Tag Archives: Take Action

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Sarah Ness, Centennial, “Destressing Art Sessions”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

My Gold Award project was created to address the high amount of stress seen in the student body at my high school, Eaglecrest High School. I held art sessions after school in the art rooms in order to help kids at my school be able to relieve stress. I worked with the National Art Honor Society and Art Club, along with the teachers that sponsor both of those clubs, in order to hold the art sessions. At the end, I had held 23 sessions.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured my impact by giving students a survey I had made and asking them if they were feeling stressed and if they thought that the session helped to relieve their stress. In the surveys, 100% of the people surveyed answered that they were feeling stressed, with the reasons why being “family,” “schoolwork,” “work,” “sleep or the lack thereof,” and “expectations for the future.” Along with that, 100% of the survey takers said that the session did help them feel less stressed.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My global/national connection is made through the access to free downloads of a manual for the sessions, and some project examples, on the website teacherspayteachers.com. I’ve also created an Instagram account that is dedicated to examples of project ideas and step-by-step instructions for how to do the projects.

What did you learn about yourself?

I’ve learned that I’m a lot more adaptable to situations that I wasn’t expecting and that I’m more capable of being a leader than what I was expecting.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

I think earning my Gold Award will help show others that I am a hard worker and very dedicated. It has also taught me better ways to deal with stress around me and to help others around me deal with their stress in a healthier way.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I think the Gold Award was an important part of my Girl Scout experience because it allowed me to use all of the skills that I have gained through my years of being a Girl Scout, along with helping me gain new ones, to make a lasting difference in the world. It helped me draw on all of my past experiences and really make the most out of everything that Girl Scouts has taught me.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

My Gold Award helped me become a

-G (Go-getter): by forcing me to do what I needed to do right now and not allowing me time to procrastinate or not try and do something that was needed.

-I (Innovator): by making me come up with ways to describe every step of an artistic process so that even someone who might think he or she isn’t artistic is able to do the same project as everyone else.

-R (Risk Taker): by causing me to step out of my comfort zone with talking to large groups and teachers, even though I knew that there was a chance that no one would want to help me. I also took a risk with doing an art-centered project because many people aren’t interested in the arts or don’t believe that they could do any projects, so I was taking a risk in the possibility that no one would even come to my sessions.

-L (Leader): by making me step into a leadership position and have to become a kind of teacher to the other students in the sessions along with having to come up with all of the projects and getting ready all of the materials that might be needed to do each of the projects.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Zoe’s Silver Award project: Help for the homeless

Submitted by Melissa H.

Pikes Peak

Monument

For Zoe’s Silver Award project, she hand-sewed and filled 60 bags of basic necessities for homeless people in the Colorado Springs/Monument area. Each bag contained a toothbrush, tube of toothpaste, dental floss, deodorant, bar of soap, washcloth, lip balm, granola bar, bottle of water, shampoo, and sunscreen.

Zoe solicited local businesses, family, and friends for donations of all materials.

After sewing and filling the bags, Zoe and her friends and family kept the bags in their cars to hand out to people in need they see along their way.

Everyone associated with this project thought a lot about the many struggles of living out on the streets. There are so many things that we take for granted, but for someone who doesn’t have such basic necessities, they can seem like extravagant luxuries. Even a simple bar of soap can be extremely helpful.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Kayleigh Cornell, Aurora, “Colorado Book Bank”

What did you do for your Gold Award project? 

In my project, Colorado Book Bank, I collected gently used children’s books from families in a local middle school. The middle school’s chapter of National Honor Society helped collect, sort, count, and box the books I collected.  I received even more books from an elementary school after their used book sale, which NJHS helped sort. After taking the books to the food bank I partnered with to give kids a lunch and a book over the summer, I received 1,360 books.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

By counting how many books I donated I determined that I could reach 1,360 kids as each kid got their own lunch and book. While I can’t see how my program affected their education level, I can impact kids right now by giving them a book to read.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement? 

Colorado Book Bank collected books from several different schools. The largest donor was an elementary school who has an existing used book sale that has always searched for a good donor partner to gift their leftover books to each year. I also worked with a local middle school to kick off the project. They are considering the project into another food bank they work with for an existing food drive they already conduct. The elementary school, Peakview, plans to continue donating books to JFS to support the lunchbox program. For the past decade, they have held a spring used book sale with a large number of books left over. The librarian has agreed to donate all leftover children’s book after each book sale to JFS to continue the project. JFS has agreed to pick up the books from the school since that has been the main stumbling block for book donations in the past. Peakview’s librarian also plans to share about the option to donate book sale leftovers to JFS.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

During my project, the chapter of National Honor Society at my school agreed to help move the books to JFS. They also helped me get in touch with the organization as a whole to get my project open on a wider scale. I connected several parts of my project by working with different National Honor Society (NHS) groups. One of the membership requirements of NHS is to provide community service. In support of this work, NHS has a national website that includes a searchable database of project ideas. Club sponsors and student members use the database to find new projects for their club. My project is being listed on that database with a link to my website so other chapters of NHS can create their own Book Bank in their community. In addition, NHS publishes an e-newsletter and have expressed interest in promoting Colorado Book Bank through that publication. Finally, I have created a website to provide supporting documents for other groups who would like to replicate the project.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned a lot about planning and how while it’s challenging, it has to be done. I also learned that leading a team of other people can be very tricky because you have to pull together the best parts of everyone and make sure all the parts you have work together seamlessly.  I’ve always known I like doing things, but during my project I learned how important it was to delegate tasks to my team to get everything done.  One of the biggest things I learned was that good communication played a key role in my project.  It’s important to ask for help because that is the only way people know you need it and it is important to be clear in written emails and phone calls.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

In the future, I want to be able to lead my own team of scientists and study the formation of planets. I need to be able to work with multiple teams to do this and pull together many different resources to achieve top-notch results from my team. Because of my project, I know how to contact different organizations and pull together people who wouldn’t have worked together otherwise.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I learned so much about myself and how to help others. I wouldn’t have been able to learn the same skills I did if I hadn’t done my Gold Award. I could learn how I could help my community and make a difference beyond what I thought possible.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

I became a go-getter because I saw a problem in my community that I wanted to solve, so I found a way that I could start solving it.

I was an innovator because I found a new way to try to start lowering rates of poverty while including people in my community.

A risk-taker meant being able to start something and talk to people that could have become a lot less popular than it actually did. But I wanted to try my project and it paid off in the end.

I became a leader because I created a team of people I relied on as they simultaneously relied on me. I took their strongest skills and combined them to form an amazing project and amazing team.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Silver Award project: Family shelter

Submitted by Lillian L.

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

I created a cart filled with books and games to donate to a family shelter in Colorado Springs for my Silver Award. There were people there of all different ages, so I provided reading material for all different age groups.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Donations needed for Gold Award project

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Hello! My name is Aubree, and I am currently working on my Girl Scout Gold Award project, which is the highest award in Girl Scouting. In order to achieve this honor, I have chosen to examine a week in the lives of people from all over the world using photography, interviews, and their stories. The purpose of this project is to teach people about other cultures, daily challenges people face, as well as highlight what makes them happy. The goal for participants is to create understanding and acceptance of self and others, to see needs and take action in their communities, and inspire others to do the same.

To achieve my goals, I need your help. I am looking for people to donate digital and disposable cameras, SD cards, and batteries. These items are needed to bring my project to developing areas around the world who may not have the resources necessary to share their story. I have been working with Compassion International to deliver cameras to countries all over the world. You can see the stories and photos on my project FB page at: facebook.com/aweekinourlives. As of now, I have responses from six countries and the goal is to put everything in a book after I receive enough responses from a diverse group of participants. If you know someone who lives in another part of the world and would like to participate, please contact me.

My participant target this month is closer than you may imagine. I am working with the Rapid City, SD Girl Scouts to deliver cameras and supplies to the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. This is one of the poorest places in the nation and where your generous donations would be going as I join them on June 18, 2017. With your help, the kids will not only get to participate in my project, but they will also get their very own camera to use after my project is over.

If you can donate the listed items, or have questions, I can be contacted at: aweekinourlives@gmail.com. I hope to gather all donations by June 16, 2017.

Thank you for your consideration!

2017 Highest Awards booklet: Now available online

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Nearly 1,800 Girl Scouts, families, and friends celebrated this year’s 1,400 Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award recipients at five regional celebrations across the state throughout late April and early May. These young women have taken charge to identify issues in their community and develop and implement original plans to create positive change. We couldn’t be more proud of their accomplishments!

Stephanie Foote, President and Chief Executive Officer of Girl Scouts of Colorado, spoke at all five celebrations. These are some of her favorite events of the year because they are the only times she gets to be in the room with so many Highest Awards recipients at once.

Sarah Greichen, a 2016 Gold Award recipient, Stephanie Foote Leadership Prize winner, and National Young Woman of Distinction, was the emcee in Pueblo, Loveland, and Denver and a keynote speaker in Pikes Peak.

Jessica Mills, a 2016 Gold Award recipient, was the emcee in Pikes Peak while Shauna Clemmer, a Gold Award recipient and current member of the Western Slope Gold Award Committee, was the emcee in Grand Junction.

The Highest Awards Celebrations are incredibly special events where girls are recognized among their family and fellow Girl Scouts for their achievements. Additionally, this is a special time for younger girls to see older girls in action and get inspired to go for their Silver and/or Gold Awards.

Check out the electronic version of our 2017 Highest Awards booklet online (http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/content/dam/girlscoutsofcolorado/documents/GSCO_2017_HA_Booklet.pdf) and view our “Best of Highest Awards 2017” photo album on Flickr (https://www.flickr.com/photos/gscolorado/albums/72157679203803063/page1).

Silver Award: Realities for Children

Submitted by Ariella Wells

Northern & Northeastern CO

Fort Collins

Kit B. was excited about doing her Silver Award to try to do something that benefited abused and foster children. She was passionate about this as she was a former foster child.

She contacted various organizations asking what types of things they might need or need done.

She ended up deciding to set up an annual drive at her church for Realities for Children. This one was hopefully the first of many.

This first one was very successful. She received over $500 and also collected some toys, clothes, and school supplies.

This has inspired her to do more and she has a couple of organizations she plans to volunteer with this summer.

Great job Kit! We are so proud of you!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Cadettes from Troop 2551 help out at Terolyn Horse Rescue

Submitted by Jennifer Harrison

Metro Denver

Aurora

Cadette Girl Scouts from Troop 2551 wanted to earn their Silver Award by helping out animals, so we found Terolyn Horse Rescue in Elizabeth. Terolyn is run almost exclusively by Teri Allen, who rescues horses from dire situations, rehabilitates them, and finds them new homes. Teri works very hard and there were plenty of projects around her ranch for our girls. The girls decided to help by photographing and inventorying a trailer full of donations and building a set of obstacles to help Teri with training horses. The girls found plenty of time to love on some of Teri’s wonderful adoptable horses!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Silver Award with Shiloh House

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Submitted by Lisa Svede

Metro Denver

Centennial

Congratulations to Hailey L. of Cadette Troop 60762 for earning her Silver Award this year. Hailey was recognized at the Highest Awards Celebration in Denver on May 7, 2017 for the work she did partnering with Shiloh House. Shiloh House offers specialized 24-hour care for youth between the ages of 5 to 18 experiencing severe behavioral and emotional issues. Placed in home-like settings, youth receive intensive therapeutic intervention to address behaviors and issues that impact their daily participation in the community. When Hailey reached out to Shiloh House, she learned they were in great need of lightly used or new towels, blankets, sheets, and new socks. Upon learning this, Hailey reached out to her community with a video on her mother’s Facebook page; through community websites; by asking her school to put in a newsletter; by asking her church to put in the bulletin; and making the collection drive known to all of the troops in her K-8 sister troop. For several weeks, Hailey collected items from the community. She held a collection night with her sister troops where she spoke to the troops about Shiloh House and her Silver Award project. Hailey delivered the many donated items she collected to Shiloh House in February. Congratulations, Hailey!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Silver Award project: Senior youth connection

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Submitted by Korrine Bishop

Northern & Northeastern CO

Fort Collins

Come join me the third Saturday of each month from 4 – 5:30 p.m. and help out at Parkwood Retirement Home in Fort Collins.

You could come once or every month!

You can sign up at www.senioryouth.wordpress.com

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.