Welcome to GSCO Blog

 

Girl Scouts can do anything and everything they set their hearts and minds to! You’ll find it all here.  From members sharing their adventures to Highest Award honorees describing their projects and news from council, cookie updates, travel opportunities, volunteer tips and much, much more.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Megan Burns, Colorado Springs, “The Silver Lining Project”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I created a website and social media presence made up of art created, inspired by, or created during the COVID-19 pandemic. I made it as a way for artists to express how they felt during this tumultuous time. I also created sticker designs in order to raise money for the website.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I knew my project has made an impact because I have gotten submissions from many different states and communities, all with different perspectives and ideas they wish to express through their art.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My website will stay active online after I have stopped receiving submissions. This is why I created my sticker designs. I also created a YouTube video as an advertisement to fully explain my project.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I have received submissions from Ukraine and the UK. I have also gotten a blog up on the WAGGGS website to reach the international community further.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned I am more capable of connecting to dozens and dozens of people than I first thought I was. My time management skills were also strengthened as a result of this project.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

I am planning to pursue a career in graphic design in college. I can point to this project as an example of my web design and organizational skills. It could also potentially help me get a job later down the road.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I feel as though this project was a really good, finalizing way to end my time with Girl Scouts. It represents all the things I have learned and all the friends I have made being a part of it. I’m so proud of all I have been able to accomplish.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I feel as though my project in itself was a huge risk. Cultivating an online presence is extremely difficult and there were so many times I wondered if this would even work at all. I’m so thankful to say it did. I was lucky enough to have a mentor and support system that helped me find artists willing to submit.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org.

Listen now: Meet an Expert – Girl Guide from Bangladesh

Girl Scouts of Colorado extends a giant thank you across 7,891 miles from Colorado to Dhaka, Bangladesh to Proma, a Bangladeshi Girl Guide who participated in our “Meet an Expert” program on February 22 in celebration of World Thinking Day.

Missed the program? Listen or watch now on our Meet an Expert playlist on YouTube.

More than 60 Girl Scouts from across the country joined the program to learn about Girl Guiding and life as a young woman in Bangladesh. The program was moderated by two young women in Colorado, Cassidy Christian, a Gold Award Girl Scout and active member of the Global Action Team, and Bebe Lin, also a Gold Award Girl Scout, active girl member of the Global Action Team, and current member of the Older Girl Advisory Board. Proma answered questions that Girl Scouts submitted in advance and told the girls all about her Girl Guide traditions, activities, and structure. She also spoke about her favorite foods, hobbies, and her interest in studying biology and genetics.

Girl Scouts who participated in the live session or listen to the recording can purchase their “Meet an Expert” patch online: https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/about-girl-scouts/gsco-shop.html

Questions? Email aimee.artzer@gscolorado.org.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Help Needed: Girl Scout Cookies for the Military

Submitted by Kay Martley

Metro Denver

Aurora

We still need APO addresses for Girl Scout family and friends to ship Girl Scout Cookies to them as part of Hearts Across the Miles. Please email hatm@gmx.com  and kaymartley@gmail.com by Monday, March 15, 2021.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Breanna Lewis, Colorado Springs, “Sewing for Humanity”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?  

I taught people how to sew and I also tied it in with a community service project.  This helped them learn the skill of sewing and then since we made pillowcase dresses, we donated the dresses to people who needed them.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience? 

I couldn’t have in-person classes, so I decided to measure my impact on how many people watched the videos I made on YouTube.  I had more than 1,600 views on one of my YouTube videos.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?  

All my videos are on YouTube, so anyone can watch them at any time, and anyone can teach a class on how to make the pillowcase dress or a scrunchie.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection? 

The places that I’m donating the pillowcase dresses to are a church that goes on missionary programs. I’m also sharing my online class guide with Girl Guides in Germany and Italy. I also have videos online that anyone can watch if they have internet access.

What did you learn about yourself? 

I learned that teaching someone how to sew is hard and that you must be adaptable and go with the flow. I learned a lot, but I need to work on my communication skills for how to get the idea across. I also learned how to take charge of things and how to be a better leader.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future? 

I have always known that I want to help other people as a career choice. This is just giving me one step closer to achieving helping other people.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?  

Since I did this my senior year, I feel like it’s just wrapping up Girl Scouts, in general, this is the last year to do everything to get it done. I think this is just the last hoorah of a Girl Scout.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

I feel in a way I became a G. I. R. L. I’m an innovator because nothing went according to plan, so I always had to reinvent my idea to go about it a different way.  I think I’m a risk-taker because I have never taught a class before and it’s a hard thing to accomplish and so just trying to get the idea across was just hard and putting yourself out there is a risk. I also had to be a leader during this project because I had to teach other people and to be able to do that, I had to be a leader and have good communication on how to explain how to do each step of how to make something.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org.

Girl Scouts x UNICEF Kid Power

More than 50 million adults, children, and families in the United States are experiencing food insecurity, a number that has only increased since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. Those in need may include members of our own communities, friends and family, or members of our troops, making this an important take-action issue for Girl Scouts.

Girl Scouts can make a big difference in their communities—and for children around the world—through GSUSA’s new partnership with UNICEF Kid Power®. This program will get girls moving, and allows your troop to unlock virtual coins to support local causes that provide meals to families in your community! And, for every ten exercise or mindfulness videos girls complete, UNICEF delivers one therapeutic food packet to a severely malnourished child. Your troop’s donation may go anywhere in the world!

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Free Admission to the U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Museum during Girl Scout Week 2021

 

Celebrate Girl Scout Week 2021 at the U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Museum in Colorado Springs.  From March 8 to 14, all Girl Scouts wearing their sash, vest, or a Girl Scout T-shirt will receive complimentary admission at the door. (Please note Tuesday, March 9 and Wednesday, March 10 are closed to general admission, but groups can visit by appointment. Contact groupsales@usopm.org for more information or to schedule a visit.)

The 60,000-square foot U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Museum in Colorado Springs is dedicated to America’s greatest athletes and their compelling stories, with the artifacts, media, and technology behind the athletes who make the United States proud. The Museum focuses on the core values of the Olympic and Paralympic movements: friendship, respect and excellence; determination, equality, inspiration and courage.

For more information and contact information, visit https://usopm.org/.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Downhill Skiing Fun

Submitted by Ariella Wells

Northern & Northeastern CO

Fort Collins

Some of the girls from Troop 720 had some downhill skiing fun last weekend! The sun was shining. The snow was fresh and great for skiing. The girls thoroughly enjoyed themselves.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Pilot a NEW Resiliency Curriculum Program by the U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Museum

Girl Scouts across Colorado are invited to pilot the U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Museum’s new Resiliency Curriculum Program. The program is called, “Becoming Your Personal Best.” Click here to get started. Next, choose to pilot one or more curriculum module for students in grades 4-12, focusing on the following resiliency skills: self-identity, perseverance, mindset, relationships, problem solving, and/or confidence. Video components highlighting the life experiences of an Olympic or Paralympic role model are included with each resiliency skill. When the module has been completed, pilot participants should complete a survey about their reactions and feedback. Modules have been designed for maximum flexibility. Accelerated lessons will take 15-20 minutes and each full-lesson will take 45-60 minutes.

Now more than ever, students and teachers alike need resiliency in their lives. The newly opened United States Olympic & Paralympic Museum in Colorado Springs invites educators and students to provide critical feedback on a brand new, research-based resiliency curriculum curated by classroom teachers, resiliency experts, and informal education institutions. Before offering this free curriculum to all Colorado schools and after-school programs in fall 2021, the museum needs people to pilot one or more curriculum modules throughout the spring to ensure each activity achieves the exceptional desired learning outcomes we are striving to reach.

Questions? Email the U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Museum.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Littleton Cadettes Aid in Animal Adoption for Silver Award Project

Submitted by Lisa Schwartz

Metro Denver

Littleton

Girl Scout Cadettes Hayden C., Leah E., and Alexa S. from Troop 63227 in Littleton completed their Silver Award requirements with a project aimed at helping families who choose to adopt pets from the Humane Society of the South Platte Valley. There are so many animals being temporarily housed at shelters right now, and sadly many of them will not survive due to lack of space at shelters and not being adopted by a family.

Although their original idea was to spend time with some of the shelter animals and to write up information for the public to encourage the adoption of those animals, they were unable to pursue that idea due to COVID practices. However, these girls did not give up. Rather, they persevered to find their new idea, and they ran with it.

The girls are trying to encourage more families to adopt a forever friend, as well as to assist the families during the first stages of adoption, by putting together care bags to be given to families when they adopt an animal from the shelter. The bags include food, treats, toys, and other supplies, as well as important information that is invaluable to first time adoptive families. The girls have included a letter to encourage the adoptive families to “pay it forward” by donating supplies, food, or a monetary contribution to help out future adoptive families. Especially in this time of the pandemic, pets are highly important in providing love and companionship to people who may feel a bit lonely or isolated.

Here is what the girls have to say about their project:

Hayden: Our Silver Award project focuses on animals and their families. Creating care packages, we start to fill the void during COVID-19. For instance, individuals are separated during physical distancing hence, producing isolation. Therefore, animals are another route to filling the gap. Our care packages allow families to obtain a straight forward headstart to their pet’s life.

Leah: In the beginning, my group and I wanted to help get animals adopted at animal shelters. We were planning on writing about the animals so that it could help them get adopted. We started calling places, asking if we could help get their animals adopted. Sadly, we weren’t able to help get animals adopted, so we had to think of other ideas. So off we went, thinking of what we could do for the community. We eventually ended up with the idea of making care packages for new pet owners. We divided up the tasks everyone would do, calling places to see if they would like to have our care packages, writing the letter for new pet owners, and putting together our care packages. We were able to use virtual meetings to work things out.

Alexa: Our project idea is important to me because families might not know how to care for an animal, and we are able to help them. I helped pick this topic because it is important to help understand and help animals in need. A lot of animals at shelters don’t get adopted, which is a big problem needing to be solved.

Hayden, Leah, and Alexa have now completed the requirements for their Silver Award and have learned so much along the way. They have been go-getters, innovators, and leaders by changing course when their original project idea could not be implemented and by reaching out to members of the community for partnership and help. The girls would like to thank the Humane Society of the South Platte Valley for partnering with them in their endeavor. Also, a big shout out to Ms. Lisa for meeting with the girls and taking in the supplies—they were so glad to meet her! Finally, the girls would like to encourage everyone to consider either adopting a shelter animal or volunteering to help out at a local shelter—you just may make a difference in the life of an animal or a family!

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Smart Cookie: March 1, 2021

The announcement that the cookie program will be extended through March 21 has been met with enthusiasm. Girl entrepreneurs and our supportive volunteers are continuing to rise above every challenge with innovative and creative solutions making this a great Girl Scout Cookie Program!

Hometown Hero Booth Focus

Generous Coloradans are happy to support your Hometown Hero, so be sure to ask customers to buy cookies to donate! Make a poster with images and facts about your Hometown Hero. When people walk by your booth ask, “Would you like to purchase Girl Scout Cookies for our Hometown Hero?” Tell them how many donated packages you want to collect, explain more about your HTH, and be ready to talk about why they matter to you! Hometown Heroes should be listed in eBudde and cookies should be delivered by the troop as soon as possible after the Cookie Program ends. Troops can pull additional cookies to fill Hometown Hero orders or use any remaining inventory at the end of the program for these donated.

Cookie Cupboard News

New Incentive for Troops and Juliettes – Select Cookie Cupboards around the state hid golden, silver, and bronze tickets in cases of cookies over the weekend. Three troops have already found winning tickets and there are plenty more!

Troops that find tickets in their cupboard orders will receive additional proceeds. Juliettes will receive Cookie Credits.

  • Golden Tickets– $100 troop proceeds
  • Silver Tickets– $50 troop proceeds
  • Bronze Tickets– $25 troop proceeds

To redeem a golden, silver, or bronze ticket, troop volunteers or Juliette caregivers need to:

  • Scan the QR code on the ticket.
  • Complete the form.
  • Upload a photo of themselves with the case of cookies and the winning ticket.

Friday, March 26 is the deadline to submit the form to redeem the winning tickets found at cupboards. Late submissions will NOT be accepted.

Cookie Cupboard Order 72 hour Hold Requirement Lifted

Many Cookie Cupboards across the state have agreed to stay open for two more weeks and Cookie Cupboards are no longer required to adhere to the 72-hour lead time. It’s the cupboard manager’s decision to have either no wait, a 24 hour wait, or continue with a 72 hour wait, depending on what works best for their workflow and availability.

  • Be sure to refer to each cupboard notes section in eBudde to see what their lead time requirements are and their cupboard hours of availability.
  • Cupboards will still require volunteers to choose a pick-up time. Doing so is the best way to manage the number of people picking up orders from a cupboard at a time and adhere to safety guidelines.
  • People picking up cookies from cupboards need an eBudde password.

Booth Updates and Inventory Management

Dates for My Sales booths have been extended in eBudde to March 21. Parents/caregivers should submit requests for My Sales booth site approvals though their troop cookie manager. Make sure that the location name and address is complete and correct. It makes it easier for customers to find!

Look for additional Council booth locations this week too!

Inventory Management

Digital Cookie – Parents/caregivers can turn off varieties of cookies that they don’t have on hand. Go to the Digital Cookie “Parent Inventory Tab” tip sheet for more information.

Allocate Cookies in eBudde – If you haven’t started already, now is the time for TCMs to allocate cookies to girls and continue to do so until the end of the program.

This year, there is the troop link that also has to be zero at the end of the program. When the program closes, there cannot be any sales on the troop “faux girl” or troop URL. Cookies sold through the troop URL (shipped and donated AND cookie booth sales) have to be allocated to selling girls in the troop.

  • “How-to” videos will post to the GSCO Facebook page/videos and YouTube channel by Friday, March 5. The demo videos will walk you through the steps on how to allocate all cookies.
  • TCMs can also check-in with their service unit cookie manager for support.

2021 Service Unit Incentive

Service units will receive an incentive of $.01 (penny) per package sold, if the number of packages sold in 2021 is 3% (or more) over the number of packages sold in 2020.

If the number of packages sold in 2021 is 6% more than the number of packages sold last year, service units will receive $.02 per package. Note: These incentives are not cumulative.

Service Units need to submit a current ACH form for the service unit bank account in order to receive the incentive deposit.

  • If you completed the ACH form with your Annual SU report in 2020, it covers you for the 2021 Cookie Program incentive.
  • If you don’t have a SU bank account, please set one up. Submit an ACH authorization before March 21.  Click here for ACH authorization link.

Reminders about Special Cookie Patches- Deadlines Extended

Colorado Girl Scouts can earn a FREE Pandemic Perseverance patch. Take a photo showcasing how you’re persevering to reach your cookie goal. This can be a photo of you working on your Digital Cookie website, hosting a virtual cookie booth, dropping off cookies on a friend or family member’s doorstep, etc. Complete this online form no later than Tuesday, March 23, 2021. Be sure to include your goals, Hometown Hero, and troop number.

To commemorate the introduction of the girl delivery option, girls will earn a custom “Porch Pixie” patch when they make their first contactless delivery to a customer!  Take a photo of yourself dropping off cookies on a friend or family member’s doorstep, etc., then complete this online form no later than Tuesday, March 23, 2021. Be sure to include your goals, Hometown Hero, and troop number.

These patches are only available to Colorado Girl Scouts.

Learn More

Revised Cookie Program Dates

March 7 – Grubhub booths end

March 21 – Cookie Program ends

March 21-24 – Cookie Program closeout

March 22 – Deadline to select and submit ALL girl rewards in eBudde.

March 22 – Final troop data due at 11:59 p.m. Allocate ALL cookies to girls in eBudde.

March 24 – Final SU submissions on ALL girl rewards in eBudde.

March 24 – Last day to pick up Hometown Hero (HTH) cookies from a cupboard.

March 26 – Deadline to submit a Money Problem Report. Form closes at 8 p.m.

March 26 – Deadline to submit form to redeem golden, silver, bronze tickets found at cupboards.

March 31 – ACH debit occurs for total amount owed to council.

First week of May – Cookie Credits mailed to girls.

May – Rewards shipped to SUCM.

Blackout dates concerning troop/group money-earning activities outside of the Girl Scout Cookie Program, will remain the same as originally stated (Jan. 31-March 17).

Any troop/group money earning activities planned for after March 17 will not be in conflict.

Girl Scouts of Colorado