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Girl Scouts can do anything and everything they set their hearts and minds to! You’ll find it all here.  From members sharing their adventures to Highest Award honorees describing their projects and news from council, cookie updates, travel opportunities, volunteer tips and much, much more.

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Volunteer Spotlight: Linda Gibbs

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Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Linda Gibbs of Cheyenne Wells in the Pikes Peak region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Linda to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I started out as a volunteer for my daughter’s troop. As the years went on and all three of my girls graduated and moved on, I continued as a volunteer because I enjoy what I do. The girls’ enthusiasm for something new and different makes me happy.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I started out as a co-leader.  Through the years, I have been a leader for all age groups. I have been a troop leader, group leader, day camp director, camp coordinator with awesome helpers, TCM, SUCM, SUM, and trainer.  I may have missed some …or not, but after 30 plus years of Girl Scouts, I just never thought to keep track.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

l have learned how to be a group leader, how to do public speaking without stammering too much, and have learned a bit about organization.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope the girls have learned to be kind and caring, to give without expecting something in return, respectful, leave any place they use clean or cleaner than when they started, and have fun while doing whatever they are doing. I always hope that they have learned one or two life skills, whether it be cooking, camping, or sewing.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I have learned that people are not always going to do everything for you.  If you want something to happen: Go do it. Sometimes what works for one person or group, doesn’t always work for everyone. Change things, make them work for you. Sometimes you just have to try something new and hope it works, if it doesn’t work, you try something different the next time. Taking the lead is how it all starts, it doesn’t mean you have to do it all!

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Volunteer Spotlight: Jennifer Ayers

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Jennifer Ayers of Johnstown in the Northern & Northeastern CO region started as a troop leader, but quickly became a product program volunteer as well. She is also a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Jennifer to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

When we first moved to Colorado from California a few years ago, my daughter wanted to join Girl Scouts and had asked me to be her leader. Knowing it would be beneficial to meeting people in our new community, I registered, but wasn’t able to get a troop formed right away, so she ended up joining a local multi-level troop. The next year, they needed someone to lead the Brownies and I gladly volunteered! Now, that both of my daughters are in Girl Scouts, I love being involved in their troop and doing something with them, instead of watching from the sidelines. I know that Girl Scouts has helped my family find an amazing group of people and I LOVE seeing these girls outside of Girl Scout activities and getting the biggest and warmest hugs! 

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I started volunteering as a troop leader and fall product program manager. This year, I added the role of cookie program manager and am becoming a service unit manager. We have a multi-level troop ranging from Daisies to Seniors. Although I’m officially leading the Brownies, our leadership team works well together and we all help each other out wherever needed. It is definitely a team effort to make sure we are helping our girls develop their G.I.R.L. skills.

I wasn’t sure where to start as a leader and the flexibility of the Girl Scout Program was kind of intimidating to me, so the volunteer online and in-person training summits have been a huge help. Networking with other leaders has been reassuring and inspiring on how to lead meetings and get ideas for activities so the girls can gain a lot from their time with Girl Scouts.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer? 

The girls have taught me more than I could have ever imagined. Our troop is full of incredible girls from all different backgrounds with different interests. It’s really been wonderful trying to make sure each girl is getting her own experience, helping them earn all of the badges that they want, and keeping things fun and character building. I have definitely had to learn to let them lead a lot more. Girl-led isn’t something that I excel at because I tend to take charge and over plan, but I am working on stepping back a bit and letting the girls have more opportunities to figure things out for themselves. 

These girls have also taught me the importance of getting outside my comfort zone and having some fun. I’m not exactly the most adventurous person, but leading our girls is pushing me to be a better version of myself and to just try new things. I am excited to see where our troop takes us as they get older! 

What do you hope girls have learned from you? 

As a troop leader, I really love being able to devote my time and energy into helping our girls grow and succeed, not only by earning badges and awards, but also as a valuable member of our community. I hope they have learned that they are fully capable of making the world a better place, no matter what their age is.

I also hope they have learned the Girl Scout Promise and Law is not just something they pledge at the beginning of our meetings and is something that really applies to our daily lives through our actions.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Volunteering has definitely helped me become a G.I.R.L. These girls deserve the best and I absolutely do not want to let any of them down so I have had to push through my own insecurities and hesitations and support our girls wherever I can. Life certainly has been a lot more fun and fulfilling because of volunteering with Girl Scouts and encouraging our troop to be more G.I.R.L. strong!

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Bronze and Silver Award Girl Scouts honored at Highest Awards celebration in Pueblo

Nearly 50 Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at the Center for American Values in Pueblo on April 20, 2018, to honor the more than 1,300 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2017-18 Girl Scout awards program year, nearly 1,000 girls across the state and 18 in Pueblo and Southeastern Colorado earned the Bronze Award. Eight girls across Pueblo and Southeastern Colorado earned the prestigious Silver Award.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts gives girls the skills and experiences they need to thrive and lead in today’s world. The world needs female leaders now more than ever. You’re making a difference,” she said.

2016 Gold Award Girl Scout Megan Burnett served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about her journey to earn the Gold Award and how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

“All the skills you learn in Girl Scouts, through the meetings you plan and the badges you earn, are all intended to prepare you for the future,” she said.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Volunteer Spotlight: Rachel Van

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Rachel Van of Alamosa in the Pueblo & Southeastern CO region started out as a troop co-leader, but quickly took on more volunteer roles. She is also a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Rachel to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a Girl Scout volunteer when my oldest daughter, Amelia, was in first grade in 2011-12. The previous school year she had joined a Girl Scout troop at the end of cookie season and that troop was in need of another volunteer to help lead the Daisies as the troop grew to over 40 girls in both Brownies and Daisies. I had been a Brownie for a couple of years as a child and had such fond memories of that time so I wanted to make sure that my three daughters had the opportunity to experience Girl Scouts as well and that is why I chose to volunteer.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I started as a troop co-Leader in Monte Vista in 2011 and was a troop cookie manager for the first time in 2012. I have continued in these roles since then. Since we live in a small rural area that is some distance from the bigger cities and we have fewer volunteers, I am currently in the roles of troop leader and TCM, volunteer trainer, cookie cupboard manager, and service unit manager/SUCM and I love getting to volunteer in so many different ways with such a great organization and getting to work with our wonderful troop of 16 girls in grades kindergarten through 7th grade. I also enjoy getting to work with the other volunteers and troops in the San Luis Valley when we have service unit events.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

As a volunteer, I have learned many things over the years. First and foremost, I have learned how to be a better leader in all aspects of my life. As I have taken my troop on their journey to be the future leaders of our country and even the world, I have learned to be more patient and kind as well as a good example for them. I have also increased my ability to handle things on the fly and go with the flow. As many other Girl Scout volunteers can probably attest, we really have to be able to roll with the punches because you never know what might come your way at a troop meeting. The best instance of this for me was one particular troop meeting we had where we were trying to make silly putty and something went wrong with the mixture and we ended up with slime instead. It was a great example to the girls to make the best of a bad situation and find another use for what you have instead of just throwing it out and starting over. They still had a blast and I honestly think they enjoyed the slime more since it was a mistake. We all had a great laugh that night.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope the girls I have worked with have learned to be confident in themselves and to take on any challenges that the world might throw at them. I also hope that the Girl Scout Promise and Law stick with them as they grow and they keep them as solid tenants in their life. The world would be a much better place if everyone knew and followed the Girl Scout Law!

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

 I would say that my experience as a volunteer has helped me become a G.I.R.L. in too many ways for me to name them all. Seven years ago, I never would have imagined that I would be this involved in Girl Scouts, but here I am and I love it! Working with my troop and the other wonderful volunteers in the San Luis Valley as well as the staff in the council offices I have learned so much. I have developed friendships and connections in my community that I never would have had without Girl Scout in my life and I am so grateful for the opportunities it has created for me. I have had the confidence to take on risks and believe in myself within my own career so that I can develop professionally as well. I don’t know that I would have taken the same risks or believed in myself without all the great things I have learned from being involved in Girl Scouts.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Volunteer View: April 2018

In April, we celebrate our volunteers and all the amazing things you do for girls here in Colorado. Our appreciation gift this year is to have thousands of trees planted in areas around the state of Colorado that have been devastated by wildfires and floods. We believe that these trees will have a lasting impact in our state, just like your impact on girls.

Thank you for being a Girl Scout volunteer!

Watch a video message from Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote and read a letter from the Colorado State Forest Service about this donation.

Read it on the blog

Save the date: Early Bird renewal promotion May 1 – June 15

As we head toward the finish line of a successful and memorable Girl Scout year, remember that your girls’ journeys have just begun. Come back next year for what promises to be another season full of unmatchable adventure at a place where girls can always take the lead, not stand in the background.

Any girl renewed between May 1 and June 15 will receive a free Early Bird patch . Any troop that has completed the Annual Troop Report for this membership year and has two, unrelated Troop Leadership Team members renewed by June 15 will receive a $25 credit to the Girl Scouts of Colorado Shop.

Mark your calendars and get ready to renew on May 1!

Outdoor Adventure Club is back

OAC 2018-2019 event information is here! Passport fees are $375 for OAC Explorers (grade 6) and $465 for OAC Trailblazers (grades 7-12). Find out about upcoming events, single event passes, registration information, and more on our website.

Get ready for adventure »

Lock in Early Bird pricing for Summer Camp by paying all balances by April 30. Still haven’t picked your session? Visit our session list to see the fun new options.

Lock in my EB pricing »

Riley Morgenthaler awarded Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize for Gold Award Excellence

Riley Morgenthaler from Morrison was selected to receive the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize for Gold Award excellence for the 2017-18 awards year. Riley realized students from low-resource schools participating in the STEM-based competition Destination Imagination were at a disadvantage because they didn’t have the same kinds of materials and support systems. To help close the gap for these students, Riley put together Creativity Tool Tubs containing various tools to help them successfully complete a Destination Imagination solution.

The Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize selection committee also chose Marieke van Erven from Brighton as Honorable Mention. Marieke partnered with the Adams County Elections Department to create VOTE (Voter Outreach Through Education), which takes education about the elections department into high school government classes.

Gold Award Day at the Capitol

Older Girl Advisory Board applications are now open

We are seeking Seniors or Ambassadors who are interested in joining the Older Girl Advisory Board for the 2018-2019 membership year. OGAB members have the opportunity to provide direct feedback of current and future programming, participate in leadership and development workshops and serve as the voice for Girl Scouts across Colorado. Questions? Contact Emily Speck.

Apply now »

New e-learning classes

Overnight Trips is newly revised and available on our e-learning site. New resources have been added to the class, including: a comprehensive list of recommended places to go, a class guide with a sample itinerary and packing lists, information to support your troop planning process, and more.

Our new and improved Program Aide (PA) facilitator training is also available now on e-learning. This training will prepare volunteers to facilitate Program Aide training to Cadette Girl Scouts as well as provide an overview of requirements and tips to make sure your training is fun and engaging for girls.

If you need assistance accessing the site, please contact Shannon Weaver, adult experience manager.

Start e-learning 

April 21: STEM Magic with the Theater of Mystery, Pueblo
Come learn about STEM with this fun magic show. Space is limited to 30 girls, so please register early for a spot!

April 28: Girl Scout Day at the Summit Interquest, Colorado Springs 
Come to our annual tree lighting and brunch family/community event. We’ll have a scrumptious buffet, family photo opportunities, crafts, sweets, and hot drinks.

May 5: Daisy Flower Garden Journey at the Denver Botanic Gardens
Daisies can complete this journey in the beautiful setting of the botanic garden. Choose between a morning and afternoon session and plan extra time to enjoy the gardens. This event has sold out the past two years, so spaces may fill quickly! Interested in volunteering? Sign up now.

May 5-6: Athlete Badge and Golf Workshops with Colorado Golf Association, Aurora
Join experts from CGA in this morning workshop to learn the basics of golf and earn the Brownie Fair Play badge or Junior Practice with Purpose badge. Daisies  will have a workshop geared specifically to their age group. Space is limited to 20 girls per session.

Want event details delivered to your inbox weekly? Sign up for the Events email at gscoblog.org.

 

10 ways to show our planet some love

From Girl Scouts of the USA

We’re Girl Scouts. We know a thing or two about being green!

It’s in our DNA. Our founder, Juliette Gordon Low, was a famous nature enthusiast—and we always encourage everyone to use our planet’s scarce resources wisely, for themselves and for everyone!

On Earth Day—and every day—you can take action to help protect and honor the planet we all call home. There’s only one Earth, but there are so many ways to celebrate it!

Here are some ideas to get you started:

1. Go outside. Nothing says you love Mother Nature like spending some quality time with her! Take a walk. Smell a flower. Listen to the birds. Take photos in a national parkand share your best shots on Instagram and Twitter using #gsoutdoors. Then check out your photos—and others.

2. Recycle. Items made from glass, paper, metal, or plastic can all be recycled into new products instead of clogging our landfills or spoiling the environment. So don’t trash it, recycle it! You’ll help conserve resources, prevent pollution, reduce greenhouse gases, and make the environment healthy for future generations.       

3. Plant a garden. See firsthand how plants develop and thrive. Grow your own flowers, fruits, veggies, a tree, or all of them! You can start from seeds, cuttings, or potted plants. Go ahead—it’s OK to get your hands dirty for a good cause!

4. Say “goodbye” to plastic water bottles. It’s important to stay hydrated, but those disposable plastic water bottles are bad news for our animal friends and the environment. Just switch to a refillable water bottle you can carry with you. It’s healthy, environmentally friendly, and economical. Win, win, and win!

5. Flip the switch on energy use. Turn off lights, computers, televisions, game consoles, and other electronic devices when you’re not using them— simple, but so effective!

6. Go to an Earth Day fair. Find an Earth Day event in your community and go! It’s your chance to learn about environmentally friendly practices, products, and volunteer opportunities. Plus, you just might make new friends who share your interests or pick up a tip or two on how to be more environmentally aware.

7. Use less, reuse more. You can reduce waste by not creating it in the first place. Try to buy reusable items instead of disposable ones. Repair broken things instead of buying new. Do a good deed by donating unwanted clothing, toys, and other items to charity instead of tossing them in the trash.

8. Spark a conversation. Talk to your friends about environmental issues that interest you. Together, you can make a plan to have a positive impact on our planet. Or get in touch with elected officials and community representatives to share your ideas on the environment. Raise your voice and be heard!

9. Conserve water. Did you know that only 1% of the Earth’s water is suitable to drink? So let’s use it wisely. Turn off the faucet while you’re brushing your teeth. Take a quick shower instead of filling the bathtub. Be on the lookout for leaks at home and school. We can do this!

10. Organize a cleanup. Get your friends and family together and have some fun cleaning up your local park, beach, school, or playground. After you’re done, have a picnic to celebrate a job well done. 

And that’s just the beginning!

In Girl Scouts, there are plenty of ways to make every day feel like Earth Day! Girls can explore the It’s Your Planet—Love It! Journey—or work toward their Outdoor badges, find an awesome summer camp, or even be part of the Girl Scout Ranger Program in our national parks.

So let’s get out there and make this an Earth Day to remember!

For more information on Girl Scouts and the outdoors, check out the special report, More Than S’mores: Successes and Surprises in Girl Scouts’ Outdoor Experiences (PDF).

Complete the “WOW” Brownie Journey in a Day

Submitted by Andrea Robison

Metro Denver

Thornton

Cadette Troop 60569 is hosting another Brownie Journey event! Our Cadettes are excited to help Brownies complete this fun and essential journey in just ONE half-day session! There are two sessions from which to choose:

-Saturday, May 5, 2018 9 a.m. – 12 p.m.

-Saturday, May 5, 2018 1 p.m. – 4 p.m.

All sessions will be located at Northglenn Christian Church (1800 E. 105th Pl., Northglenn, CO 80233).

The Wonders of Water Journey will be completed in one half-day session by learning Ways of Working (LOVE water, SAVE water, SHARE water) led by our enthusiastic Cadette guides.

LOVE water: Bring your love of water activities to share and learn all about water.

SAVE water: All girls will participate in a community service activity to help promote the conservation of water.

SHARE water: Brownies will be working independently and together to create posters for their schools to spread the news about how to save water.

Cost: $10 per Brownie

This is not a drop-off event. Leaders are expected to adhere to adult to girl ratios. Journey books and badges are not included.

All payments must be made prior to the event (echecks are accepted). No on-site registration will be available. To register or for more information, contact Andrea Robison at troop0569@gmail.com.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Volunteer Spotlight: Jenni Esser

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Jenni Esser of Peyton in the Pikes Peak region has had many different volunteer positions at both the troop and service unit levels. She is also a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Jenni to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I was pretty much “volun-told.” Haha. I took my oldest to the first Girl Scout meeting of the year in Peyton and told them, while holding my three-month old second daughter, that I’d help where I could but that I had the little one. At the end of the meeting, I was introduced as the new Daisy leader.  Lol.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I know how important and influential Girl Scouts was to me. When I was 12 or 13, my Girl Scout troop traveled from Ohio to Rocky Mountain National Park via the Badlands and Cheyenne, WY. It was the trip of a lifetime to me. I knew from that trip that I wanted to be a geologist for the U.S. Geological Survey and live in Colorado. I made that goal happen at age 22. I want to make sure my girls (and others too!) have a great experience through Girl Scouts so they too can experience and explore new places and things and find their goals and have them become reality. 

And that role has expanded. I started out as a Daisy Leader and have moved up with my oldest daughter through Brownies, Juniors, and Cadettes. I will soon be her Senior leader when she bridges this summer. I am also the Service Unit Manager for SU 10 (both before the merge and after the split from SU 13).

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have learned that my Girl Scouts leaders were saints. It is a lot of work leading girls, but it is also an enriching experience. I love seeing the girls explore something new. I love their excitement and energy. It’s contagious.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope the girls have learned how to lead and to be great women by living the Girl Scout Law. I hope they continue to learn and explore throughout their lives and that they also become leaders and role-models to younger and future Girl Scouts.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Being a leader hasn’t helped me become a G.I.R.L. I have been one because I grew up a Girl Scout. Being a leader has given me the opportunity to help girls become a G.I.R.L.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Girl Scout awarded the Mary Jo Jacobs, M.D. Memorial Girl Scout Adventure Fund

Girl Scout Daisy (soon-to-be Brownie) Rebecca W. of Garfield County in the Mountain Communities region is headed to Girl Scouts of Colorado summer camp after receiving the Mary Jo Jacobs, M.D. Memorial Girl Scout Adventure Fund. Rebecca will attend “Mermaids” Tomahawk Ranch in June.  She wrote in her application for this award, “What does Girl Scouts mean to me? It means that we can do lots of fun things, like selling cookies and talking to people. Also, we do lots to help our community. This year, we went to the animal shelter and donated food and blankets. We also bought four families Thanksgiving dinner, who couldn’t afford to buy the food themselves. Right before winter break, our whole troop made dinner for our families. There was over 60 people there! Before school started we went camping as a troop too! My favorite thing about Girl Scouts is spending time with my friends. We have a big troop, and I belong to the Daisies. We have five Daises, and it’s really fun to get to know them.”

Mary Jo’s four children established the scholarship in December 2014 to honor their mother’s extraordinary legacy. As an 8-year-old girl growing up in 1937, Mary Jo wanted a new pair of roller skates. She wanted them more than anything in world— until she learned her Brownie troop was going to be able to go to summer camp. Mary Jo had to make a choice: spend the $8 she had worked so hard to earn on roller skates or Girl Scout camp? For Mary Jo, the decision was simple. She was going to Girl Scout camp. Mary Jo’s mother walked her to the local Girl Scout office, so she could be the first to register. A reporter for the Artesia Daily Press in New Mexico even wrote a story about Mary Jo and her decision.

After returning home from camp, Mary Jo continued to participate in Girl Scout activities, including going to camp. Eventually, she became a doctor and worked tirelessly to serve the people of Eagle and Garfield Counties, Colorado.

The Mary Jo Jacobs, M.D. Memorial Girl Scout Adventure Fund provides Girl Scouts from Eagle and Garfield counties in Colorado with a scholarship so they can experience the learning opportunities, joy, and camaraderie of attending Girl Scout Camp. “Our hope is that that many girls will have the same positive experience, education and adventure that mom had through her involvement in Girl Scouting and her opportunity to attend Girl Scout camp,” said Dr. Patricia VanDevander, daughter of Dr. Mary Jo Jacobs.

Registration for Girl Scout Camp is now underway on the Girl Scouts of Colorado website at girlscoutsofcolorado.org. For summer 2017, girls can attend overnight camp sessions at Sky High Ranch near Manitou Lake and Woodland Park or perennial favorite Tomahawk Ranch near Bailey, southwest of Denver. Activities include archery, backpacking, photography, and rock climbing. Overnight camp runs from 3 to 12 days for girls ages 6 and up.  Girl Scouts of Colorado will continue to offer day camping adventures throughout the state. The summer camp schedule is live on the Girl Scouts of Colorado website (girlscoutsofcolorado.org). Girl Scout summer camp programs are open to all girls throughout Colorado, whether they’re in a troop or not, and new campers get a 10-percent discount.

Girl Scouts of Colorado is 32,000 strong—more than 22,000 girls and 10,000 adults who believe in the power of every G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader)™ to change the world. Our extraordinary journey began more than 100 years ago with the original G.I.R.L., Juliette Gordon “Daisy” Low. On March 12, 1912, in Savannah, Ga., she organized the very first Girl Scout troop, and every year since, we’ve honored her vision and legacy, building girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. We’re the preeminent leadership development organization for girls. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org.

Working to earn the “Primitive Camper” badge

Submitted by Ariella Wells

Northern & Northeastern CO

Fort Collins

We got the girls together outdoors to start working on the “Primitive Camper” badge. The girls learned about plants that could be edible in the wild and also primitive shelter building. They built two very different structures based off what they could find around them. They had an amazing time and are talking about more they want to do outdoors!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Girl Scouts of Colorado