Tag Archives: Longmont

Longmont Girl Scouts and Community Cinema Partner for Black History Month

 

Community Cinemas (CommCi) and Girl Scout Troop 3010 from Longmont have announced a partnership for Black History Month. Each Friday in February, CommCi, a new youth-led nonprofit in Longmont, will present a series of drive-in movies that offer a safe opportunity to build community, and support local industry.

Girl Scout Troop 3010 will offer the ability for patrons to order Girl Scout Cookies for delivery to the vehicle. Proceeds from the ticket sales will support the County Collective, El Comite, CIRC, and various other local nonprofits.

Girl Scout Troop 3010 is made up of 18 Cadettes from sixth – eighth grades from a variety of local schools. The girls are currently working on the Girl Scout Silver Award, the highest honor a Cadette can achieve. The girls will dedicate at least 50 hours on a project that addresses a problem and supports local organizations. Silver Award teams are working with Veteran’s Puppy For Life, Medicine Horse, Yola’s Pet Rescue, Attention Homes, Little Libraries, and creating women’s empowerment patch for Girl Scouts.

The series will feature “Blazing Saddles” on February 5; a double feature Girl Power evening with “The Princess and the Frog” followed by “Hidden Figures” on February 12; “Moana” on February 19; and “Black Panther” on February 26. CommCi provides a fun and safe environment for communities to come together while supporting local restaurants, nonprofits, and providing a fun learning environment.

CommCi is an all-in-one dinner with a movie pop up, providing the community a safe way to come together. Partnering nonprofits will receive 10% of the day’s revenue, in an effort to support their mission.

Tickets are $31/per car and includes warming mechanisms. Patrons also have the option to purchase full meals via restaurant vendors (Georgia Boys BBQ and La Vita Bella), snacks, and beverages are also available for purchase. For the month of February, patrons can receive Girl Scout Cookies delivered to their vehicle as well.

CommCi was created by the Youth Leaders of the County Collective with program launch support from Persona, Inc and fiscal sponsor, Longmont Community Foundation. Boulder County Collective is a youth lead non-profit. Dedicated to Empowerment through Equity. Longmont Community Foundation is a tax- exempt public charity created by and for the people of a particular region (in this case Longmont and the St. Vrain Valley). Their mission Improving life in the St. Vrain Valley through philanthropy and charitable leadership. Persona Group (P.G) is a full-service brand, digital, and event consulting agency.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scout Day of Service

Submitted by Eleanor T., Girl Scout Brownie, Troop 77918

Northern & Northeastern

Longmont

For Day of Service, I picked up trash. My mom and I went to Roosevelt Park in Longmont and we walked around the whole park and picked up trash with our grabbers. We got more than two pounds of trash! I think it’s important to pick up trash because it helps our community.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Gold Award Girl Scouts impact Colorado communities and beyond

In the face of the global coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, Girl Scouts continue to do all they can to make our world a better place by taking action to address issues facing their local communities. There are no better examples of this Girl Scout spirit and resiliency than the 16 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who recently earned the distinction of Gold Award Girl Scout, the highest honor in Girl Scouting. They include:

  • Sidney Barbier from Steamboat Springs, Steamboat Mountain School, tackled the issues of waste and recycling, particularly at Colorado state parks. She designed signage for state parks, hosted events to educate others about waste diversion, and even created a Junior Ranger curriculum.
  • Charlotte Blish from Arvada, Arvada West High School, started a nonprofit, Watering Communities, to teach elementary-aged students about how the lack of clean water impacts socio-economic and education resources in parts of Africa.
  • Clare Bolon from Longmont, Apex Homeschool Enrichment Program, developed and taught a week-long online course about how to write and read cursive. She also created resources to help students continue to practice their cursive after completing the course.
  • Kayla Fairweather from Parker, Ponderosa High School, developed a video curriculum on Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) to supplement the T1D training that teachers currently receive. It features the perspectives of diabetic students, parents, a professional athlete with T1D, an endocrinologist, and a diabetes resource nurse.
  • Zoe Johnson from Monument, Palmer Ridge High School, created a handbook and video about horse care and safety to educate new or inexperienced horse owners, as well as barn staff at summer camps.
  • Beatrice Lin from Longmont, Silver Creek High School, developed a workshop and handbook for Girl Scout Daisies and Brownies called “Bringing Global to Girls” (BGtG). The goal is to help younger Girl Scouts develop a sense of connection to the rest of the world and appreciation for other cultures.
  • Ellie McWhirter from Denver, East High School, developed a series of educational materials, including a website, to decrease plastic bag usage in her community and increase the knowledge of plastic bag pollution.
  • Isabella Mendoza from Longmont, Silver Creek High School, designed a cheap and sustainable habitat for solitary bees to lay eggs in and distributed more than 350 habitats around Colorado and the world. She also hosted a community event for people to make their own habitat.
  • With the help of local Girl Scout troops, Ashlyn Morrill from Parker, Chaparral High School, created a pollinator garden that attracts various pollinators, including hummingbirds, butterflies, bees, etc. Girls learned the importance of pollinators and were inspired to do their part to help conserve the pollinator populations.
  • Opal Mosbarger from Peyton, Falcon High School, addressed the issue of animal displacement during emergency situations. She collected kennels and blankets for Perfect Fit Wellness Center, so people can keep their pets safe during natural disasters and other emergencies.
  • Wren Murzyn from Fort Collins, Poudre High School, partnered with doctors, nutritionists, and others to create a guidebook to assist individuals who are wanting to get healthy, but don’t know where to start.
  • Meredith Neid from Denver, George Washington High School, started a self-care club at her high school to healthily address rising levels of stress amongst her peers. After the start of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, she adapted her project to include Zoom conversations with high school seniors about processing the pandemic and what it means to grow up during this time.
  • Anna Rahn from Colorado Springs, Pine Creek High School, created 17 STEM activities for schools and after-school programs. Due to the pandemic, she was unable to distribute them to local schools, so she developed a website where PDFs of the activities are available.

The Girl Scout Gold Award is the mark of the truly remarkable— earned only by a high school Girl Scout who works to address an issue she’s passionate about in a way that produces meaningful and lasting change. Whether it’s on a local, national, or global level, Gold Award Girl Scouts provide innovative solutions to significant challenges. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award Girl Scouts, and girls are entitled to enlist at a higher pay grade if they join the military.

“Gold Award Girl Scouts don’t just change the world for the better, they change it for good—and these Girl Scouts embody everything this achievement stands for,” said Leanna Clark, Chief Executive Officer of Girl Scouts of Colorado. “Each of these young women addressed an issue that’s important to her in order to earn her Gold Award, and we congratulate each of these Gold Award Girl Scouts on this momentous accomplishment.”

You can learn more about these Gold Award Girl Scouts and their projects on the Girl Scouts of Colorado blog.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Beatrice Lin, Longmont, “Bringing Global to Girls”

What did you do for your Gold Award project? 

In a world that is rapidly changing and developing, it can sometimes be hard to remember how we connect to other girls — especially the ones that aren’t in our immediate presence. At a young age, it is difficult to develop a sense of connection to people halfway across the world, simply because they aren’t in our local community. As a result, younger children may lack empathy and compassion for others, especially around the world. To address this, I decided to create a curriculum for Daisies and Brownies (girls from kindergarten through second grade) called “Bringing Global to Girls” (BGtG). This workshop aims to help Daisies and Brownies develop a sense of connection to the rest of the world. Through this workshop, Daisies and Brownies learned new things about themselves and things about themselves that can connect them to others. Many of the activities included were inspired and adapted from activities described in Girl Scout resources and handbooks, with publications ranging from 1926 all the way up to last year, 2019. By mixing the ideas of the past with the current knowledge and resources of today, we can gain new insight about ourselves and our Girl Scout and Girl Guide sisters around the world.

I personally ran two workshops with younger girls in Colorado over Zoom. As well as this, I ran a “how-to”workshop for older girls and leaders in Colorado. By doing this, I promoted “global thinking” to all levels in GSCO.

Access the handbook HERE!

Purchase the patch HERE!

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

When I ran my workshops, I asked my target audience — Daisies and Brownies  — to complete a “KWL Chart” (Know, Want to Know, and Learned) at the beginning and end of each session. Using this tool, I was able to survey what my audience knew and how much they grew throughout the workshop. My curriculum will continue to promote global thinking and citizenship through the translations of my handbook into Spanish and Mandarin Chinese, its publication on the GSCO website, and the custom patch created for this project.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement? 

As mentioned earlier, my handbook is published on the GSCO website, as well as the translations into Spanish and Mandarin Chinese. Access the handbook HERE!

The curriculum is promoted in the GSCO Retail Shop along with the custom patch, and it will be available for anyone to purchase and participate in. Purchase the patch HERE!

A copy of my handbook and patch will be at GSCO History Center, and will be taken care of for years to come. Since I ran a “how-to” workshop for older girls and leaders, those who participated will run workshops with their own troops or groups, which will help spread the word about BGtG. As a delegate of the GSCO Global Roundtable, I shared my handbook with the Bangladesh Global Roundtable delegation, and am continuing to find other contacts for Girl Scouts/Girl Guides around the world. In order to branch out of the Girl Scout loop, I also presented about my project alongside GSCO CEO Leanna Clark to the Longmont Rotary Club.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

As mentioned before, my curriculum is translated into multiple languages. This will help my curriculum become more accessible to girls and leaders around the nation and world. Those who participate in the “Bringing Global to Girls” workshop may also be inspired to take action in their global and local communities to promote global thinking. Lastly, sharing my handbook with other Girl Scouts/Girl Guides around the world, such as the Girl Guides in Bangladesh, is instrumental to the global aspect of my project

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned a lot about myself during this process, but most importantly, I learned that I’m capable of more than I thought. My project’s impact and accomplishments reached far beyond what I had envisioned at first. These successes have shown me the importance of a team and communication, how to lead my team towards my desired results, and how to implement feedback and mix it with my own opinions. Along with this, my project took a lot of perseverance and effort, but I’m glad that I chose something I care about, which made all of my efforts worth it. 

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Since I have learned so much by leading the BGtG team, I feel prepared to take on any leadership opportunities in my future. Although my future projects may not look as similar to BGtG, the fundamental leadership skills and values that I developed during this process make me feel like I’m ready for anything. 

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience? 

Like many, I started Girl Scouts in kindergarten as a Daisy, and selling cookies was the biggest initiative I took part in. Progressing through elementary and middle school, the Bronze and Silver Awards I earned built the foundation and skills that I needed to earn my Gold Award. These experiences prepared me to take on the challenge to “make the world a better place.” The outcome of my project far exceeded my expectations, and this experience was much more valuable than I had envisioned. This process was incredibly rewarding and insightful, and I’ll never forget it.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

After a global pandemic threw a wrench in my initial plans, I became an innovator. Rather than hosting my workshops in person and with local troops, I was forced to rethink and reformat my curriculum to fit into a virtual setting. I was far out of my comfort zone, but after lots of discussion and work with my team, I was able to successfully run multiple workshops online. As well as this, I created a virtual workshop mini-handbook to give others guidance on how to bring global to girls virtually. 

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org.

Silver Award Project: Teen Alcohol Awareness and Prevention

Submitted by Tilley R-K

Northern & Northeastern CO

Longmont

Before the lockdowns and school closures, I went to several classrooms and talked to eighth graders about alcohol awareness and prevention. My sister and father have been alcoholics for many years and not only does that affect them, but our family as well. I want to help others be aware of signs, so they can get help and reach out when they need it. I created a presentation about what alcoholism is and how to get help, as well as shared my stories.

As a Girl Scout, we learn to help the community and make the world a better place. Many people don’t know the risks of alcohol, but many hear how fun it is to drink. While doing the project, I learned a lot about myself and others. Many people around me have been affected by alcohol. Before I knew much about it, I never knew where to get help for myself, as well as my sister. Now, as I’m still learning more about alcoholism, I’m able to get help from school counselors, and some places around town. They’re all great places if you need it, and don’t ever be afraid to ask for help.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Brownie Troop 77918 Honors Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg at the Longmont Library

 

Submitted by Krista Allard

Northern & Northeastern CO

Longmont

Girl Scout Troop 77918 is so excited to share their collaborative mural honoring the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg at the Longmont Library! Our Brownies earned their Painting badge by painting a nature scene with found items, talking about how paint colors can reflect their moods, and each Girl Scout painting two sections of this collaborative mural.

The Brownie mural was then presented to our whole troop while working on the Democracy badge on Election Night. During this meeting, we learned about the branches of our government, read the book “Grace for President” by Kelly DiPucchio, voted on our next badges to be completed, and learned about all the amazing things that Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg accomplished for our country.

Take a walk past the Longmont Library to see our mural on the East Side of the Building!

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Isabella Mendoza, Longmont, “Increasing Bee Habitats”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Girl Scout Gold Award project, I designed a cheap and sustainable habitat for solitary bees to lay eggs in and distributed more than 350 habitats around Colorado and the world. I hosted an event in my community where participants could make their own habitats with their unique designs, and made a how-to video that is posted on YouTube so anyone who is interested in making a habitat can watch it and follow along. I also sent 29 bee boxes to 11 other states in the United States and more than 30 bee boxes to four other countries. Participants in the event and those who watched the video also got knowledge about the importance of solitary bees and other ways they can help pollinators.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured the impact of my project by counting how many habitats were distributed at events or through shipping. I distributed 305 bee habitats in Colorado, and an additional 62 in other states in the United States and in countries around the world.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project is sustained partly by the design of the habitat itself. Leafcutter bees, a type of solitary bee, will reuse habitats year after year to lay their eggs. Additionally, the bee boxes I distributed are wrapped in duct tape to weather proof them. A teacher at my former high school has also committed to including the bee habitats as an end-of-the-year craft, so high school students will be able to make them year after year.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My project’s global and national connections are the 62 bee habitats I sent around the United States and the world. Every livable continent has solitary bees that can use my bee box! Additionally, I posted a how-to video on YouTube that can be viewed from anywhere around the world.

What did you learn about yourself?

One major thing I learned is that I am an organizational person. I enjoyed making spreadsheets and keeping track of information, a skill that has since served me in both my academic and personal lives. I also learned that I am capable of being a leader in general. I was able to motivate others and successfully lead a team through an event, and I was able to distribute hundreds of bee boxes not only in my community but around the world. If I were not a leader, I would not have been able to make the impact that I did.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Earning the Gold Award has already impacted my future by giving me more confidence to take action about the things that matter to me. It will further impact my future by showing scholarships and companies that I am a leader, capable of making real change.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience? 

Earning the Gold Award was an important part of my Girl Scout experience because I have been a part of Girl Scouts since I was in first grade. I grew up learning life skills with Girl Scouts, and it was important to me that I had something tangible to show for it. The Gold Award further strengthened skills I had been practicing, such as communicating with a team and managing a project, which was the perfect closer to my career as a Girl Scout.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

Earning my Gold Award helped me to become an innovator and a leader. I designed and prototyped my bee habitat, taking into consideration what would be helpful for a bee and what accessible items were, which made me a better innovator. I practiced many leadership skills as well, especially communication, but also project management, confidence, and problem solving.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org.

Bead Kits Available: Earn a badge or patch, or just have fun!

Submitted by Sharon Manning

Northern & Northeastern CO

Longmont

Troop 73392 has a variety of beautiful hand rolled paper beads from Uganda and other assorted materials for girls (and adults) to create beautiful and unique items. While our flyer (below) includes ideas and pictures for how to use the materials we supply, you are limited only by your imagination and creativity! The craft kits are $12/girl and include three activities, plus a fun patch. We are including extra beads and other materials, so girls have the opportunity to create more than three activities. Either use the materials to earn a badge, like the Junior Jeweler badge, or just have fun and earn the fun patch included.

Check out these  crafts which can be made with these bead kits:

We would love to see some of your creations. Share your photos and stories on the GSCO BlogFacebookTwitter, and Instagram. Twitter and Instagram users should also use #GSColo.

For more information contact Sharon Manning at sharon_colorado@msn.com or (303) 775-0043.

Craft Flyer_2020_Revised

Craft Galore Order Form

Jeweler Badge_Flyer

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

 

Trefoil Trunk Fun

Submitted by Krista Allard

Northern & Northeastern CO

Longmont

Our Trefoil Trunk was the perfect way to spend a snowy morning ❄️ Brooke loved the experiment, making her crown to celebrate Juliette Gordon Low’s birthday, and, most especially loved, making paper beads for her “pearl” necklace honoring Juliette Gordon Low! Thanks GSCO for adding this bit of fun to our mailbox every month!

Click here to learn more about Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Trefoil Trunk subscription boxes, including how to order yours!

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Clare Bolon, Longmont, “Clarity with Cursive”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I taught a five-day online course about how to write and read cursive.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I made a survey for them to finish at the end of my last day of classes. I also took screenshots of their handwriting throughout the week to show how their calligraphy progressed.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

I had multiple things that helped my project be sustainable. I had an online university (The 8 Gates University) sponsor my cursive course for two years. I made a YouTube Channel and put up videos that summarize and teach the course. I found a platform called Teachers Pay Teachers where I put my video course on as well. And lastly, I’m working with my local library to have my course put onto their Facebook page.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

The 8 Gates, YouTube, and Teachers Pay Teachers are global platforms. I also used the National Archives to show my students the importance of cursive. I also used it as a place for them to go to for practicing their cursive.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that things don’t go as planned, and the best way to deal with it is by finding alternative ways to finish your project. I also learned that teaching is a lot harder than I had thought.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

I have learned how to teach online, how to use an online program, how to present things with confidence, and how to calm myself when I get stressed. I think those skills will help me greatly in the future.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

It helped enforce the leadership skills that I had been learning ever since I started ten years ago.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I think I really used my go-getter and innovator skills when I did this project, especially after COVID-19 started. I had to come up with new ideas for my project while still keeping the same time for when I was going to conduct my five-day cursive course.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org.