Tag Archives: Global Girl Scouts

W.A.G.G.G.S.: Who we are

The World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts is the largest voluntary Movement dedicated to girls and young women in the world. Our diverse Movement represents ten million girls and young women from 150 countries.

For more than 100 years Girl Guiding and Girl Scouting has transformed the lives of girls and young women worldwide, supporting, and empowering them to achieve their fullest potential and become responsible citizens of the world.

Our strengths lie in innovative non-formal education programs, leadership development, advocacy work, and community action, empowering girls and young women to develop the skills and confidence needed to make positive changes in their lives, in their communities, and countries.

We deliver these programs in five W.A.G.G.G.S. Regions: AfricaArabAsia PacificEurope, and Western Hemisphere. We also hold advocacy and leadership events at our five World Centers: Our Chalet in Switzerland, Sangam in India, Pax Lodge in the UK, Our Cabaña in Mexico, and Kusafiri, our World Centre traveling around Africa. Through our global programs, girls from all over the world come together to learn new skills, share their international experiences, and form lifelong friendships.

Our Vision is for: All girls are valued and take action to change the world.

Our Mission is: To enable girls and young women to develop their fullest potential as responsible citizens of the world.

WAGGGS Countries 2016 – 10-18

2019 World Thinking Day theme and toolkits

Take the lead on February 22 to celebrate 2019 World Thinking Day with Girl Scouts and Girl Guides from 150 countries! (That’s one big celebration!) Girls also celebrate World Thinking Day throughout the spring.

Promoted by the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGGS for short) along with Girl Scouts of the USA, World Thinking Day originated in 1926. That’s when delegates from around the globe met at Camp Edith Macy—now called Edith Macy Conference Center—in New York and agreed February 22 would henceforth be known as a special day for Girl Guides and Girl Scouts worldwide.

Every year since, World Thinking Day has called for Girl Scouts and Girl Guides to join together and take part in activities that promote changing the world for the better.

The theme for World Thinking Day in 2019 is leadership!

Check out our activity guides below to explore many different ways girls can be leaders and create the change they want to see in the world—and celebrate being part of the global sisterhood that is Girl Scouts and Girl Guides!

Activity Guide for Girl Scout Daisies, Brownies, and Juniors: https://www.girlscouts.org/content/dam/girlscouts-gsusa/forms-and-documents/For-Girls/think-global/GSUSA_World-Thinking-Day_18_Activities%20DBJ-B.pdf

Activity Guide for Girl Scout Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors: https://www.girlscouts.org/content/dam/girlscouts-gsusa/forms-and-documents/For-Girls/think-global/GSUSA_World-Thinking-Day_18_Activities%20CSA-B.pdf

Check out the Global Action Toolkit for more information on celebrating global action days throughout the year: https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/content/dam/girlscoutsofcolorado/documents/globalactiondaystoolkit_final_aug2018.pdf

How to use the Global Action Days Toolkit

Every Girl Scout is part of a special group of girls that stretches not just across the United States, but around the world. Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA) is a member of the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGGS), which includes 10 million girls in 150 countries. All those girls, in all those countries, are working to make the world a better place.

Throughout the year, girls have the opportunity to work together and participate in Girl Scout programming that relates to different global issues affecting women and girls. This toolkit describes nine international days and is designed to help volunteers engage with Girl Scouts on these global days of action.

The program for each global action day in the toolkit includes:

  •  A description of the day
  • Why Girl Scouts celebrate the day
  • Any program or content notes related to sensitive issues
  • Activities by program grade level (Daisy/Brownie/Junior and Cadette/Senior/Ambassador) and/or activities suitable for all ages
  • Journey and badge connections
  • Suggestions for community service or partnerships
  • Additional resources and references

As girls learn about and explore the issues surrounding a particular day, they may be inspired to engage in community service or even complete a Take Action project. Depending on the program grade
level of the Girl Scouts, these could be used as an option for a Journey Take Action project or lead to a highest award project.
Journey and badge connections are listed for each day of action.

Suggestions for community service are listed in each global action day section, and additional information on different community
service and Take Action projects on page 8. Some activities in this toolkit are applicable to multiple days. It is okay to use the resources
and activities for one day in developing a program for another, similar day.

In addition to this program toolkit, councils will be provided with partnership and social media  resources related to each day on a quarterly basis.

Many of the activities in this toolkit address issues that girls in Girl Scouts face. Be sensitive  to the challenges and experiences of the girls in your troop or group as you explore these topics.

TIPS AND TRICKS

Make sure you have a reasonable understanding of the issue or topic addressed by a global action day before sharing it with girls. We have you covered—you’ll find additional resources and background materials listed in the resources section for each global action day. You don’t have to know everything, but you should have a basic understanding of the topics you’ll be covering and the confidence to look up specific information if girls ask a question to which you don’t know the answer. This shows girls that it’s okay not to be “perfect” and encourages them to learn along with you.

You may also want to ask an expert to share their knowledge and experiences with your troop. Depending on the global action day you are celebrating, this may mean reaching out to a local company or nonprofit organization, university, or government office. For example, on World Environment Day, you might invite an environmental scientist to your meeting to discuss the environment in your community and the way global issues, such as climate change, habitat loss, or natural disasters, have impacted the environment where you live. You may even tap experts within your own personal or professional networks who would love to share their expertise with your troop.

This toolkit includes nine global action days. Don’t try to cover them all, at least not right away. Talk with girls about the days that are most interesting to them, and start with those activities. Some of the days fall quite close together, so you may also want to rotate days through different years. For example, this year you might explore information and communication technology (ICT) topics to participate in Girls in ICT Day, which takes place on the fourth Thursday in April, and next year, you might celebrate Global Action Week for Education, which falls on the third or fourth week in April. Infuse a global perspective in all your activities, not just on these days. Everything we do in Girl Scouts, we do as part of a global sisterhood, 10 million girls strong. When you go hiking or camping, talk with your girls about ways we can all enjoy and protect our planet. When you are volunteering at your local food bank, remember that hunger is a problem everywhere in the world and that by addressing it in your local community, you are helping to solve a global problem. Even when you are just playing, take a moment to remember that all girls enjoy having fun and all girls deserve the opportunity to play. These simple connections remind Girl Scouts that they are part of a community much bigger than themselves.

BUILDING SAFE SPACE

Many of the topics addressed by the days of action in this toolkit can be sensitive and challenging for girls to learn about. At the same time, these issues can deeply motivate girls to take action and create positive change. So it’s critical that girls are able to explore these issues in a safe and supportive environment. Some suggestions for building this safe space within your troop or group meeting are:

  • Let girls and parents know ahead of time what’s on the table for discussion during the meeting. You don’t have to go into the full meeting plan, but it’s a good idea to give them a head’s up so that they can plan and prepare together and you can obtain the necessary permissions, especially if you’ll be addressing sensitive issues. A sample copy of a sensitive issues permission form is found in the appendix of this toolkit.
  • Begin with an icebreaker or trust game, even if group members have known each other for a while. It helps to reinforce a sense of group cohesion.
  • Set a group contract with the girls. This is a good idea to do with any group, regardless of what you’re doing, because it empowers them to discuss and agree on how to treat each other and to establish group norms. Let girls come up with their own rules and discuss them until there is consensus. Some questions you may want to ask girls are:
    • What would make this a safe and respectful place for us to be?
    • What would be good ways to treat each other?
    • What group rules do you have in other places, like at school or in sports? Which ones apply here?
    • How will we make sure we all follow this agreement?
    • Girl Scouts is a girl-led and challenge-by-choice environment.

Make sure girls can opt out if they are uncomfortable or if they need a moment to process. Let them know some good ways to do that, such as going to the bathroom or getting a drink of water. Come up with a signal that girls can use to let you know if they’d like
to talk to you privately about what they’re feeling.

THE ENTIRE GLOBAL ACTION DAYS TOOLKIT CAN BE ACCESSED VIA THE GLOBAL GIRL SCOUT SECTION OF ANYTIME ACTIVITIES: https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/content/girlscoutsofcolorado/en/events/anytime-activities.html

Introducing the Global Action Toolkit

Every Girl Scout is part of a special group of girls that stretches not just across the United States, but around the world. Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA) is a member of the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGGS), which includes 10 million girls in 150 countries. All those girls, in all those countries, are working to make the world a better place.

Throughout the year, girls have the opportunity to work together and participate in Girl Scout programming that relates
to different global issues affecting women and girls. This toolkit describes nine international days and is designed to help volunteers engage with Girl Scouts on these global days of action.

What Is Global Girl Scouting?

Global means relating to the whole world. A global organization is worldwide and international, and from our very beginning, the Girl Guide and Girl Scout Movement has been international in nature.

In 1909, Sir Robert Baden-Powell, founder of the Boy Scouts in the United Kingdom, held the first Boy Scout rally at a park in London called the Crystal Palace. As they gathered, a group of girls marched onto the Crystal Palace and demanded to be able to participate. Seeing the passion and commitment of these girls, Baden-Powell turned to his sister Agnes Baden-Powell to begin the Girl Guide/Girl Scout Movement. Soon after, groups started in the United
Kingdom, Australia, Canada, Denmark, Finland, New Zealand, and South Africa.

A few years later, in 1912, Juliette Gordon Low met Baden-Powell and discovered her life’s purpose in Girl Scouting. She founded three troops of Girl Guides in London and Scotland before returning to the United States to found Girl Scouts of the USA, and start the first Girl Scout troop in Savannah, Georgia, on March 12, 1912.

From that first meeting of 18 girls, Girl Scouts pushed boundaries—welcoming girls across class, cultural, and ethnic lines to ensure all girls, including those with disabilities, had a place to grow and develop their leadership skills. They played basketball. They hiked, swam, and camped. They learned to read the world around them for instance, earning badges by studying a foreign language or learning to tell time by the stars.

Girl Scouting continued to expand its reach to more and more girls, with the first Girl Scout troops launching outside the United States in China, Syria, and Mexico. Lone Troops on Foreign Soil (now called USA Girl Scouts Overseas) registered its first Girl Scout troop in Shanghai, China, with 18 girls in 1925.6 Today, Girl Scouts of the USA includes 2 million Girl Scouts in 92 countries around the world.
Juliette Gordon Low said it best when she declared, “Girl Scouting and Girl Guiding can be the magic thread which
links the youth of the world together.” For over 100 years, the Girl Scout and Girl Guide Movement has brought girls
together in a global sisterhood to make the world a better place.
There are many ways for girls to engage with this global sisterhood throughout their Girl Scout experience. Whether it
is exploring global issues through a Girl Scout Journey, earning their Global Action award, or traveling with a Girl Scout
Destination, girls can engage with global issues at every program grade level.

This toolkit—for learning about or taking part in nine global action days—is a resource for councils and volunteers to help girls connect to our global Movement and to the issues that affect girls around the world.

Stay tuned for more blog posts about the Global Action Toolkit! Information such as how to use the toolkit and how to celebration each Global Action Day is coming next.

You can access the entire Global Action Days Toolkit under the Global Girl Scout section of Anytime Activities: https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/content/girlscoutsofcolorado/en/events/anytime-activities.html

Questions? Email gscoglobal@gmail.com