Tag Archives: Take Action

Centennial Juniors take action to help homeless animals

Submitted by Niki Spiers

Metro Denver

Centennial

Girl Scout Juniors from Troop 60168 decided to take action to help homeless animals. The troop finished up their Outdoor Journey by visiting the Dumb Friends League in Denver. The fourth graders learned what the current needs for the shelter were and set out to collect donations. They made posters, asking for donations and hung them in Peabody Elementary. Then, they made school announcements requesting donations. They reached out to family, friends, and neighbors for donations. On January 29, 2019, they arrived at Dumb Friends League with bags of paper towels, Q-tips, cotton balls, dish soap, and more! During their tour, they learned Dumb Friends League helps over 22,000 animals every year with most homeless dogs and cats being adopted within two weeks! It was a fun and educational visit for both Girl Scouts and parents. Everyone left grateful knowing homeless animals were being well taken care of at the Dumb Friends League!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Bronze Award Girl Scouts: Because pets need to eat too

Submitted by Emily Sage

Northern & Northeastern CO

Loveland

Hi! We are Troop 71020. We are a Girl Scout Junior troop. We are going to share with you how we earned our Bronze Award, and what we learned along the way.

When it came to our Bronze Award, we thought of animals and said “what if they’re hungry?” We brainstormed as a troop and met with community organizations, and finally found the perfect idea: a pet food drive! A pet food drive would help decrease the number of pets that are starving. We also wanted to help people that couldn’t afford pet food, so we found a local charity called House of Neighborly Service that provides food to those in need, including pet food. We organized a pet food drive across our community; put collection boxes in local stores, schools, and churches; and advertised our drive and the need for pet food. Our drive lasted for three weeks and we collected 1,489 pounds of pet food! We used money earned from the Fall Product Program to purchase bins to help store all of the new pet food. House of Neighborly Service was very thankful for our donation.

While working on our Bronze Award, we faced a couple problems, such as some stores weren’t willing to sponsor our project. It was also hard to figure out how to help the whole community with just ten girls and meeting just one time a month. To solve these problems, we split up and each individually found a location to host our food drive boxes and we expanded our options to include churches, schools, and workplaces, rather than just retail stores. Of course, if we did this again, we would change a few things, like having more time to find locations to host our food drive.

Pets around the world still need food, and you can donate pet food to a local food pantry or animal shelter whenever you can. One person can make a difference by making an action or donation in their community or around the world.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Girl Rising: Movie screening

Submitted by Katy Herstein

Metro Denver

Highlands Ranch

Senior Troop 60043 would like to announce the screening of Girl Rising on February 10, 2019. This PG-13 movie will inspire you in ways you haven’t thought of. It will leave you with ideas for your Silver Award or Gold Award projects. It will really make you stop and think about our world of girls!

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This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Save the date: 2019 Highest Awards celebrations

Girl Scouts of Colorado is thrilled to announce the dates for the 2019 Highest Awards celebrations statewide.

Friday, April 26, 6 p.m.

Center for American Values

Pueblo, CO

Sunday, April 28, 2 p.m.

Embassy Suites by Hilton Loveland

Loveland, CO

Friday, May 3, 6 p.m.

Penrose House Garden Pavilion

Colorado Springs, CO

Sunday, May 5, 2 p.m.

Denver Marriott Tech Center

Denver, CO

Thursday, May 9 6 p.m.

Silverthorne Pavilion

400 Blue River Pkwy.

Silverthorne, CO 80498

Sunday, May 19, 2 p.m.

Colorado Mesa University

Grand Junction, CO

These celebrations are an opportunity to recognize the outstanding Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award Girl Scouts who have earned their distinction in the last year. All troops and/or girls who have earned their Bronze, Silver, or Gold since March 2018 are invited to participate in a celebration of their choice. Anyone planning to attend must RSVP online, the RSVP form will be made available on our events page in March 2019.

Gold Award Girl Scouts across the state will also be recognized at Gold Award Day at the Capitol on Monday, April 8. Each Gold Award Girl Scout is encouraged to participate in both regional celebrations as well as Day at the Capitol.

Please note the deadline to notify GSCO you have earned your Bronze or Silver Award and participate in celebrations is March 1, 2019. Notify us now that your girls have earned their Bronze or Silver Award: http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/for-volunteers/forms-and-resources/bronze-and-silver-notification.html

Questions? Email Kaitie LoDolce, highest awards manager, at highestawards@gscolorado.org.

Celebrations SavetheDate 2019_final (002)

 

“Girl Rising” movie screening

Submitted by Katy Herstein

Metro Denver

Highlands Ranch

Girl Scout Troop 60043 has planned a public screening of the documentary “Girl Rising” as the Take Action project for their “GIRLtopia” Journey. Click on the link to the flyer below for details.

“Girl Rising” is an extremely thought provoking film about the state of girls’ access to education around the globe. These Seniors really had their eyes opened to other girls’ struggles and the want to share this opportunity with you.

Senior Troop 60043 are girls from 9th and 10th grade in Highlands Ranch. They enjoy all that Girl Scouting has to offer and are up for trying anything that comes their way!

When their Take Action project is complete, their next major projects are Girl Scout Gold Award plans!

They were also selected by Girl Scouts of the USA to participate in a study of the outdoor badges. They will be completing two of four chosen badges by GSUSA and completing a survey after the badges have been completed! Exciting!

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This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Emily Clark, Colorado Springs, “The Art of Being a Naturalist”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I developed a years worth of art lesson plans for fourth graders at School in the Woods. These lesson plans meet the Colorado Department of Education standards for Art for fourth graders, but are unique in that they are tailored towards outdoor education.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I used feedback from School in the Woods and their students as my lesson plans were used to measure the impact of my Gold Award. My lesson plans are now a part of their ongoing classroom curriculum.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project is sustainable because the lesson plans include instructions on how to teach each lesson, so they can be used by anyone. I designed them specifically to be implemented by parents, or adults who have no prior art education. This means they can be used by parents homeschooling their children in addition to parents assisting in the classroom.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I sent .pdf files of the lesson plans to the national parks service, homeschooling groups, and some local art programs. These lesson plans have been shared across the United States, and I know they have been used in California, Colorado, and Ireland.

What did you learn about yourself?

Through my project I learned teaching really isn’t my thing, but I learned a lot about art through teaching art and creating art lesson plans. While I don’t intend to be a teacher, I do plan on pursuing a career in art.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

The lessons I learned through my Gold Award Project will stay with me for the rest of my life. I can use what I learned on future applications for jobs or scholarships. Skills I learned and utilized include time management, leadership, teamwork, collaboration, and how to research and revise my work.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award teaches girls how to organize a project and set goals through a subject they enjoy and are passionate about. I feel I used the skills I learned in teamwork during Reach for the Peak, goal setting I learned through cookie sales, and skills from other Girl Scout events, projects, and workshops all came together to help me achieve success in earning my Girl Scout Gold Award.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

Earning my Gold Award helped me become a G.I.R.L. because it challenged me to take risks. It helped me become a risk-taker because I had to try new things and reach out to people in order for my project to be successful. I couldn’t just rely on the skills I had, but had to ask others for their assistance to make my project successful.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Multi-level Troop 65659 uses computational thinking to help oceans

Submitted by Jessica Spangler

Metro Denver

Denver

Girl Scout Cadette Elizabeth completed the “Think Like a Programmer” Journey with the help of her multi-level troop. She planned a web-site to raise awareness of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch to inspire people everywhere to make lifestyle changes that can help solve the problem and protect our resources.

First, the girls made a list of local, personal, and global problems computers can solve. They learned about what programmers do and what computers do to solve problems. With input from the troop, Elizabeth chose a community to focus on for her Take Action project: the ocean community of people and animals. She narrowed down all the problems affecting the ocean community to the Great Pacific Garbage Patch.

They used computational thinking by taking a big problem, The Great Pacific Garbage Patch, and breaking it into steps. They learned how to apply user-centered design by identifying the concerns, interests, and needs of the users of the oceans: humans need healthy food, transportation, medicine, minerals, transportation, and a healthy climate, and sea creatures need a healthy, clean environment to live in.

Elizabeth’s solution was to educate and inspire people about the garbage patch,. She considered what might be important to our users: easy ways to take action and step-by-step instructions. Elizabeth used feedback to improve her solution by learning what current ocean clean-up projects tell the public that people can do to help.

Elizabeth wanted to reach others to teach them what she learned, so the troop hosted a Call to Action event for the whole community. During the event, troop members and attendees learned about the problem and created artwork to raise awareness and remind them of their pledge to Take Action. Elizabeth came up with the idea to create a website to share information about the garbage patch, so her project would be sustainable. She wanted the website to include information for visitors on how to contact their elected representatives and information on local recycling options.

The finished website includes art inspired by the Great Pacific Garbage Patch created by Elizabeth, her troop, and the event guests. It also includes instructions on how to make your own art and pledge to Take Action to ensure our oceans are protected! Please visit the site at https://garbagepatchcalltoaction.myvidmy.com/ and share the link with everyone you know to create lasting change!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Colorado Springs Gold Award candidate constructs special shelter for feral cats

Girl Scout Gold Award candidate Leah J. from Colorado Springs constructed a catio, an outdoor cat shelter for feral cats, for the rescue group Look What the Cat Brought In. On Sunday, November 4, 2018, she hosted an open house at the shelter to showcase the catio to the public.

Leah describes her project:

I have always been an animal person, but I am particularly drawn to animals in need. I know I cannot adopt every animal out there that needs a home, so I do everything I can to help make their lives better. Feral cats are a particular challenge. People don’t want them running loose and creating a bigger problem by having more cats. But, rescue organizations are often ill-equipped to adequately address the needs of cats that are used to roaming the great outdoors.  Until they are adopted to live out their lives as barn cats, feral cats must be kept safe at a rescue, which usually means in indoor spaces. To help improve the lives of these cats, I built a cat patio, a catio, where the cats can go to feel the sun and wind, but still be safe. My catio is connected to the rescue’s building so that cats may use the windows to go indoors or outdoors as they choose. The positive effect this choice has had on the cats has been seen in terms of calmer cats; they are no longer always afraid, they have become more accepting of humans, and some are even showing trust towards humans. It thrills me to have made such a difference in the lives of the 12 cats currently living with access to my catio. I hope other organizations with feral cats will build their own!

Open only to girls in high school, the Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls—and the most difficult to earn. The Gold Award project involves seven steps: 1. Identify an issue, 2. Investigate it thoroughly, 3. Get help and build a team, 4. Create a plan, 5. Present the plan and gather feedback, 6. Take action, 7. Educate and inspire. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Fox21News/ KXRM-TV featured Leah’s project during one of their broadcasts.

 

 

Brownies journey through Wonderland

Submitted by Jen Rotar

Northern & Northeastern CO

Berthoud

On November 3, 2018, 32 Brownies from seven different troops took the marvelous “Journey Through Wonderland,” hosted by Troop 70700 of Berthoud. The Cadettes designed, organized, and led this “Journey in a Day,” with whimsical activities based on Lewis Carroll’s original story.

The Brownies earned their “World of Girls” Journey by telling their own stories, practicing teamwork, getting creative, and making healthy choices.

They topped off the day by creating Kindness Cards to distribute in their own communities as a Take Action project. Imagining what would happen if the Queen of Hearts sent her card soldiers to spread kindness, each Brownie will share their Kindness Cards in their own communities.

While the Brownies said they loved all the activities of the day, the favorites were definitely the Mad Hatter Hat Station and Caterpillar teamwork challenge.

Each station was designed and led by Cadettes, who worked through the challenges of planning the event and gained confidence in their own leadership abilities.

Troop 70700 is hosting “Journey Through Wonderland” again in December (already sold out), and is planning additional sessions for 2019. To be placed on an interest list for upcoming sessions, please email Troop 70700 leader Jen Rotar at rotarjen@msn.com.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Silver Award project: Installing Little Free Libraries at community parks

Submitted by Hailey and Megan T.

Western Colorado

Grand Junction

We love reading and wanted to share that with our community. As Girl Scouts, we decided to make this our Silver Award project and partnered with Grand Junction Parks and Recreation. We started with a Little Free Library at Lincoln Park playground. We designed, built, and installed the Little Free Library on Earth Day 2018. The theme was trees because it went with the tree theme at Lincoln Park playground. Then, Grand Junction Parks and Rec asked us to build another Little Free Library at another city park, Canyon View, and we agreed. We kept the same design for the most part, but had a sports theme for this library because it fits in with the theme of sports at this park. We learned a lot from this experience including woodworking skills, patience, and time management. We really enjoy reading, so this was a great opportunity for us to help the community read more and earn our Silver Award.

News Channel 11/KKCO-TV in Grand Junction even featured our project on one of their broadcasts.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VwA_-jxga-E

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.