Welcome to GSCO Blog

 

Girl Scouts can do anything and everything they set their hearts and minds to! You’ll find it all here.  From members sharing their adventures to Highest Award honorees describing their projects and news from council, cookie updates, travel opportunities, volunteer tips and much, much more.

Build Your Own Tomahawk

Watch this video and Starlight from Tomahawk Ranch will teach you how to build your own tomahawk! Be sure to watch our video on knife safety before starting this program.

VIDEO TRANSCRIPT: Build Your Own Tomahawk

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouts of Colorado Unveils New Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Programming: You don’t need to be a Girl Scout (or a girl!) to participate

Girl Scouts of Colorado (GSCO) is proud to unveil ways for everyone, not just girls or Girl Scouts, to develop an appreciation for the rich diversity of various cultures in their community and around the world.

GSCO is partnering with Children’s Hospital Colorado, Colorado Mountain College, Denver Public Schools, and Denver7 on new Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion programming, adapted from a program developed by our Girl Scout sisters in Minneapolis. The programming is designed to help participants start the conversation about race and racism by learning to appreciate diversity and honor and celebrate differences. In addition, our “Conversation Starters: Let’s Talk Differences” virtual roundtables will give families the tools they need to begin talking about issues related to race and racism. Both parents and children will deepen their understanding and respect for people who may be different from them and learn how to better relate to others.

Experts from GSCO, Children’s Hospital Colorado, and Colorado Mountain College will answer questions about these important topics, with Anne Trujillo from Denver7 moderating the discussion. There will be two Conversation Starters, one for parents and caregivers on July 30 about how to talk with children about differences, race, and racism; the other on August 13 is specifically designed to answer questions on these topics directly from children. Questions can be submitted in advance here.

Everyone who completes the activities as part of GSCO’s Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion programming will earn the “Diverse. Inclusive. Together.” patch. This program is designed for everyone, including families, communities, schools, and religious groups. The developmentally appropriate activities ease the way to having meaningful conversations with youth starting at kindergarten through 12th grade. The programming includes hands-on activities, reflective writing, discussions on understanding, and more. All programming is also available in Spanish, thanks to translation services from Denver Public Schools.  For a comprehensive list of activities for each age level, visit the Girl Scouts of Colorado website or contact Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper. Also, because not everyone who will complete these activities has a Girl Scout vest or sash, we have created a digital patch that can be proudly displayed on social media to show the recipient’s commitment to appreciating, understanding, and respecting people of all races and cultures.

“The Girl Scout Movement has been about social justice, equity, and inclusivity from its very beginning, and part of the Girl Scout mission is to make the world a better place,” said Chief Executive Officer Leanna Clark. “As an organization, Girl Scouts of Colorado is recommitting to that mission. That’s why we’re opening up this programming beyond girls and beyond our Girl Scout community to make it available to as many people as possible. We hope families will take part together to deepen their understanding of themselves and others.”

Diversity and inclusion have been core values of Girl Scouts since its founding in 1912. Girl Scouts prepares girls to lead, to speak up and speak out, and to take action for change, fairness, equality, civility, and compassion for all people, and to arm them with the courage, confidence, and character they need to make our world a better place. Girl Scouts will always stand for justice, for respect, and for the inherent value and worth of each individual who makes up the beautiful and richly diverse tapestry of the United States.

GSUSA CIT Summer Showcase

On July 21, 2020, Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA) is inviting all current CIT’s (CIT1 & CIT2) to participate in a CIT Summer Showcase.  Learn new songs and activities and have the opportunity to meet and gather together with CIT’s from across the country! Visit https://cit_summer_showcase.eventbrite.com to register by July 20.

As a group, if you and your fellow CIT friends are interested in presenting an activity or song during the showcase, please contact GSCO Camp Staff Hobbes and Kitty at sara.kleinkopf@gscolorado.org and sarah.bales@gscolorado.org by July 17.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Senior Behind the Ballot Badge Step Four of Five

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In a few years, you will be 18-years-old and able to vote. It is also a presidential election year, and a year in which Colorado chooses a new U.S. Senator, and all the seats we hold in the House of Representatives are on the ballot as well. In American history, women and 18-year-olds have not always had the right to vote (or run as a candidate for office), but now they do, and you will. It will not only be your right to vote, but a wonderful way to honor the women who fought for our right to vote in every election. Voting is also the best (and easiest) way to tell the government where you stand on the issues and whom you think is best able to make decisions that will affect you and your sister Girl Scouts. In the Senior Behind the Ballot Badge, we will explore the way people get elected to office, and the importance of voting both here at home and around the world.

Step One: Find out more about elections

Step Two: Investigate the Ins and Outs of Voting

Step Three: Get Out the Vote

Step Four: Plan a Campaign

Let’s take a look at what it takes to attract voters. Do one or more of the following activities.

Create a sample campaign budget. We are about to head into election season and elections cost money. Find out how campaign money is spent by creating your own sample budget.  Include the costs for polling and travel, staff salaries, and don’t forget the buttons, bumper stickers and lawn signs! TV and radio ad costs differ depending on region. Take a look at the Federal Election Commission’s website to see how much your local representative raised and spent and take that into account when creating your budget.

OR

Create a campaign ad. Most people these days are tired of seeing the same old campaign ads on TV. Take a look at three different ads from three recent elections. Are the ads negative or positive? Truthful or misleading? Do they feature the candidate, or their opponent, or someone else? Make your own ad, one that’s not like any that are on TV these days. Keep in mind the following: Who are you trying to attract?  Young voters, new voters, voters from a different background? Don’t forget your campaign slogan!

OR

Find a platform and write a speech. Every campaign begins and ends with a speech. Read or watch campaign speeches by three winning candidates. What do they care about? What do they want to protect by seeking office? Do they use clichés or slogans in their speech? Decide what you care about and why other people should, and write a passionate speech as if you are running for a local office or student council.

Share your work on the GSCO Blog, or on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram. Twitter and Instagram users should also use #GSColo.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouts of Colorado Unveils New Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Programming

Girl Scouts of Colorado (GSCO) is proud to unveil ways for everyone, not just girls or Girl Scouts, to develop an appreciation for the rich diversity of various cultures in their community and around the world.

GSCO is partnering with Children’s Hospital Colorado, Colorado Mountain College, Denver Public Schools, and Denver7 on a new Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion patch program, adapted from a program developed by our Girl Scout sisters in Minneapolis. The program is designed to help participants start the conversation about race and racism by learning to appreciate diversity and honor and celebrate differences. Grant funding will provide FREE patches to the first 750 Girl Scouts of Colorado girl members who complete all activity and reporting requirements. Use this online form* to request your patch.

In addition, “Conversation Starters: Let’s Talk Differences” virtual roundtables on July 30 and August 13 will give families the tools they need to begin talking about issues related to race and racism. Both parents and children will deepen their understanding and respect for people who may be different from them and learn how to better relate to others. RSVP now for the Conversation Starters and submit your questions for our experts.

* Please note – Free patches are for current Colorado Girl Scouts only who have fully completed the patch program. The form must be completed once for each individual Girl Scout. Non-Girl Scouts can fill out this online form to let us know they have completed the program, receive their digital patch, and/or order a physical patch.

Questions? Email inquiry@gscolorado.org.


Girl Scouts of Colorado Presenta Nueva ProgramaciĂłn de Diversidad, Equidad, e InclusiĂłn

Girl Scouts of Colorado (GSCO) está muy orgulloso en presentar maneras para que todos, no solamente las niñas o Girl Scouts, podamos desarrollar una apreciación para la diversidad de las varias culturas en sus comunidades y alrededor del mundo.

GSCO se está asociando con el Children’s Hospital Colorado, Colorado Mountain College, Denver Public Schools, y Denver7 en nuestro nuevo programa de parches de Diversidad, Equidad, e Inclusión, que fue adaptado de un programa desarrollado por nuestras hermanas Girl Scouts de Minneapolis. El programa es diseñado para ayudar a los participantes a empezar la conversación sobre la raza y el racismo al aprender como apreciar la diversidad y honrar y celebrar las diferencias. El uso de subvenciones ayudara a proveer los parches GRATIS a las primeras 750 niñas miembros de Girl Scouts of Colorado que completan todas las actividades y entregan los requisitos. Use esta forma en línea* para pedir su parche.

además, tendremos mesas de discusión virtuales llamadas “Conversation Starter: Let’s Talk DIfferences” el 30 de julio y el 13 de agosto que darán a familias las herramientas que necesitan para empezar a platicar de los temas relacionados con la raza y el racismo. Tanto los padres como a los hijos profundizaran su entendimiento y el respeto hacia la gente que es diferente de ellos y aprenderán como relacionarse mejor a otros. De su RSVP ahora para esas platicas “Conversation Starters” y entregue sus preguntas a nuestros expertos.

* Por favor tome note – Los parches gratis solamente son para las niñas con membrecía en Girl Scouts de Colorado que han completado este programa de parches. La forma se tiene que completar una vez para cada Girl Scout individual. Los que no son Girl Scouts pueden llenar esta forma en línea para dejarnos saber que han completado este programa, recibir su parche digital, y/o ordenar un parche físico.

ÂżPreguntas? Mande un correo electrĂłnico a inquiry@gscolorado.org.

2020-2022 OGAB Applications Open July 20

So, you have earned a bunch of badges, completed some Journeys, gone on some amazing adventures, and you are now wondering what you next step in Girl Scouts is. What about joining the Older Girl Advisory Board?!

The Older Girl Advisory Board (OGAB) is a group of Seniors and Ambassadors from across the state who provide direct feedback to staff about programming, while helping our council to stay current with the wants, needs, and desires of our girl members. As a member of OGAB, you are basically making sure our programming stays girl-led!

Also, being a part of OGAB looks AMAZING on college and job applications. You are developing and improving your skills in working with groups, program development, and leadership- all skills that a college or employer looks for!

We meet virtually every month for one hour discuss and brainstorm topics that are prepared by Girl Scouts of Colorado staff or something that OGAB members want to bring up. Then, twice a year we meet in-person at Tomahawk Ranch for a retreat from a Saturday morning – Sunday afternoon, which is where we do A LOT of program development, discussion, and of course, fun.

Our schedule for 2020- 2021:

August 29-30, 2020: Retreat at Tomahawk

March 6-7, 2021: Retreat at Tomahawk

Second Wednesday of each month: Virtual Meeting

Sound interesting? Then apply! Applications are open from July 20 – August 7 and can be found here: https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/our-program/older-girls/older-girl-advisory-board.html

To apply, you will need to:

  • Answer a series of short essay questions
  • Provide email addresses for two references who are not family members

If you pass the first application round, you will be asked to join a video interview call the week of August 10-14. You will be able to select a date and time that works for your schedule.

Questions? Contact Emily Speck at Emily.Speck@gscolorado.org.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Celebrate the Recipients of the 2020 Volunteer Recognition Awards

Join Girl Scouts of Colorado Chief Executive Officer Leanna Clark on Saturday, July 18 at 2 p.m. as she announces the recipients of the 2020 Volunteer Recognition Awards. Everyone is invited to attend this virtual celebration to honor the many amazing volunteers across the state, who were nominated for—and received—a recognition award. You can get a notification that the event is starting by clicking the “Get Reminder” button on the bottom right of the Video Premiere post.

You can watch a live video premiere of the celebration on the GSCO Facebook page. Not on Facebook? That’s OK! Watch on our YouTube channel using this link: https://youtu.be/AvaVwxt1CsE. Please note this link will not work until the celebration starts at 2 p.m. If you log on early, you may need to refresh your screen at this time.

Service units that have virtual or socially-distanced special award celebration moments with their volunteers can share photos and videos on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Twitter and Instagram users should also use #GSColo.

Silver Award Girl Scout Upcycles Wooden Pallets to Make Garden Beds

Silver Award Girl Scout Scarlett Montgomery-Anderson from Grand Junction upcycled 16 wooden pallets to make more than a dozen garden beds for nonprofit organizations and members of her community. Those who received the beds include Karis, Inc. at The House, First Congregational Church, and Grand Valley Unitarian Universalists. Scarlett hopes those who receive the beds (and benefit from them) will discover low-cost methods to grow their own food. Scarlett also did a planting demonstration with Grand Valley Unitarian Universalist’s youth, showing them how to plant and care for their new garden.

The idea for this project came about at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. Scarlett, along with help from her mom, made her own garden beds out of pallets. After learning how her family could benefit from growing their own food, Scarlett wanted to make more garden beds to help those in her community, especially during these challenging times.

Through completing this project, Scarlett earned the Silver Award, the highest honor for a Girl Scout Cadette. Also, as part of her project, she is encouraging others to make garden beds out of wooden pallets. She created a “how to” video and it is now posted on Girl Scout of Colorado’s YouTube channel: https://youtu.be/tDcsodKvBbU

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

“Clifford the Big Red Dog” Book Craft

 

This easy craft is perfect for younger Girl Scouts (or younger siblings) and is a great follow-up to reading “Clifford the Big Red Dog” by Norman Bridwell.

Materials needed:

  • Glue
  • Scissors
  • White paper or colored construction paper
  • Markers

If the construction paper is not available, shapes can be drawn on white paper and colored.

You will need:

  • Dog face (peanut shape)
  • Two Red ears (elongated teardrop shape)
  • One Nose (triangle shape)
  • Two Eyes

Glue red ears to backside of head.

Color black pupil on two eyes and glue on head. Add nose on lower portion of head.

Once head is dried, draw eyebrows and mouth.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Senior Behind the Ballot Badge Step Three of Five

In a few years, you will be 18-years-old and able to vote. It is also a presidential election year, and a year in which Colorado chooses a new U.S. Senator, and all the seats we hold in the House of Representatives are on the ballot as well. In American history, women and 18-year-olds have not always had the right to vote (or run as a candidate for office), but now they do, and you will. It will not only be your right to vote, but a wonderful way to honor the women who fought for our right to vote in every election. Voting is also the best (and easiest) way to tell the government where you stand on the issues and whom you think is best able to make decisions that will affect you and your sister Girl Scouts. In the Senior Behind the Ballot Badge, we will explore the way people get elected to office, and the importance of voting both here at home and around the world.

Step One: Find out more about elections

Step Two: Investigate the Ins and Outs of Voting

Step Three: Get Out the Vote

The 26th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution lowered the legal voting age from 21 to 18. Yet, in the 2016 election, less that 50% of voters under 30 cast a ballot. While this is the only age group to have election turnout increase since the 2012 election, it is still the age group with the lowest turn-out by far. Choose one or more activities to help increase the voter turnout of young Americans.

Research and create a poster. Explain the voter registration process you learned in Step Two, including the motor voter registration, which makes it easier for any American with a state issued driver’s license or identification card to register to vote. Include the other ways there are to vote, including a link to online voter registration.

OR

Make a Voting Calendar. It can be paper, electronic, in app form, or to be integrated into social media. Please include local, state, and federal elections for your county. You might also include nonpartisan websites and references where any voter can get truthful and unbiased information about candidates and issues.

OR

Educate! Get a sample ballot from a recent election, and use it as a tool to show young voters in Colorado how easy it is to fill out and return a ballot, who won in the last election, and how their vote is important. Include data on the winners, and how many people voted for each candidate or issue.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

 

Girl Scouts of Colorado