Tag Archives: Northern & Northeastern CO

Volunteer Spotlight: Rini Kirkpatrick

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Rini Kirkpatrick in the Northern & Northeastern CO region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Rini to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

Growing up in Indonesia, I was in Girl Scouts for several years. During that time, I saw my parents being involved by helping out with activities, such as camping trips, hikes, and other activities. I learned a lot as a Girl Scout, and even though I did not continue past middle school, I wanted that experience for our daughter.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I started out at the troop level as a leader for our daughter’s Daisy troop. As we continued our Girl Scouting adventures, I became more involved with the service unit. I served as a service unit cookie manager for several years, and was involved in the parent-daughter volunteer camp for three years. I was also on the committee with the first Youth Engaged in Learning about Leadership (YELL) event in Northern Colorado. Currently, our troop is hosting the Power Up anti-bullying program update pilot, so we can offer it to troops in the region. In addition, I support the SU fall product program manager and the older girl Gift Wrap Committee. 

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

Through the years, I learned that being a volunteer was a great way to connect and be involved with our daughter, as well as other girls. Looking back, I feel a sense of wonder of how much the girls in the troop have grown into leaders. The Girl Scout program includes so many options, they meet the varied interests of girls. I hope I was able to make a difference in girls’ lives, so they can reach their full potential, achieve their dreams, and make a difference in the world. 

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

Perseverance. Standing up for yourself and for others. Learning there are different ways you can make a difference, and it does not have to be a big thing to make a difference. Courage. Willing to make new friends, even if you don’t know anyone. Finding your people. Working together. Being open to new experiences. Having open hearts and open minds.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

When working to provide girls with the best leadership experience, I have gone out my comfort zone to organize and participate in activities that I had not previously done. I hope by guiding girls to take charge of their own activities, I show that leaders are not necessarily those who are in front, but also those who ensure that people around them have the opportunity to grow into their fullest potential. 

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

Delivering cookies to our Hometown Heroes

Submitted by Ariella Wells

Northern & Northeastern CO

Fort Collins

Troop 70720 had many Hometown Heroes this year– thanks to fantastic customers in the northern Colorado area!

We delivered 500 packages of Girl Scout Cookies to the Larimer County Food Bank and another 70 packages to Good Samaritan. After delivering the cookies to Good Samaritan, we stayed for an hour to do crafts, color, and hangout with residents. Many of the residents were Girl Scouts and some had some great stories to tell.

Kindness and giving back is always a joy and it was lovely to have this opportunity.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Weekend of cabin camping and fun

Submitted by Ariella Wells

Northern & Northeastern CO

Fort Collins

Girls in Troop 70720 spent the weekend at Magic Sky Ranch, camping at Old Lodge. We did some hiking on Old Homestead Trail. We enjoyed games, s’mores, scary stories, a talent show, rock climbing, and more. We love this property and have been going there for eight years.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Volunteer Spotlight: Ashley Lampe

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Ashley Lampe of Eaton in the Northern & Northeastern CO region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Ashley to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a leader of my daughter’s troop during a leadership transition to ensure that all our girls could continue participating in Girl Scouts, doing things they love.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I’m a troop leader and TCM to a fantastic Cadette troop. Other than those specifics, I’ve helped at cookie pickup, the cookie cupboard, and as a mentor to others. Overall, I help where I can.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

Girls have the courage and power to do whatever they want, but only to the capacity that we allow, so remember to remove the roadblocks and tear off the roof to allow them to reach their fullest potential.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope each and every girl has learned that they can do absolutely anything they set their mind to, not to be afraid to advocate for themselves, to stand their ground when they need to, and be able to do so in a meaningful and respectful manner.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Being a Girl Scout volunteer has tested my very being, in every capacity. I’ve stretched in ways I’ve never thought possible, have been more creative than I’ve ever been, and expanded in every direction. Molding and leading our future leaders doesn’t come with a cookie cutter manual, but requires flexibility and continual development to be the best I can be.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Volunteer Spotlight: Nicole Lockwood

 

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Nicole Lockwood of Fort Collins in the Northern & Northeastern CO region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Nicole to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a Girl Scout volunteer, after I earned my Gold Award and wanted to continue sharing my Girl Scout story. Plus, I wanted to inspire girls to reach for their dreams and pursue their goals. I had a strong support system as a girl with a few key leaders and my mom. I wanted to share that same support with other girls, who may not have that same support. 

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

Like most volunteers I wear several hats within Girl Scouts, which has lead to taking on various different roles. Those include being a troop leader, service unit product program manager, Gold Award mentor, member of the Membership Connection Committee, and Colorado delegate for the 2017 National Convention. I also participate with the Girl Scout Choir. Each of these different roles has allowed me different opportunities and chances to work with several other volunteers and girls across the state. Of all the roles I have held, one of my favorite was being with the Girl Scout Choir and being able to attend the 95th and 100th Anniversary Singalong in Washington, D.C. Another favorite role of mine was being able to be a delegate at the 2017 convention. It was a first time experience for myself and I got to be part of some of the national decision making with GSUSA, along with being able to meet and interact with other volunteers and girls across the country and even worldwide, while also being able to meet some very important people from GSUSA. Most of my different volunteer roles I have held for almost six years. 

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

There are lots of things I have learned while being a Girl Scout volunteer. I have learned that any girl you work with, for no matter the length of time, will always look up to you as a role model. I’ve also learned that while being a volunteer, we still need to embody what the Girl Scout Law means as sometimes we are also the face of Girl Scouts. Most importantly, I have learned that sometimes the girls aren’t the only ones who get to have fun and try new adventures. 

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope that the girls I have been able to volunteer with have learned that you can do just about anything you set your mind to. Nothing is ever unattainable, unless you don’t try. Along with that, I hope the girls have learned that its always important to try something new, because you never know what new adventures or doors it may open up for you. 

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

My experience as a volunteer has helped become a G.I.R.L. in several different ways. I have become a go-getter by always willing to step up for a new challenge or task whether it be taking on a new role in one of my Girl Scout troops or just by being an extra helping hand whenever and wherever it may be needed. I’m innovator by always thinking outside of the box and trying to come up with new and creative ways to solve any problem or task that comes my way. Sometimes doing things a little different will lead to a unexpected outcome. Becoming a risk-taker has showed me that I should never be afraid to step out of my comfort zone or to try new activities. Becoming a leader with a troop for so many years has allowed me to watch my own leadership skills grow and blossom so much that, I was able to to take on some of the other roles that I currently have. Becoming a G.I.R.L. has showed me that there is so much more to being a Girl Scout volunteer and it has shown me some of the experiences and opportunities that I may have missed when I was a Girl Scout myself. 

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

Volunteer Spotlight: Jill Mann

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Jill Mann of Windsor in the Northern & Northeastern CO region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Jill to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

Originally to help my daughter’s troop when my oldest girl was a Daisy and they needed someone to coordinate the troop cookie sales. I’ve since helped out with troop and service unit level leadership.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I’ve been our troop cookie manager for four years now. This is my second year in a troop leadership position. Last year, I worked with our Brownies. This year, I’ve helped our Daisy and Cadette level troops (mixed level troop) with their badge goals, and assisted our other leaders with Brownie and Junior level activities. I have also assisted our troop leadership team on our yearly troop camping trips. This year, I’ve also assisted with our service unit leadership and was the service unit cookie manager.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I’ve learned that there are so many more opportunities for our girls to learn a variety of skills, all they need is a little guidance to see the possibilities and think outside the box.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope they have seen that they really can do anything they want to with a little determination and the ability to ask for help if they need to, and that there is something to be learned from every experience.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I have definitely had to leave my comfort zone on this adventure. I tend to be more of a quiet observer. Being a Girl Scout volunteer, I’ve had to get out, do things, and learn new skills I would not have otherwise picked up.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

Gold Award Girl Scout: Amy Fishman, Boulder, “Connecting Teens With Nature”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

As a high school student in Boulder, I’ve had incredible access to the outdoors throughout my teen years, like many of my classmates. However, as I’ve progressed through school, I learned that many of my peers do not remain engaged in the environment or its issues: they do not spend time outside, choosing instead to focus on schoolwork, Netflix, or other indoor activities, rather than the area that surrounds us. For my project, my aim was to foster a connection between teens and the environment. To this end, I worked to acquire information focused on teens’ engagement with the outdoors and then facilitated an improved connection with the outdoors. Through this, I also increased their understanding of environmental issues, in Boulder and beyond.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

At the start of my project, I administered surveys to students at high schools in my area. The results of the surveys illustrated the lack of environmental connection experienced by my peers. After analyzing the surveys, I designed a program based on their results that subsequently improved participating teens’ levels of engagement with nature and understanding of issues impacting the environment by approximately 30%.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

Science Adventure Program has agreed to a written commitment to continue the project through an annual meeting focused on fostering environmental stewardship and awareness in high school aged teens before they begin adult life. I shared information with a number of environmental groups, both local and international.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

As part of my project’s sustainability, I contacted the environmental organizations Green 10, Sierra Club, and Forest Stewardship Council. Green 10 is a coalition of environmental organizations that are active on the European level, which helped me to have a global impact by sharing my information. Forest Stewardship Council is located in the United States and focuses on environmental stewardship in relation to United States forests. Both Green 10 and Forest Stewardship Council responded to my research, which helped to spread the information acquired in my project nationally and globally.

What did you learn about yourself?

Throughout this project, I learned how to effectively communicate my ideas to a wide variety of audiences. I have also learned the importance of delegating work while in a leadership position. I realized that I was incapable of doing everything myself: for example, I could not administer a large quantity of surveys to multiple high schools. By delegating, I was able to reach my goals.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

I believe that earning my Gold Award will impact me primarily due to the fact that my communicative and leadership abilities have improved. Because I want to continue my education in regards to environmental studies, which has a focus on collaborative group work, having strong communication skills will be impactful to me in the future.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

At the beginning of high school, a large number of girls in my troop ended their involvement. This was deeply disappointing to me, because Girl Scouts has been deeply important to my personal community and friend group. Only one other girl remained part of my troop, and we both decided to complete our Gold Awards. Our work on our separate projects added to my experience as a Girl Scout, and I think that because we were supporting each other in our goals, I was able to build a strong community and truly learn from my experience as a Girl Scout in high school.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I think that my Gold Award project helped me to become an innovator because I was obligated to solve problems as they arose, which challenged me, but also forced me to grow in this respect. For example, one meeting with students was scheduled in late December, but it became difficult for classmates to meet up in person for the second meeting in January. To resolve this, I chose to lead a session through a group email conversation. This, to me, was an effective and innovative solution, and helped me to become a stronger problem solver.

To me, completing my Girl Scout Gold Award project represents the fulfillment of my commitment to Girl Scouts. Much of my younger years focused around being a Girl Scout, and to recognize that I have gotten to this point as one is deeply important to me. I connected with my community by sharing my passion and my idea with the people around me, which has been one of the most important aspects of my time as a Girl Scout.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Gold Award Girl Scout: Trinity Brubaker, Longmont, “Free Mental Health Little Library”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

Both my biological parents were drug addicts that suffered from mental illness. I was taken into foster care at age two and adopted at age three. You would think my story would end there. A kid born to drug addicts and placed in foster care should fail, right? My biological parents gave me a gift, the gift of both musical and artistic talent. Due to early childhood trauma, I experienced at the hands of my biological parents, I struggle with attachment disorder, a mental illness. Our society often views people with mental illness as failures. The stigma attached to speaking out about mental illness and getting help for a mental illness is one of our nation’s greatest social problems. This is where my Gold Award project takes shape. I combined my experiences with having a mental illness and my artistic talent to speak up, take a risk, and make a social change. I built a little library full of mental health books. I spoke out to groups of people about my mental illness and asked them to support my project with books. I presented to groups of young children and educated them on mental health issues. I created a safe place for conversation around mental health issues while creating a physical library people can go to get information on mental health.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I found that my storytelling became in itself a work of art and an important part of my project. The impact of storytelling is hard to fit into a spreadsheet and measure. The conversations started by the box have become just as important as creating a beautiful space for mental health resources to be exchanged. The creation of a physical box started a conversation. We must tell our stories to address the social need of breaking down the stigma around mental illness. We need to find spaces that are safe to share our resources. The stories people shared with me measured the impact more than any numbers every will. I do, however, visit the box weekly and see titles are gone and new titles put in there place.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project is sustainable as long as there is a book in it. The library will continue to impact people by educating them about mental health, as well as providing amazing resources for families in need. I have partnered with therapists and counselors and asked them to continue to direct people to the free library. This mental health library is also listed on a global website that directs people to free little libraries around the world. https://littlefreelibrary.org/ourmap/

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I am an artist. I looked at the link between mental illness and people with artist backgrounds. I researched how difficult it is for all people to access mental health resources. Nationally, there is a lack of funding for mental health resources. I wanted to create an artistic work of art that would also function to provide mental health resource to the community. “Countless painters, composers, writers, and musicians have suffered from depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia, prompting people to ask the question, are artists more likely to suffer from mental illness. The research says yes. A 2012 study followed 1.2 million patients and their relatives and found that bipolar disorder is more common in individuals with artistic professions including dancers, photographers, and authors.”  Source: https://www.mnn.com/lifestyle/arts-culture/stories/8-artists-who-suffered-mental-illness

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that I am stronger than I thought. That I can start an uncomfortable conversation. Lastly, that I can overcome obstacles thrown my way.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

It is my hope that my project has helped create a new space for sharing mental health resources, while encouraging others to share their stories.I hope to continue using my gifts and talents in the future while seeking a degree in art therapy.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I have been in Girl Scouts for over 10 years. I always looked at doing my Gold Award as the last step in my Girl Scout experience. The Gold Award gave me something to work for in my career of Girl Scouting.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

Risk-Taker! Let’s face it, many people who ignite change, at first, fail!  The first person who said, “Women should be given the right to vote,” risked failure, and failed for years. Being a teen who stands up to announce that she lives with a mental illness makes people uncomfortable. In telling my story and using my artistic talents to create a safe place to exchange mental health resources I am taking an authentic creative risk. I am saying it it time to tell our stories about surviving and thriving with a mental illness. I am using my story and my talents to say it is time for us to provide free resources to support those with mental illness and it is past time to feel safe to stand up to say I live everyday with a mental illness. I will gladly fail if my creative project and my story helps start to break down the stigma attached to living with mental illness.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scout Daisies first Hometown Hero cookie delivery

Submitted by Brittany Smith

Northern & Northeastern CO

Windsor

Our Girl Scout Daisies made their first-ever Hometown Hero cookie delivery! They were able to donate over 100 packages of Girl Scout Cookies to the Fort Collins Rescue Mission. We are so lucky to have an organization to support our homeless neighbors. The girls really enjoyed giving back to the community.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Volunteer Spotlight: Dezire Sanchez

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Dezire Sanchez of Greeley in the Northern and Northeastern CO region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Dezire to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

When my daughter was in kindergarten, we were at a UNC football game and they advertised a Girl Scout event in conjunction with UNC. My daughter was interested in the event, so we decided to give Girl Scouts try and registered, so that she could attend the event. We did not have plans on continuing after that year, but we quickly discovered the joy that Girl Scouts brought both of us. At the end of her first year, I decided to take a leader role as I was excited that we had found something that we both enjoyed. When I signed her up, I had no idea of the journey that I we were about to begin.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

Currently, I have the following volunteer roles within Girl Scouts: member of the service unit team, service unit fall product program manager, troop leader, troop fall product program manager, and troop cookie manager. When I became involved in the troop my daughter joined, I had no idea that I myself would become a Girl Scout. I have greatly appreciated each of these roles as they have helped me learn and experience being a Girl Scout. I have also made many new friends and have witnessed the kindness and welcoming that I all hope each Girl Scout feels throughout their journey. 

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have learned that you can become a Girl Scout at any age. I have also learned so much from dealing with the challenges of time management and going outside of my own comfort levels to being a good role model for these girls. I have learned that no matter how hard or rough of a week I am having I will have one uninterrupted hour that I will dedicate to the girls. I have learned to look at the world through their eyes and their hearts and appreciate the compassion and drive they have. I have learned more from these girls than I could have imagined. 

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

My hope is that the girls continue to always choose kindness and that we always leave the places and people better than we found them. I hope that these girls continue to gain confidence in their abilities, skills, and knowledge to reach their goals. I also hope that they have the courage to continue to try new things and always seek adventure.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

When I began this journey, I would not have expected my experiencing to be anything other than a leader. Oh to look back and realize how incorrect my thoughts were. As a volunteer, I am a G.I.R.L. I am a go-getter most during cookie season. I work with the girls to create a plan that will motivate them to sell cookies and help them understand the commitment they will need to reach their cookie goals. I am an innovator while planning our meetings and activities. I am a risk-taker when we are camping. To be honest, I have never been “outdoorsy,” so this was always a big deal for me. However, camping has quickly become an activity that my daughter and I enjoy tremendously. I fulfill my leader role within service unit level and am truly amazed by all of the wonderful troop leaders I have come to know through our service unit. 

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.