Tag Archives: Junior

Girl Scouts Information Night in Boulder, CO

Please join us to learn all about what it means to be a Girl Scout, and the wonderful volunteer opportunities available. Inviting K-12th grade girls and an adult to learn more. New troops are forming today!

As a Girl Scout, your girl will practice leadership with grit like a go-getter, problem solve like an innovator, embrace challenges like a risk-taker, and show empathy like a leader—in an all-girl, girl-led, and girl-friendly environment where she can feel free to let her full, magnificent personality shine through every single time.

Main Boulder Library – Eldorado Room – October 24th from 6 to 7 PM

To start your girl’s membership with Girl Scout of Colorado visit: www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/join

Girl Scouts Information Night in Boulder, CO

Please join us to learn all about what it means to be a Girl Scout, and the wonderful volunteer opportunities available. Inviting K-12th grade girls and an adult to learn more. New troops are forming today!

As a Girl Scout, your girl will practice leadership with grit like a go-getter, problem solve like an innovator, embrace challenges like a risk-taker, and show empathy like a leader—in an all-girl, girl-led, and girl-friendly environment where she can feel free to let her full, magnificent personality shine through every single time.

Main Boulder Library – Eldorado Room – September 26th from 6 to 7 PM

To start your girl’s membership with Girl Scout of Colorado visit: www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/join

“Playing the Past” at Plains Conservation Center

Visit Denver Botanic Gardens’ Plains Conservation Center through their One-Day Prairie Perspectives Immersion experience and earn the “Playing the Past” badge for Girl Scout Juniors.

Immerse your Girl Scouts in the challenging perspective of a child growing up in the 1800’s as a Cheyenne Indian or a homesteader. Girls can explore the prairie ecosystem and participate in activities at the homestead and Cheyenne camp, cook a meal, journal, and connect with the cultural history. Overnight portion includes campfire, storytelling, wagon rides on the prairie, and sleeping in the tipis (weather permitting).

Cost:

  • One-Day Prairie Perspective Immersion, 9 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.: $60 within SCFD / $65 outside SCFD
  • One-Day Prairie Perspectives Plus Optional Overnight ends 9 a.m. the following day: $125 within SCFD / $130 outside SCFD

One adult chaperone admitted free for every five students, additional chaperones are $30 each for the one day program and $60 each for the overnight program. A 50-percent deposit is due at least 30 days prior to program date; full payment is due at least one week pre-program.

More information: https://www.botanicgardens.org/education/schools-teachers/plains-conservation-center

Questions? pccinfo@botanicgardens.org

Bronze Award project: Native bee houses

 

 

 

 

 

Submitted by Bree Dulaney

Metro Denver

Centennial

Juniors from Girl Scout Troop 61608 from Centennial spent five hours at the Denver Botanic Gardens. They were researching ideas for their Bronze Award project, building native bee houses.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Girl Scouts celebrate 15th anniversary of Yule Marble Initiative

2019 marks 15 years since Girl Scout Troop 60357 of Lakewood petitioned state lawmakers to designate the Yule Marble as the Official State Rock of Colorado. The girls embarked on the project to make Colorado the most geologically patriotic state in the union, with red, white, and blue geologic symbols (mineral: http://bit.ly/2HuK7P2, rock: http://bit.ly/2EmmZjW, and gemstone: http://bit.ly/2M1Ysqv). The project also enabled them to earn the Girl Scout Bronze Award, the highest honor for fourth and fifth grade Girl Scouts.

Now, Girl Scout alumnae are reflecting on what the project meant to them and the impact Girl Scouts has had on their lives.

“Now, in 2019 looking back over the last 15 years, I realize that this project did more for me as an adult than I ever could have imagined.”

“It’s pretty awesome to say that I was part of a group of young, ambitious women that took on the seemingly impossible and succeeded.”

MiKayla Loseke

“The most important lesson I learned from all this hard work is you can achieve anything you   put your mind to. A group of young girls with the help of a few very strong women were able to pass a bill into law in the state of Colorado. We weren’t experienced in the way governments work. We had no idea what we were doing. (The help we received from Senator Betty Boyd was incredible, we wouldn’t have been able to do it without her.)”

“I learned to be proud of my accomplishments. Our troop is going to be a part of Colorado’s history forever, and having that accomplishment, knowing that I was part of something great, gives me the courage to continue doing great things.”

Laura Eckhardt 

“The Yule Marble Initiative gave me a sense of hope for my own life and for the lives of those around me. My 12-year-old self was bold enough to go in front of a room of politicians and tell them that ‘even the smallest citizen can have a voice,’ and what was amazing was that those intimidating politicians listened and also agreed with us. What an empowering feeling for a bunch of pre-teens! I try to carry that feeling with me throughout my life and let it be a reminder when I doubt myself or the world around me, that change is possible and even the smallest, most seemingly insignificant of us are capable of making great changes in the world around us. That gives me hope.”

Emily Cameron

“I like to use this event as an example when I am working with fourth and fifth graders who are just starting to want to make their marks on the world. I share with them that a group of kids just like them, from their own neighborhoods, were able to make such a large and lasting change in their community, and that if they see a need, they too can reach out and do something about it.”

“Yule marble has become so much more than our Bronze Award project, it laid the foundation for the kind of people we grew up to be, and the kind of power we all have to make a difference in our world. If a bunch of little girls can change their world and make it just a little bit better, imagine what the rest of us can do if we set our minds to it.”

Caitlin Corenblith

 

 

 

Bronze Award Girl Scouts: Fostering Foster Source

Submitted by Tammy Lemmon

Metro Denver

Commerce City

Girl Scout Troop 62228 finished their Bronze Award project Mother’s Day weekend. The girls wanted to redecorate a kids play area. As the girls were researching places to redecorate, our girl Makenna mention a place she volunteered at on her days off of school called Foster Source. Foster Source is a free resource center for foster parents and foster kids. Prior to our girls coming in to this space, kids had a small play area with minimum toys. The space was oriented toward younger kids and not super inviting.

Through the Girl Scout season, the girls broke into small groups and focused on one area of the project. They ran a donation drive, and applied for a grant to purchase materials. They also created reading, new baby playpen, and crafting areas. The girls added new toys, books, and crafts for all ages. They also donated tablets and headphones for older kids. They also created a sensory space for kids that might need a safe place.

The girls did an amazing job thinking of others through this project. They put themselves in others’ shoes and what items they would need and what items they would want the most in a foster situation. Not only did they buy for girls their age, but for boys. They thought of kids in high school and babies and toddlers that might not know what is going on in their life.

Us troop leaders could not be prouder of our girls. We gave advice and ideas, but at the end of the day, all the girls made all the decisions.

They are now all looking forward to their Silver Award, but also staying in touch with Foster Source to continue contributing to all the good they do for kids.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Bronze and Silver Award Girl Scouts honored at Highest Awards Celebration in Western Colorado

More than a dozen Girl Scouts, along with their families and friends, gathered at Colorado Mesa University in Grand Junction on May 19, 2019, to honor the more than 1,200 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2018-19 Girl Scout awards program year, 14 Girl Scouts in the Western Colorado region earned the Bronze Award. 15 girls across the Western Colorado region earned the prestigious Silver Award. 42 girls across Colorado earned the prestigious Gold Award..

Gold Award Girl Scout and current Gold Award mentor Heidi Ragsdale served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

24 Girl Scouts learn about watershed conservation and the environment

 

In partnership with Colorado Trout Unlimited (CTU) and Anadarko, two dozen Girl Scouts had the opportunity to serve as citizen scientists, anglers, and artists on Saturday, May 11, 2019 at Kassler Center in Littleton. The goal of the event was to help girls develop an appreciation for watershed conservation and the environment. This outdoor watershed experience employed STEM-education (science, technology, engineering, math), plus recreation and arts to explore a local stream. CTU volunteers led Girl Scout Juniors and Cadettes in observing a stream, collecting flow data, sampling macroinvertebrates (aka aquatic bugs), fly tying, and fly casting. Girls also explored the natural area around Kassler Center and recorded their thoughts and observations.

Colorado Trout Unlimited is dedicated to conserving, protecting, and restoring Colorado’s coldwater fisheries and their watersheds. With a grassroots base comprised of nearly 12,000 members in 24 local chapters across the state, CTU works both locally and statewide through advocacy, education, and on-the-ground restoration projects. For more information visit www.coloradotu.org.

“Designing Robots” badge workshop with Arrow Electronics

Girl Scout Juniors are invited to earn their “Designing Robots” badge with Arrow Electronics.

When:

Saturday, June 1, 2019

9 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Where:

Arrow Electronics

Centennial

Register online now:

https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/content/girlscoutsofcolorado/en/events-repository/2019/junior_designing_rob.html

Arrow Electronics is an American Fortune 500 company headquartered in Centennial. The company specializes in distribution and value-added services relating to electronic components and computer products.

Light breakfast will be provided during check-in and girls will receive their “Designing Robots” badge at the end of the workshop. All girls should have earned their “Programming Robots” badge prior to attending the workshop.

This is not a drop-off event. All girls must attend with a parent, guardian, or troop leader. Adult-to-girl ratios must be met. Girls attending with a troop leader should bring a completed parent permission form for a Girl Scout activity, which her troop leader should retain in case of emergency.

Registration closes on May 23 OR when capacity has been met.

Questions? Email aimee.artzer@gscolorado.org

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