Tag Archives: Northern & Northeastern CO

Boulder Girl Scouts get their hands dirty to help low-resource children

Submitted by Susan Twetten

Northern & Northeastern CO

Boulder

For the second year in a row, Girl Scout Troop 73500 in Boulder volunteered their Saturday morning to clean bikes for Share-a-Gift, which helps low-resource families provide holiday gifts for their kids. The girls cleaned 145 bikes!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Helping “stalemate” the beavers

Submitted by Lisa Herrmann

Northern & Northeastern CO

Longmont

It is a tradition in our troop to help someone in our community. One such effort went to help lakes in the Pella Crossing area. After the flood, things changed in the way the lakes were made up, and some pesky beavers were trying to block the flow of water between the lakes, which in turn would have flooded newly planted vegetation. We helped their pipe system that keeps the water flowing!  Afterwards, a ranger took us to show how it all worked.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Brownies journey through Wonderland

Submitted by Jen Rotar

Northern & Northeastern CO

Berthoud

On November 3, 2018, 32 Brownies from seven different troops took the marvelous “Journey Through Wonderland,” hosted by Troop 70700 of Berthoud. The Cadettes designed, organized, and led this “Journey in a Day,” with whimsical activities based on Lewis Carroll’s original story.

The Brownies earned their “World of Girls” Journey by telling their own stories, practicing teamwork, getting creative, and making healthy choices.

They topped off the day by creating Kindness Cards to distribute in their own communities as a Take Action project. Imagining what would happen if the Queen of Hearts sent her card soldiers to spread kindness, each Brownie will share their Kindness Cards in their own communities.

While the Brownies said they loved all the activities of the day, the favorites were definitely the Mad Hatter Hat Station and Caterpillar teamwork challenge.

Each station was designed and led by Cadettes, who worked through the challenges of planning the event and gained confidence in their own leadership abilities.

Troop 70700 is hosting “Journey Through Wonderland” again in December (already sold out), and is planning additional sessions for 2019. To be placed on an interest list for upcoming sessions, please email Troop 70700 leader Jen Rotar at rotarjen@msn.com.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Second Service Unit 747 hike

Submitted by Ariella Wells

Northern & Northeastern CO

Fort Collins

A few Girl Scouts from Service Unit 747 went out in the chilly Sunday weather to hike at Hewlett Gulch. Since it ended up being all older girls, they decided to do the entire trail. They hiked eight miles altogether! The next service unit hike is not until April, but be on look out for it! We hope to have more girls join in next time.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Gold Award Girl Scouts impact Colorado communities and beyond

Twelve Girl Scouts from across Colorado have earned the distinction of Gold Award Girl Scout, the highest honor in Girl Scouting, after completing Take Action projects benefiting their local communities and those around the world.

  • Brittany Argo from Aurora, Cherokee Trail High School, built a prayer garden at St. Michael’s the Archangel and aided in the construction of a prayer garden at a church in the Philippines.
  • Evyn Batie from Loveland, Mountain View High School, led a team of students to create the Northern Colorado Student Mental Health Resource Guide, an electronic compilation of some of the best youth mental health resources across the region.
  • Bryce Civiello from Evergreen, Conifer High School, designed a pamphlet for teens that can help them take the first steps toward getting help from a mental health professional.
  • Angela Foote from Centennial, Arapahoe High School, developed a relationship between the organizations Family Promise of Denver and Denver Tech for All to ensure low-resource students and families have ongoing access to computers.
  • Madeline Ford from Englewood, Cherry Creek High School, partnered with the Boys & Girls Club to create a five-session literacy program, which promotes a positive reading environment and teaches children new ways to express themselves through books and poetry.
  • Littlepage Green from Breckenridge, Summit High School, created a lesson plan and video to educate students about food allergies. In-person lessons also included training on how to properly use an epi-pen.
  • Maya Hegde from Englewood, Cherry Creek High School, partnered with the Mangala Seva Orphanage in India and Brydges Centre in Kenya to teach girls how to make reusable sanitary pads using materials they already have. The program she developed also taught the girls how to sell sanitary pads in their own communities to tackle the stigma around the menstrual cycle.
  • Grace Matsey from Highlands Ranch, Mountain Vista High School, created a music tutoring program for elementary and middle school musicians, which was run by members of her high school’s Music Honor Society.
  • Annarlene Nikolaus from Colorado Springs, Discovery Canyon High School, oversaw the construction of a series of buddy benches for local K-12 public schools. Students also participated in age-appropriate lessons led by Annarlene about buddy benches and what they can do to be better friends.
  • Bailey Stokes from Buena Vista, Buena Vista High School, created outdoor-based lesson plans for the use of fourth grade science teachers across Colorado. Topics covered included investigations, habitat, and adaptations.
  • Emma Lily from Longmont, Silver Creek High School, designed a website, created a podcast, and wrote a children’s book celebrating the Longmont Sugar Beet Factory and its historical significance.
  • Katherine Walden from Larkspur, Castle View High School, taught elementary school students about the importance of bees and how to install bee boxes that local bee species and other pollinators can call home.

Open only to girls in high school, the Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls—and the most difficult to earn. The Gold Award project involves seven steps: 1. Identify an issue, 2. Investigate it thoroughly, 3. Get help and build a team, 4. Create a plan, 5. Present the plan and gather feedback, 6. Take action, 7. Educate and inspire. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

“Earning the Girl Scout Gold Award designation is truly a remarkable achievement, and these young women exemplify leadership in all its forms,” said Stephanie Foote, President and Chief Executive Officer of Girl Scouts of Colorado. “They saw a need and took ownership of helping to develop a solution and took action to make it happen. Their extraordinary dedication, perseverance, and leadership is making the world a better place.”

Girl Scouts of Colorado is 32,000 strong—more than 22,000 girls and 10,000 adults who believe in the power of every G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader)™ to change the world. Our extraordinary journey began more than 100 years ago with the original G.I.R.L., Juliette Gordon “Daisy” Low. On March 12, 1912, in Savannah, Ga., she organized the very first Girl Scout troop, and every year since, we’ve honored her vision and legacy, building girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. We’re the preeminent leadership development organization for girls. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Evyn Batie, Loveland, “Northern Colorado Student Mental Health Resource Guide”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Girl Scout Gold Award Project, I led a team of Mountain View High School students in creating and compiling the Northern Colorado Student Mental Health Resource Guide. This guide is an electronic compilation of some of the best youth mental health resources across Northern Colorado, listing organizations from therapy groups to trainings on how to talk to people in your life about suicide. The organizations listed in the guide had been selected based on participation in another event I planned and hosted last year, Mountain View’s first-ever “Spread The Health,” a mental health awareness night, and each group had proven themselves to care deeply about youth mental health. My team created this guide to ensure that, whether or not students had attended this event, any student could all have access to the mental health resources many in our country, state, county, and school district need.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

The impact of the guide was measured through surveys my team and I designed and distributed in various classrooms around Mountain View. We asked students questions about the current state of their mental health and whether the resources in the guide would be helpful to them in the future. We found the majority of students said that they will most likely utilize one of the organizations in the future the most prevalent being safeTALK, a suicide awareness training that 31 out of 50 kids said they are likely to utilize.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

This project was designed to be sustained without my involvement. By creating an electronic resource, training a youth team with students of various grade levels, working with the MVHS Advisor Board (a team of teachers who gave approval for the publication of this guide), and working without a budget, I have ensured my project is sustainable. An electronic resource ensures that even as I step away from this project, others are always able to continue its development and publication. My team is well-rounded and large enough that, even if one person doesn’t continue, there will be someone able to sustain the project for years to come. Choosing to initiate this project without a budget not only made the process less stressful for me, but also ensured the school district’s continued interest as they do not have much money to spend. Additionally, Mr. Smith, one of Mountain View’s counselors, has passed the guide on to other local high schools which secures the guide’s future as a resource in the Thompson School District.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

The complex task of working to improve mental health, provide resources, and deal with the stigma of getting help is a problem facing our entire country and world today. Mental Health America states that, “56% of American adults with mental illnesses do not receive treatment.” And according to stats from Our World In Data, “15% of all the world’s population has mental disorder of some kind.” The same process used for this project at Mountain View High School in Loveland, Colorado, could be used to help students in schools all around the country and the world facing so many of the same things.

What did you learn about yourself?

Through my Gold Award, I learned that we can always keep growing. I have taken on huge leadership projects and commitments in the past, but nothing like the Gold Award. Working on a project, creating something important, is a very different phenomenon when you’re working alone. However, the Gold Award committee challenged me and pushed me to broaden my leadership skills, expand my team, and release the reins of control that I often hold so tightly. I learned a lot about myself as a leader when I had to lead so many people and have as much faith in their skills as I do my own.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

My future is dedicated to the cause of mental health and the Gold Award was another step towards that. I have the joy now of knowing that I have reached the highest level I can in an organization of leaders while educating others on a topic I am passionate about.  I am walking away from Gold Award with stronger leadership skills such as communication, time-management, and delegation and with a deeper understanding of mental health and how to share my message.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I have been a Girl Scout for ten years and earned my Bronze and Silver awards. It felt natural and even necessary to earn the Gold. My Gold Award was the compilation of every skill Girl Scouts has ever taught me from being a leader to being a friend, being creative to begin assertive. The Gold Award was an important part of my Girl Scout experience because it gave me the chance to show everything I had learned through this organization and that has been the most amazing opportunity I could ever have had.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

Go-Getter: I saw the mental health problem prevalent in my community and my life and began to consider the factors that contributed. The lack of awareness students seemed to have about the resources there to help them stood out and I knew I needed to find a way to share those with all students.

Innovator: The idea of a compiled resource guide was one that very few people had ever seen and being able to do a Girl Scout Gold Award electronically and for no cost at all was an unusual method of action.

Risk-taker: It was a huge step outside of my comfort zone to work with a large team of youth and wonder if they’d be able to deliver all the things I needed, but ultimately, working with them made the guide so much better than it would have been without them.

Leader: I was able to utilize all the best skills I have learned from ten years of being a Girl Scout to lead a team to create the best possible project for our community.

Gold Award helped me become the best G.I.R.L. I could be.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Join the Our Cabana trip and get two for one price

Submitted by Theresa Szczurek

Northern & Northeastern CO

Boulder

Girl Scout Troop 70007 (Senior / Ambassador troop from Boulder) needs your help to get FIVE more registration commitments to join in the June 2 – June 10, 2019  ‘Acapulco Adventure II’ at the WAGGGS World Center Our Cabana. ALSO, there is a special ‘two for one’ all-inclusive price offer for relatives for those who commit in 2018 — bring mother / daughter, father / daughter, two sisters, two adults, etc. and the $1400 program fee covers two of you.

Registrants must be at least 13-years-old. We need a commitment soon or the program will be cancelled. More info: https://www.wagggs.org/en/events/acapulco-adventure-ii-at-our-cabana-2019/.

If you are interested or have questions, email girlscouttroop70007@gmail.com.

This is a girl-led troop and a girl-led trip. Grace F., Girl Scout Ambassador who is a Senior at Boulder High School, is the trip coordinator and go-getter. She has researched and organized the trip plan, including the budget. Grace, girl troop leader of Troop 70007, is taking the initiative to make this experience happen. Why? She wants to visit the WAGGGS World Center Our Cabana, meet other Girl Scouts from around the world, and do the sea turtle service project at Acapulco.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Power of cookie

Submitted by Ariella Wells

Northern & Northeastern CO

Fort Collins

Participating in the Girl Scout Cookie Program can pay off. Earlier this month, girls from Troop 70720 got to go to Great Wolf Lodge in Colorado Springs because of all their hard work in February and March of 2018. They had to wait awhile, but it was worth it. It was a blast with their indoor water park and various activities.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

New cuisines progressive bike ride

Submitted by Ariella Wells

Northern & Northeastern CO

Fort Collins

Two of the girls planned out the “New Cuisines” badge for Cadettes. The last part was a progressive bike ride lunch. They rode 12-miles and stopped at various houses for parts of a lunch meal.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Yoga at McIntosh Lake

Submitted by Sharon Manning

Northern & Northeastern CO

Longmont

The tenth grade girls of Troop 73392 are currently working on the “Senior Cross Training” badge. The girls identified fitness goals such as eating healthier, reducing junk food, and being more consistent in exercising on a regular basis.

After identifying goals, the girls kicked off the cardiovascular part of their badge with kayaking/paddleboarding across McIntosh Lake.

The girls also wanted to work on flexibility and stretching. They returned to McIntosh Lake to practice yoga with Left Hand Yoga. Left Hand Yoga offers a free community class on Sunday morning at 11. During the summer/early fall months, the class is held at McIntosh Lake with a beautiful view of the mountains.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.