Tag Archives: Bronze Award

the highest award a fourth or fifth grader can earn.

Troop 1332 earns Bronze Award

Submitted by Linda Graves

Metro Denver

Parker

Troop 1332 earned their Bronze Award by partnering with Senior Friends League to visit nursing homes where seniors do not receive many visitors. When the girls set out to earn their Bronze Award, they knew they wanted to help seniors, but they weren’t sure how to go about doing it. After learning that more than half of seniors in nursing homes are forgotten, they decided visiting with these seniors was how they wanted to use their time to make a difference.

The troop found a local volunteer ministry that does organized visits to two particular nursing homes per month where the need for visitors is the greatest. Each month, the girls would get together and make a craft that could be given to the seniors at the next monthly visit. They made paper flowers, jewelry, cards, and cookies, which was a way the girls could start conversations with the seniors and interact with them. The girls played simple games with the seniors, such as hitting a balloon back and forth, beanbag toss, and singing Girl Scout Camp songs to them! The seniors really enjoyed the songs!

The girls started this project with the goal of giving to a population that needed their time and friendship the most, but ended up gaining as much as they gave. During their visits, they spoke with seniors who were also Girl Scouts and they shared their favorite things about being a Girl Scout. The girls learned about different cultures and, most of all, they learned how rewarding it is to bring joy to others by simply giving your time and listening!

The girls completed their required hours, but they are eager to continue visits with these seniors! They’re already planning another craft and additional visits for the upcoming holidays.

Troop 1332 wants to spread the word about the organization we worked with to earn our Bronze Award, Senior Friends League. This is a great organization that makes a difference in the lives of seniors and brings joy and happiness to the world. Our girls learned so much about having empathy and serving others through this project and the efforts of the league.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Girl Scout Junior helps bunnies to earn Bronze Award

Submitted by Ana Martin Del Campo

Metro Denver

Thornton

Alison E., a Girl Scout Junior, has been in Troop 62816 only this Girl Scout year. When she joined this new troop, she realized all the Girl Scouts had already earned their Bronze Award and she wanted to earn hers as well!

Alison read all the requirements to earn the Bronze Award. Then, she saw a lot examples about what other Girl Scouts had done to become Bronze Award Girl Scouts.  We started the adventure with a visit to animal shelters. Alison visited dog shelters, cat shelters, bunny shelters, etc. all while looking for a problem that she could help solve.

During a visit to the Colorado House Rabbit Society, she noticed they have a lot of bunnies! She came up with an idea for how to help the organization by hosting a class to educate the community about adopting bunnies as pets. After that she told me, “This is it mom! I want to do my Bronze Award project to help bunnies to find a  home!”

This summer, she spent more than 35 hours preparing for this event. She talked with the president of Colorado House Rabbit Society, Nancy LaRoche, who authorized the project. The Colorado House Rabbit Society is in Broomfield. Then, she talked with people at the Anythink York Library in Thornton. She worked as a team with Michele Hawking from the library to make a flyer for the class and upload it on the library’s web-site.

Next, Alison took a four-hour class at the shelter and studied and read many articles to learn about bunnies. She visited the bunny shelter several times to have meetings with LaRoche so everything would be fine with the Colorado House Rabbit Society.

She also made a PowerPoint presentation for her class, and chose and prepared all the materials to do a craft bunny toy for the class. People could decide to keep the toy or donate it to the Colorado House Rabbit Society! She also convinced LaRoche to bring bunnies from the Colorado House Rabbit Society to the class, so people could meet and pet them.

On Saturday, September 1, 2018, Girl Scout Junior Alison earned her Bronze Award by hosting a class to educate the community about how to adopt bunnies from the Colorado House Rabbit Society. It was amazing  and she received a lot of compliments. The Colorado House Rabbit Society even donated stuffed animal bunnies as a gift for children who attended the class. It was a surprise for everybody!

Alison wanted to share her story to show other Girls Scouts that you can earn your Bronze Award as a team in your troop or by yourself. You can do it sometimes in one or two years or sometimes in few months over the summer. And most importantly, if you love your idea about what you want to do as a Bronze Award project, go for it! You can do it! If you work hard and are determined to do it, you will earn your Bronze Award!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Gold Award and Highest Awards and Take Action trainings

We are thrilled to be offering both Gold Award and Highest Awards and Take Action trainings at Leadership Summits across the state for the summer and fall of 2018!

You may be asking, “What is a Leadership Summit?” Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Leadership Summits are learning conferences that offer volunteers (and girls!) the opportunity to get energized for the new membership year and check required trainings off the to-do list. In addition to offering trainings for new and experienced volunteers, we are offering “Older Girl Leadership Summit” tracks at each event where older girls can participate in training all day.

Gold Award Training is required for any girl interested in pursuing her Gold Award.

Highest Awards and Take Action is the perfect opportunity to connect with other troop leaders about successful projects and learn how to let girls take the lead in making a difference in their community with Take Action projects that girls will complete in their Journeys, Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award projects.

Colorado Springs, Saturday, August 25
Older Girl Leadership Summit: https://gscolorado.formstack.com/forms/older_girl_leadership_summit_pp_08_25_2018
Leadership Summit (for adults): https://gscolorado.formstack.com/forms/leadership_summit_in_colorado_springs_pp_08_25_2018

Loveland, Saturday, September 8
Registration links coming soon!

Denver, Saturday, September 29
Registration links coming soon!

Grand Junction, Saturday, October 20
Super Saturday event, Gold Award training only.
Registration link coming soon!

Questions about Highest Awards? Email highestawards@gscolorado.org

G.I.R.L.s deliver thousands of school supplies for low-resource students

Girl Scout Junior Troop 1631 from Highlands Ranch, which has 14 girls, collected thousands of school supplies for low-resource students over the spring and summer. They included pencils, markers, glue, scissors, binders, paper, books, and teaching materials.  On Sunday, August 12, 2018, the girls delivered the supplies to an elementary school in Evans.

They were able to collect the supplies by reaching out to schools in their own community, and asking to place boxes in the lobby to collect supplies.  A dozen schools agreed to participate, and the girls worked with the schools to publicize their project through posters, an e-newsletter to parents, and the schools’ announcements. Additionally, some of the girls reached out to Office Depot in Highlands Ranch, which agreed to place another collection box in the front of the store.

Through this project, the girls will earn the Girl Scout Bronze Award,  the highest honor for a Girl Scout Junior and the third highest honor in Girl Scouts.

All four major TV stations in Denver shared the story of the girls’ project.

Earlier this summer, the girls completed their biggest girl-led project yet! Many of the girls were in the NICU (neonatal intensive care unit) as babies, or have overcome some sort of medical challenge, so when completing the “Agent of Change” Journey, they wanted to do something to help children and families in the NICU at UCHealth. The girls assembled 20 NICU Care Kits and delivered them to the hospital in June. The full story, along with a few photos and thank you letters from parents who received the kits, is here: https://bit.ly/2usUFXc.

G.I.R.L.s collect school supplies to earn Bronze Award

Submitted by Melissa Holmberg

Metro Denver

Littleton

Girl Scout Junior Troop 1631 from Highlands Ranch, which has 14 girls, is currently working to earn their Bronze Award by collecting school supplies for low-resource students. The girls identified a need for school supplies an elementary school in Evans. Next, they reached out to schools in their own community, and asked to place boxes in the lobby to collect supplies.  A dozen schools agreed to participate, and the girls worked with the schools to publicize their project through posters, an e-newsletter to parents, and the schools’ announcements.

On July 12, 2018, the girls met to merge and sort the donated supplies. They include pencils, markers, glue, scissors, binders, paper, and books. Additionally, some of the girls reached out to Office Depot in Highlands Ranch, which agreed to place another collection box in the front of the store. The girls hope people buy and donate additional supplies on the spot. On August 12, the girls will deliver the donated supplies to Union Colony Elementary School in Evans.

Earlier this summer, the girls completed their biggest girl-led project yet! Many of the girls were in the NICU (neonatal intensive care unit) as babies, or have overcome some sort of medical challenge, so when completing the “Agent of Change” Journey, they wanted to do something to help children and families in the NICU at UCHealth. The girls assembled 20 NICU Care Kits and delivered them to the hospital in June. The full story, along with a few photos and thank you letters from parents who received the kits, is here: https://bit.ly/2usUFXc.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too

Big city fun for mountain town Cadettes

Submitted by Annie Sachs

Mountain Communities

Steamboat Springs

Steamboat Springs Cadette Troop 54538 recently celebrated earning their Bronze Award (as fifth-graders) with a Denver weekend of theater and fine dining! The girls loved the touring Broadway musical “School of Rock,” especially with all the children in the cast. They also enjoyed a behind-the-scenes tour of DCPA and capped off the weekend with the famed Brown Palace brunch. Thanks so much to the Lufkin Family for helping fund all the fun!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Girl Scout Troop 179 earns Bronze Award

Submitted by Nancy Renken

Northern & Northeastern CO

Boulder

The 5th grade Girl Scout Juniors of Troop 179 earned their Bronze Award on Saturday, April 28, 2018 at Heatherwood Elementary School in Gunbarrel. The Bronze Award is the highest award that Girl Scout Juniors can earn. Girl Scout Cadettes can earn the Silver Award, and Girl Scout Seniors and Ambassadors can earn the Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouting.

Part of the requirements for the Bronze Award is recognizing a need in the community, making a plan, and finally, putting it into action. In this case, the girls talked about how the playground designs at Heatherwood Elementary were really faded and hadn’t been updated in years. As outgoing 5th graders, they wanted to give back to their school. A small delegation of Girl Scouts: Sophia J., Katy R., and Meaghan Z. met with Principal Jaramillo to discuss whether or not such a project would be feasible. The principal was really open to their proposal and agreed that the girls could take on the project. Sharon Lynch was our parent in charge who helped the Girl Scouts with determining supplies needed and kept the project within their scope. While the girls could not take on everything that needed repainting, they were able to repaint the tetherball courts, two four-squares, and a hopscotch. They were dedicated, focused, and they did a great job. All of them were really engaged in the project.

Additionally, when a Girl Scout was not on paint duty, she worked on a secondary project of decorating food delivery bags for There With Care.

Our project was successful due to the enthusiasm and dedication of Girl Scout Troop 179, the direction of Sharon Lynch, the support from the parents of Troop 179, and additional support from Prana Construction, and Papa John’s Pizza, 28th St., Boulder.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award Girl Scouts honored at Highest Awards celebration in Silverthorne

Nearly 100 Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at the Silverthorne Pavilion in Silverthorne on May 11, 2018, to honor the more than 1,300 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2017-18 Girl Scout awards program year, nearly 1,000 girls across the state and 25 in the Mountain Communities region earned the Bronze Award. 10 girls in the region earned the prestigious Silver Award and three became Gold Award Girl Scouts.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts gives girls the skills and experiences they need to thrive and lead in today’s world. The world needs female leaders now more than ever. You’re making a difference,” she said.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Bronze and Silver Award Girl Scouts honored at Highest Awards celebration in Grand Junction

More than 100 Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at Colorado Mesa University in Grand Junction on May 6, 2018, to honor the more than 1,300 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2017-18 Girl Scout awards program year, nearly 1,000 girls across the state and 40 in the Western Slope and Southwestern Colorado region earned the Bronze Award. 13 girls across the Western Slope and Southwestern Colorado region earned the prestigious Silver Award.

2016 Gold Award Girl Scout Katie Otto served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about her journey to earn the Gold Award and how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

“Girl Scouts is an amazing community and organization. The skills that you learn through Girl Scouts will give you the skills to succeed further in life. Girl scouts teaches girls: courage, confidence, and character,” she said.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award Girl Scouts honored at highest awards celebration in Colorado Springs

More than 300 Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at the Penrose House at El Pomar in Colorado Springs on May 4, 2018, to honor the more than 1,300 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2017-18 Girl Scout awards program year, nearly 1,000 girls across the state and 191 in the Pikes Peak region earned the Bronze Award. 105 girls in the region earned the prestigious Silver Award and six became Gold Award Girl Scouts.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts gives girls the skills and experiences they need to thrive and lead in today’s world. The world needs female leaders now more than ever. You’re making a difference,” she said.

2016 Gold Award Girl Scout Megan Burnett served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about her journey to earn the Gold Award and how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

“All the skills you learn in Girl Scouts, through the meetings you plan and the badges you earn, are all intended to prepare you for the future,” she said.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.