Tag Archives: Colorado Springs

I just earned the Crocs patch

Submitted by Aubrey Y.

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

I’m a first year Brownie and I just earned Crocs’ Come As You Are patch! I really had a lot of fun working on this with my mom since we can’t have regular Girl Scout meetings because of COVID-19. Thank you Girl Scouts of Colorado so I could keep busy and still get to do Girl Scout fun things!

I learned to that I can be a champion in my own life by having more courage, being more confident, staying strong, and being a good role model and mentor, and being a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator,  risk-taker, and leader).

Girl Scouts of Colorado is proud to partner with Crocs to teach girls to Come As You Are™! Based in Niwot, Colorado, Crocs’ proclamation to the world is to be comfortable in your own shoes. Everyone is unique in their own way and at Crocs, we celebrate one-of-a-kinds and stand together with all kinds. This patch program teaches Girl Scouts to embrace who they are and accept others for who they are. Download the full activity booklet online.

Listen now: Meet a Meteorologist webinar

Girl Scouts of Colorado thanks Sydney Jackson for co-hosting our “Meet a Meteorologist” webinar! More than 35 Girl Scouts from across Colorado participated in this webinar on May 19, 2020. Missed it? Listen to the recording now.

Sydney is a morning meteorologist for KKTV 11 out of Colorado Springs. She grew up in the Kansas City area and became fascinated by weather at a young age. From ice storms to tornadoes, Sydney was intrigued by the constant weather changes and followed her passion that sparked in grade school.

Sydney studied meteorology at the University of Missouri-Columbia and then Mississippi State University. Previously, Sydney worked at a station in Columbia, Missouri for four years. While in Missouri, she covered severe weather including flooding, hail, tornadoes, and snow. She was also a teaching assistant to a college meteorology course.

During the webinar, Sydney spoke to girls about the tools she uses to forecast the weather, what it is like being a meteorologist on television, advice for girls interested in meteorology, and so much more! Her favorite Girl Scout cookie is a Thin Mint, but only if it is frozen!

Check out the KKTV Weather Classes online too: https://www.facebook.com/pg/kktv11news/videos/

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

 

Honoring Hometown Heroes at Fire Station 19

Submitted by Merry Hammes

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

Troop 42694 selected Fire Station 19 as our Hometown Hero for our 2020 Cookie Program. They are helping our community as first responders during this pandemic and we wanted to show our appreciation. We were able to donate more than 100 packages of Girl Scout Cookies. Due to social distancing, Sara represented the troop during delivery.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Ridgeview Elementary Beautification Project

Submitted by Megan Standifer

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

For the past two years, Troop 45237 of Colorado Springs has been working with Ridgeview Elementary staff to give back to the school that housed troop meetings for four years. After several ideas and research, the troop was approved to install a new flower and tree garden at the school.

After getting approval from the principal, facility manager, and district, the troop installed a flower garden, new tree, and edging in the school roundabout. They also painted rocks to leave. The principal wrote us to say thanks for leaving a legacy!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Girl Scout Cookies to Children’s Hospital

Submitted by Cindy Opong

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

Colorado Springs Daisy/Brownie/Junior Troop 43483 delivered Girl Scout Cookies to the recently opened local branch of Children’s Hospital. The troop of 14 girls chose the staff at Children’s Hospital for their Hometown Hero donations. They received enough donations during the Cookie Program to give 178 packages of cookies. Two sisters made the delivery on behalf of the troop due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

The hidden talent of a faithful Girl Scout leader

Submitted by Debbie Swanson

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

Noreen Landis-Tyson is President and CEO of CPCD…giving children a head start since 2002, one of the largest and most complex nonprofits in GSCO’s Pikes Peak region. She is nationally recognized by her peers for her leadership, knowledge, and expertise, serving as a mentor through UCLA’s New Director Mentor Program, supporting the development of new Head Start directors, and is regularly asked for advice and support to other programs throughout the country. She brings her expertise and innovation to managing El Paso County’s Head Start program, and is an expert in building partnerships, having nurtured collaborations with six school districts to blend Head Start services with the state-funded Colorado Preschool Program to serve almost 1,800 of the county’s most vulnerable young children and their families. Noreen has created partnerships with three early care and education programs to offer Head Start services in their centers, supporting increased quality for all children in those centers.

As if that wasn’t enough, Noreen is also an internationally-ranked bicycle race official, one of only 50 women in the world to hold that rank, and frequently officiates bike races around the world. She was the first female president of the commissaire’s panel at the UCI Track World Championship this year in Berlin, and was to be the first woman to hold that same position at the Tokyo Olympics this year before they were cancelled.

Noreen has participated as a leader of a Conversation Stations at Secrets to Success for the past two years. In this role, Noreen talks to more than 100 girls about her work, why she loves it, and how she is changing the world with it. She does this with more than 20 other professional women who network with girls to have them learn the myriad options open to them for their own future work. She also serves as a board member to the Girl Scouts of Colorado Board of Directors. Noreen truly appreciates how Girl Scouts are preparing girls to be our future leaders and innovators, and leads the way by her own example.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

The nomination deadline for 2020 Volunteer Recognition Awards is April 30. GSCO invites members statewide to take this opportunity to recognize an outstanding volunteer by nominating them for a Volunteer Recognition Award. Nominators are responsible for ensuring enough endorsements are submitted to support their nomination of a volunteer for an award. Your volunteer support specialist can check nomination and endorsement submissions for you. Learn more.

Volunteer Spotlight: Shana Barbera

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Shana Barbera of Colorado Springs in the Pikes Peak region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Shana to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a Girl Scout volunteer when I signed my daughter up when she was entering Kindergarten. There was a table set up at her ice cream social at her school with a volunteer talking about all the opportunities in Girl Scouts. My daughter is now in sixth grade and about to finish up her seventh year in Girl Scouts.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I started out as a assistant leader. Then, I quickly took over the group of Daisy girls as the other leader moved away. At year three, I housed Girl Scout Cookies for our troop cookie mom and learned about the process of being the TCM. The following year I took over as our troop TCM and I just completed my fourth year being the TCM for our troop. Then, two years ago I took over as the fall product manager for my troop. I recently took on another role this past year as service unit fall product manager and service unit cookie manager for two different service units in the Pikes Peak region, as well as continuing in all my other roles. I think I’m going to do it again next year.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have learned so much by being a Girl Scout volunteer. I was only a Girl Scout for one year when I was in fifth grade. So, I have learned about all the badges, songs, and traditions. Now, that my daughter is competing in Reach for the Peak, I have been learning all the same skills we are teaching them for the competition, such as fire building, nature identification, proper ways to set up camp, etc.– thanks to some wonderful knowledgeable volunteers in my troop. I am now CPR and First Aid certified. I have always loved giving back. But, I have a newfound hobby. I love mentoring these young ladies and providing them with once in a lifetime opportunities, liking sleeping under the shark tank at the Denver Aquarium, and so much more! I will probably continue to volunteer even after my daughter graduates high school.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope that the girls I lead are learning some value life skills. I hope they have fun and make life long friends. Hopefully they will continue Girl Scouts through high school and one day become a volunteer or find other ways to give back to their community.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Thank you to Girl Scouts of Colorado, all your volunteers,  and all the wonderful leaders I have worked with over the years. You have shaped me into the volunteer I am today. I have gained more confidence in myself and I have the courage to try things I wouldn’t normally do.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

The nomination deadline for 2020 Volunteer Recognition Awards is April 30. GSCO invites members statewide to take this opportunity to recognize an outstanding volunteer by nominating them for a Volunteer Recognition Award. Nominators are responsible for ensuring enough endorsements are submitted to support their nomination of a volunteer for an award. Your volunteer support specialist can check nomination and endorsement submissions for you. Learn more.

Volunteer Spotlight: Jody Clair

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Jody Clair of Colorado Springs in the Pikes Peak region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Jody to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

My Daisy daughter. We could not find a troop, so we started one. There were very few in our area.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I have been a leader 17 years this Girl Scout year. I have also had the pleasure of being a council trainer many years, and a council delegate twice.

Then, I have worked with girls on the Power Up program and PA training. I have worked for many years in our service unit and on our Region Four Cookie Committee. Whew!

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

To not take everything for granted. I have had a Girl Scout lose her mom and we assisted in helping her work through it; Girl Scouts on my door step that had been abused; Girl Scouts from homes with no money; Girl Scouts from homes with drug addicted parents; and so much more in 17 years. To see any Girl Scout smile and to say “I have your back” has made me realize you just never know what someone needs in their life. It could be a simple smile!

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

To be great humans! I also hope they have learned to try something before they give up.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I was outgoing before Girl Scouts, but now it is about me and the Girl Scouts and what that means in my heart, not “just” my daughter. She works year-round at Tomahawk Ranch and to see that makes me the proudest mom and leader out there! Seeing her thrive, reminds me every day to keep striving for those things in G.I.R.L and to share it with as many Girl Scouts as possible! Them becomeing better people makes my life full.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

The nomination deadline for 2020 Volunteer Recognition Awards is April 30. GSCO invites members statewide to take this opportunity to recognize an outstanding volunteer by nominating them for a Volunteer Recognition Award. Nominators are responsible for ensuring enough endorsements are submitted to support their nomination of a volunteer for an award. Your volunteer support specialist can check nomination and endorsement submissions for you. Learn more.

 

Gold Award Girl Scout: Emma Popkin, Colorado Springs, “Alternative Gardening at Palmer High School”

What did you do for your Gold Award project? 

For my Gold Award project, I successfully obtained the necessary funding for and installed two hydroponic (meaning that they do not require soil) Grow Towers into the library at my school. These Grow Towers are currently growing a variety of herbs and vegetables that are being incorporated into a series of educational workshops meant to both educate students on the importance of locally sourced and healthy food options and allow the students to sample some of the actual produce grown. I also prepared a slideshow on how climate change impacts food supply and the need for locally sourced food that is being displayed next to the Grow Towers. Along the way, I established a central working committee of teachers, staff, administrators, and students to carry out my project and have involved representatives from two local community organizations doing similar work (the Pikes Peak Urban Gardens and the Colorado Springs Food Rescue).

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

Throughout the duration of my project (especially during and after the educational workshop that I hosted), I continually questioned my target audience to gauge what they knew before my project and what they had learned after seeing my project. Additionally, I was approached by many of my peers and teachers several times and informed that they have gained a greater understanding of the issue from my project.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My Gold Award project will be sustained by my project advisor, Mr. Chamberlin, and an environmental club at Palmer. Mr. Chamberlin will assist the members of the environmental club with the Grow Tower maintenance and will also continue to facilitate educational workshops with other groups of students at Palmer. The library staff will also help maintain the Grow Towers. Moving forward, the members of the environmental club will also explore additional ways to involve more students in other classes with the Grow Towers. Additionally, Mr. Chamberlin is spear-heading a new horticulture class that will be offered at Palmer.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

To fulfill my global connection, I created an informational brochure about Grow Towers and my project and sent one to the New York branch of the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGGS), along with a short introduction of myself and a description of my project. WAGGGS is an international Girl Scouts organization that is assessable to Girl Scouts all over the world and highlights the projects of numerous outstanding Girl Scouts. My hope is that this organization will include my project on their website so that Girl Scouts all over the world can learn about my work and become inspired to complete a similar project of their own.

Additionally, my project inspired efforts to initiate a horticulture class at Palmer (my advisor is leading that effort). I also presented to a science class at Galileo Middle school about my project and inspired teachers there to work towards obtaining Grow Towers of their own.

What did you learn about yourself?

Along the way, I learned several things about myself:

  1. I possess a strong work ethic
  2. I possess the ability to excite others about my project
  3. I possess strong leadership skills (public speaking, coordinating meetings, contacting staff members and other community leaders, etc.)
  4. I am good at public speaking
  5. I possess resiliency, flexibility, and the ability to adapt to changing conditions during the various project stages

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Upon completing my Gold Award project, I feel more educated about my issue (the impact of climate change on food production) and more inspired to pursue a career to help address this issue or a similar issue in the future. This project has helped me develop and utilize several important life skills such as public speaking, leadership skills, budget-making, and problem-solving. I feel confident that I will be able to tackle any challenge moving forward.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I believe that completing my Gold Award project was an excellent way to cap off my Girl Scout experience. I have been in Girl Scouts since second grade and have completed both the Bronze and Silver awards, a Journey, and many different badges. I believe that the Gold Award project was great way to put all of the skills that I have learned as a Girl Scout into action and complete a project that I really care about.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

After completing my Gold Award project, I feel that I have become a better innovator and leader. Throughout this project, I encountered many different obstacles that required me to problem solve and innovate possible solutions. Additionally, I believe that I grew as a leader – this project required me to facilitate several meetings, phone calls, and presentations, work with my team to create several budgets and timelines, reach out to other community organizations doing similar work, and conduct a press conference with a local newspaper and news channel.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org.