Tag Archives: Longmont

Gold Award Girl Scout: Emma Lilly, Longmont, “Loco for LoCo”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I did a research project about the Longmont Sugar Beet Factory. I started by interviewing people who had worked at the Longmont Sugar Beet Factory or had connections to it. These interviews were then turned into a podcast style format and posted on my website (https://lillyemma24.wixsite.com/loco4loco/podcasts).

The next step of my project was to write a children’s book, The Magic Beet, which is the story of three children as they travel back in time and learn about the sugar factory. A copy of each book went to each elementary school in the St. Vrain School District and is still available for purchase on my website. I also had several book readings at the Longmont Public Library and I presented to several different organizations, including the Longmont Kiwanis and Longmont City Council, about my project.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

The book I wrote, The Magic Sugar Beet, is still currently for sale online and my interviews have all been kept on my live website. Additionally, a copy of my book was placed in the libraries of every elementary school in our district, and eight teachers have given me confirmation that this book will become a part of their curriculum. Currently, the third grade history curriculum is focused on local history, but some of the teachers I have talked to have said that not much time is spent talking about the Longmont Sugar Beet Factory (an important part of Longmont’s beginning), so when teachers read the book to their classes and listen to the podcasts, the work I did for my Gold Award is able to be sustained for years to come.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection? / How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I published a survey on my website that was available to Girl Scouts and anyone around the world to fill out. This survey asked people questions about whether or not they planned on learning about their local history, and it also had a challenge of learning one fact about their local history that they did not already know. This part of my project, encouraged learning about local history for all ages, and results showed that over 71% planned on continuing to learn about their town’s local history. More about this project can be found at (https://lillyemma24.wixsite.com/loco4loco/local-history-project).

What did you learn about yourself?

At the beginning of this project, I was nervous to reach out and talk to people I did not know, but through my Gold Award project I learned that I am capable of planning a project and leading a team. Even though I was often worried throughout the process that people would find me incompetent, I stuck with it and learned that most people were very eager to help me with my project even if I wasn’t an expert on the material. Through this project, I learned I was able to talk to important people in the community whether it was our city council when I shared my project with them, or people who worked for the St. Vrain Historical Society.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

My Girl Scout Gold Award has given me the skills to run a project and the confidence to do it. I gained many team leading skills that can still help me in the future. I had four artistic friends who had agreed to illustrate the book for me. Even with a small team, delegating tasks was more difficult than I expected. They took about a month longer than the deadline to submit their art to me, and it was sometimes difficult to get them to respond to emails. Going into college and later my career with the experience of leading a team will help me greatly in being a better leader.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

Getting my Gold Award was a very important part of my Girl Scout experience because it gave me the chance to put many of the leadership skills I learned throughout Girl Scouts (such as badges or summer camp), into action. The Gold Award was something I had really wanted to go after since I was a younger Girl Scout, and so it was rewarding to accomplish it and hopefully inspire other Girl Scouts to Go Gold!

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

My Gold Award helped me become a better innovator. I got to discover a lot about a place and history of the Longmont Sugar Beet Factory something I knew virtually nothing about at the start of the project, so I had to do a fair amount of research. In school, we always get a very broad sense of history, so to delve deeply into one tiny aspect of history was really fascinating to me. Since my project was not strictly partnered with a particular organization or group, I had to take initiative and carve a path for this project that did not yet exist, and that required a fair amount of creativity. I had to problem solve when it came to finding people to interview or ways in which I could promote my project. I got used to changing and revising my project as time went on, and I think this aspect as well as learning about my history outside of class work helped shape me into someone who was able to more adapt easily to whatever tasks were thrown at me.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Power of Cookie: Trip to Catalina Island and Emerald Bay

Submitted by Lisa Herrmann

Northern & Northeastern CO

Longmont

Troop 74447 from Longmont saved up funds from three cookie seasons and made the trip to Catalina Island and camped at Emerald Bay. There were about 350 people at the camp and we were the only ones from Colorado! We competed in an Aqua Olympics and had a great time!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Preparing for Reach for the Peak

Submitted by  Sharon Manning

Northern & Northeastern CO

Longmont

Troop 73392 decided earlier this year to rise to the challenge of Reach for the Peak, a competition of traditional Girl Scout skills now in its 31st year. The girls spent the summer working on skills such as knots, lashings, orienteering, and more. After weekly practice sessions, Ashley, Sophia, Trinity, Charlotte, and Alyssa were ready for the challenges they faced the weekend of August 10 and 11, 2018. Everyone had a great time and learned a great deal about skills, team work, and personal growth thanks to the amazing volunteers who make this competition possible.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Continuing the Journey

Submitted by Sharon Manning

Northern & Northeastern CO

Longmont

Troop 73392 has weeded, tilled, and planted their garden plot in the 11th Avenue Community Garden in Longmont. The girls have learned a great deal about the time and commitment required to grow food. They have learned how too much water, as well as too little water, can affect plants. Last week, the girls harvested tomatoes, cucumbers, and onions.  As the season progresses, they will also harvest carrots, peppers, and squash.

The girls have been documenting their project on the GSCO blog. Follow the Journey: http://gscoblog.org/2018/05/were-sowing/

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

We’re sowing

Submitted by Sharon Manning

Northern & Northeastern CO

Longmont

Just a few short weeks ago, Troop 73392 started out with a 20 by 20-foot garden bed filled with weeds at the 11th Avenue Community Garden. After hours of weeding, a lesson in rototilling, spreading two-cubic yards of garden soil donated by Midwest Landscape Supply in Longmont, the girls are finally ready to plant. So far, the girls have planted onions, potatoes, lettuce, and spinach, but have FAR bigger plans in the next several weeks.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Kicking off the garden season

Submitted by Sharon Manning

Northern & Northeastern CO

Longmont

Troop 73392 is tackling a 20-foot by 20-foot garden bed to help grow food for OUR Center in Longmont. But, before you can grow vegetables, you have to clear the weeds! And, there are a lot of weeds in 400- square feet of garden. Several members of the troop and parents spent two hours preparing the garden bed and learning how to run a tiller.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Our Journey shenanigans

Submitted by Lisa Herrmann

Northern & Northeastern CO

Longmont

As part of our Breathe Journey, Troop 74447 toured the Celestial Seasonings factory in Boulder (and survived the Mint Room), and then we followed that up with goat yoga. A super fun day!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

OGAB kept me engaged and allowed me to grow

Submitted by Emma Lilly

Northern & Northeastern CO

Longmont

Almost two years ago, I received a postcard in the mail from GSCO announcing that they would be starting an Older Girl Advisory Board, and that they were looking for applicants for the program. I had been involved in Girl Scouts in a troop from 5th through 8th grade, and I became a Juliette in high school after my troop broke up. I loved going to summer camp, and but besides that, I did not know many other older Girl Scouts. I applied to the program because I figured it would be a good way to meet other active Girl Scouts as well as a chance for me to share my opinions and ideas with Girl Scouts.

Being on the OGAB has been a wonderful experience. I have made some really great friends, and not only do we have a ton of fun on our retreats (playing a lot of Spoons and other games), but I also feel we are contributing to some positive changes being made within Girl Scouts. During our retreats and web calls, we have discussed a variety of subjects from the CIT and PA experience, to cookie sales, to how we can keep older girls in the program.

When I came to the first OGAB retreat, I was pretty nervous because I felt like I wasn’t a “real” Girl Scout because I am not in a troop, but it quickly became apparent to me that my opinions and experiences were valuable to the group. As my confidence grew, I became comfortable sharing all of my ideas, and now I am one of the more talkative ones in our group.

Being a part of OGAB has added a lot to my Girl Scout experience because it has given me a group that feels almost like a troop and it has allowed me to reflect on my experiences in Girl Scouts and see how we could improve certain programs. It also has given me another leadership role within Girl Scouts, because we have essentially been representing girls all around the state. Of course, this is an experience that looks great on college applications and resumes, but it is also real experience that I believe has prepared me for college and beyond.

If you are a Girl Scout Senior or Ambassador and have the opportunity to apply to OGAB, I would highly recommend it. It has added so much to my Girl Scout experience, and I have made so many good friends. I have so many fond memories from my time in OGAB, and as I go off to college next year, I will miss it so much.

The Older Girl Advisory Board (OGAB) is a group of Senior and Ambassador Girl Scouts from all regions of Colorado that provide feedback on projects that enrich the experience of Girl Scouts of Colorado.  Make your voice heard by applying today! Applications close on September 18, 2018. https://gscolorado.formstack.com/forms/ogab2018

Questions? Contact Emily Speck, emily.speck@gscolorado.org or 303-607-4811

Learning about cars

Submitted by Sharon Manning

Northern & Northeastern CO

Longmont

Troop 73392 recently earned their Senior level “Car Care” badge with the help of Bowen Street Garage in Longmont. The girls learned about the different fluids used in a car, belts, engines, and how to check and add fluids, if necessary. The girls also learned about various motors, parts of the motor, and what happens if you don’t maintain appropriate fluid levels. Andreas, the owner of Bowen Street Garage, showed the troop the damage caused by low oil levels with an engine he was in the process of repairing as a result of low oil in the engine. But, the favorite part of the evening was learning how to change a tire and actually doing it!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Simple meals with Pie in the Sky Bakery

Submitted by Sally Boyd

Metro Denver

Lakewood

Troop 60697 took a break from cookie sales to finish up their Simple Meals badge at Pie in the Sky Bakery in Longmont. After a great discussion on food safety, Executive Chef Tiffany Price took them on a tour and helped them make their own gluten-free pizza!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.