Welcome to GSCO Blog

 

Girl Scouts can do anything and everything they set their hearts and minds to! You’ll find it all here.  From members sharing their adventures to Highest Award honorees describing their projects and news from council, cookie updates, travel opportunities, volunteer tips and much, much more.

Don’t forget the GSCO Classifieds too! Looking for Girl Scout materials or have some to sell or share, browse the Classifieds. Have a service to offer or need an expert for your next troop meeting, place an ad.

Epic Adventures day camp

Submitted by Brandy Schauppner

Metro Denver

Brighton

What could be better than spending a week at day camp? Join us for an EPIC experience doing crafts, outdoor fun, team building, some badge activities, and even a Take Action project.

This is for girls from Daisy through Junior with leadership opportunities for Cadette through Senior!

Brownies will have the chance to earn their Brownie W.O.W. Journey with the help of Cadettes who are working on their LIA awards.

We will spend our days making new friends, playing in the sun, going on hikes, and even a tour of the ON-SITE historical museum!

Program Aide Internship (PAI) and Program Aide opportunities are also available. Although we are not providing the training at camp, we will be offering the internship part of the requirement. If you would like to complete PA training prior to camp and need help finding a training session, please email us at epicadventures.gs@gmail.com. We may hold a PA training if enough girls are interested.

When:

June 10 – June 14, 2019

9 a.m. – 3 p.m. (Campers arrive at 8:30 a.m. and go home at 3 p.m. each day)

Where;

Adams County Regional Park (Adams County Fairgrounds)

Al Lesser Building Park

9755 Henderson Rd.

Brighton 80601

Contact

Email: epicadventures.gs@gmail.com

Directors: Anna Mills and Brandy Schauppner

Anna Mills: (303) 907 – 4654

Brandy Schauppner (720) 878 – 3947

Information and Registration website: https://epicadventuresdaycamp.wordpress.com/

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Gold Award Girl Scout receives $10,000 scholarship

Congratulations to Gold Award Girl Scout Cassidy Christian from Highlands Ranch! She received a $10,000 scholarship through The First Tee of Denver. The scholarship donor was Girls in Golf. Just like Girl Scouts, Cassidy has been involved with The First Tee since kindergarten. GSCO asked Cassidy to tell you more about the award and her experience with The First Tee.

“I love the entire program! I’ve taken lessons and have been a Junior Coach for the past three summers. Two years ago, I was selected as one of 28 First Tee High Schoolers from across the country to attend the Outstanding Participant Leadership Summit at the Triennial Network Meeting in Orlando. Part of becoming one of the Most Outstanding Participants was creating a project to help my First Tee chapter and my community. The project I created was to increase girl participation in The First Tee. I planned a Girl Scout event where we had 18 Brownies come and learn about golf and earn their “Fair Play” badge. I had the teamwork of TFT coaches, my high school golf team and my Girl Scout troop to help lead the little girls in an evening of golf fun. Golfing with The First Tee and Girl Scouts have had a huge impact on my life. I was so pleased to be able to combine the two of them into a fun event. Golf is a wonderful sport that you can play for your entire life. I wish that more girls would give golf a chance. There are so many opportunities for girls in golf!”

After learning that many people don’t know how often they need to replace their smoke detectors and the dangers of having a defective smoke detector, Cassidy was inspired to earn the highest honor in Girl Scouts. She developed a “Smoke Detector 101” resource in Spanish and English. She also designed and distributed magnets to remind families to change their smoke detectors.

 

Volunteer Spotlight: Aneida Slomski

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Aneida Slomski of Colorado Springs in the Pikes Peak region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Aneida to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I got my daughters into Girl Scouts because I enjoyed being a Girl Scout when I was a girl. It’s a great program and after a couple years, the troop needed a new leader, so I volunteered.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I started out as a Brownie Leader, and then we became a multi-level troop and I went up through the levels with my daughters. I work with the Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors now and I’m the treasurer for our troop. I love working with this level because they’re so capable and have such good ideas. I have volunteered at day camps and service units. Now, I’m a service unit co-director. I’m on various committees on the service unit level to help plan our fall campout and World Thinking Day activities. I help coordinate summer activities with our troop, like campouts and trips to go caving (the crawling on your knees kind, not the walking kind) and whitewater rafting. We have camped at three different Girl Scout camps in Colorado through the years. I’ve also helped coordinate many trips to local businesses and organizations, so the girls can learn how things work in our area and the girls can get service project ideas.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I am a homebody. The girls really get me out of my comfort zone and I like it. I started out not even knowing how to start a fire. I had to learn to cook outdoors; I think sometimes I cook better outdoors than indoors! I learned PowerPoint and Excel to help the troop. The first spreadsheet I made added the phone number. I had to learn knots, map and compass, lashing, and other outdoor skills, so I could teach the girls for the Reach for the Peak camping competition. They learned from the leaders, and then they just ran with it. They got so good at it that they reached the point where they told the leaders where to sign and where to drive them and they won the highest award.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope the girls have learned to try new things. If a girl has an idea (and they always have amazing ideas), there are adults who will help them get to where they want to be, cheering them on. I hope the girls learn about the outdoors and how capable they are in that environment. In a multi-level troop, they really get the opportunity to work with girls of different ages and cultural backgrounds. I hope they have learned that our differences are no big deal.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Being a leader has taught me to be on the lookout for exciting things to share with the girls and to work with others to make them happen. As an innovator, I’ve learned to create events from scratch like day camps and cultural events. I am not the type to take a lot of risks, but I was a risk-taker and a leader when I organized a townhall meeting to save Sky High Ranch. I have never gotten involved like that before, and it was really amazing to see my adult daughters, the girls from our area, former camp counselors, and so many local leaders coming together to speak up and save our camp. Council listened, they were very supportive, and Sky High Ranch was open for summer camp again. We did it for the girls.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

 

 

Join us for World Environment Day on June 16

Outdoors and Girl Scouts go together! As part of our partnership with Colorado State Forest Service, Girl Scouts of Colorado is hosting a special day on June 16 at Meadow Mountain Ranch to celebrate World Environment Day.

This is also a wonderful way to celebrate Father’s Day, as the whole family is invited to attend. This event is hosted by the Girl Scouts of Colorado Global Action Committee.

By celebrating World Environment Day, Girl Scouts honor Juliette Gordon Low’s legacy of promoting respect and love of the great outdoors far and wide. Through Girl Scouting, girls see the earth as their home. Whether they’re learning about endangered wildlife, developing creative recycling projects, or working toward a grade-level award, girls focus on care, conservation, and responsibility. They make sure the beauty and wonder of our planet endure for future generations to enjoy.

Girls will have the opportunity to participate in several activities across the camp property throughout the day. The event is open-house style and you’re welcome to come for the whole event, or part of it, and participate in whichever activities interest you. Activities include:

Activities from the Global Action Days Toolkit

  • A hands-on activity from our awesome partner, the Colorado State Forest Service.
  • A chance to meet with a former Girl Scout about her career in forestry/environmental science and experiences as a wildland firefighter.
  • Conservation-related service projects on the property.
  • Walk the MMR Nature Trail and earn your patch (patches for sale via GSCO Retail Shop).
  • S’mores station.
  • Displays from the GSCO Global Action Committee & History Committee.

You are welcome to bring a sack lunch and/or snacks for the day.

You can also pick up your FREE Global Action Days patch at this event. You have earned the Global Action Days patch by celebrating three of the Global Action Days during the year by completing at least one activity from the toolkit for each day. Because World Thinking Day has its own award, it cannot be used to earn the Global Action Days patch. You may use this World Environment day toward the patch requirements.

To register: Fill out the online RSVP form to let us know how many Girl Scouts, family, and friends are attending this free event. The RSVP will also ask how many Global Action Days patches you’ll be picking up that day. If you do not RSVP in advance, we cannot guarantee a patch for you that day. Online RSVPs will close Tuesday, June 11.

This is not a drop off event. All girls must attend with a parent, guardian, or troop leader. Adult-to-girl ratios must be met. Girls attending with a troop leader should bring a completed parent permission form for a Girl Scout activity, which her troop leader should retain in case of emergency.

Questions? Email aimee.artzer@gscolorado.org or have trouble completing registration, please contact inquiry@gscolorado.org or 877-404-5708.

Celebrate World Thinking Day in Colorado Springs

Submitted by Melissa Stamps

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

Still looking to celebrate World Thinking Day with your Girl Scout sisters? Join Service Unit 413 for an around-the-world showcase of countries! You and your troop can choose to represent a country with a display of facts, art, artifacts, snacks, etc. or to be tourists and just come enjoy the fun!

When:

Saturday, April 27, 2019

10 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Where:

Colorado Military Academy

Colorado Springs

Cost:

$1.50/per girl presenting

$5 per girl touring

Adults are free.

Questions? Contact Melissa Stamps at mcs9886@yahoo.com or (719) 551 – 0270 to choose a country and register, or with any questions.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Volunteer Spotlight: Christine Kucera

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Christine Kucera of Steamboat Springs in the Mountain Communities region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Christine to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I’ve become a Girl Scout volunteer for many reasons. First, I volunteered to become a troop leader while in college at Illinois State University. I missed all of the fun activities and my connection to younger girls. I felt that I had a lot to share with a group of Brownies. I had a wonderful time taking them camping and teaching them what I remembered as most special to me.

After I got married and moved to California, I volunteered again. I wasn’t ready to have children of my own yet, but again missed my connection with girls. I became very involved with a troop of girls through Juniors and Cadettes. We taught them life skills, took them canoeing, camping, and skiing.  One of them had never seen snow and now takes her family skiing.

We moved to Colorado and took a break from volunteering to spend more time on the slopes and raising children. I resisted volunteering for a while because I felt that I was too busy with my two children. My kids went to a small local charter school north of Steamboat Springs and I realized that my daughter needs to get to know more town kids to help ease her eventual integration into the high school. I was able to find a Girl Scout troop that would hold off starting the meeting after school until we could arrive. This was a nice sized troop that had lots of fun playing games and singing songs, but was not doing any badges. I was hoping to have my daughter enjoy Girl Scouts without her mom as the leader, but I stepped in and helped. I led this troop through Bronze and Silver awards, trained them to win Reach for the Peak, and am guiding them down their paths to the Gold Award. Girl Scouts has become an important part of my soul.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I now have many roles in Girl Scouts. I am a Senior/Ambassador troop leader, member of the local Girl Scout grant committee, Mountain Communities region volunteer trainer, local troop camp director, and 2018 National Delegate. My troop and I lead many local events each year, ranging from bridging, World Thinking Day, cookie rallies, monthly multiage group meetings, and annual troop camp. I am a trainer for adults, especially 101 and Camping and Cooking. I am the trainer for Program Aides and soon Volunteer in Training. I plan and implement PA-run troop camp for Juniors and older each summer. I was honored to be selected as a National Delegate and want to take my troop to the National Convention in Florida in October 2020.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have learned that when girls are challenged, they step up and can accomplish anything. I have seen Daisies learn how to use a compass, tie lashing, and do dishes for all of camp with more maturity than the average middle schooler. I have seen girls struggle with the stress of the Reach for the Peak Competition, immediately start planning their next year’s theme and come back two years later to win the Peak Award. My troop ran a local older girl super troop, teaching outdoor skills, Girl Scout ceremonies, songs and games, and had girls repeatedly ask me when I will be healthy enough to start it up again this year until I got it scheduled. I have watched my daughter work diligently for a year and a half on her Gold Award, only to say “I know I could be done at this point, but I want to go bigger and make a real difference.” I have girls from my California troop who contacted me over Facebook and reminisce with me about the things we did and how they are sharing those things with their families. I have learned that everything I do with Girl Scouts makes a lasting impact on young women and it makes me feel inspired every time I see an unspoken thank you.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope that girls learn to pass on their strengths while improving their weaknesses. My greatest hope is they realize that they are role models for people younger and older than themselves and they can make as big of an impact as they desire.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

My greatest desire is to give my daughter amazing experiences that help her through her life journey. While trying to accomplish this, I have stepped up and become a go-getter. I have had to come up with innovative ways to share everything I know and teach her things I am learning for the first time. I have taken risks that I would not have dreamed of before that have made me a stronger person. Have I become a better leader than before? I think that goes without saying. Even more importantly than my personal growth, I have watched all the girls I’ve interacted with turn in a G.I.R.L. by following my example. Girl Scouts makes all of us better women.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

 

Rainbow Alley honored as Hometown Heroes

Submitted by Laura Hopkins

Metro Denver

Littleton

Cadette Troop 60074 tries to think outside of the box when it comes to choosing Hometown Heroes, and pick organizations that don’t get donations from other troops. This year, they chose Rainbow Alley, a community center for LGBTQ youth in Denver. When we brought the cookies in, they gave us a great tour and explained all of the services they offer for young people. We hope that the staff, volunteers, and kids enjoy the cookies!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Troop 60678 earns “Musician” badge

Submitted by Melissa Sommers

Metro Denver

Littleton

Our troop went to Do Re Mi Lessons in Littleton and had a blast learning about a variety of instruments. We got to hear the violin, viola, and cello and give them each a try. Do Re Mi owners, Dean and Desiree Hirschfield, played an Irish jig using the violin, also known as a fiddle, and the cajon, which we learned was a percussion instrument. Charlotte organized the event. She and Dean composed a song together and taught it to the rest of the troop.

Charlotte learned about music from around the world! She was an innovator and risk-taker by composing a song and performing to her troop. She taught the song to her troop and they performed it at the end of the event!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Volunteer Spotlight: Cindy Miller

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Cindy Miller of Denver in the Metro Denver region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Cindy to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I am passionate about women in leadership and have always been active in women’s leadership organizations. Girl Scouts provides the most amazing leadership development programs for girls. The broad membership of Girl Scouts means that we impact so many girls as an organization. As a volunteer, I get to impact the organization as a whole and also individual girls, which I love.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I am a Gold Award mentor and committee member. I mentor up to five girls at a time. I serve on the GSCO Board of Directors and as a Committee Chair, and I volunteer to support events around the state whenever or wherever I can. I help with the 99’s Aviation Patch Day each year (I’m also a member of the 99’s), and I love working at a cookie distribution site each year. 

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

That our future is a good one because there are so many smart, engaged young women in Girl Scouts, who are already making an impact on the world. I can’t wait to see what they do next. I’ve also learned that there are so many dedicated volunteers, who do so much for Girl Scouts. I am humbled by the time and energy  that so many of them invest.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope that girls learn to approach challenges as opportunities to learn, that solving a problem is rewarding, and that learning new things is always exciting even if you don’t think you will “use” that skill or information again. I learn a great deal from girls (and other volunteers) – especially the highest awards girls. The problems they see in the community and the world, and how they go about making an impact, inspires me.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I think I was already a G.I.R.L. I just didn’t have that acronym to describe it. Volunteering with Girl Scouts, however, has given me the opportunity to apply my leadership skills in new ways. Being around other G.I.R.L.s, I have learned to see and think about problems in new ways (innovator).

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

Volunteer Spotlight: Becky Woodbridge

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Becky Woodbridge of Durango in the Southwestern Colorado region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Becky to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

My daughter was the main reason why I volunteered for Girl Scouts. However, I became a leader because I wanted to support as many girls as I can in my community. I am an advocate for women to use their voice and live with dignity. Beliefs are formed when we are young and I feel strongly that girls need support early on, so they grow into being a strong leader and to build the belief that they have the right to use their voice and what they say and do matters. I was a Girl Scout and it was a tremendous foundation for my morals, values, and character.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout. 

I am the troop founder and leader of 26243 in Durango. We started in July 2018 and currently have 12 girls: Daisies, Brownies, and a Junior. We are expanding our troop in the fall and adding a third co-leader. I am a very active troop leader and we are very involved in the community events.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

Oh boy where do I start… I had wonderful memories of Girl Scouts, but mostly it was Girl Scout Camp, selling cookies (1970’s), and doing a craft at a meeting. Beyond that, I was not really familiar what a Girl Scout meeting was all about. There was so much to learn and especially all of the new products, learning tools and resources like the Volunteer Toolkit. I have learned how to listen to what the girls want in a meeting, structure a meeting, and manage different age groups. The Daisies operate so differently than the Brownies.

What do you hope girls have learned from you? 

I hope girls have learned by my example. Leadership has many different facets. Listening to concerns and addressing them. Be polite and treat everyone of all ages with respect and follow the Girl Scout Law. To be adventurous, enjoy the journey, and take risks.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

I’ve been a leader of my own real estate company, a lead purser with American Airlines, and now Girl Scouts. Applying it to children with the right degree of go getting, inspiring innovation, taking risk in new territory has pushed me to be better and more effective leader. Without a doubt Girl Scouts is playing a very important role for me as a leader with my new start up business. It’s making me stronger!

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

 

Girl Scouts of Colorado