Tag Archives: Steamboat Springs

The Girl Scout way: G.I.R.L. 2017

Submitted by Chris Kucera

Mountain Communities

Steamboat Springs

I recently had an amazing Girl Scout experience that I want to share. I knew that going to National Convention as a delegate would be exciting, but I had no idea that it would change the way I look at Girl Scouting. I have returned from Ohio more motivated than ever before, and want to encourage you to share my energy. Even more importantly, I want to convince all Girl Scouts to attend a National Convention themselves.

I am a Mountain Communities Trainer and also teach the Program Aid course. I am a strong advocate of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience (GSLE) and enjoy opportunities to teach others. I’ve worked with so many talented Girl Scouts, but I was blown away by the girls chosen as national delegates. The girl delegates were active in giving opinions on our voting topics. They were thoughtful, insightful, passionate, and persuasive. However, when the discussion topic of how to get more girls into Girl Scouting and keep them, they were incredible. These young women had talked with other girls and shared their stories. They had concerns about diversity, funding, and leadership. They expressed that while many girls are tired of Journeys, others really like them. They presented original ideas that made everyone in the room think, “Wow, why aren’t we doing that?”

I want to encourage all of you to return to your troops and let the girls take the reins. It takes a bit of encouragement to get them on the leadership path, but I’ve seen what can happen when they succeed. I can only hope that my daughter becomes half as successful and amazing as the young women chosen to represent their councils.

I had a meeting with my friend and mentor, Nancy Mucklow, who encouraged me to apply to be a delegate. She wants to plan some big Girl Scout travel, and I virtually doubled her list. Did you know that there is a petition to name the bridge over the Savannah River in Savannah, Georgia the Juliette Gordon Low Bridge? When I told my troop about a chance to participate in their bridging ceremony, their eyes lit up and I think they started their packing list in their heads. I was unaware that Girl Scouts has a camp in Minnesota that does Boundary Waters canoe trips, and the cost is so low it’s staggering. You can go as a large group, an individual, or even a family. I was thrilled to find out that this high adventure trip is affordable and am starting to look at dates. I hope that I can encourage others to join me. I also learned a great deal more about the different world centers and Nancy is starting our travel plans for 2019 – I can’t wait!

The Hall of Experiences was just amazing. I learned information that I never realized existed.  It had activities for the girls, from crafts, to the local science museum, to NASA. We were especially impressed with one gentleman at the NASA booth. Not only did he tell us about current science and demonstrate thrilling technology, he gave out important advice about high school and college classes to focus on and emphasized the importance of earning your Gold Award before applying for colleges. My favorite part of our conversation though, was about his daughter’s troop that he leads. We talked with our first colleges, and the advisors there taught my daughter the important questions she should be asking. They talked to her, not me. They asked her the important questions and helped her narrow down her scattered thoughts. I’m grateful for their approach in helping my daughter start her college search.

The breakout sessions were so informative and fun. My daughter attended the girl only yoga and self-defense class. She was very excited to prove herself to the self-defense instructor. She was told to hit the instructor if attacked. When the instructor snuck up on my daughters back and grabbed her hand, my daughter turned and hit her. The instructor was so thrilled that it was caught on video and she posed together yelling YEAH! While she was beating up adults, I attended a bullying seminar. While this was not normally not my thing, I was extremely impressed and inspired. The speaker had a different way of looking at the topic, and I can’t wait to share what I learned.

The inspirational speakers and videos were simply phenomenal. Coming from a family of gymnasts, hearing Gabby Douglas speak was thrilling. Chelsea Clinton was a joy and we just loved her discussion with the Young Women of Distinction about their Gold Awards. The psychologist that spoke was simply amazing. I am still discussing her theories with my daughter. However, in my opinion, the best speaker of the Convention was our very own CEO, Sylvia Acevedo. The way she could engage every person in the audience, regardless of their age was so wonderful. She loved getting all of us to stand up, dance and celebrate Girl Scouting together. If her speaking skills weren’t enough, she also took the time to talk with anyone who wanted her ear and smile for hundreds of selfies. If you have never heard amazing woman speak, I encourage you to seek her out.

The point that I want to stress is that National Convention is just so much more than just a convention. It’s a lifetime experience. I met people who have been attending National Convention since the 80’s. I was inspired by one woman who brings her granddaughters to every National Convention. I find this idea compelling and hope to someday be able to follow in this woman’s footsteps. Did I forget to talk about SWAPS? Just imagine bringing 250 swaps representing our great state and trading with Girl Scouts from around the country – and the world!

When I returned from convention, I was simply exhausted. There were so many fun and interesting things going on that we averaged about five and a half hours of sleep a night. The most amazing part of the convention started after I got home and got a real eight hours of sleep. I have ideas. I have plans. I am motivated. I see how my local troop and my volunteer efforts fit into Girl Scouts around the country. I want to see Girl Scouts of Colorado become a leader in our amazing national organization. I want to see more Girl Scouts, young and old, attend national conventions and come home as inspired as me. I want you to join me at the next national convention in 2020 in Orlando, Florida!

To sign the petition for the Juliette Gordon Low Bridge:
https://www.girlscouts.org/en/about-girl-scouts/advocacy/the-girl-scout-advocacy-network/sign-a-petition-to-name-the-savannah-bridge.html

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Nancy Mucklow honored at bridging ceremony

Submitted by Cricket Hawkins

Mountain Communities

Steamboat Springs

On the last warm Sunday of the summer of 2017, Girl Scouts in Steamboat Springs presented Nancy Mucklow with the “Thanks” badge. Nominated by Girl Scouts of Colorado Board of Directors chair-elect Rae Ann Dougherty, Nancy did not expect the overwhelming number of endorsements that also supported the honor. Ms. Dougherty was unable to attend, but provided the following statement for the ceremony:

“Because of Nancy’s spirited devotion, Girl Scouts of Colorado is fortunate to have a strong and growing base of active Girl Scouts of all ages in Steamboat Springs, a key area of our Mountain Communities region! Not only does she share and invite girls from all over the state to participate in Steamboat events, her energy routinely spills out into other geographic areas throughout the state with a VERY positive impact. Without Nancy’s dedication, commitment, enthusiasm, and energy, I believe we would not have as strong, dynamic, and vibrant Girl Scout Program in Steamboat Springs. Even with her male dominated family, she shepherds many girls, as well as adult volunteers, through the program.”

You can read more about Nancy, this special honor, and her Girl Scout story in the Steamboat Pilot and Today.

Prior to the surprise presentation, many Girl Scouts bridged to Brownie through Ambassador level with a full rededication ceremony. Thank you everyone for a wonderful afternoon!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

 

#Grow with Steamboat: World Thinking Day celebration

Submitted by Nancy Mucklow

Mountain Communities

Steamboat Springs

Celebrating Girl Scouts World Thinking Day was a BLAST and a badge earning opportunity for 14 troops in Steamboat Springs! Following the WAGGGS #Grow theme, a badge event was coordinated at the Strings Pavilion, in partnership with Strings in the Mountains, a local arts supporter, Colorado State Forest Service, and Yampa Valley Sustainability Council.

From an educational video about WAGGGS and our world centers (made by two Cadette troops) to the “When We Shine” dance choreographed by a Cadette troop, and badge and leadership stations led by Cadette and Senior/Ambassador troops as well as the Forest Service and Sustainability Council, all kicked off by our Silver Award Cadette troop’s flag ceremony, Steamboat Girl Scouts and friends participated in an afternoon session with Girl Scouts of all ages and a special visit from incoming GSCO Board of Directors President, Rae Ann Dougherty to earn the World Thinking Day Challenge badge.

In addition to earning the badge, girls went home with a tree to plant from CSFS AND a discount code to attend a Strings in the Mountains showing of James and the Giant Peach.

This event was sponsored by the Lufkin Family Fund for Girl Scouts in Routt County.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Courageous Girl Scout shares her story

Katelyn Ibarra, a Girl Scout from Steamboat Springs who helped save lives after a city bus crashed, recently travelled to Washington, D.C. to be honored as a 2017 Citizen Honors Award winner by the Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation.

On March 29, 2016, Katelyn and her family were on their way to eat dinner when they came upon a city bus that had crashed on U.S. Highway 40 near CR 44. The roads were very slick and icy from a snowstorm earlier in the day. As soon as Katelyn saw the crash, she knew she had to help. After climbing up a slippery, muddy slope to reach the front of the bus, Katelyn climbed through the broken windshield and into the bus. Without hesitation, she helped the driver and numerous passengers, many of whom were in shock, bleeding, or had other serious injuries.

In addition to this award, Girl Scouts of the USA awarded Katelyn the prestigious Medal of Honor for “saving life or attempting to save life without risk to the candidate’s own life.”

We asked Katelyn to share her story about that fateful night and the events that have followed. Here is her story:

Recently, my life was changed forever after I did a simple deed that I thought was a no-brainer. In March 2016, my family and I came upon a head-on collision between an SUV and a city bus. I assisted the victims by climbing up a muddy embankment and through the broken windshield of the bus where I helped  passengers who had facial injuries and were in shock. That night, I saw people from all characteristic spectrums. I saw people who didn’t slow down at all. I encountered people that had a weak stomach, but still tried to help. There were the others that helped like I did. In my mind, anyone and everyone would have done what I did, but on that night and the year to follow I learned otherwise. As I was once told, there are ordinary angels all over the place, it’s just a matter of them showing themselves. My biggest thought in the moment was, I would want someone to help me, so I made sure to help them!

After that night, the attention I received was way out of my comfort zone. I received the Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Meritorious Service Award and Girl Scouts of the USA’s Medal of Honor. In addition, the local newspaper wrote articles, I was interviewed on the news, and it was all over social media. I felt like telling the story was bragging, but that all changed last month.

was presented the Young Hero Citizens Award from the Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation in Washington, D.C. It was an amazing experience and so humbling! I visited monuments, Arlington National Cemetery, the Joint Mayer Military Base, and the U.S. Capitol. I even got to eat dinner in the Library of Congress. I met such a sweet and inspiring lady named Molly who was awarded a Citizen’s Medal of Honor for stopping a school shooting. I also met over 20 men who had received the Congressional Medal of Honor for Valor (for saving lives while in the military). They told their stories in a simple and kind way and would never shame anyone while telling their stories. I realized there is a way to talk about my story while staying humble. Receiving the award wasn’t the point, the main point was showing your character by spreading kindness, helping others, and passing on good qualities.   

Men and women today and throughout history have sacrificed their lives everyday to keep us free. They are the reasons we are here today and can live the lifestyles we live now. When you see a veteran make sure to always thank them and to respect them. I’m still not really sure what to think about all this and how it will impact my life, but I’m definitely more comfortable about it now. You never know how your life can change in such a split second, both for the better or the worse. I’m thankful I was able to help that night.  

 

Full STEAM Ahead: Making WAVES with science and art

Submitted by Nancy Mucklow

Mountain Communities

Steamboat Springs

Steamboat Springs Girl Scouts made WAVES with STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math) on a school day off in March 2017.

Girls spent the morning exploring light waves, the physics of light, making a spectroscope, experimenting with Watery Waves, the science of hydrology, and discovering sound waves, including some cool dance moves and “watching” sound happen.

Small group sessions were led by women in the community who work as science and STEAM professionals. They also shared career information about their areas of expertise.

The afternoon was spent focusing on theater arts including interactive workshops and theatrical games with improv and public speaking practice in a local historical theatre and performing arts venue.

The day was made possible through a grant of sponsorship by Yampa Valley Electric Association as well as the Lufkin Family Fund for Routt County Girl Scouts.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Steamboat Springs Girl Scout named 2017 Citizen Honors Award winner

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Katelyn Ibarra, a 16-year-old Girl Scout from Steamboat Springs who helped save lives after a city bus crashed, has been named a 2017 Citizen Honors Award winner by the Congressional Medal of Honor Society. Katelyn, along with five other heroes, will be recognized at a ceremony at Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall in Arlington, Va., on National Medal of Honor Day, Saturday, March 25, 2017.

On March 29, 2016, Katelyn and her family were on their way to eat dinner when they came upon a city bus that had crashed on U.S. Highway 40 near CR 44. The roads were very slick and icy from a snowstorm earlier in the day. As soon as Katelyn saw the crash, she knew she had to help. After climbing up a slippery, muddy slope to reach the front of the bus, Katelyn climbed through the broken windshield and into the bus. Without hesitation, she helped the bus driver and numerous passengers, many of whom were in shock, bleeding, or had other serious injuries.

“The Citizen Honors Awards recognize and celebrate the exceptional deeds that America’s citizen heroes perform every day in communities across our nation,” said Thomas G. Kelley, Medal of Honor Recipient and president of the Congressional Medal of Honor Society. “Our 2017 winners embody the spirit of the Medal of Honor and represent the highest levels of service and heroism. They’ve earned this award through their courage, selfless service or commitment to our nation’s military service members and families.”

In September of 2016, Girl Scouts of the USA awarded Katelyn the prestigious Medal of Honor for “saving life or attempting to save life without risk to the candidate’s own life.” Tracy Shelton, an Ibarra family friend, was among those on bus. “She (Katelyn) needed no direction or instruction. She immediately went over to one of the most severely hurt. The blood didn’t faze her. She showed no shock. She was just this ‘strength’ among us,” wrote Shelton in a letter to Girl Scouts of the USA. “She responded in a way that was clearly above her age. She showed such a high level of maturity. I know adults that would not have climbed into that bus, with people screaming and all the blood.”

For more information about the Citizen Honors Award or the Medal of Honor and its recipients, visit the Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation website at http://themedalofhonor.com.

 

 

Meet Our Mentors: Nancy Mucklow

Nancy Mucklow

 

 

 

 

Nancy is one of our Gold Award Mentors who is strongly committed to successfully guiding girls through the Gold Award in our Mountain Communities region. Learn more about Nancy below and stay tuned for more “Meet Our Mentor” blog posts over the next few months! Go Gold!

Region 5 – Mountain Communities

Steamboat Springs, CO

  • 40+ Years as a Girl Scout Volunteer
  • Two Years as a Gold Award Mentor
  • Gold Award Recipient

Why did you become a Gold Award Mentor?

As a GS Gold Award Mentor, I want to help others with this monumental accomplishment. It’s an important step for our girls and our communities.

What words of advice do you have for girls about the Gold Award?

Don’t wait! Start today!

About Nancy:

Hi! I’m a Lifetime Girl Scout, I earned my First Class and was one of the first in Colorado to earn the Gold Award in the early 1980s. I was fortunate to grow up in a very supportive Girl Scout family and my mom and my sister have been my “cohorts” on many of my Girl Scout adventures. As the mother of boys, I’m excited to be able to give back to girls and encourage girls to be all they can be. To take advantage of a multitude of experiences and to continue in Girl Scouts so they can enjoy all it has to offer older girls, for travel, wider experiences, and connections to the adult world they will soon enter.

Gold Award Retreat in Steamboat Springs

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We are thrilled to offer an exciting Gold Award Retreat in Steamboat Springs on October 22 and 23, 2016. This retreat is an opportunity for girls to receive Gold Award Training, connect with other girls, brainstorm their ideas, and leave with at least three concrete next steps for moving forward with their Gold. Come on out for an amazing weekend in the mountains and leave with a clear picture of your Gold Award journey!

Even if you have already attended Gold Award training, this is an opportunity to meet members of the Gold Award Committee, connect with other girls, and build your confidence to go for the Gold!

The retreat will begin at 1 p.m. on Saturday, October 22 and will end at 11 a.m. on Sunday, October 23. Attendees are welcome to bring their own lunch and dinner, however GSCO will provide all meals for $10 per person.

All girls must be accompanied by a parent or troop leader in order to attend.

Registration closes Friday, October 14. Don’t miss out on this once a year opportunity!

Register now: https://gscolorado.formstack.com/forms/gold_award_retreat_mc_10_22_2016

 

Steamboat Springs Bridging stirs feelings

Submitted by Chris Kucera

Steamboat Springs

Mountain Communities

This weekend, we had our Service Unit-wide Bridging event. We bridged girls into every level from Daisies to Ambassadors. As detailed in a previous blog post, we awarded the Bronze Cross. Both the girls bridging into Seniors gave heartfelt speeches in front of about 80 people. While Samantha Kucera meant her words for me and her other leaders, I wanted to share her inspired words with all leaders as I believe they have meaning for us all:

To all my leaders you are special and wonderful and this is just for you.

You do not have any more spare time or energy than we do, you all work full time, juggle your families, your schedule and try to keep it all together as best you can. The only difference between you and other people is that you believe in what Girl Scouting has to offer. So much so, that you contribute your time, your miles, and your talents to help girls grow in Scouting.

You complete authorization forms, budgets, and registrations, and fill your house with boxes of paperwork that we will never see. You are required to take many hours of training as well as attend various meetings so that you can provide a variety of programs which meet the needs and interests of every individual girl. You try to involve parents who want you to understand that they do not have the time to drive on outings or help at meetings. You rejoice at the generosity of others. Sometimes you find yourselves going in too many directions, and you run out of steam. Time slips by, but that doesn’t mean you do not care. So many evenings you spend on the phone, seeking advice and support from other leaders when problems occur. “How do I run a journey in a day?” “How many badges do I need to order?” “Can I run a multiage group?”

Your dining tables are covered with bits of rope, menus, trip permits, craft supplies, paper work and badges for each and every girl in the troop. Sometimes you feel unappreciated. Yet, these girls can fill you with pride at their determination and accomplishments. Their smiles light up a room; and when they say “Thank You”, it makes it all worth it.

You help us build relationships. Some struggle more than others. Considerate, loyal, helpful, friendly… is encouraged by the Girl Scout Promise and Law. And sometimes you too must learn these lessons over and over again with us. But you are willing to keep learning. Please be patient if we appear distracted or frustrated or overwhelmed at times. You provide us with encouragement and offer your help. You keep us in your thoughts.

You are, after all, mentors…role models…leaders. Volunteers who have taken an oath to give these girls, your girls, the most precious gift you have to offer- the gift of time.

There is only one thing left to say: thank you. I owe my success to all of you.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Girl Scout saves lives after bus crash: Katelyn Ibarra receives Medal of Honor from Girl Scouts of the USA

katelyn-ibarra-2

Girl Scouts of the USA has awarded the prestigious Medal of Honor to Katelyn Ibarra, a 16-year-old Girl Scout from Steamboat Springs, for saving numerous lives after a city bus crashed. On March 29, 2016, Katelyn and her family were on their way to eat dinner when they came upon a city bus that had crashed on U.S. Highway 40 near CR 44. The roads were very slick and icy from a snowstorm earlier in the day. As soon as Katelyn saw the crash, she knew she had to help. After climbing up a slippery, muddy slope to reach the front of the bus, Katelyn climbed through the broken windshield and into the bus. Without hesitation, she helped the bus driver and numerous passengers, many of whom were in shock, bleeding, or had other serious injuries.

Tracy Shelton, an Ibarra family friend, was among those on bus. “She (Katelyn) needed no direction or instruction. She immediately went over to one of the most severely hurt. The blood didn’t faze her. She showed no shock. She was just this ‘strength’ among us,” wrote Shelton in a letter to Girl Scouts of the USA. “She responded in a way that was clearly above her age. She showed such a high level of maturity. I know adults that would not have climbed into that bus, with people screaming and all the blood.”

Girl Scouts of the USA awards the Medal of Honor for “saving life or attempting to save life without risk to the candidate’s own life.” In March, Katie Hurley of Northglenn, Colo. was awarded the Medal of Honor for saving her mother’s life after her glucose levels dropped to a life-threatening level.