Tag Archives: Longmont

Gold Award Girl Scouts impact Colorado communities and beyond

Twelve Girl Scouts from across Colorado have earned the distinction of Gold Award Girl Scout, the highest honor in Girl Scouting, after completing Take Action projects benefiting their local communities and those around the world.

  • Brittany Argo from Aurora, Cherokee Trail High School, built a prayer garden at St. Michael’s the Archangel and aided in the construction of a prayer garden at a church in the Philippines.
  • Evyn Batie from Loveland, Mountain View High School, led a team of students to create the Northern Colorado Student Mental Health Resource Guide, an electronic compilation of some of the best youth mental health resources across the region.
  • Bryce Civiello from Evergreen, Conifer High School, designed a pamphlet for teens that can help them take the first steps toward getting help from a mental health professional.
  • Angela Foote from Centennial, Arapahoe High School, developed a relationship between the organizations Family Promise of Denver and Denver Tech for All to ensure low-resource students and families have ongoing access to computers.
  • Madeline Ford from Englewood, Cherry Creek High School, partnered with the Boys & Girls Club to create a five-session literacy program, which promotes a positive reading environment and teaches children new ways to express themselves through books and poetry.
  • Littlepage Green from Breckenridge, Summit High School, created a lesson plan and video to educate students about food allergies. In-person lessons also included training on how to properly use an epi-pen.
  • Maya Hegde from Englewood, Cherry Creek High School, partnered with the Mangala Seva Orphanage in India and Brydges Centre in Kenya to teach girls how to make reusable sanitary pads using materials they already have. The program she developed also taught the girls how to sell sanitary pads in their own communities to tackle the stigma around the menstrual cycle.
  • Grace Matsey from Highlands Ranch, Mountain Vista High School, created a music tutoring program for elementary and middle school musicians, which was run by members of her high school’s Music Honor Society.
  • Annarlene Nikolaus from Colorado Springs, Discovery Canyon High School, oversaw the construction of a series of buddy benches for local K-12 public schools. Students also participated in age-appropriate lessons led by Annarlene about buddy benches and what they can do to be better friends.
  • Bailey Stokes from Buena Vista, Buena Vista High School, created outdoor-based lesson plans for the use of fourth grade science teachers across Colorado. Topics covered included investigations, habitat, and adaptations.
  • Emma Lily from Longmont, Silver Creek High School, designed a website, created a podcast, and wrote a children’s book celebrating the Longmont Sugar Beet Factory and its historical significance.
  • Katherine Walden from Larkspur, Castle View High School, taught elementary school students about the importance of bees and how to install bee boxes that local bee species and other pollinators can call home.

Open only to girls in high school, the Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls—and the most difficult to earn. The Gold Award project involves seven steps: 1. Identify an issue, 2. Investigate it thoroughly, 3. Get help and build a team, 4. Create a plan, 5. Present the plan and gather feedback, 6. Take action, 7. Educate and inspire. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

“Earning the Girl Scout Gold Award designation is truly a remarkable achievement, and these young women exemplify leadership in all its forms,” said Stephanie Foote, President and Chief Executive Officer of Girl Scouts of Colorado. “They saw a need and took ownership of helping to develop a solution and took action to make it happen. Their extraordinary dedication, perseverance, and leadership is making the world a better place.”

Girl Scouts of Colorado is 32,000 strong—more than 22,000 girls and 10,000 adults who believe in the power of every G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader)™ to change the world. Our extraordinary journey began more than 100 years ago with the original G.I.R.L., Juliette Gordon “Daisy” Low. On March 12, 1912, in Savannah, Ga., she organized the very first Girl Scout troop, and every year since, we’ve honored her vision and legacy, building girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. We’re the preeminent leadership development organization for girls. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org.

Yoga at McIntosh Lake

Submitted by Sharon Manning

Northern & Northeastern CO

Longmont

The tenth grade girls of Troop 73392 are currently working on the “Senior Cross Training” badge. The girls identified fitness goals such as eating healthier, reducing junk food, and being more consistent in exercising on a regular basis.

After identifying goals, the girls kicked off the cardiovascular part of their badge with kayaking/paddleboarding across McIntosh Lake.

The girls also wanted to work on flexibility and stretching. They returned to McIntosh Lake to practice yoga with Left Hand Yoga. Left Hand Yoga offers a free community class on Sunday morning at 11. During the summer/early fall months, the class is held at McIntosh Lake with a beautiful view of the mountains.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Tour of Nations 2019

Submitted by Sharon Manning

Northern & Northeastern CO

Longmont

Troop 73392 is hosting Tour of Nations on March 17, 2019 at the Boulder County Fairgrounds exhibit building in Longmont.

The theme for World Thinking Day in 2019 is “Celebrating 110 years of Adventure.” Join the adventure by hosting a country from the WAGGGS website or visiting the event as a tourist.

Several countries have already been chosen, such as Australia, Greece, Holland, and Colombia , so gather your Girl Scout sisters and start planning!

For more information, please visit the GSCO website/event calendar or contact Sharon Manning at sharon_colorado@msn.com for a  flyer.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

It’s time for COSMIC Boo Bowl

Submitted by Rebecca Wilson

Northern & Northeastern CO

Longmont

Boo Bowl is a Girl Scout tradition that dates back several decades! Please join us on October 21, 2018 for a COSMIC Boo Bowl! Dress up in costume, receive a fun patch, and bowl under the black lights to the spooky music! In this Scotch Doubles format, you can bowl with your daughter or the girls in your troop. Or, your daughter can be her own partner! This year, we have a special session that is for older girls (seventh grade and up) only for those girls who would like to participate without parents! Just drop off and have a blast! Get those registrations in soon: https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/events-repository/2018/cosmic_boo_bowl.html

We will fill up quickly! Can’t wait to see your cosmic costumes!

More Information

If you have any questions, please email us at GSCOTroop2081@gmail.com.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Around the World in Two Days: Traveling adventure camp

Submitted by Carolyn Decker

Northern & Northeastern CO

Longmont

Girl Scout Brownies and Juniors are invited join us for Around the World in Two Days, a traveling adventure camp! The Ambassadors of Troop 78527 have planned lots of fun activities for you to explore different places around the world. Break away from the winter doldrums and enjoy three-days and two-nights camping in comfy heated cabins at Tomahawk Ranch Girl Scout Camp near Bailey.

This fun-filled camp will start the evening of Friday, Jan. 25, 2019 and end after breakfast on Sunday, Jan. 27. Our troop has traveled internationally to Belize and wants to inspire your girls to go on an adventure where ever that may be, so pack your bags and join us!

Price is $100 per girl and $55 per adult. Girls will get a fun patch.

Registration deadline is Jan 7.

Troops must meet safety-wise ratios. Adults over safety-wise ratios must pay girl rate.

Please contact Maria Cross at cross.maria.e@gmail.com with any questions.

Register by printing the registration form below and sending the
completed form to Troop 78527 (address is included in the form). Or, you can email cross.maria.e@gmail.com and request an electronic registration form.

40962780_aroundworldcamp_flyerregistration

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Emma Lilly, Longmont, “Loco for LoCo”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I did a research project about the Longmont Sugar Beet Factory. I started by interviewing people who had worked at the Longmont Sugar Beet Factory or had connections to it. These interviews were then turned into a podcast style format and posted on my website (https://lillyemma24.wixsite.com/loco4loco/podcasts).

The next step of my project was to write a children’s book, The Magic Beet, which is the story of three children as they travel back in time and learn about the sugar factory. A copy of each book went to each elementary school in the St. Vrain School District and is still available for purchase on my website. I also had several book readings at the Longmont Public Library and I presented to several different organizations, including the Longmont Kiwanis and Longmont City Council, about my project.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

The book I wrote, The Magic Sugar Beet, is still currently for sale online and my interviews have all been kept on my live website. Additionally, a copy of my book was placed in the libraries of every elementary school in our district, and eight teachers have given me confirmation that this book will become a part of their curriculum. Currently, the third grade history curriculum is focused on local history, but some of the teachers I have talked to have said that not much time is spent talking about the Longmont Sugar Beet Factory (an important part of Longmont’s beginning), so when teachers read the book to their classes and listen to the podcasts, the work I did for my Gold Award is able to be sustained for years to come.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection? / How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I published a survey on my website that was available to Girl Scouts and anyone around the world to fill out. This survey asked people questions about whether or not they planned on learning about their local history, and it also had a challenge of learning one fact about their local history that they did not already know. This part of my project, encouraged learning about local history for all ages, and results showed that over 71% planned on continuing to learn about their town’s local history. More about this project can be found at (https://lillyemma24.wixsite.com/loco4loco/local-history-project).

What did you learn about yourself?

At the beginning of this project, I was nervous to reach out and talk to people I did not know, but through my Gold Award project I learned that I am capable of planning a project and leading a team. Even though I was often worried throughout the process that people would find me incompetent, I stuck with it and learned that most people were very eager to help me with my project even if I wasn’t an expert on the material. Through this project, I learned I was able to talk to important people in the community whether it was our city council when I shared my project with them, or people who worked for the St. Vrain Historical Society.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

My Girl Scout Gold Award has given me the skills to run a project and the confidence to do it. I gained many team leading skills that can still help me in the future. I had four artistic friends who had agreed to illustrate the book for me. Even with a small team, delegating tasks was more difficult than I expected. They took about a month longer than the deadline to submit their art to me, and it was sometimes difficult to get them to respond to emails. Going into college and later my career with the experience of leading a team will help me greatly in being a better leader.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

Getting my Gold Award was a very important part of my Girl Scout experience because it gave me the chance to put many of the leadership skills I learned throughout Girl Scouts (such as badges or summer camp), into action. The Gold Award was something I had really wanted to go after since I was a younger Girl Scout, and so it was rewarding to accomplish it and hopefully inspire other Girl Scouts to Go Gold!

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

My Gold Award helped me become a better innovator. I got to discover a lot about a place and history of the Longmont Sugar Beet Factory something I knew virtually nothing about at the start of the project, so I had to do a fair amount of research. In school, we always get a very broad sense of history, so to delve deeply into one tiny aspect of history was really fascinating to me. Since my project was not strictly partnered with a particular organization or group, I had to take initiative and carve a path for this project that did not yet exist, and that required a fair amount of creativity. I had to problem solve when it came to finding people to interview or ways in which I could promote my project. I got used to changing and revising my project as time went on, and I think this aspect as well as learning about my history outside of class work helped shape me into someone who was able to more adapt easily to whatever tasks were thrown at me.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Power of Cookie: Trip to Catalina Island and Emerald Bay

Submitted by Lisa Herrmann

Northern & Northeastern CO

Longmont

Troop 74447 from Longmont saved up funds from three cookie seasons and made the trip to Catalina Island and camped at Emerald Bay. There were about 350 people at the camp and we were the only ones from Colorado! We competed in an Aqua Olympics and had a great time!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Preparing for Reach for the Peak

Submitted by  Sharon Manning

Northern & Northeastern CO

Longmont

Troop 73392 decided earlier this year to rise to the challenge of Reach for the Peak, a competition of traditional Girl Scout skills now in its 31st year. The girls spent the summer working on skills such as knots, lashings, orienteering, and more. After weekly practice sessions, Ashley, Sophia, Trinity, Charlotte, and Alyssa were ready for the challenges they faced the weekend of August 10 and 11, 2018. Everyone had a great time and learned a great deal about skills, team work, and personal growth thanks to the amazing volunteers who make this competition possible.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Continuing the Journey

Submitted by Sharon Manning

Northern & Northeastern CO

Longmont

Troop 73392 has weeded, tilled, and planted their garden plot in the 11th Avenue Community Garden in Longmont. The girls have learned a great deal about the time and commitment required to grow food. They have learned how too much water, as well as too little water, can affect plants. Last week, the girls harvested tomatoes, cucumbers, and onions.  As the season progresses, they will also harvest carrots, peppers, and squash.

The girls have been documenting their project on the GSCO blog. Follow the Journey: http://gscoblog.org/2018/05/were-sowing/

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

We’re sowing

Submitted by Sharon Manning

Northern & Northeastern CO

Longmont

Just a few short weeks ago, Troop 73392 started out with a 20 by 20-foot garden bed filled with weeds at the 11th Avenue Community Garden. After hours of weeding, a lesson in rototilling, spreading two-cubic yards of garden soil donated by Midwest Landscape Supply in Longmont, the girls are finally ready to plant. So far, the girls have planted onions, potatoes, lettuce, and spinach, but have FAR bigger plans in the next several weeks.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.