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Bronze and Silver Award Girl Scouts honored at Highest Awards celebration in Pueblo

Nearly 50 Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at the Center for American Values in Pueblo on April 20, 2018, to honor the more than 1,300 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2017-18 Girl Scout awards program year, nearly 1,000 girls across the state and 18 in Pueblo and Southeastern Colorado earned the Bronze Award. Eight girls across Pueblo and Southeastern Colorado earned the prestigious Silver Award.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts gives girls the skills and experiences they need to thrive and lead in today’s world. The world needs female leaders now more than ever. You’re making a difference,” she said.

2016 Gold Award Girl Scout Megan Burnett served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about her journey to earn the Gold Award and how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

“All the skills you learn in Girl Scouts, through the meetings you plan and the badges you earn, are all intended to prepare you for the future,” she said.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Colorado lawmakers honor Gold Award Girl Scouts

On Monday, April 9, 2018, Colorado State Representatives broke from traditional business to honor 40 Gold Award Girl Scouts from across Colorado. More than half of this year’s honorees were at this recognition, which took place shortly after the session opened at 10 a.m. To earn the Gold Award, the highest honor in Girl Scouts, each of these young women completed a large-scale project that solves a community problem not only in the short-term, but for years into the future. By doing so, they’ve gained extraordinary leadership and citizenship skills that mark them as valuable contributors to their communities and world.

In addition to honoring these Girl Scouts and their extraordinary Gold Award projects that benefited communities across the world, Girl Scouts of Colorado introduced the winners of the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize and the Debbie Haskins Spirit of Girl Scouting Award. Riley Morgenthaler from Morrison received the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize. She created Creativity Tool Tubs to help close the gap that students living in low-resource areas face when participating in the STEM-based activity, Destination Imagination. The Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize was made possible through a generous gift to the Girl Scouts of Colorado Endowment by Girl Scouts of Colorado President & CEO Stephanie A. Foote. “Riley’s project is an exceptional example of sustainable impact through leadership. I am proud to present this prize to her and recognize Girl Scouts whose Gold Award projects have made a lasting impact,” Foote said.

Riley was honored along with one other Gold Award Girl Scout, whom the selection committee for the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize determined was deserving of Honorable Mention. Marieke van Erven from Brighton partnered with the Adams County Elections Department to create VOTE (Voter Outreach Through Education), which takes education about the elections department into high school government classes.

Elizabeth Hoelscher from Aurora was named the first recipient of the Debbie Haskins Spirit of Girl Scouting Award. She partnered with Avanti House, which houses teenage survivors of sex trafficking, to build a new library for the home and create welcome baskets for the girls. This award is given in memory of Girl Scout Gold Award Mentor Debbie Haskins, who had a passion for working with older Girl Scouts. It recognizes one outstanding Gold Award Girl Scout from Colorado who exemplifies the Girl Scout spirit through courage, confidence, and character.

“Earning the Girl Scout Gold Award designation is truly a remarkable achievement, and these young women exemplify leadership in all its forms,” said Foote. “They saw a need and took ownership of helping to develop a solution and took action to make it happen. Their extraordinary dedication, perseverance and leadership are making the world a better place.”

Open only to girls in high school, the Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls—and the most difficult to earn. The Gold Award project involves seven steps: 1. Identify an issue, 2. Investigate it thoroughly, 3. Get help and build a team, 4. Create a plan, 5. Present the plan and gather feedback, 6. Take action, 7. Educate and inspire. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

The following Colorado Girl Scouts are among the 40 statewide who will be receiving the prestigious Gold Award for the 2017-18 Girl Scout awards year:

  • Losing a close family friend to testicular cancer inspired Geneva Ascher from Breckenridge, Summit High School, to teach young people how to properly perform self breast and testicular exams. The lesson plans she created and delivered to her classmates will continue to be used by her school.
  • Meg Bleylefrom Highlands Ranch, Highlands Ranch High School, worked to increase the bee population by teaching children about how people need and depend on bees.
  • Beth Bolonfrom Longmont hosted a workshop for sixth through ninth grade girls to help them improve their communication skills and bolster their confidence when interacting with others.
  • Cheyanne Bridgesfrom Colorado Springs, Liberty High School, partnered with the Pikes Peak Humane Society to support their animal medical fund by providing a sustainable source of donations from her school.
  • Tara Butlerfrom Denver, Overland High School, created a course and curriculum specifically for senior citizens to educate them on how to use their smartphone and better understand the technology.
  • Nicole Choma from Breckenridge, Summit High School, developed a partnership between her own rugby team and a local after school program designed to promote physical activity and healthy eating behaviors in children. Older students taught a rugby lesson at elementary schools around Summit County.
  • Kayleigh Cornellfrom Aurora, Grandview High School, started the Colorado Book Bank and collected more than 1,300 new and gently used books for students in a summer lunch program.
  • Aubree Crockett from Colorado Springs, Vanguard High School, wanted to create understanding and acceptance between people around the world while inspiring people to create positive change on their own. She did this through distributing electronic kits, which included a digital camera and instructions for how people could share their daily life, to people all over the world. Fifty-two participants and 25+ partner organizations have all received a copy of the book and more stories are being collected and added to the project.
  • Peyton Dailey from Centennial, Grandview High School, created a coalition between Spanish Honor Society students at her school and the Independent Learning Communities program, to provide ILC students the opportunity to learn and practice Spanish in a one-on-one setting.
  • Victoria Delatefrom Centennial, Cherry Creek High School, created a four-week self-defense course to give her fellow students the knowledge and skills to protect themselves from sexual assault.
  • Emma Deutschfrom Denver, Rocky Mountain School of Expeditionary Learning, improved the cat rooms at the Denver Animal Shelter. By creating a more welcoming and colorful space, she encouraged more people to adopt cats.
  • Kamaryn Evansfrom Castle Rock, Douglas County High School, worked to raise awareness for victims of domestic violence and for the Crisis Center, which works to end domestic violence through advocacy, education, and prevention.
  • Inspired by her own love of music and struggles with mental health, Madeline Farr from Centennial, Arapahoe High School, worked to install a piece of outdoor musical equipment called a “metallophone” on the playground of a low-resource elementary school. She also provided the school with lesson plans for how to use the instrument and educated her community about the importance of alternate recess activities for anxious young people.
  • Brenna Giblin of Westminster, Jefferson County Open School, worked to increase awareness for Turner Syndrome and help girls who are diagnosed with it. TS is a chromosomal disorder that affects 25-50 out of every 100,000 live baby girl births. Brenna created a video of girls with TS sharing their stories, experiences, and advice for others.
  • Rose Goodmanfrom Boulder, Boulder High School, created a lesson plan, which meets common-core standards, to educate second grade students about the declining bee population and how they can help bees.
  • Elizabeth Hoelscherfrom Aurora, Grandview High School, partnered with Avanti House, which houses teenage survivors of sex trafficking, to build a new library for the home and create welcome baskets for the girls.
  • Ashlin Hultfrom Niwot, Niwot High School, created a series of materials for middle-school girls to encourage healthy body image and increase self-esteem.
  • Zoi Johnsfrom Golden, Lakewood High School, coordinated the installation of three 10,000-liter water filtration tanks in a school in rural Uganda and educated students in Uganda and in Colorado about the importance of clean water.
  • Emma Kerr from Monument, Palmer Ridge High School, built a bookshelf and reading center at a local elementary school. With the help of administrators and teachers, she also started a fun and competitive read-a-thon program in which more than 300 students participated.
  • Emelie Knitz from Colorado Springs, Discovery Canyon Campus High School, created a cookbook for FoCo Café in Fort Collins to educate people about what community cafés are, how they help the public, and where people can find other community cafés.
  • Makayla Kocherfrom Monument, Colorado Springs Christian School, created an art program for nursing home residents.
  • Kayleigh Limbachfrom Niwot, Niwot High School, wrote a guidebook for incoming International Baccalaureate students to help them weigh their options for their academic future.
  • Ty’esha Lockyer from Colorado Springs, Colorado Springs Christian School, worked to encourage more people to volunteer for Special Olympics. She created a brochure and posters that went to more than 100 volunteer and civic organizations across the county.
  • Justine Monsell from Highlands Ranch, Mountain Vista High School, partnered with American Legion Post 82 and the Elizabeth Cemetery to provide emblem markers and flags for the more than 150 veterans who are laid to rest in the cemetery.
  • Alexis Montaguefrom Castle Rock, Castle View High School, hosted a panel discussion so girls could learn more about career opportunities in STEM.
  • Riley Morgenthaler from Morrison, Conifer High School, created Creativity Tool Tubs to help close the gap that students living in low-resource areas face when participating in the STEM-based activity, Destination Imagination.
  • Sarah Nessfrom Centennial, Eaglecrest High School, hosted nearly two dozen after-school art therapy sessions to help kids at her school relieve and manage stress.
  • Gwyneth Ormesfrom Centennial, Cherry Creek High School, organized a series of after-school workshops to teach elementary school girls Processing (a basic programming language), along with the foundational concepts of computer science.
  • Emma Parkhurstfrom Centennial, Littleton High School, revitalized The Lions Cupboard, a local clothing closet, to make the space more accessible for families in need.
  • Jaden Scott from Fort Collins, Fort Collins High School, partnered with BASE Camp, an after school enrichment program, to offer dance classes as an extracurricular activity. Throughout her project, she taught more than 230 children dance at elementary schools throughout the Fort Collins area.
  • Abagail Sickingerfrom Castle Rock, Douglas County High School, developed a curriculum to help high school students get a job. Topics included: resume writing, what to wear, conducting yourself during an interview, and how to answer interview questions.
  • Katrina Stroudfrom Boulder, Niwot High School, created an activity booklet for The Butterfly Pavilion to teach children about Monarch butterflies and bumble bees.
  • Grayson Thomasfrom Lyons, Lyons High School, designed a mural of diverse and significant members of the STEM community for Lyons Middle/Senior High School.
  • Lillian Tobias from Breckenridge, Summit High School, partnered with the Colorado Haiti Project and traveled to Haiti to set up an entrepreneurship program at St. Paul’s school in the rural coastal town of Petit Trou de Nippes.
  • Marieke van Ervenfrom Brighton partnered with the Adams County Elections Department to create VOTE (Voter Outreach Through Education), which takes education about the elections department into high school government classes.
  • Melissa Wilsonfrom Castle Rock, Castle View High School, developed several materials to educate people who can hear about how to interact with those who are deaf.
  • Inspired by her mother’s battle with cancer, Susan Wilsonfrom Aurora, Grandview High School, created a media center for cancer patients undergoing treatment at Parker Adventist Hospital.
  • Mihaela Zaharescu from Broomfield, Prospect Ridge Academy, worked with her school’s National Honor Society chapter to create dental care packets for children in need. She also organized a drive to collect toothbrushes, toothpaste, floss, and mouthwash to go into the packets.

Girl Scouts of Colorado is 32,000 strong—more than 22,000 girls and 10,000 adults who believe in the power of every G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader)™ to change the world. Our extraordinary journey began more than 100 years ago with the original G.I.R.L., Juliette Gordon “Daisy” Low. On March 12, 1912, in Savannah, Ga., she organized the very first Girl Scout troop, and every year since, we’ve honored her vision and legacy, building girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. We’re the preeminent leadership development organization for girls. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org.

40 Colorado Girl Scouts earn Gold Award, the highest honor in Girl Scouts

This spring 40 Colorado Girl Scouts will receive the Gold Award, the highest achievement in Girl Scouts. These young women are challenged to change the world – or at least their corner of it. Gold Award Girl Scouts are making the world a better place. They’ve completed a large-scale project that solves a community problem not only in the short-term but for years into the future. By doing so, they’ve gained extraordinary leadership and citizenship skills that mark them as valuable contributors to their communities and world.

This year’s Colorado Gold Award projects benefited communities around the world. Topics varied from creating a cookbook and raising awareness for community cafés nationwide to educating elementary school students about the declining bee population to helping Haitian children learn valuable business skills. Lillian Tobias from Breckenridge traveled to Haiti to set up an entrepreneurship program at St. Paul’s school in the rural coastal town of Petit Trou de Nippes. Emelie Knitz from Colorado Springs created a cookbook for FoCo Café in Fort Collins to educate people about what community cafés are and how they help the public. Rose Goodman from Boulder created a lesson plan, which meets common-core standards, to educate second grade students about the declining bee population and how they can help bees. Marieke van Erven from Brighton partnered with the Adams County Elections Department to create VOTE (Voter Outreach Through Education), which takes education about the local elections department into high school government classes.

The following Colorado Girl Scouts are among the 40 statewide who will receive the prestigious Gold Award for the 2017-18 Girl Scout awards year:

  • Losing a close family friend to testicular cancer inspired Geneva Ascher from Breckenridge, Summit High School, to teach young people how to properly perform self breast and testicular exams. The lesson plans she created and delivered to her classmates will continue to be used by her school.
  • Meg Bleylefrom Highlands Ranch, Highlands Ranch High School, worked to increase the bee population by teaching children about how people need and depend on bees.
  • Beth Bolonfrom Longmont hosted a workshop for sixth through ninth grade girls to help them improve their communication skills and bolster their confidence when interacting with others.
  • Cheyanne Bridgesfrom Colorado Springs, Liberty High School, partnered with the Pikes Peak Humane Society to support their animal medical fund by providing a sustainable source of donations from her school.
  • Tara Butlerfrom Denver, Overland High School, created a course and curriculum specifically for senior citizens to educate them on how to use their smartphone and better understand the technology.
  • Nicole Choma from Breckenridge, Summit High School, developed a partnership between her own rugby team and a local after school program designed to promote physical activity and healthy eating behaviors in children. Older students taught a rugby lesson at elementary schools around Summit County.
  • Kayleigh Cornellfrom Aurora, Grandview High School, started the Colorado Book Bank and collected more than 1,300 new and gently used books for students in a summer lunch program.
  • Aubree Crockett from Colorado Springs, Vanguard High School, wanted to create understanding and acceptance between people around the world while inspiring people to create positive change on their own. She did this through distributing electronic kits, which included a digital camera and instructions for how people could share their daily life, to people all over the world. Fifty-two participants and 25+ partner organizations have all received a copy of the book and more stories are being collected and added to the project.
  • Peyton Dailey from Centennial, Grandview High School, created a coalition between Spanish Honor Society students at her school and the Independent Learning Communities program, to provide ILC students the opportunity to learn and practice Spanish in a one-on-one setting.
  • Victoria Delatefrom Centennial, Cherry Creek High School, created a four-week self-defense course to give her fellow students the knowledge and skills to protect themselves from sexual assault.
  • Emma Deutschfrom Denver, Rocky Mountain School of Expeditionary Learning, improved the cat rooms at the Denver Animal Shelter. By creating a more welcoming and colorful space, she encouraged more people to adopt cats.
  • Kamaryn Evansfrom Castle Rock, Douglas County High School, worked to raise awareness for victims of domestic violence and for the Crisis Center, which works to end domestic violence through advocacy, education, and prevention.
  • Inspired by her own love of music and struggles with mental health, Madeline Farr from Centennial, Arapahoe High School, worked to install a piece of outdoor musical equipment called a “metallophone” on the playground of a low-resource elementary school. She also provided the school with lesson plans for how to use the instrument and educated her community about the importance of alternate recess activities for anxious young people.
  • Brenna Giblin of Westminster, Jefferson County Open School, worked to increase awareness for Turner Syndrome and help girls who are diagnosed with it. TS is a chromosomal disorder that affects 25-50 out of every 100,000 live baby girl births. Brenna created a video of girls with TS sharing their stories, experiences, and advice for others.
  • Rose Goodmanfrom Boulder, Boulder High School, created a lesson plan, which meets common-core standards, to educate second grade students about the declining bee population and how they can help bees.
  • Elizabeth Hoelscherfrom Aurora, Grandview High School, partnered with Avanti House, which houses teenage survivors of sex trafficking, to build a new library for the home and create welcome baskets for the girls.
  • Ashlin Hultfrom Niwot, Niwot High School, created a series of materials for middle-school girls to encourage healthy body image and increase self-esteem.
  • Zoi Johnsfrom Golden, Lakewood High School, coordinated the installation of three 10,000-liter water filtration tanks in a school in rural Uganda and educated students in Uganda and in Colorado about the importance of clean water.
  • Emma Kerr from Monument, Palmer Ridge High School, built a bookshelf and reading center at a local elementary school. With the help of administrators and teachers, she also started a fun and competitive read-a-thon program in which more than 300 students participated.
  • Emelie Knitz from Colorado Springs, Discovery Canyon Campus High School, created a cookbook for FoCo Café in Fort Collins to educate people about what community cafés are, how they help the public, and where people can find other community cafés.
  • Makayla Kocherfrom Monument, Colorado Springs Christian School, created an art program for nursing home residents.
  • Kayleigh Limbachfrom Niwot, Niwot High School, wrote a guidebook for incoming International Baccalaureate students to help them weigh their options for their academic future.
  • Ty’esha Lockyer from Colorado Springs, Colorado Springs Christian School, worked to encourage more people to volunteer for Special Olympics. She created a brochure and posters that went to more than 100 volunteer and civic organizations across the county.
  • Justine Monsell from Highlands Ranch, Mountain Vista High School, partnered with American Legion Post 82 and the Elizabeth Cemetery to provide emblem markers and flags for the more than 150 veterans who are laid to rest in the cemetery.
  • Alexis Montaguefrom Castle Rock, Castle View High School, hosted a panel discussion so girls could learn more about career opportunities in STEM.
  • Riley Morgenthaler from Morrison, Conifer High School, created Creativity Tool Tubs to help close the gap that students living in low-resource areas face when participating in the STEM-based activity, Destination Imagination.
  • Sarah Nessfrom Centennial, Eaglecrest High School, hosted nearly two dozen after-school art therapy sessions to help kids at her school relieve and manage stress.
  • Gwyneth Ormesfrom Centennial, Cherry Creek High School, organized a series of after-school workshops to teach elementary school girls Processing (a basic programming language), along with the foundational concepts of computer science.
  • Emma Parkhurstfrom Centennial, Littleton High School, revitalized The Lions Cupboard, a local clothing closet, to make the space more accessible for families in need.
  • Jaden Scott from Fort Collins, Fort Collins High School, partnered with BASE Camp, an after school enrichment program, to offer dance classes as an extracurricular activity. Throughout her project, she taught more than 230 children dance at elementary schools throughout the Fort Collins area.
  • Abagail Sickingerfrom Castle Rock, Douglas County High School, developed a curriculum to help high school students get a job. Topics included: resume writing, what to wear, conducting yourself during an interview, and how to answer interview questions.
  • Katrina Stroudfrom Boulder, Niwot High School, created an activity booklet for The Butterfly Pavilion to teach children about Monarch butterflies and bumble bees.
  • Grayson Thomasfrom Lyons, Lyons High School, designed a mural of diverse and significant members of the STEM community for Lyons Middle/Senior High School.
  • Lillian Tobias from Breckenridge, Summit High School, partnered with the Colorado Haiti Project and traveled to Haiti to set up an entrepreneurship program at St. Paul’s school in the rural coastal town of Petit Trou de Nippes.
  • Marieke van Ervenfrom Brighton partnered with the Adams County Elections Department to create VOTE (Voter Outreach Through Education), which takes education about the elections department into high school government classes.
  • Melissa Wilsonfrom Castle Rock, Castle View High School, developed several materials to educate people who can hear about how to interact with those who are deaf.
  • Inspired by her mother’s battle with cancer, Susan Wilsonfrom Aurora, Grandview High School, created a media center for cancer patients undergoing treatment at Parker Adventist Hospital.
  • Mihaela Zaharescu from Broomfield, Prospect Ridge Academy, worked with her school’s National Honor Society chapter to create dental care packets for children in need. She also organized a drive to collect toothbrushes, toothpaste, floss, and mouthwash to go into the packets.

Open only to girls in high school, the Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls—and the most difficult to earn. The Gold Award project involves seven steps: 1. Identify an issue, 2. Investigate it thoroughly, 3. Get help and build a team, 4. Create a plan, 5. Present the plan and gather feedback, 6. Take action, 7. Educate and inspire. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

“Earning the Girl Scout Gold Award is truly a remarkable achievement, and these young women exemplify leadership in all its forms,” said Stephanie Foote, president and chief executive officer of Girl Scouts of Colorado. “They saw a need and took ownership of helping to develop a solution and took action to make it happen. Their extraordinary dedication, perseverance and leadership are making the world a better place.”

Girl Scouts of Colorado will honor these Gold Award Girl Scouts as well as recipients of Girl Scouts’ other two Highest Awards, the Silver (the Highest Award a Girl Scout Cadette can earn) and Bronze (the Highest Award a Girl Scout Junior can earn), at upcoming ceremonies around the state. These events include:

  • April 20 at 6 p.m. at Center for American Values, 101 S. Main St. #100, Pueblo
  • April 22 at 2 p.m. Embassy Suites by Hilton, 4705 Clydesdale Pkwy, Loveland
  • April 29 at 2 p.m. at the Denver Marriott Tech Center, 4900 S. Syracuse St., Denver
  • May 4 at 6 p.m. at the Penrose House Garden Pavilion 1661 Mesa Ave., Colorado Springs
  • May 6 at 2 p.m. Colorado Mesa University, 1100 North Ave., Grand Junction
  • May 11 at 6 p.m. at Silverthorne Pavilion, 400 Blue River Pkwy, Silverthorne

You can learn more about these extraordinary young women and their projects on the Girl Scouts of Colorado blog. You have permission to use the photos and biographies of any of the girls listed above in print or online publications. If you would like to interview any of these Girl Scouts about their project and the impact it had, please contact AnneMarie Harper, Girl Scouts of Colorado public relations director.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Geneva Ascher, Breckenridge, “Testicular and Breast Cancer Self Exams”

What did you do for your Gold Award project? 

For my Gold Award project, I instructed the freshman,  along with some sophomores, juniors, and seniors at my high school, how to perform self exams for testicular cancer and breast cancer. My project included a Google slide presentation and fake testicles and breasts, with mock cancerous lumps so that students could understand what they are looking for when performing self exams.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

Before my presentation, I conducted a survey though Google forms asking students what they would do of they every encounter an abnormality with their body. The way I asked the question lead to the biased answer of contacting a doctor, but even with my biased conclusion, students were still unsure. After my presentation, there was a very similar questionnaire on their Health Unit test, and many of the students said they would contact their doctor after finding anything different about their body.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

After the completion of my project, the health teacher and the health science teacher at my school pledged to make it a formal part of her annual curriculum at Summit High School. Beyond this, I have made a video that will be played on Tiger TV through Summit County TV10.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

Beyond just having this presented in health classes at Summit High School, my friends and I edited a video giving a quick presentation on my project ,in Video Production 2 and it will be play on Summit County TV 10 through their broadcast journalism segments produced by the students in the Video programs at Summit High School. This reaches a global connection because Summit County is a very destination/recreation vacation spot and people from all over the world can watch SCTV10 as they stay in hotels in Summit County. This video will also be uploaded to YouTube.

What did you learn about yourself?

This project was very outside of my comfort zone. I have always been very afraid of public speaking, but this project gave me the leadership skills of taking action in situations I would have normally never put my self into. Through the Gold Award project and the majority of my Girl Scout experiences have led me to be the person I am today. I am now less held back, more outgoing, and I now have the will to complete any task that is brought my way. My determination through this project has also given me the chance to be the vice president of the Certified Nurses Assistant Club, Summit Health Leaders at my school. This has also given me a chance to grow my leadership skills. The Gold Award has brought me to a mentality that I can accomplish all that I work for.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Getting my Gold Award has proven to me that I can finish anything I put my mind to. Whether it is schoolwork or making a difference to the community around me, I now know that I can change anything that I feel needs to be changed. Dedication is one of my strongest attributes now. This can help me in the future because I am not sure what life holds for me, but I am confident I will find success.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The most important part of my Gold Award was the awareness that I have created for two very curable cancers. My view on these cancers are that if sex and mental health are so widely talked about in schools, cancers, too, need to be talked about.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

G- This project had the intention of getting me through the stress of something that will only benefit the community and eventually the world around me. This is important to me because I have never been the greatest about completing tasks that may seem a little difficult. But because I enjoyed the topic and the atmosphere I created with my Gold Award, I was determined to complete it. This will serve me in the rest of my life because I now have the mind set that even if I do not enjoy what I am working on, the feeling of completing a given task is so rewarding it is always worth it.

I- Though out my project, I created new ideas and brought my self into new positions that I would never have put my self in. My Gold Award has created a new, interesting presentation shown through out my school, but it has brought out the best in me. I am now comfortable with my self and am comfortable with unfamiliar situations.

R- The Gold Award says nothing more than risk-taker to me. To complete this project, you need to put your self out into new positions, find new interests, and make a difference. No difference would be made in the world if people never tried anything new.

L- My high school life has been filled with different leadership positions, but the Gold Award has brought it to new heights. I am now able to finish all that is brought my way, with confidence that I have done my best.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

RSVP now for 2018 Highest Awards celebrations

UPDATE: Registration for the Denver Metro Highest Awards celebration on April 29, 2018 and Pikes Peak Highest Awards celebration on May 4, 2018 are now closed. We have reached capacity.

Congratulations to Colorado’s newest Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award Girl Scouts! You have made change in your corner of the world, maybe even beyond, now it is time to celebrate your accomplishment!

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award Girl Scouts who have earned their distinction in the last year are invited to participate in one of Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Highest Awards celebrations across the state. We have several celebrations planned throughout April and May and cannot wait to see you there. Use the information below to see these events on our calendar and RSVP for one of these exciting celebrations. Please note that everyone planning to attend (girls, troop leaders, guests, etc.) must RSVP online ahead of time.

Instructions for how to prepare for the celebration will be included in your confirmation email after you RSVP online.
Questions? Email HighestAwards@gscolorado.org

*Please note that capacity is limited at the Northern CO, Pikes Peak, and Denver Metro events. We ask that each girl bring only four or fewer guests. Additionally, events may reach capacity and close before the posted RSVP deadline.

Friday, April 20, 6 p.m.
Center for American Values
Pueblo, CO
http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/content/girlscoutsofcolorado/en/events-repository/2018/pueblo_southeastern_.html

Sunday, April 22, 2 p.m.
Embassy Suites by Hilton Loveland
Loveland, CO
http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/content/girlscoutsofcolorado/en/events-repository/2018/ne_ha_celebration.html

Sunday, April 29, 2 p.m.
Denver Marriott Tech Center
Denver, CO
http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/content/girlscoutsofcolorado/en/events-repository/2018/denver_ha_celebration.html

Friday, May 4, 6 p.m.
Penrose House Garden Pavilion
Colorado Springs, CO
http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/content/girlscoutsofcolorado/en/events-repository/2018/pp_ha_celebration.html

Sunday, May 6, 2 p.m.
Colorado Mesa University
Grand Junction, CO
http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/content/girlscoutsofcolorado/en/events-repository/2018/ws_ha_celebration.html

Friday, May 11, 6 p.m.
Silverthorne Pavilion
Silverthorne, CO
http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/content/girlscoutsofcolorado/en/events-repository/2018/mc_ha_celebration.html

Gold Award Girl Scout: Ty’esha Lockyer, Colorado Springs, “Help Wanted: Special Olympics”

What did you do for your Gold Award Project?

My project provided a wide range of organizations and individuals an awareness of the need for volunteers with Special Olympics and the huge impact that can be made in the lives of persons with developmental disabilities. I designed a tri-fold brochure and poster explaining the volunteer opportunities available and contact information for the four Special Olympics Regions in Colorado. I distributed more than 300 brochures and 35 posters with a cover letter explaining this project and my own involvement as my sister’s unified partner in tennis. The distribution included mailing packets to Girl Scout Council Offices throughout Colorado, Boy Scout State office, 30 National Honor Society Chapters, Local and State Civic Groups, IB Programs, and all 50 State Special Olympics Offices. I presented in person my project to my school Student Ministries and National Honor Society chapter, local libraries, the local Boy Scout office and the Senior Center.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

After sharing opportunities to volunteer with my tennis teammates and coaches, three became unified partners in our local Special Olympics tennis program last season. Many others, including the three from last season, have expressed their interest in getting involved this year.  Based on my 33% success rate, the number of possible new volunteers through awareness provided by the brochures and posters is huge. Also, the interest from members in NHS chapter at my school to acquire the needed service hours gives me confidence that volunteer involvement throughout the State of Colorado will increase dramatically.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

For over 25 years, my family has been involved with Special Olympics and witnessed volunteers continuing to serve this community year after year.  Historically, volunteers soon discover that they receive much more than they give and become more involved as they see the many opportunities.

Since I have given permission for the reproduction of the brochures and posters when needed, the awareness will continue to be shared for many years to come.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I believe that many athletes with disabilities will benefit when awareness of volunteer opportunities is increased.  A letter was sent to all 50 Special Olympic State offices with a brochure, encouraging duplication of this project in their area.  I received a letter from the Tennessee office stating that they are hoping to use the information in their state and thanking me sharing my project with them.  Hopefully, many other states will do the same.  In addition, with the military presence in our community, movement and re-involvement could spread across the country as well as the world.

What did you learn about yourself?

The courage to present ideas to people I don’t know isn’t as hard as I thought, especially when presenting a worthwhile opportunity.  I began with the idea that I would promote volunteering in my own community, but as I began developing the project, with the encouragement of my mentor, I realized that I needed to think bigger, which I will definitely do in the future.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Besides having the honor of being one of the relatively small group of girls that achieve the Gold Award, I have the satisfaction of knowing I participated in and completed the Girl Scout experience.  Also, the time management I developed while juggling the many other activities I’m involved with at school and church will serve me well in college and my future career.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of you Girl Scout experience?

The Girl Scout program is designed to help girls develop and grow in abilities like leadership and friendships. The Bronze, Silver, and Gold Awards promoted problem solving, serving others, and an awareness of community needs.  The sense of finishing well has definitely contributed to empowering me for the future challenges I will face. My involvement as my sister’s unified partner in Special Olympics tennis has shown me that when you give, you receive even more.  To know that I have made other’s aware of this opportunity has been very gratifying.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L.?

I definitely see myself as a go-getter.  Not only did I “go get” volunteers for our local tennis team “The Fireballs,”  I personally shared with many people my own experience as my sister’s tennis partner and by mailing more than 100 packets with cover letters explaining my experience and including brochures and posters to be used as they felt would reach the most people.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Gold Award Girl Scout: Jaden Scott, Fort Collins, “Get Up and Dance”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

Through the Before and After School Enrichment program in Northern Colorado, also known as BASE Camp, I taught dance classes to 230 kids over the course of a year and made a program where dancers in the area can volunteer, if they are over 15-years-old, to teach dance to kids at elementary schools. My goal was to get kids physically moving where they may not have had the opportunity to do so, while sharing my passion for dance. I also wanted to inspire others my age to teach dance and inspire children as well.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured my impact in the way the children responded to me being there and what they did following my time with them. Each time I went to teach, I could see the kids’ faces light up and get really excited to start dancing. Two girls from one of the schools I taught ended up dancing my choreography at the BASE Camp Family Fun Fair while wearing the “Get Up and Dance” t-shirts I gave out to the students. During spring break, I taught a few of the same children twice and the second time they saw me, they immediately recognized me and got extremely excited. The Group Leaders from each school where I taught, provided me with feedback on how much the kids enjoyed it.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

This project is sustainable because it is a program that dancers will be able to volunteer through for years to come. By having more and more volunteers each year, all of the BASE Camp students will get more of the exercise they need and the enjoyment of dance.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

After finishing this project, I moved to New Hampshire and was able to continue teaching dance to kids in an after school program. I have also shared my story on Facebook with a worldwide group of dancers in hopes of inspiring more to follow my path.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that I have all of the qualities to become a great teacher and can be an inspiration to the younger generation. When I started teaching at the first school, I was shy and not very confident while teaching, but when it came time to teach at the last school, my confidence grew and I became much more comfortable in front of all the kids.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

It will impact my future because it is something I can look back on and be proud of as a self-accomplishment. To be able to impact this many kids and more to come in the future, all on my own, is something not many people can say at my age.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award for me has always been a finish line towards the end of someone’s Girl Scout career and a beacon to look to. By having this goal right from the start, now achieving it feels like you’ve made it to the top and have finished it.  It gives me a great sense of accomplishment.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

Earning my Gold Award helped me become a risk-taker and a leader. I was shy and not very confident in myself when I first started teaching, but now I have become a teacher for my dance club at my high school as well as helped the theater director at school teach the dance choreography for the spring play.  I feel more comfortable and confident about it each time I teach. I would’ve never imagined that I would teach this many kids, become a source of inspiration at my age, and have taken this kind of risk before this project.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Gold Award Girl Scout: Nicole Choma, Breckenridge, “Elementary School Rugby Program”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award project, I created an elementary school rugby program, and I was able to teach elementary school age children rugby, with my coaching skills.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

To measure the impact of my Gold Award, I hope to see more participation in the middle and high school teams for both boys and girls rugby. To be able to see impact, I had the children raise their hands in the beginning and end of the program and I asked them who was interested in playing rugby in the future. I saw more and more hands being raised at the end of the program, which meant that more children wanted to join at the end of my program.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project will be sustained by training younger teammates to take over this camp for the years to come. I will be involved until graduation. My hope for the younger ruggers is to build upon their leadership skills and perform to their highest expectations once I leave the program. My rugby coach and the Summit Rugby Team board will also be involved with continuing the program.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

The global link to my project is that rugby is played worldwide. It is mainly thriving in countries such as Australia, New Zealand, England, Ireland, and South Africa. This sport was also reintroduced into the 2016 Rio Summer Olympics and will be continued onto the 2020 summer Olympics. So will the increasing popularity of the sport, it would be important to have knowledge upon the sport. I also talked about this global link with the kids at the program. Many of them did not know that rugby was an Olympic sport and how much is was played around the world. Globally, rugby is ranked at #6, with the second most watched and attended competition that is just behind the FIFA world cup. According to ranker.com in the U.S rugby is ranked as #19 comparing this to the worldwide favorite sport of soccer that is ranked at #5.

What did you learn about yourself?

With this project I learned more of what my weaknesses were. Some of those weaknesses included organization and communication. I learned that those were the areas that I needed to improve upon, which takes me how I improved through this project. I learned that in order to have everything work out you need to have everything planned, to be able to communicate to others, on what I want to accomplish.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

It will be a good source that I can reflect upon, and know that if I set my mind to something I can achieve it. I will also have the sense that I did something good for my community before I left for college, and it has inspired me to do more great things for the people around me.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I think the Gold Award was an important part of my Girl Scout experience because it was a good way to conclude my Girl Scout experience and really put all of the skills that I have learned as a Girl Scout into my Gold Award, but also lead me to be a lifetime Girl Scout.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

My Gold Award has taught me things that I didn’t realize that I was empowered with. The most that empowered me and caused my project to be successful was for me to be a risk-taker. Doing this project, I had to take a risk, that risk was to teach a whole new group of people that didn’t really know the sport of rugby. It was not a easy task. I had to innovate and bring a whole new idea of a sport to a group of people. Striving for my Gold Award helped with that significantly.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Gold Award Girl Scout: Peyton Dailey, Centennial, “Spanish for One, Spanish for All”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

The issue addressed by my project was unequal opportunity within my school for every student to learn Spanish. While traditional classroom style Spanish is offered, for differently abled students, there are not designated classrooms or hired staff to be able to offer these students the same opportunity to learn. My project created a coalition between Spanish Honor Society students and the ILC program (Independent Learning Communities), in order to provide ILC students the opportunity to learn Spanish within a one-on-one setting, and to allow Spanish Honor Society students the opportunity to share their accumulated knowledge. The root cause of this issue was a lack of human resources, specifically teachers, who have the time in their schedules to give ILC students a one-on-one teaching environment in order to enable ILC students to learn the nuances of a language. While the average class size in a public high school ranges from 20 to 30 students, classes at my high school can range upwards of 30 students due to its over 3,000 student population. For even the average student, these large class sizes can be challenging. ILC students face challenges with focus and in a large classroom, the noisy distracting environment inhibits their focus. The best learning environment for these students is a quiet room with only one or two other people. Unfortunately, most schools don’t have the means to accommodate this in terms of providing ILC students with private teachers, as foreign language is not a graduation requirement. My project addresses this issue by providing student teachers who are willing to spend the time to work one-on-one with these students. Since students have at least one free period, with the 100 members in Spanish Honor Society, it is easy to pair Spanish Honor Society members with ILC students in a way that fits both schedules. In order for ILC students to have equal opportunity to become bilingual and be set up for success in the job market after high school, it is imperative they are given individual attention to focus on becoming conversational in Spanish with this one on one teaching format. To accomplish this, I created an interactive Spanish curriculum unique to the learning needs of differently abled students, that can be used as a basis for all tutoring sessions. This curriculum covers a vast array of subjects including: time, seasons, family, food, school, classroom, conversation, activities, sports, colors, numbers, clothing, feelings, body parts, geography, animals, holidays, jobs and transportation. These subjects were chosen based on working with a Spanish teacher at my school to develop a holistic curriculum, comparable to that of a traditional Spanish 1 curriculum. This curriculum uses a plethora of media, including: presentations, videos, games, music, flashcards and worksheets, in order to reinforce the learning goals.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I gauged the impact of my project on my target audience by administering surveys to tutors and ILC students alike to measure how members rated the programs as well as what could be improved and how much Spanish had been learned. Furthermore, because three additional schools have already adopted this program and the number of participants from first semester to second semester has tripled, the impact of my project is exponential.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project will be sustained beyond my involvement through Spanish Honor Society. I created a Google Sites page with all the curriculum loaded on the page in order to make the curriculum readily available after my departure. Additionally, my school uses a site named “Schoology” in order to allow students to view content teachers have posted. I utilized this same site, and created a course name “Unified Spanish,” in which I uploaded all of the curriculum for the course. In this way, after my involvement, both the Google Site, and the Schoology page will still exist independently. The Google site was developed to share more globally for those outside of the Cherry Creek School District, and the Schoology page was developed for those within the District. Students in Spanish Honor Society all have access to these pages, and are able to continually upload new content and use the material for future tutoring. I also set up an independent email associated with the project, to use as a login for the Google sites, and created a manual for next year’s students to use to continue the program. This is now an established program at my school, and the Spanish Honor Society sponsor, Ms. Wisler, will continue to sponsor this program and guide future students in their endeavors. Each year, Ms. Wisler will allow any student interested to lead the program and incentivize new membership to the program through rewarding participants with service hours that are required by Spanish Honor Society. Additionally, a printed manual, which is also available online, has been created to guide the new head of the program in their endeavors. All of these materials are meant to be continually refined.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

The other national/global link to my project is the Twitter page I have created to promote my project to others. Social media is the best way to reach millennials these days, and even businesses and schools have joined this movement so that almost everyone is digitally connected. Through this Twitter page, I have followed accounts of other schools and programs dealing with differently abled students. I have also posted a link to my Google sites website in order to provide universal access to the curriculum and program, in the hopes of growing this program. Furthermore, I have emailed other Spanish Honor Society sponsors (teachers) and ILC teachers within the district to promote this program. They have all received a link to the Google Sites page and have access to all course materials and guides to begin the program within their schools.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned from this project that being a leader is not an easy task. Leading requires constant communication with those you’re leading as well as those who are helping you. Some methods I learned that helped me lead this program is finding the easiest way for my peers to participate in this program. One of these ways was connecting digitally. Instead of sending them emails or requiring them to meet twice a week, I would send out group texts as reminders to sign up for tutoring or of updates with the program. Also, I learned the importance of touching base with the teachers I was working with. Even though I led the program, Ms. Wisler, the head of Spanish Honor Society, and Ms. Linda, the head of ILC, both needed regular updates from me in order to offer me tips or suggestions, so constant follow up with them has been key. I also learned that sometimes you need to try different methods in order to succeed. Last year, when I first started tutoring for ILC, I quickly learned that in order to reinforce a concept, using a variety of different methods is useful. I applied this same knowledge in the creation of this program. From finding the best meeting place to figuring out the best way to communicate with tutors, all proved to be tasks that required looking at the issue from more than one perspective. Concerning myself, I learned that I am a people person. I love making new connections and learning about new people and communicating with different people. In a school of over 3,000, most don’t even know every person in their own class let alone other classes. Through this program, I was able to meet and get to know students of all classes and demographics who came together for one purpose, to help others. I truly enjoyed getting to know teachers, staff, and students whom I never met before. Currently about 20 tutors are participating to teach all ILC students capable of participating.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

I firmly believe that as a result of this project, I will be able to take on even more strenuous challenges in all facets of my life. Knowing that there are a multitude of ways to solve any given issue has also enabled me to look at perspectives other than my own and try a variety of methods to surmount any given obstacle. In turn, this has developed my communication and leadership skills and taught me how to work as a unified front with those on a team. I was amazed that while I can accomplish a lot as an individual, with the help of others, so much more can be accomplished. It takes more than one person to solve an issue like the one I’ve identified in my project. Without the help of others this project would not have reached the magnitude of strength it did. Leadership is more than about the individual, it’s about how an individual can unite and influence others to work together for a common cause. It’s certainly true that there’s strength in numbers, and my sharing my passion and hard work with others who value the Spanish language, I was able to inspire my colleagues and now friends to take action with me. I will continue to grow and learn from others I encounter in my life, and apply both the knowledge I’ve gained from this project, and future knowledge acquisition to grow as both a person and a leader.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I believe that my Gold Award was an important part of my Girl Scout experience because I was able to apply the values of the organization in a sustainable way. From when I started Girl Scouts in first grade, I began to develop the sense of what being a Girl Scout really means, being part of a larger community and developing ways to better that community as a whole.  Furthermore, through completing my Gold Award I feel as though I have gained a greater sense of independence as an individual, because of the strenuous nature of all the requirements of the award.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

Attaining my Gold Award has helped me become a G.I.R.L. by allowing me to identify a challenge within my community and giving me the opportunity to be a go-getter by formulating a plan and putting it into action. The project has helped me become an innovator by applying non-traditional methods to reach desired results.  Not everything works the first time, sometimes it’s necessary to be creative and approach a challenge in a different manner.  I’ve developed my risk-taking skills by reaching out to people I hadn’t known previously and taking the chance that they would reject my ideas or project as a whole.  But by doing so, I’ve realized that the answer is always no unless you ask.  Risks are a necessary part of life to achieve success.  Finally, I’ve developed myself as a leader by working with students, faculty, and community members alike to unite for a common goal.  This was no easy feat.  I had to adapt my communication skills for my target audience and work in conjunction with an agglomeration of schedules to achieve success.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Gold Award Girl Scout: Emelie Knitz, Colorado Springs, “FoCo Cafe Cookbook”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I created a cookbook for FoCo Cafe in Fort Collins to help educate people about community cafes and how they positively impact their community. Not only did I include information and recipes from FoCo Cafe, but I also included a recipe and information from 13 other community cafes around the United States. I also did a presentation at a club at my school to further educate people in my community about community cafes.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

One way I measured impact was by handing out surveys to the people I presented to. Before the presentation, they answered the questions, “Do you know what a community cafe is?” and “Do you know why community cafes are important?” on the survey. Most people did not know the answers to these questions. However, the majority of people were able to answer both of the questions after the presentation, showing improvement and that my goal of educating people about community cafes was reached.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

I have given the template for FoCo Cafe’s cookbook to FoCo Cafe so they can continue to print the cookbooks and change information if needed. I have also given the template of the cookbook to the 13 other community cafes so that they can print the cookbooks for their cafes as well.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

In the cookbook, I have included a recipe, photo, and information from 13 other community cafes in the USA. The 13 cafes are Oakwood Soul Cafe (NY), Tulsa’s Table (OK), Take Root (MO), One Bistro (OH), SAME Cafe (CO), CAFE 180 (CO), Mustard Seed Cafe (TX), Stone Soup Cafe (MA), One Acre Cafe (TN), Grace Cafe (KY), Knead Community Cafe (PA), Fair Trade Cafe (AZ), and Table Grace Cafe (NE). I sent the cookbook template to the cafes as well so that they will be able to print them for their own cafe.

What did you learn about yourself?

I definitely learned from my poor time management skills in the duration of this project and improved my organization skills because I had to manage all of the information and recipes from multiple cafes. One thing I really learned about myself during this project was how I handled panic. Once the community cafe I was originally working with closed, I started to panic because I thought that I would have to create a whole new project, but I just had to breathe and reflect upon what I had done so far in order to move forward.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

This project will impact me in the future because of the confidence I have gained in myself as a person and my abilities as a leader. I now know that I can persevere through a big project that I planned myself, and I believe I will be more confident in leading other people and projects, whether they are big or small. In this project, I also learned how important it is to have the help of other people because it is difficult to go through life and achieve your goals all by yourself. I am thankful that I have experienced planning and executing a big project like this now because I can learn from the mistakes I made and utilize my new skills in future projects in college and beyond.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award is important to me, not just because it is the highest award Girl Scouts can earn, but because of the experience I gained. I got to put together all of my leadership skills I had gained until this point and plan, organize, and execute a project. Not only did I succeed with this project, but I also helped my community in ways I never knew I could. I will always remember this project and the things I learned from it.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Earning the Gold Award helped me to become a go-getter because I had to dive right into this project. When the community cafe I was originally working with closed, I didn’t think about quitting, but wanted to continue the project because I had already put forth so much effort. Now that I know I can execute projects, I will be more willing to take them on in the future.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org