicgardens.org/selection.aspx?sch=121694

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Juniors earn cybersecurity patch

Submitted by Randi Bangerter

Metro Denver

Highlands Ranch

We learned sending a message on a computer network is very complicated. Even short messages must travel through many other computers and networks. They don’t just go to directly to their destination.

By completing this activity, the girls will earn this special cybersecurity patch. Learn how to earn yours.

STREAM Girls in Longmont and Montrose

Join us for STREAM Girls in Longmont and Montrose!

Saturday, October 12, 2019

Izaak Walton Clubhouse, Longmont

8 a.m. – 6 p.m.

Register online: https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/events-repository/2019/stream_girls_14306547.html

Sunday, October 27, 2019

Ross Reels, Montrose

8 a.m. – 6 p.m.

Register online: https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/events-repository/2019/stream_girls_.html

This event gives Girl Scouts the opportunity to earn a patch as they serve as citizen scientists, anglers, and artists, in order to build an appreciation for watershed conservation and the environment. This outdoor watershed experience employs STEM-education (science, technology, engineering, math) plus recreation and arts to explore a local stream.

Cost: $5/girl

Every person is a citizen of her watershed, and Colorado Trout Unlimited (TU) has partnered with Girl Scouts of Colorado so that girls will get the complete picture of what their stream could mean to them.

At this event, TU volunteers will lead Girl Scout Juniors and Cadettes in observing a stream, collecting flow data, sampling macroinvertebrates (aka aquatic bugs), fly tying, and fly casting. The day also gives girls time to explore the natural area and record their thoughts and observations in their handbooks. Each girl will receive a STREAM Girls patch at the end of the day.

Light snacks will be provided throughout the day and participants should bring a nut-free sack lunch with them. A detailed packing list, liability waiver for CO Trout Unlimited, and other pre-information will be provided for all participants via email one week before the event.

This is not a drop off event, all Girl Scouts must attend with a parent, guardian, or troop leader. Girls attending with a troop leader must complete a Parent Permission form for a Girl Scout Activity that troop leaders will retain for their records. Adult-to-girl ratios must be met for girls attending as a troop. Parents, guardians, and troop leaders will supervise girls and assist with activities as needed.

Capacity for this event is 24 Girl Scouts. Registration will close on Tuesday, October 1 OR when capacity has been reached.

Questions? Email aimee.artzer@gscolorado.org.

40963104_tu_stream_girls_-_october_2019_flier

 

Earn your “Horsemanship” badge

Submitted by Gabriella Grieve

Metro Denver

Sedalia

Girl Scout Juniors: Earn your “Horsemanship” badge with Inspiring Strides at a three-hour clinic on September 14, 2019 from 1-4 p.m. Learn everything horse-related and complete all requirements to earn your badge. The clinic will cover everything from grooming, handling, arena etiquette, horse anatomy, tack anatomy, horse behavior, and riding!

To register please email Gabriella Grieve at Inspiring Strides at inspiringstridesco@gmail.com. The registration process does include a liability release waiver, photo release, and safety rules form.

Cost: $50 /rider

Deadline: September 7 Class has limited space so please register early!

The clinic is held in an outdoor arena, so please wear weather-appropriate, as well as horse appropriate, attire. Long pants and closed-toe shoes are mandatory. Bicycle helmets are not appropriate for riding, so please only bring ASTM-approved helmets. If you do not have an ASTM-approved helmet, there will be some available for riders.

For more information about Inspiring Strides, visit us on Facebook or Instagram using the handle @inspiringstridesco.

Questions? Don’t hesitate to reach out via email at the above address or call (303) 495-9259.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Earn a FREE cybersecurity patch

Calling all Girl Scout Daisies, Brownies, and Juniors! Here’s your chance to earn a special cybersecurity patch from Girl Scouts of the USA.

Step One

Choose the cybersecurity activity appropriate for your Girl Scout level as listed in this PDF:

CybersecurityPatch_FacilitatorGuide

These activities are from the Daisy, Brownie, and Junior cybersecurity badges. If you choose to swap out another activity, we highly recommend that you use one from Badge 1: Cybersecurity Basics, since that badge teaches foundational concepts that are built on in badges 2 and 3.

Step Two

Complete the activity and take lots of photos/videos.

Step Three

Share your story and photos from the activity using the Share Your Stories form: www.gscoblog.org/share 

Be sure to include what you learned about cybersecurity and why it is so important, along with any plans you might have to earn another STEM or cybersecurity badge.

Watch this video by a troop of Girl Scout Juniors who earned this special patch.

Once your story and photos have been received, GSCO Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper will contact you regarding the number of patches you need and where they should be mailed. Patches will be distributed on a first come, first-serve basis.

Questions? Email AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

“Space Science Investigator” badge night for Juniors

Submitted by Marcy Kendall

Northern & Northeastern CO

Boulder

Girl Scout Juniors are welcome to join Troops 72418 and 73010 to earn their “Space Science Investigator” badge on Friday, October 4, 2019 from 4:30-6:30 p.m. at Fiske Planetarium (2414 Regent Drive. Boulder 80309). Cost is $12/girl. You must register by October 1. Space is limited!

All five steps will be available, so girls can earn the badge. The first step of the badge is a scale model. This starts OUTSIDE the planetarium and the leader/parent needs to do the walk with the girl(s). That is  NOT done by the volunteers at the planetarium.

The time is 4:30-6:30 p.m. and includes a show specifically for the Girl Scouts to earn their badge.

What’s included:

  • Dinner: pizza, veggies, and fruit
  • “Bake” your own spacecraft
  • Make a spectrometer
  • Planetarium show
  • Ball Aerospace engineer volunteers

What’s NOT included:

  • The “Space Science Investigator” badge itself – (can be added on separately)
  • Beverage: Bring your own water bottle
  • Enough volunteers to walk with your girls on the scale model (done before or after other stations with parents/leaders who brought the girls). This step is to be done by girls with their leaders/adults either before 4:30 or after the planetarium show. Directions for the scale walk will be provided to adults before the date.

For parking information use this website: https://www.colorado.edu/fiske/plan-your-visit/parking-bus-information

Registration link: https://junior-space-science-investigator-night.cheddarup.com

Questions? Please email Marcy Kendall at marcy.kendall@gmail.com.

40963104_junior_space_science_investigator_night_flyer_and_registration

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Bronze Award project: Native bee houses

 

 

 

 

 

Submitted by Bree Dulaney

Metro Denver

Centennial

Juniors from Girl Scout Troop 61608 from Centennial spent five hours at the Denver Botanic Gardens. They were researching ideas for their Bronze Award project, building native bee houses.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Girl Scouts celebrate 15th anniversary of Yule Marble Initiative

2019 marks 15 years since Girl Scout Troop 60357 of Lakewood petitioned state lawmakers to designate the Yule Marble as the Official State Rock of Colorado. The girls embarked on the project to make Colorado the most geologically patriotic state in the union, with red, white, and blue geologic symbols (mineral: http://bit.ly/2HuK7P2, rock: http://bit.ly/2EmmZjW, and gemstone: http://bit.ly/2M1Ysqv). The project also enabled them to earn the Girl Scout Bronze Award, the highest honor for fourth and fifth grade Girl Scouts.

Now, Girl Scout alumnae are reflecting on what the project meant to them and the impact Girl Scouts has had on their lives.

“Now, in 2019 looking back over the last 15 years, I realize that this project did more for me as an adult than I ever could have imagined.”

“It’s pretty awesome to say that I was part of a group of young, ambitious women that took on the seemingly impossible and succeeded.”

MiKayla Loseke

“The most important lesson I learned from all this hard work is you can achieve anything you   put your mind to. A group of young girls with the help of a few very strong women were able to pass a bill into law in the state of Colorado. We weren’t experienced in the way governments work. We had no idea what we were doing. (The help we received from Senator Betty Boyd was incredible, we wouldn’t have been able to do it without her.)”

“I learned to be proud of my accomplishments. Our troop is going to be a part of Colorado’s history forever, and having that accomplishment, knowing that I was part of something great, gives me the courage to continue doing great things.”

Laura Eckhardt 

“The Yule Marble Initiative gave me a sense of hope for my own life and for the lives of those around me. My 12-year-old self was bold enough to go in front of a room of politicians and tell them that ‘even the smallest citizen can have a voice,’ and what was amazing was that those intimidating politicians listened and also agreed with us. What an empowering feeling for a bunch of pre-teens! I try to carry that feeling with me throughout my life and let it be a reminder when I doubt myself or the world around me, that change is possible and even the smallest, most seemingly insignificant of us are capable of making great changes in the world around us. That gives me hope.”

Emily Cameron

“I like to use this event as an example when I am working with fourth and fifth graders who are just starting to want to make their marks on the world. I share with them that a group of kids just like them, from their own neighborhoods, were able to make such a large and lasting change in their community, and that if they see a need, they too can reach out and do something about it.”

“Yule marble has become so much more than our Bronze Award project, it laid the foundation for the kind of people we grew up to be, and the kind of power we all have to make a difference in our world. If a bunch of little girls can change their world and make it just a little bit better, imagine what the rest of us can do if we set our minds to it.”

Caitlin Corenblith

 

 

 

Bronze Award Girl Scouts: Fostering Foster Source

Submitted by Tammy Lemmon

Metro Denver

Commerce City

Girl Scout Troop 62228 finished their Bronze Award project Mother’s Day weekend. The girls wanted to redecorate a kids play area. As the girls were researching places to redecorate, our girl Makenna mention a place she volunteered at on her days off of school called Foster Source. Foster Source is a free resource center for foster parents and foster kids. Prior to our girls coming in to this space, kids had a small play area with minimum toys. The space was oriented toward younger kids and not super inviting.

Through the Girl Scout season, the girls broke into small groups and focused on one area of the project. They ran a donation drive, and applied for a grant to purchase materials. They also created reading, new baby playpen, and crafting areas. The girls added new toys, books, and crafts for all ages. They also donated tablets and headphones for older kids. They also created a sensory space for kids that might need a safe place.

The girls did an amazing job thinking of others through this project. They put themselves in others’ shoes and what items they would need and what items they would want the most in a foster situation. Not only did they buy for girls their age, but for boys. They thought of kids in high school and babies and toddlers that might not know what is going on in their life.

Us troop leaders could not be prouder of our girls. We gave advice and ideas, but at the end of the day, all the girls made all the decisions.

They are now all looking forward to their Silver Award, but also staying in touch with Foster Source to continue contributing to all the good they do for kids.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Bronze and Silver Award Girl Scouts honored at Highest Awards Celebration in Western Colorado

More than a dozen Girl Scouts, along with their families and friends, gathered at Colorado Mesa University in Grand Junction on May 19, 2019, to honor the more than 1,200 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2018-19 Girl Scout awards program year, 14 Girl Scouts in the Western Colorado region earned the Bronze Award. 15 girls across the Western Colorado region earned the prestigious Silver Award. 42 girls across Colorado earned the prestigious Gold Award..

Gold Award Girl Scout and current Gold Award mentor Heidi Ragsdale served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.