Tag Archives: Longmont

Gold Award Girl Scout: Emma Gibbs, Longmont, “Raptor Activities Leadership Council”

What did you do for your Gold Award project? 

My project addressed the social stigmas and lack of understanding for people’s diverse talents and passions. My goal was to increase attendance at regularly lower attended events and increase the amount of school spirit through the organization of more school events. My target audience was the students at my high school with the intent to inform other high schools of the program’s results and create a guide or template on how to create a program like mine at other schools. As my project progressed, I realized that I needed to focus on why students weren’t attending events, so I partnered with the school administration and PTO to find alternate ways to communicate with students about events going on in my school.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?  

As you will see below from my presentation, my initial goals were not being met, but after reflection and refocus of the project, I was able to more effectively communicate events through the PTO, administration, and to students.

End of semester one reflection:

  • Not seeing the attendance that I wanted to be seeing at that point
  • Was asking RALC group for ideas and they still weren’t working
  • Felt like I was a failure and wasn’t making a difference
  • Needed to get to the root cause of attendance

I needed more help, so I partnered with my school’s booster club and found that:

  • Root of low attendance with communication
  • Also, an issue with general school spirit
  • Allowed me to better communicate and connect with my school administration

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project will continue to be sustained for years to come. Since I did my project as part of the leadership academy at my school, I was able to work with the junior class and get a junior (now senior) to commit to continuing my project into the next school year. This individual is very passionate about school spirit and is involved in multiple extra-curricular activities, making her a perfect fit for this project. My leadership academy director also has expressed how much she enjoys this program and is committed to keeping it running in the years to come. By sharing my project with other schools, it will also be sustained because similar programs may start to pop up throughout the area and spread. While these programs might not be the exact same as mine they will be addressing the same or similar issues that I focused on.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I was able to send my project to other schools in the midwest. Our school leadership group had partnered with another school to learn about the Leadership Academy. I was able to send my project to those individuals.

What did you learn about yourself? 

I learned about project organization, time management, flexibility, and being open to change. Even though my initial project objectives weren’t being met, I was able to regroup and refocus my objectives to a more narrow project. I thought I would be able to increase attendance at events, but I discovered that finding better and broader ways of communication could be effective in increasing awareness, which will drive attendance.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

I will be able to take the skills I learned, specifically communication with adults, learning to preserve, being flexible, and open to suggestions from others. These skills will be used in college in my classes, honors activities, and with my soccer team and coaches. I learned that communicating and sharing of ideas with others can help to keep projects moving forward and be successful.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience? 

The Gold Award was an important part of Girl Scouts as it takes all the skills and talents that you learn over the years and puts them together into one large project.  I enjoyed completing the Journeys with my troop members. We were a troop from several different schools and it was always interesting to see how other schools were dealing with issues. Being responsible for a large project: planning, organizing, implementing, and completing it can be very rewarding.  As I mentioned, I learned a lot of new skills and learned about working with other people of all ages.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I believe the Gold Award helped me to become even more of a go-getter. I have always worked at being organized and staying on top of homework and projects, while playing soccer at the highest level possible. Being a go-getter has helped me get where I am today, at a Division 1 college, playing soccer, while obtaining a college degree, with a focus in nursing. I am also a part of the honors program at my college. When I see something that I want, I figure out what it will take to get it, and I work hard to achieve my goals.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

 

Junior “Think Like an Engineer” overnight camp

Submitted by Maria Cross

Northern & Northeastern CO

Longmont

Where better to earn your Junior “Think Like An Engineer” Journey than at Tomahawk Ranch! Join Ambassador Troop 78527 for a fun-filled overnight camp.

Who: Girl Scout Junior troops or Juliettes with adult

Dates: Saturday, January 25 to Sunday, January 26, 2020

When: Arrive at 3 – 4 p.m. Saturday, Depart at 2 p.m. Sunday

Where: Tomahawk Ranch Girl Scout Camp near Bailey- enjoy heated cabins with bunk beds and bathrooms

Cost: $70 per girl $40 per adult. Girls must attend with adult. Adults above safety-wise ratios pay girl rate. Price does not include Journey award patches.

Registration deadline: Tuesday, January 7, 2020

During this fun Journey camp, Juniors will have a blast finding out how engineers use “design” thinking to solve problems. The Ambassadors will guide them in three design thinking activities to explore hands-on what it’s like to think like an engineer. You will also receive the materials needed for your group to work on a design project to help others. Your girls can take their design project with them to share with their community to complete their Take Action Project are complete their Journey!

Register/pay online
https://junior-think-like-an-engineer-journey-in-a-day.cheddarup.com or mail in registration form below.

40963104_tle_junior_flyer_registration

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Troop 77904 learned how horses can help people feel better

Submitted by Kelly Davidson

Northern & Northeastern CO

Longmont

Brownie Troop 77904 from Longmont visited the Colorado Therapeutic Riding Center earlier this month to explore the connection between animal and human compassion.

The girls learned that the center takes in donated horses and trains them to help people with disabilities and other challenges.

The girls took a tour of the facility and learned how special adaptive devices enable people with physical disabilities to ride horses. The girls also learned that horses can comfort people who are sad or facing other challenges.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Girl Scouts learn about watershed conversation and the environment in Longmont

In partnership with Colorado Trout Unlimited (CTU) and Anadarko, a dozen Girl Scouts had the opportunity to serve as citizen scientists, anglers, and artists on Saturday, October 12, 2019 at Izaak Walton Clubhouse in Longmont. The goal of the event was to help girls develop an appreciation for watershed conservation and the environment. This outdoor watershed experience employed STEM-education (science, technology, engineering, math), plus recreation and arts to explore a local stream. CTU volunteers led Girl Scout Juniors and Cadettes in observing a stream, collecting flow data, sampling macroinvertebrates (aka aquatic bugs), fly tying, and fly casting. Girls also explored the natural area and recorded their thoughts and observations.

Special thanks to the Boulder Daily Camera for joining GSCO for this special event!

Colorado Trout Unlimited is dedicated to conserving, protecting, and restoring Colorado’s coldwater fisheries and their watersheds. With a grassroots base comprised of nearly 12,000 members in 24 local chapters across the state, CTU works both locally and statewide through advocacy, education, and on-the-ground restoration projects. For more information visit www.coloradotu.org.

Brownie “Think Like an Engineer” overnight camp

Submitted by Maria Cross

Northern & Northeastern CO

Longmont

Camping, Journeys, and Girl Scout sisters~ Oh My! Join Ambassador Troop 78527 for a fun-filled overnight camp as you earn your “Think Like An Engineer” Journey!

Who: Girl Scout Brownie troops or Juliettes with adult chaperone

Dates: Friday, January 24 to Saturday, January 25, 2020

When: Arrive at 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. Friday, Depart at 2 p.m. Saturday

Where: Tomahawk Ranch Girl Scout Camp near Bailey– enjoy heated cabins with bunk beds and bathrooms

During this Journey camp, Brownies will have a blast finding out how engineers use “design” thinking to solve problems. The Ambassadors will guide them in three “design” thinking activities to explore hands-on what it is like to think like an engineer. You will also receive materials for your group to work on a design project to help others. Your girls can take their design project with them to share with their community for their Take Action Project to complete their Journey.

Cost: $70 per girl, $40 per adult- price does not include Journey patches. Girls must attend with adult. Adults above safety-wise ratios pay girl rate.

Registration deadline: Tuesday, January 7

Register/pay online: https://browniethinklikeanengineer.cheddarup.com

Email cross.maria.e@gmail.com with questions.

40963104_tle_brownie_flyer_registration

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Last kayak/paddleboard workshop of the season

Submitted by Sharon Manning

Northern & Northeastern CO

Longmont

Troop 73392 hosted their last kayak/paddleboard workshop of the season. Although the air and water temperature were on the cool side, the girls from Troop 60350 had a beautiful morning to enjoy blue skies and a gorgeous view of Longs Peak while playing on the water.

Troop 60350 had the opportunity to challenge their water craft skills with a variety of different kayaks and paddleboard while enjoying the scenery and wildlife at McIntosh Lake in Longmont.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Junior “Think Like an Engineer” overnight camp

Submitted by Maria Cross

Northern & Northeastern CO

Longmont

Where better to earn your Junior “Think Like An Engineer” Journey than at Tomahawk Ranch! Join Ambassador Troop 78527 for a fun-filled overnight camp.

Who: Girl Scout Junior troops or Juliettes with adult

Dates: Saturday, January 25 to Sunday, January 26, 2020

When: Arrive at 3 – 4 p.m. Saturday, Depart at 2 p.m. Sunday

Where: Tomahawk Ranch Girl Scout Camp near Bailey- enjoy heated cabins with bunk beds and bathrooms

Cost: $70 per girl $40 per adult. Girls must attend with adult. Adults above safety-wise ratios pay girl rate. Price does not include Journey award patches.

Registration deadline: Tuesday, January 7, 2020

During this fun Journey camp, Juniors will have a blast finding out how engineers use “design” thinking to solve problems. The Ambassadors will guide them in three design thinking activities to explore hands-on what it’s like to think like an engineer. You will also receive the materials needed for your group to work on a design project to help others. Your girls can take their design project with them to share with their community to complete their Take Action Project are complete their Journey!

Register/pay online
https://junior-think-like-an-engineer-journey-in-a-day.cheddarup.com or mail in registration form below.

40963104_tle_junior_flyer_registration

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Mother’s Day Project

Submitted by Sharon Manning

Northern & Northeastern CO

Longmont

Troop 73392 of Longmont used a combination of troop funds, personal funds, and community donations to create a special Mother’s Day gift for the clients of St. Vrain Valley Safe Shelter.

BeadforLife, a Boulder non-profit organization, donated beautiful handmade bags and grass woven baskets made by women in Uganda to support this project as well as lip balm. The girls used a combination of troop and personal funds to purchase pens, notebooks, tissues, hand sanitizer, hand lotion, gum, and granola bars to include in the handbags. To round out the project, the girls wrote inspirational messages with Hershey hugs to include in each purse.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Volunteer Spotlight: Carolyn Decker

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Carolyn Decker of Longmont in the Northern & Northeastern CO region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Carolyn to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

Girl Scouting was a huge part of my life growing up with my mom, my three sisters, and I all all being involved. I had such great experiences as a Girl Scout, camping, backpacking, sailing, traveling, going to a spectacular art camp, being a camp counselor that I wanted to make sure my daughter also had a chance to experience Girl Scouts, so I volunteered to lead a troop when she was old enough.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

While we lived in Arizona, I led a group of girls from when they Brownies through Cadettes. When we moved to Colorado, I became involved in a huge multi-level troop where I helped lead Daisies through Seniors. I am currently leading an Ambassador troop, or should I say I am guiding an Ambassador troop since the young women are the leaders now. I am also a Girl Scout trainer leading different level 101 classes and Cooking and Camping training.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

That Girl Scouting is just as fun as an adult as a girl! I am amazed by the passion and dedication that all the adult volunteers I have met have for making Girl Scouting happen for girls. I have also learned that Girl Scouting is the most fun when girls are making the decisions.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

That they are each in their own unique way powerful people that can make things happen.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I am naturally a solitary “go-getter,” but I have learned through Girl Scouting that working as a team toward a goal is really inspiring. I also have learned that you have incredible experiences when you are a risk-taker. I would never ever have considered learning to scuba dive without my girls and now they want to go on another traveling adventure to explore the world and scuba dive again!

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

Gold Award Girl Scout: Trinity Brubaker, Longmont, “Free Mental Health Little Library”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

Both my biological parents were drug addicts that suffered from mental illness. I was taken into foster care at age two and adopted at age three. You would think my story would end there. A kid born to drug addicts and placed in foster care should fail, right? My biological parents gave me a gift, the gift of both musical and artistic talent. Due to early childhood trauma, I experienced at the hands of my biological parents, I struggle with attachment disorder, a mental illness. Our society often views people with mental illness as failures. The stigma attached to speaking out about mental illness and getting help for a mental illness is one of our nation’s greatest social problems. This is where my Gold Award project takes shape. I combined my experiences with having a mental illness and my artistic talent to speak up, take a risk, and make a social change. I built a little library full of mental health books. I spoke out to groups of people about my mental illness and asked them to support my project with books. I presented to groups of young children and educated them on mental health issues. I created a safe place for conversation around mental health issues while creating a physical library people can go to get information on mental health.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I found that my storytelling became in itself a work of art and an important part of my project. The impact of storytelling is hard to fit into a spreadsheet and measure. The conversations started by the box have become just as important as creating a beautiful space for mental health resources to be exchanged. The creation of a physical box started a conversation. We must tell our stories to address the social need of breaking down the stigma around mental illness. We need to find spaces that are safe to share our resources. The stories people shared with me measured the impact more than any numbers every will. I do, however, visit the box weekly and see titles are gone and new titles put in there place.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project is sustainable as long as there is a book in it. The library will continue to impact people by educating them about mental health, as well as providing amazing resources for families in need. I have partnered with therapists and counselors and asked them to continue to direct people to the free library. This mental health library is also listed on a global website that directs people to free little libraries around the world. https://littlefreelibrary.org/ourmap/

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I am an artist. I looked at the link between mental illness and people with artist backgrounds. I researched how difficult it is for all people to access mental health resources. Nationally, there is a lack of funding for mental health resources. I wanted to create an artistic work of art that would also function to provide mental health resource to the community. “Countless painters, composers, writers, and musicians have suffered from depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia, prompting people to ask the question, are artists more likely to suffer from mental illness. The research says yes. A 2012 study followed 1.2 million patients and their relatives and found that bipolar disorder is more common in individuals with artistic professions including dancers, photographers, and authors.”  Source: https://www.mnn.com/lifestyle/arts-culture/stories/8-artists-who-suffered-mental-illness

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that I am stronger than I thought. That I can start an uncomfortable conversation. Lastly, that I can overcome obstacles thrown my way.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

It is my hope that my project has helped create a new space for sharing mental health resources, while encouraging others to share their stories.I hope to continue using my gifts and talents in the future while seeking a degree in art therapy.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I have been in Girl Scouts for over 10 years. I always looked at doing my Gold Award as the last step in my Girl Scout experience. The Gold Award gave me something to work for in my career of Girl Scouting.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

Risk-Taker! Let’s face it, many people who ignite change, at first, fail!  The first person who said, “Women should be given the right to vote,” risked failure, and failed for years. Being a teen who stands up to announce that she lives with a mental illness makes people uncomfortable. In telling my story and using my artistic talents to create a safe place to exchange mental health resources I am taking an authentic creative risk. I am saying it it time to tell our stories about surviving and thriving with a mental illness. I am using my story and my talents to say it is time for us to provide free resources to support those with mental illness and it is past time to feel safe to stand up to say I live everyday with a mental illness. I will gladly fail if my creative project and my story helps start to break down the stigma attached to living with mental illness.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org