Tag Archives: Junior

Girl Scouting at Home: Earn your Junior Detective badge Part Three of Three

Do you want to try out the skills that make great detectives? Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team is here to help you earn your Junior Detective badge!

Now, let’s move on to Step Five! Watch this video for a fun scavenger hunt and follow clues to solve a real mystery. Here’s the print-out you will need to complete your scavenger hunt: Adult Handout for Final Scavenger Hunt

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouting at Home: Earn your Junior Detective badge Part Two of Three

Do you want to try out the skills that make great detectives? Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team is here to help you earn your Junior Detective badge! For Steps One and Two, we practiced the power of observation and used a special code to write a secret message. Steps Three and Four are to fingerprint for fun and try out detective science. Watch this video for some activities to do just that! For the “fingerprint for fun” activity, you can also print this fun handout, or you can draw it yourself: Fingerprint Printable Handout

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Badges Through the Power of the Internet

Submitted by Brennah D.

Metro Denver

Highlands Ranch

I led my Girl Scout troop through the Scribe badge on Zoom. With my PowerPoint presentation, we were able to get everything checked off. This was my first time making a PowerPoint presentation and being a leader through online learning. It was fun!

I love Girl Scouts and everything it has let me do!

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouting at Home: Complete Step Five of the Junior Gardener badge Part Five of Five

Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team has five fun activities to help you complete Step Five of the Junior Gardener badge, which is to grow your own garden. Over the next few days, we’re going to share our favorite tips and tricks to planting a great garden, no matter how little space or money you have. So far, we have learned about sourcing seeds, windowsill gardens, container gardening, and companion gardens. For the last part of this series, we are going to learn about square root gardening.

If you have access to bigger pots, a raised bed, a bit of yard, or a plot at a community garden, you can practice square root gardening in order to get the most veggies for your space.

Different types of plants need different amounts of space. For example, you can plant 16 carrots or radishes in one square foot of soil, but one zucchini needs at least two-square feet to itself. To help make sure your spacing is correct, you can make your own seed tape!

Seed Tape Activity

Materials Needed:

  • Square root gardening chart
  • Toilet paper/Facial tissue/Tissue paper/Paper streamers (white is ideal, but any color is fine)
  • Cornstarch
  • Water
  • One Pot
  • One Wooden spoon
  • Seeds
  • Pencil
  • Ruler
  • Paintbrush
  1. Gather your materials. We used crepe paper streamers, but any thin, easily dissolvable paper is fine (toilet paper, facial tissues – so long as there’s no lotion or aloe, tissue paper, etc.)
  2. Make the cornstarch paste. Add one cup of water and one tablespoon of cornstarch to a pot and place on your stove over medium heat. Whisk until boiling, then turn off water, and let it cool completely. It will be thick and gel-like when finished.
  3. Once your paste is cooled, we can make the tape. I am using carrot seeds, as they are super tiny and ideal for seed tape, but feel free to use whatever seeds you have. Refer to the square root gardening chart to determine how far apart to space your seeds.                                       .
  4. Measure out one foot of your paper. If you’re using something wider, cut it in two-inch wide strips.
  5. Measure the distance you want your seeds and mark it on one side of your strip .              
  6. Using a clean paint brush, dab a dot of your cornstarch paste on each dot.                                  
  7. Place one seed on each dot of paste. 
  8. Line the edge of your strip with a thin layer of paste, enough to stick, but not so much that you dissolve the paper. 
  9. Fold the strip in half and let dry. 
  10. Plant in your garden at the depth recommended by the seed packet.

Square Root Gardening Chart:

TYPES OF PLANTS NUMBER OF PLANTS PER SQUARE FOOT
16 carrots, beets, radishes, leaf lettuce, green onions
9 onions, turnips, spinach, peas, snap peas, parsnip, bush beans
4 pole beans, head lettuce, garlic, romaine, asparagus pea, corn
2 cucumber, celery, basil, potatoes, swiss chard, kale
1 peppers, eggplant, tomatoes, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage
½

 (THESE PLANTS NEED AT LEAST 2 SQ FEET EACH)

Summer squash, pumpkins, winter squash, melons, zucchini

 

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouting at Home: “Think Like an Engineer” Challenges Part Three of Four

Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team has developed a series of “Think Like an Engineer” Challenges for the week of May 11, 2020. These activities aren’t Girl Scout level-specific. However, they would probably be best for Girl Scout Daisies, Brownies, Juniors, and younger Cadettes. Each activity correlates with the Think Like an Engineer Journeys as each Journey asks girls to do three design thinking activities, and that’s basically what these are.

Today’s challenge is to create your own boat using foil, water, and coins. Watch this video and see how many coins your boat can hold before it sinks. What did you learn about buoyancy and gravity?

Previous Challenges:

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouting at Home: “Think Like an Engineer” Challenges Part Two of Four

Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team has developed a series of “Think Like an Engineer” Challenges for the week of May 11, 2020. These activities aren’t Girl Scout level-specific. However, they would probably be best for Girl Scout Daisies, Brownies, Juniors, and younger Cadettes. Each activity correlates with the Think Like an Engineer Journeys as each Journey asks girls to do three design thinking activities, and that’s basically what these are.

Today’s challenge is to plan, design, and build a sturdy bridge using items from around your home! Watch this video for some ideas.

Check out yesterday’s challenge: Structural engineering

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

 

Girl Scouting at Home: Complete Step Five of the Junior Gardener badge Part Four of Five

Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team has five fun activities to help you complete Step Five of the Junior Gardener badge, which is to grow your own garden. Over the next few days, we’re going to share our favorite tips and tricks to planting a great garden, no matter how little space or money you have. So far, we have learned about sourcing seeds, windowsill gardens, and container gardening. Today, you can learn about companion gardens with this helpful infographic.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouting at Home: “Think Like an Engineer” Challenges Part One of Four

Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team has developed a series of “Think Like an Engineer” Challenges for the week of May 11, 2020. These activities aren’t Girl Scout level-specific. However, they would probably be best for Girl Scout Daisies, Brownies, Juniors, and younger Cadettes. Each activity correlates with the Think Like an Engineer Journeys as each Journey asks girls to do three design thinking activities, and that’s basically what these are.

Watch this video for your first challenge, structural engineering. You will need three pieces of paper, tape, and books. Your challenge is to build three different structures to find out which one is the most sturdy.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

 

Girl Scouting at Home: Complete Step Five of the Junior Gardener badge Part Three of Five

Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team has five fun activities to help you complete Step Five of the Junior Gardener badge, which is to grow your own garden. Over the next few days, we’re going to share our favorite tips and tricks to planting a great garden, no matter how little space or money you have. So far, we have learned about sourcing seeds and windowsill gardens. Now, we are going to learn about container gardening.

There are plenty of vegetables that thrive when grown in a pot, including tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, lettuce, carrots, and other root vegetables (if it’s a deep pot). Herbs and flowers also do well in a container garden. The best part of container gardening is that if there is unexpected weather that could harm your plants, you can bring them inside, and you can grow plants that would otherwise not survive a cold winter, or a hot summer outside.

For a container garden, you will need: various sizes of pots, soil, seeds or seedlings, water, and a sunny spot outside, like a balcony, porch, or deck.

Step One

Find a place for your containers. It is a lot easier to put your container gardens together in the place where they will live, as the filled pots will be heavier to move. Make sure the amount of sun the pots will get matches the amount of sun your plants will need.

Step Two

Determine if your pots have draining holes, and if they do not, ask your caregiver to help you add some. This will probably require tools. You need at least two holes to ensure good drainage. Three is better.

Step Three

Add more drainage potential with rocks, upside yogurt cups (don’t cover your holes), or smashed up water bottles.

Step Four

Fill your pots with soil. Potting soil is better suited than general garden soil.

Step Five

Add your seeds or plants.

Step Six

Thoroughly water your garden.

Step Seven

Enjoy your garden. Here are some examples of container gardens.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouting at Home: Complete Step Five of the Junior Gardener badge Part Two of Five

Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team has five fun activities to help you complete Step Five of the Junior Gardener badge, which is to grow your own garden. Over the next few days, we’re going to share our favorite tips and tricks to planting a great garden, no matter how little space or money you have. In Part One, we learned all about sourcing seeds. Now, we are going to learn about windowsill gardens.

If you don’t have a yard or a balcony, there are plenty of plants you can grow right inside your home! Some plants need lots of light, and some don’t need very much at all! Herbs, like basil, oregano, dill, thyme, rosemary, parsley, and cilantro, are plants that do well in a windowsill garden! African violets are a plant that does not like a lot of direct sunlight and thrives in a windowsill garden.

Windowsill Garden Activity

Materials Needed:

  • Small containers like pots or cups (make sure they have holes in the bottom, and something to catch water that spills out)
  • Soil
  • Seeds/Seedlings
  • Water
  • Sunny window

The examples are building an herb garden, but you can use any seeds/plants you want.

Step One: Gather your materials.

Step Two: Poke holes in the bottom of your cups and label each cup.

Step Three: Fill your cups with soil. We used an organic garden soil from a hardware store.

Step Four: Plant your seeds according to the directions on the packet. Most herbs don’t need to be very deep.

Step Five: Place your cups in a shallow water tight container, and place on your windowsill.

Step Six: Don’t forget to water your new garden!

Step Seven: Keep the soil moist until the seeds sprout, then water according to the directions on the seed packets.

Step Eight: Enjoy your windowsill garden!

Here are some more examples of windowsill gardens.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.