Tag Archives: COVID-19

Steamboat Springs Junior Troop 56342 Takes on COVID for Troop Meetings

Girl Scout Junior Troop 56342 of Steamboat Springs wanted to share their creative ways to have a troop meeting during the current pandemic! Before GSCO guidelines were updated on October 14, 2020, the troop developed a fabulous “sanitization station” and kaper chart for meeting precautions.

The girls are very serious about checking temperatures pre and post meeting – check out the picture of their kaper chart and sanitization station. They also created a health screening log. The group also engineered some new and improved sit-upons for their social distancing! Of course, the girls will have to add their troop leader’s names to the kaper chart for temperature taking now that the guidelines have been updated.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

COVID-19 Update: October 2020

Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA) has updated its guidance for in-person gatherings and now requires a health screening questionnaire to be filled out and signed by the caregiver on the day of an in-person meeting or activity. If a participant answers “yes” to any of the questions, they should not attend the in-person activity. Before attending an in-person meeting or activity, each participant should submit a COVID-19 pre-screen questions (pdf) or COVID-19 pre-screen form (online version – automatically emailed directly to the troop leader’s email address input on the form). Troop volunteers can collect the information and signatures at the event or send to caregivers ahead of the event/meeting on the same day.  The forms do not need to be collected by GSCO, however troop volunteers should save paper or electronic files for one year.

There are also updates to face covering and carpooling sections of the COVID Guidance for Volunteers. Be sure to check the COVID page on the website for the most recent information. (You can also get there by clicking the pink banner on the home page.)

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Sidney Barbier, Steamboat Springs, “State Park Waste Diversion”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

My project is focused on State Park Waste Diversion. However, a huge part of my project is focused on educating the public on the basics of recycling and waste diversion in hopes to inspire and empower future generations to make a difference and share their knowledge with the world! My project branched into a variety of pieces such as a staff orientation to educate staff at Colorado state parks on the basics of waste diversion so that they can help share their knowledge. I worked to create a Junior Ranger curriculum that includes reduce, reuse, recycle guidelines. I did my own in-person waste sorts with the public in order to bring awareness and get helpful data as an insight into the issue of recycling contamination. To help further knowledge of recycling, I developed and posted signage that is both sustainable and durable that will help educate people and empower them to make the right choice! Every piece of my project aims at sustainability of our amazing state parks for future generations of girls to enjoy.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

My initial plan was to measure my project’s success at Steamboat Lake by doing a beginning and end waste sort, however due to the COVID-19 pandemic, I instead found success in my project based on the number of people I was able to reach and on all levels, from staff, visitors, the public, and Girl Scouts of all ages. I was able to see this based on the number of views on my YouTube Channel, blog, and Facebook. In addition, simply posting the signage made a huge difference in the amount of contamination in the trash and recycling as observed by park employee Eric Young. When I was at Steamboat Lake posting the signage, I had multiple staff members come up to me and say how thankful they were for my presentation at their staff orientation and how much they learned. I was visibly able to see the impact education truly has on people of all backgrounds and ages. People gained new knowledge on the basics of waste diversion, the what, why, and how of recycling, as well as what individuals can do in the community to help reduce their own waste. I taught many young girls how to do their very own waste sort at home and how to set up their own successful recycling systems. My impact was measured throughout my project in less quantifiable means then I had intended, but the overall impact was based on the overall increase in knowledge and education around where our waste is truly going. I started the conversion, and I will continue to help be a part of it.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

In order to ensure the sustainability and longevity of my project beyond my involvement, I created and developed a letter of commitment that was signed by Kelly Cook, my project advisor and the administrative assistant of Steamboat Lake State Park, that ensures commitment by the state park to maintain the vision and goals of my project through a series of detailed and specific commitments. The letter of commitment lays out each part of my project and the resources available in order for the state park to continue my work. For each step of my project, I worked to make it sustainable for future use. For example, I uploaded videos of my staff orientation presentation to YouTube to be available for future use. I created a waste sort kit to be available to each seasonal interpreter for further use in park programs. I created signage that will last for at least two years and can be easily repurchased for continued educational awareness. I provided a PDF of resources from Yampa Valley Sustainability Council as well as the Junior Ranger program to be reprinted, reused, and recycled to continue the use of these resources for both the public, visitors, and young kids. By signing this letter of commitment, Steamboat Lake Park has committed to maintaining my project vision, goals, and mission beyond my involvement in order to increase waste diversion and recycling to make the state parks more sustainable for future generations to enjoy.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I met and coordinated with Girl Scouts of Colorado staff member Anna Danilla in order to find ways to share and integrate my Gold Award Project with the  Girl Scouts Love State Parks Weekend event. I ended up creating a blog post coupled with pictures that share the basics about my project and the relationship to state parks. In addition, I shared my Project Greenify YouTube Channel as online resources for the virtual piece of the Girl Scouts Love State Parks Weekend, September 12 and13, 2020. The blog information and YouTube link was posted on Girl Scouts of Colorado website, Facebook, and sent out in RSVP emails to reach potentially 1,000 girls and their family’s and share my project with Girl Scouts beyond Routt County.

What did you learn about yourself?

One of the biggest things I learned about myself throughout the whole project is that I truly do have the power to make a difference. Through perseverance, patience, passion, and hard work, I was able to make an impact on other people and the environment as a whole. I learned that I have the ability to lead and collaborate with others to create something achievable. I didn’t simply write down lofty goals, I achieved them. I learned that my passion for the environment and the human-environment interaction, is not something that will go away. It is a true passion that I want to continue to learn about, study, and share in my future and beyond. I learned what direction I want my life to take; I want to study environmental science and policy in college and beyond.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Earning my Gold Award has not only given me the confidence that I can change the world, but the tools to continue to make a difference. In my future, I will use my Gold Award experience as a segue into having a more lasting impact and continuing to share my passion for environmental science with the world. Being a Gold Award Girl Scout will help in every application and interview for college and beyond. It has given me the leadership skills that will apply to every situation life throws at me.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The journey towards earning my Gold Award was a truly unique experience and was a perfect cumulative experience of everything I have learned and gained from Girl Scouts since I was in kindergarten. I used the basics of the Girl Scout Promise to “use resources wisely” and turned it into a sustainable and achievable project. I took initiative and worked to serve my community as I had been taught to do throughout my years as a Girl Scout. I feel that earning my Gold Award was an achievement I had always dreamed of. Ever since I saw the Gold Award Girl Scouts as my troop received our Silver Award, I knew I wanted to one day stand up there and present how I used Girl Scouts as a forum for making a difference.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

Throughout my Gold Award journey, I was able to strengthen and develop a multitude of leadership skills. I believe that one of the greatest skills I gained was in collaboration. I learned to practice balancing independence with reaching out to my team for help, support, feedback, and advice. Along with collaboration came innovation. In both dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic and simply working towards sustainability for my project, I was able to demonstrate leadership in using my own confidence and delegation skills to continue my project moving forward. I continue to reach out to organizations and team members, and did not simply stand by idly during the strict period of quarantine. I became a real “go-getter,” as I used my drive and motivation along with a positive mindset to find creative solutions, by creating virtual material such as Project Greenify, finding ways to coordinate with Girl Scouts Love State Parks Weekend, and posting signage in a socially distant way. I developed skills in public speaking as I stepped up to a position of leadership and led waste-sort, staff orientation, public presentations, and Girl Scout events. I continually practiced accountability as I took responsibility for keeping up with my target dates, setting up my own meetings, and focusing on time management in order to accomplish each of my goals. I stepped up to become a coordinator, decision-maker, and active listener, as I became involved in other organizations such as state parks, and Yampa Valley Sustainability Council. The Gold Award experience has truly brought out my initiative and commitment to taking a stand and becoming an influential G.I.R.L.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Ellie McWhirter, Denver, “The Give-a-Bag-Take-a-Bag Project”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my project, I decreased the amount of plastic bag usage in my community and increased the amount of knowledge on the issue of plastic bag pollution in my community. My initial project plan was to place systems in grocery stores where if a costumer forgot their reusable bag they could get one from the system and use that for their groceries instead of a plastic bag. I had talked to stores and we were already to start the system, but then, COVID. Because of COVID and the fact that my project was super hands-on, I had to switch gears completely. My project became all informational and I beefed up my website with information on the issue and how to help. I also printed off flyers and pamphlets and distributed them in my community through grocery stores, coffee shops, etc.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured the impact of my project through my website and the Park Hill Food Bank. On my website, I was able to tell how many people visited each page, and how many people signed the petition banning plastic bags that was on my page. Through the food bank, I was able to tell how many people donated reusable bags.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project is sustained beyond my involvement through the help of East High School’s Sustainability Club. I have connected the president of the club with the convention center (for bag donations) and the Park Hill food bank. I also gave her copies of all my flyers.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

Plastic pollution is a global problem and a problem in my community. By addressing the issue in my community, I had the potential to have my project go global. I contacted Feeding America, Food Bank of the Rockies, and had a global connection to the petition on change.org.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned about my persistence and grit. The project took a lot of time and effort, and the fact that I had some ups and downs with it and was still able to complete it showed my grit.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

I think earning the Gold Award taught me leadership, communication, accountability, and reasonability skills. These skills are important in life and will help me tremendously in the future.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I feel that the Gold Award was extremely important because it was a nice send off into the real world. I had been in Girl Scouts since first or second grade and so just being able to grow in character throughout my life and then have a big finale sendoff was very rewarding. The Gold Award also taught me very valuable life lessons and skills that I can and will continue to use, so I would say that was a very important part of my Girl Scout experience.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

I think earning my Gold Award helped me become a go-getter because it made me realize that if I put my mind to something and put in the effort, I can do anything I want. It helped me become an innovator because I had to adapt to certain situations and adjust my project to fit the requirements under a circumstance. The Gold Award helped me become a risk-taker because throughout the project, I had to step out of my comfort zone in some instances. For example, contacting big organizations and communicating with adults in the workplace. This got me out of my comfort zone and was somewhat of a risk. It helped me become a leader through leading a team of volunteers and a team in general.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org.

Grand Junction Girl Scouts Earn Bronze Award

Submitted by Jenni Grossman

Western Colorado

Grand Junction

Congratulations to McKenzie, Lauren, Abbie, Jolie, and Peyton from Troop 13497 in Grand Junction! They earned the Girl Scout Bronze Award for a project to help seniors in nursing homes who may be feeling lonely due to visiting restrictions as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. The girls made videos and special crafts, including photos, drawings, and activity sheets, for multiple nursing homes in their area. Two of the nursing homes were chosen because one of the girls has a family member living there.

The Girl Scouts started a different project to earn the Bronze Award in February 2020, but then had to do a 360 in March when COVID-19 hit. They thought the residents of the nursing homes would be so lonely due to visiting restrictions. The girls decided to make videos of their favorite children’s books so the activities directors could play them for the residents. The girls also wanted some activities for the residents. After the girls called multiple places, they learned they had to laminate whatever they picked, so it could be sanitized. They each made five to ten different sheets (drawings, word searches, mazes paintings, colored pictures with uplifting quotes) for the residents. The girls also made copies of their work and laminated each one. Each nursing home received 40 drawing/activity laminated sheets. We also gave the organizations a list of the videos that the girls made so they could access them whenever they wanted.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Kayla Fairweather, Parker, “E.N.D. T1D – Educating Non-Diabetics About Type 1 Diabetes”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award project, I created a video curriculum on Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) to supplement the T1D training that teachers currently receive. The video featured the perspectives of diabetic students, their parents, a professional athlete with T1D, an endocrinologist, and a diabetes resource nurse. Together, these perspectives offered a more personal view of the challenges faced by diabetic students and insights on the emotional burden of managing this condition in the school environment. I also made a video specifically for diabetic students and their parents to show them that they’re not alone with their condition, and many of the feelings they experience are completely normal and shared by others. I presented my video at two sessions during Type One Nation, a T1D educational event, and at a statewide diabetes resource nurse meeting.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

When presenting my video, I provided before and after surveys to every attendee. I received great feedback from parents of diabetic children, many stating that they related to the video’s message. Comments were left including a new understanding that, “everyone associated with diabetes have the same thoughts/concerns” and “T1D does not prevent one from doing anything.” Every diabetic teen who viewed the video responded that they believe teachers and other students need to learn more about T1D, especially how to relate to diabetic students and to not joke about it or confuse it with Type 2 Diabetes. Most responded that they felt more comfortable talking with their teachers about T1D after watching the video and had takeaways such as “you are not alone” and you “have many peers supporting you.”

The impact of my video was especially profound on the diabetes resource nurses. Before watching the video, about 67% responded that the emotional challenge of living with T1D was only a small or medium part of their current curriculum. After watching the video, about 90% responded that the emotional challenge should be a large part of the curriculum. I received comments such as “very well put together video and very helpful having the perspective of the patient/student,” “the importance of including the student perspective,” “how important it is to share with staff the challenges that kids with T1D face and what their thoughts are about needing help in the classroom,” and “I appreciated the statement that every student with diabetes is different.” Diabetes Nurse Educators from both JeffCo Public Schools and Pueblo County District 70 commented that they would love to share the video within their school districts.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project advisor, Kelly Driver, is including my video in the Type 1 Diabetes curriculum for the Douglas County School District. All new teachers and nurse assistants in Douglas County will watch the video along with the standard T1D curriculum they already receive. The video will additionally be shown by nurses in middle school health classes in Douglas County schools. My video is also being shared with diabetes resource nurses from school districts across the state. I have had several of these resource nurses express an interest in continuing to share my video with the nurses, teachers, and coaches within their school districts.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

Diabetic students across the world are met with a lack of education about Type 1 Diabetes within the school setting. I reached out to several global and national organizations that work to share resources with all diabetics facing these common issues. I have spoken with a media coordinator from Beyond Type 1, an online diabetes education, advocacy, and support organization that works with T1D on a global level. I shared my video with her, and she is trying to have it featured on the Beyond Type 1 website. I also shared my video with the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, and they featured it on their Rocky Mountain Chapter Facebook page. This social media account has 2,747 followers.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned a great deal about how I work with others and tackle challenges. First, I learned that although I am typically more shy, I felt comfortable talking with my team members and other large groups over the course of my project. Since my project was something I felt passionate about, I wasn’t extremely nervous to share it with others. I also learned that the goals I set in my head are sometimes a little overly ambitious. With my Gold Award, I realized quickly after starting that my project plan was too complex for the time frame I had to work with. Fortunately, I was able to work with my project advisor and Gold Award mentor to revise my plan. Additionally, I learned that I am fairly good at balancing various tasks, whether that was different parts within my project or other school and extracurricular commitments during the course of my Gold Award. Finally, I learned that I am usually open to new perspectives and was able to be flexible with sudden changes and obstacles during my project, especially the shift to virtual presentations with the start of the COVID pandemic.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Earning my Gold Award helped me realize that I have the capability and support from others to change my community for the better. My Gold Award experience was the first time that I really set out to address a large issue of personal importance to me. During my upcoming years in college and my future career, I have more confidence to tackle challenges and seek help from others who share in a desire to make a change. I am also much more aware of the extensive planning that goes into large-scale projects. With this, I think I will be better prepared to manage my time and put forth the effort needed to prepare for and complete the task at hand. I have also grown tremendously in my communication skills which will help me in any career.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

Most of my Girl Scout experience was centered around learning to be a leader in my community. The Gold Award was the culminating experience that allowed me to apply that learning and actually make an impact that was especially meaningful to me. My Gold Award helped me realize how many skills I had acquired over my years as a Girl Scout. It really put into perspective how valuable this whole journey has been in shaping the person I am today.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Earning my Gold Award helped me grow as a risk-taker. Before this project, I had very little experience with conducting formal interviews and creating a final video product. My Gold Award really took me out of my comfort zone while learning these new skills. I also took risks in contacting new people over the course of my project and taking the initiative to try to form connections that would last beyond the project itself. I faced numerous obstacles over the course of my project with things not going as planned. From having to rethink my main project focus to rescheduling presentations and sharing my project through virtual platforms, I learned to be flexible and creative with finding solutions to a wide range of problems.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org.

Silver Award Project: The Support Pal Program

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Submitted by Rebecca G.

Metro Denver

Denver

We have all been struggling to adjust to our new normal: wearing masks outside our homes, schools going online, social distancing, and many other challenges. During this difficult time, frontline healthcare workers are dealing with all of these challenges as well as many others due to this deadly new virus with no vaccine or cure.

Elderly patients in nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and their own homes experience some of the highest pandemic-related risks, both in susceptibility to the virus and increased severity of the subsequent illness. The most debilitated elderly, those with terminal illnesses, often choose hospice care to enhance their quality of life when that time is limited. Hospice nurses work to make sure these patients are as comfortable as possible. Under normal circumstances, before the pandemic, these nurses worked tirelessly, each leading a whole team of individuals working to ensure that hospice patients receive the best care. Due to the pandemic’s requirements of social distancing and contact precautions, everyone on the hospice team except the hospice nurse is prohibited from seeing the hospice patients in person; therefore, the hospice nurse now bears the full responsibility for in-person support of the isolated hospice patient. This increased responsibility and pressure on the hospice nurses inspired my Silver Award Project.

To start, I asked the nurses what their biggest challenges are at this time. Their responses included protecting themselves from COVID-19, witnessing the heartbreak of loved ones who are not able to visit their family members due to strict “no visitor” rules, talking through their masks, and needing lots of ziplock and paper bags for their PPE. I took these struggles into account and created a plan to help them.

First, I painted boxes for the nurses to keep in their cars to store their PPE and other equipment and I personalized each box for each nurse. I also painted a smaller box to hold their personal items. With these boxes, the nurses can streamline their trunk organization for transporting their supplies.

Next, to make the real difference in the nurses’ lives, I created the Support Pal Program. I invited Girl Scouts from many different troops to participate and assigned each Girl Scout volunteer one hospice nurse to support. Each week, the Girl Scout Support Pal sends her assigned nurse an email with an uplifting message or joke to brighten her nurse’s day. The nurses have reported that they look forward to these emails that make them smile and brighten their week. Please note that this is not a pen pal program requiring the nurses to respond! The Support Pals’ emails help the nurses deal with their stress and make their week better. It is a one way support system for these hero-nurses at this difficult time.

This Silver Award Project is vital at a time when healthcare workers are under so much stress. Hospice nurses always help others so this is our chance to help them. Thank you to all the brave nurses and doctors risking their lives in nursing homes and in hospitals to help their patients. I would also like to thank my troop leader and mother for her help, ideas, and support during this project and for her dedication to her patients everyday. Thank you.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

A Bridging to Remember

 

Submitted by Susan Cullison

Metro Denver

Commerce City

This has been a tough year for Girl Scouts as COVID-19 really stopped all in-person events in March. Our girls not only had to contend with their world suddenly drastically changing, but remote school learning and all of the plans they had for Girl Scouts suddenly stopping and/or being cancelled left and right- not to mention the struggle of not being able to see friends in-person and share hugs. Our troop met virtually in the spring and took a break over the summer, but after school started back up, we decided to proceed with our bridging ceremony, as we felt the girls really needed to see each other. We wanted to honor all they had accomplished from the previous year. Ms Nikki from our leadership team had a great idea to purchase “plank” pieces online that could be painted and assembled together to form a flat bridge so that every girl could paint their very own piece of the bridge and the troop could have it as a keepsake. Our troop also has a member that is in a wheelchair full time, so this way she could participate by going over the bridge as well! The troop set up a painting time with each girl prior to the bridging ceremony in an open garage and had small groups of girls come in at staggered times to ensure safety. When the bridge was put together at the ceremony each girl had so much fun seeing how her individual work fit into the framework of the group, and what a beautiful symbol of diversity it was! It was such a neat personalization to add to the ceremony and something we expect the troop to enjoy for years.

We love when the girls are able to express themselves individually and see how their contribution makes for a beautiful outcome for everyone!

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

In-person shopping at the GSCO Retail Shop

We are excited to welcome you back to the Girl Scouts of Colorado Retail Shop with scheduled shopping hours. Customers can now reserve a 30-minute slot. Girl Scouts of Colorado puts everyone’s safety and health first. A maximum of four customers are allowed in the shop at one time. Please continue to be respectful of recommended guidelines of six-feet physical distancing. Face masks are required at all times during your visit. Due to safety concerns, returned merchandise is not being accepted until further notice.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Teddy Bear Project and Blanket Drive

Submitted by Joanne Kappel, Executive Director, The Child Rescue Foundation, Inc.

Please direct all questions to childrescue97984@aol.com.

Girl Scouts in Colorado are invited to participate in the annual Teddy Bear Project and Blanket Drive organized by The Child Rescue Foundation, Inc. More than 176,000 items have been donated to date! The 2020 goal is to collect 10,000 plush animals in any size, shape, or color for children in crisis.

Review the information listed below,  the PDF linked here, and send all questions to childrescue97984@aol.com. More information can be found online: http://cr-foundation.org/wordpress1/annual-calender/tbp-teddy-bear-project/

Statistics for thought:

  • Safehouse Denver serves 10,000 women and their children annually.
  • In Denver alone, police report responding to more than 6,000 domestic violence calls annually with more than a third involving children who witness violence.
  • The Gathering Place (a shelter for women and children) reports serving between 130-300 women and children nightly.
  • In Northwest Denver, one school system reports having roughly 500 homeless children that they service and care for.

COVID-19 Updates for Collections

  1. Please make sure your amazing Girl Scouts have washed hands and wear masks while collecting, tagging, and bagging all plush animals.
  2. If possible, running small lots through dryer on high heat (check to make sure that animals can withstand that without melting) and add a sanitizer.
  3. New is better, but we do accept slightly used. Please make sure in sorting that you examine each donation for tears, missing parts, and dirt or smudges. Those items cannot go through at all this year.
  4. If possible, after your final tagging party and each bag is closed tightly, quarantine items for two weeks and label each bag with the date quarantined. We are doing these safety measures to let the public know we care and are practicing care and safety at every turn.

This year, we will have ten receiving sites only, and we will have a positive confirmation on those sites by October 15, 2020.

Thank you for understanding and wanting to make a smile appear on faces that may be struggling or sad at this difficult time! We appreciate you!

Review all instructions on how to participate and action steps in the PDF above. November 16, 2020 is the final day for delivery.

Direct all questions to childrescue97984@aol.com. More information can be found online: http://cr-foundation.org/wordpress1/annual-calender/tbp-teddy-bear-project/

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.