Tag Archives: Colorado Springs

Daisy’s Circle Supporter Spotlight: Noreen Landis-Tyson

Tell us about your connection to Girl Scouts.

I was a Girl Scout from second grade through my senior year in high school, served as a Junior leader in the early 1970’s in Bowling Green, Ohio, then as a Brownie leader in the last 1980’s in Colorado Springs. I have recently been elected to join the Board of Directors of Girl Scouts Colorado.

What is the most valuable thing that Girl Scouts gives girls today?

  • Opportunities to grow their self-confidence that contributes to educational and personal success
  • Opportunities to serve as girl leaders that develop into women leaders

Why did you join Daisy’s Circle?

Monthly giving is an easy way to contribute to a cause that I love and allows me to provide more support than I would be able to do with a one-time gift.

What is the best thing about monthly giving?

It is easier to budget for small monthly gifts than one big one.

Named after Girl Scout founder, Juliette “Daisy” Gordon Low, Daisy’s Circle is Girl Scouts of Colorado’s monthly giving program. Funds raised through Daisy’s Circle provide financial assistance for girls and volunteers, support Outreach Programs and more.  For more information: https://www.gscodaisyscircle.org/

Hometown Hero Cookies for Marian House volunteers

 

 

 

 

 

Submitted by Lauren Johnson

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

Troop 43318 brought Hometown Hero Girl Scout Cookies to the volunteers at the Marian House Soup Kitchen in Colorado Springs. The girls worked hard to collect 60 packages for the volunteers. In past years, they have donated to the sheriff’s office, firefighters, and humane society volunteers.

I love that the troop came up with idea of the Marian House volunteers on their own.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Troop 43893 delivers cookies to H.O.P.E.

Submitted by Aydin Hoo

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

Troop 43893 in Colorado Springs delivered Girl Scout Cookies to their Hometown Hero, H.O.P.E. Worldwide- Colorado Springs. This amazing, multi-level troop collected donations during cookie season for over 200 packages. This Hometown Hero organization helps bring hope and change to the poor and needy in our community. Our girls met and chose HOPE after they had the opportunity to serve at a volunteer session. The girls made and served burritos and hot chocolate to our chronically homeless during the winter months. We look forward to serving with HOPE again in the future.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Gold, Silver, and Bronze Award Girl Scouts honored at Highest Awards Celebration in Colorado Springs

More than 75 Girl Scouts, along with their friends and family, gathered at the Penrose House at El Pomar in Colorado Springs on May 3, 2019 to honor the more than 1,200 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2018-19 Girl Scout awards program year, 126 Girl Scouts in the Pikes Peak region earned the Bronze Award. 53 girls across the Pikes Peak region earned the prestigious Silver Award. 42 girls across Colorado earned the prestigious Gold Award.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

Highest Award recipients are perfect examples of girls who lead the Girl Scout way. Taking the lead like a Girl Scout means being a go-getter who is bold, honest, and determined to succeed; an innovator who thinks outside the box; a risk-taker who is willing to try new things; and a leader who leads with empathy,” she said.

2018 Gold Award Girl Scout and winner of the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize for Gold Award Excellence Riley Morgenthaler served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about how earning the Girl Scout Gold Award has impacted her life.

Every time I think that the Gold Award has given me everything it possibly can, I get a new, amazing opportunity; use the tremendous number of skills it taught me; or receive unexpected feedback from the community I targeted with my project. I am so amazed to see how my project has continued to grow wings and impact even more people, ” she said.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

A special thank you to News5/KOAA-TV for airing photos of the event.

Service Unit 413 encampment

Submitted by Melissa Stamps

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

Service Unit 413 in Colorado Springs is hosting our super hero encampment. This event is open to troops, parents, and girls.

When:  May 10, 2019 5 p.m. – May 12, 2019 7 a.m.

Where: Sky High Ranch

Cost: $30 per girl, $20 per adult

Questions/ To Register: Melissa Stamps at mcs9886@yahoo.com.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Volunteer Spotlight: Vicki Tussey

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Vicki Tussey of Colorado Springs in the Pikes Peak region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Vicki to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a volunteer in 2013 when my youngest daughter was a Daisy. 

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I started off as a co-leader for the Daisies in Troop 3893. I would plan the meetings and run the activities for the Daisies. I was a co-leader for two years before changing Girl Scout troops. In 2015, I became a co-leader for Troop 4000. My role within Troop 4000 was to help out with the activities and chaperoning on field trips. Then in 2016, my daughters joined Troop 2821. In that troop, I helped out as one of the cookie managers within our troop. In 2017, I became the service unit manager for Service Unit 22. 

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

As a parent of a Girl Scout, I never knew how much the leaders and the co-leaders did for the girls. It wasn’t until I became a co-leader myself did I realize how important the role was. 

I have learned how important it is to work one-on-one with each of the girls, be there for them, and take the time to listen and answer any questions they have. 

The hardest role I ever had was being one of the cookie managers. I learned how to be patient with the parents and understanding when financial issues came up.

As a service unit manager, I’ve learned it’s important to be available to provide resources and answer any questions a leader or co-leader may have. It’s also important to plan a monthly meeting for our leaders within our service unit. I never realized how important these meetings were until I started to attend them. It gives our leaders the opportunity to talk about experiences they’ve had within their troop and time to ask questions and to request help if a problem arises. 

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

The one thing I hope the girls have learned from me is, it is OK to ask questions.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

It all started with volunteering with Girl Scouts for me. I have learned that I can be a leader for our Girl Scouts. That it is fun to try new things like, indoor skydiving or sleeping at a zoo. I can make a difference within my community by volunteering with not only the Girl Scouts but with many other organizations.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

 

Volunteer Spotlight: Megan Block

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Megan Block of Colorado Springs in the Pikes Peak region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Megan to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?  

I really enjoyed my Girl Scout years ( 7-8 grade and 10 grade) in northern Maine and Belgium and I wanted to provide others girls with cool opportunities.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I began my Girl Scout leadership roles as a resident counselor at Camp Tanasi (Norris Lake in Tennessee) in 1991. I was a commissioned Lieutenant in the Air Force and I was waiting to go on active duty. At my first assignment at Wright-Patterson in Ohio, a fellow Lieutenant and I started a Brownie troop in Fairborn, Ohio and we led together for four years. I met and married my husband and we got stationed in Incirlik AB in Turkey in 1995. I got to lead a Daisy troop for 1.5 years while there. In 1998, we moved to Colorado Springs and we had our first child, Madison. When she entered kindergarten in 2003, I started her Girl Scout troop. After having my fourth child in 2004, my friend led the troop and I took a year off. I returned to leadership for her troop in 2005.  When my second daughter, Mackenzie started kindergarten in 2007, I started her troop as well. During this time, I have also held the nut and cookie mom positions every year, as well as serving as the SU 20 treasurer for two years and the SU 20 manager for six years.  Both of my girls have also earned their Gold Awards. I am also a BS volunteer and I also have an Eagle Scout and future Eagle Scout.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have learned that you need to put the needs of the girls first and Girl Scouts is only as good as you make it. Try not to complain unless you are willing to step up and make things better. 

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope they have learned to be curious and explore the world around them. I want them to try new things and challenge themselves. The only limits you have are the ones you put on yourself!

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

As a leader, I have overcome many fears (dealing with mice and fears of the dark as a camp counselor; taking on a troop with a fellow 22-year-old and doing all sorts of overnights in Ohio; traveling with girls to MN, SD, CO, KS, MO and this summer CA) and planned countless troop and service unit events (Reach for the Peak, SU encampments, skate nights, thinking days, leader/daughter dinners, swim nights, trampoline events, paint parties, pottery days, etc). I have helped plan many badge weekends and “Journey in a weekend”— fully utilizing Girl Scout properties such as the Pueblo Loft, Hamp Hut, Twisted Pine, Sky High, Meadow Mountain Ranch, and Tomahawk. I always try to lead by example… going first off the 20-foot high dive at Norris Lake, taking the first leap of faith in Buena Vista, holding Rosie the Tarantula first at the Butterfly Pavillion, and leading countless flashlight-free night hikes.  While I love the idea of doing an EF Tour, we pride ourselves with doing summer trips that cost between $250 and $450 each summer. By utilizing Girl Scout and church properties and making our own meals, we still have a great time and make awesome memories! 

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

Volunteer Spotlight: Terri Dayton

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Terri Dayton of Colorado Springs in the Pikes Peak region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Terri to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

While I was in the Air Force, stationed in Norway, several high school girls needed a leader. Since I grew up as a Girl Scout, I figured why not.  We had a blast together. I continued as a leader in Maryland for my daughter, Erica. Continuing that tradition when we moved to Colorado. It was an instant way to make friends. I have now been a leader for five troops.  Some my girls have been in an one that my daughters were not in. I love witnessing the growth of the girls from Daisies and Brownies, to young adults. It is so much fun teaching and mentoring them.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

Wow:  I have had soooo many roles. 

  1. Leader and co-leader of five troops in Colorado and Maryland
  2. SU Camp Director in Maryland
  3. SU Secretary in SU 16
  4. SU Manager/Director SU 16
  5. SU Treasurer SU 16
  6. Gold Award Mentor

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

How to be flexible. There is rarely a time where I have something planned and we stick to it. I have often gone from Plan A all the way to Plan L. To have extra ideas, games, songs, crafts, explanations, and reasons in my back and front pockets. I have learned to listen and watch the girls for cues of what works and what isn’t working. Each girl is special whether she is mine or someone else’s. We all have something special, unique to bring to the table.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

Hopefully, some life skills, flexibility, mentoring and leadership.  Most of all: love for each other. I think all the time we have spent together over the years, that my girls have learned that if something is not working, then we need to move on to something else. I have witnessed girls grow from timid young people to leaders in their career field, watching that one “tomboy” girl in elementary, middle, and high school become a fashion designer, helping girls find their passion, their dream, making a goal, then a plan, watching them live their dream is awesome. 

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I:  I have learned to be more flexible. Looking for ways to meet all the girls needs not just one or two and to help girls at every level. The girls have taught me to listen, think, discuss ways to improve, and or change an idea.

L:  I am a far better Girl Scout leader by taking this journey with the girls. Instead of leading all the time, I love to mentor them to become leaders, to find the best part of themselves all the time, believe it and live it.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

 

Colorado Springs Girl Scout earns patch from Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame

Submitted by Erin B.

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

To celebrate Women’s History Month, my mom took me to CSU in Ft. Collins and I met my cousin Raechel. We all walked to the library on campus and checked out the exhibit on display about Colorado women who have been inducted into the Hall of Fame. It was really interesting. My favorite was learning about Susan Helms. How amazing to be a part of so many firsts for women! She attended the Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, where I’m from.

The Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame is excited to partner with Girl Scouts of Colorado to provide girls across the state an opportunity to learn the stories of women who have shaped our state and the nation’s history with courage, leadership, intelligence, and creativity. Girl Scouts are future female leaders of Colorado and the Hall of Fame recognizes and preserves the accomplishments of past and present Colorado women. – M.L. Hanson, Founder of the Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame

Girl Scout alumna summits all 58 of Colorado’s peaks over 14,000 feet as solo climber

Submitted by Debbie Swanson

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

Laura Clark, a Girl Scout alum and current troop leader in the Pikes Peak Region, summited all of Colorado’s 58 peaks over 14,000 ft. solo. She completed them in under 14 months, finishing in September of 2018. Laura is a Lifetime Girl Scout and contributes much of her success to the experiences she had in the Girl Scout program. In Girl Scouts, Laura found a space where she could be herself, unlike at school where she felt pressured to fit in. Laura became a Girl Scout in 1986 and was a member of Girl Scout Troop 1494 and later Troop 1503 in Mission Viejo, CA. Her leadership journey began as troop treasurer, collecting 50-cent meeting dues. Her troop rotated through leadership positions, learning how to run effective meetings, set agendas, keep accurate records, and plan activities. Because of Girl Scouts, Laura was able to try new things. If she was interested in sewing or hiking or camping or cooking or first-aid, there was always a Girl Scout badge where she could learn more. She made lifelong friends in Girl Scouts, of whom with many she’s stayed in contact. Her favorite Girl Scout experience was camp. And, of course, singing Girl Scout songs!

“Girl Scout Camp is where I first learned how to shoot a bow and arrow, start a fire, cook outdoors, use a compass, hike at night, rock climb, swim and canoe in a pond, tack and ride and care for a horse (while backpacking in all types of weather) and successful problem solving and conflict resolution strategies. I was encouraged to lead where I could and to try new things.”

Summitting all 58 of Colorado’s peaks over 14,000 feet usually takes years, if not decades, to complete. Laura credits Girl Scouts for the physical and mental strength, endurance, careful planning, determination, adaptability, high-risk tolerance, willingness to ask questions and research, and love of the outdoors, animals, and all types of weather needed to complete the feat. Laura carefully chose her ‘finisher,’  the last peak a climber needs to summit, to say they have summited them all, and it is usually chosen for a special reason. 14er enthusiasts are known for choosing their finisher well in advance. Laura chose Mt. Sherman in honor of Camp Sherman, the Girl Scout Camp in California that started her on her path towards loving the outdoors, adventure, goal-setting, leadership, and girl power.

Laura currently leads Girl Scout Senior Troop 2393 and the troop’s Outdoor Survival Team and has assisted seven girls in earning the Girl Scout Gold Award (and has several more working towards this goal). Last year, she led the first-ever Girl Scout Rocket Troop 46319.
Laura works in marketing and also writes for her blog where she reflects on hiking and Girl Scouts. Laura credits the interpersonal skills, business skills, goal- setting, and marketing she learned from the Girl Scout Cookie Program to helping her in her marketing career.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.