Tag Archives: Steamboat Springs

Steamboat Springs Junior Troop 56342 Takes on COVID for Troop Meetings

Girl Scout Junior Troop 56342 of Steamboat Springs wanted to share their creative ways to have a troop meeting during the current pandemic! Before GSCO guidelines were updated on October 14, 2020, the troop developed a fabulous “sanitization station” and kaper chart for meeting precautions.

The girls are very serious about checking temperatures pre and post meeting – check out the picture of their kaper chart and sanitization station. They also created a health screening log. The group also engineered some new and improved sit-upons for their social distancing! Of course, the girls will have to add their troop leader’s names to the kaper chart for temperature taking now that the guidelines have been updated.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Sidney Barbier, Steamboat Springs, “State Park Waste Diversion”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

My project is focused on State Park Waste Diversion. However, a huge part of my project is focused on educating the public on the basics of recycling and waste diversion in hopes to inspire and empower future generations to make a difference and share their knowledge with the world! My project branched into a variety of pieces such as a staff orientation to educate staff at Colorado state parks on the basics of waste diversion so that they can help share their knowledge. I worked to create a Junior Ranger curriculum that includes reduce, reuse, recycle guidelines. I did my own in-person waste sorts with the public in order to bring awareness and get helpful data as an insight into the issue of recycling contamination. To help further knowledge of recycling, I developed and posted signage that is both sustainable and durable that will help educate people and empower them to make the right choice! Every piece of my project aims at sustainability of our amazing state parks for future generations of girls to enjoy.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

My initial plan was to measure my project’s success at Steamboat Lake by doing a beginning and end waste sort, however due to the COVID-19 pandemic, I instead found success in my project based on the number of people I was able to reach and on all levels, from staff, visitors, the public, and Girl Scouts of all ages. I was able to see this based on the number of views on my YouTube Channel, blog, and Facebook. In addition, simply posting the signage made a huge difference in the amount of contamination in the trash and recycling as observed by park employee Eric Young. When I was at Steamboat Lake posting the signage, I had multiple staff members come up to me and say how thankful they were for my presentation at their staff orientation and how much they learned. I was visibly able to see the impact education truly has on people of all backgrounds and ages. People gained new knowledge on the basics of waste diversion, the what, why, and how of recycling, as well as what individuals can do in the community to help reduce their own waste. I taught many young girls how to do their very own waste sort at home and how to set up their own successful recycling systems. My impact was measured throughout my project in less quantifiable means then I had intended, but the overall impact was based on the overall increase in knowledge and education around where our waste is truly going. I started the conversion, and I will continue to help be a part of it.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

In order to ensure the sustainability and longevity of my project beyond my involvement, I created and developed a letter of commitment that was signed by Kelly Cook, my project advisor and the administrative assistant of Steamboat Lake State Park, that ensures commitment by the state park to maintain the vision and goals of my project through a series of detailed and specific commitments. The letter of commitment lays out each part of my project and the resources available in order for the state park to continue my work. For each step of my project, I worked to make it sustainable for future use. For example, I uploaded videos of my staff orientation presentation to YouTube to be available for future use. I created a waste sort kit to be available to each seasonal interpreter for further use in park programs. I created signage that will last for at least two years and can be easily repurchased for continued educational awareness. I provided a PDF of resources from Yampa Valley Sustainability Council as well as the Junior Ranger program to be reprinted, reused, and recycled to continue the use of these resources for both the public, visitors, and young kids. By signing this letter of commitment, Steamboat Lake Park has committed to maintaining my project vision, goals, and mission beyond my involvement in order to increase waste diversion and recycling to make the state parks more sustainable for future generations to enjoy.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I met and coordinated with Girl Scouts of Colorado staff member Anna Danilla in order to find ways to share and integrate my Gold Award Project with the  Girl Scouts Love State Parks Weekend event. I ended up creating a blog post coupled with pictures that share the basics about my project and the relationship to state parks. In addition, I shared my Project Greenify YouTube Channel as online resources for the virtual piece of the Girl Scouts Love State Parks Weekend, September 12 and13, 2020. The blog information and YouTube link was posted on Girl Scouts of Colorado website, Facebook, and sent out in RSVP emails to reach potentially 1,000 girls and their family’s and share my project with Girl Scouts beyond Routt County.

What did you learn about yourself?

One of the biggest things I learned about myself throughout the whole project is that I truly do have the power to make a difference. Through perseverance, patience, passion, and hard work, I was able to make an impact on other people and the environment as a whole. I learned that I have the ability to lead and collaborate with others to create something achievable. I didn’t simply write down lofty goals, I achieved them. I learned that my passion for the environment and the human-environment interaction, is not something that will go away. It is a true passion that I want to continue to learn about, study, and share in my future and beyond. I learned what direction I want my life to take; I want to study environmental science and policy in college and beyond.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Earning my Gold Award has not only given me the confidence that I can change the world, but the tools to continue to make a difference. In my future, I will use my Gold Award experience as a segue into having a more lasting impact and continuing to share my passion for environmental science with the world. Being a Gold Award Girl Scout will help in every application and interview for college and beyond. It has given me the leadership skills that will apply to every situation life throws at me.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The journey towards earning my Gold Award was a truly unique experience and was a perfect cumulative experience of everything I have learned and gained from Girl Scouts since I was in kindergarten. I used the basics of the Girl Scout Promise to “use resources wisely” and turned it into a sustainable and achievable project. I took initiative and worked to serve my community as I had been taught to do throughout my years as a Girl Scout. I feel that earning my Gold Award was an achievement I had always dreamed of. Ever since I saw the Gold Award Girl Scouts as my troop received our Silver Award, I knew I wanted to one day stand up there and present how I used Girl Scouts as a forum for making a difference.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

Throughout my Gold Award journey, I was able to strengthen and develop a multitude of leadership skills. I believe that one of the greatest skills I gained was in collaboration. I learned to practice balancing independence with reaching out to my team for help, support, feedback, and advice. Along with collaboration came innovation. In both dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic and simply working towards sustainability for my project, I was able to demonstrate leadership in using my own confidence and delegation skills to continue my project moving forward. I continue to reach out to organizations and team members, and did not simply stand by idly during the strict period of quarantine. I became a real “go-getter,” as I used my drive and motivation along with a positive mindset to find creative solutions, by creating virtual material such as Project Greenify, finding ways to coordinate with Girl Scouts Love State Parks Weekend, and posting signage in a socially distant way. I developed skills in public speaking as I stepped up to a position of leadership and led waste-sort, staff orientation, public presentations, and Girl Scout events. I continually practiced accountability as I took responsibility for keeping up with my target dates, setting up my own meetings, and focusing on time management in order to accomplish each of my goals. I stepped up to become a coordinator, decision-maker, and active listener, as I became involved in other organizations such as state parks, and Yampa Valley Sustainability Council. The Gold Award experience has truly brought out my initiative and commitment to taking a stand and becoming an influential G.I.R.L.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org.

Girl Scouts Love State Parks Weekend: Project Greenify, a Girl Scout Gold Award Project

 

Girl Scouts Love State Parks Weekend is coming up September 12 – 13, 2020! This year, girls can participate virtually or in–person by visiting select Colorado State Parks to participate in self–guided activities like nature trails, junior ranger programs, activity backpacks, and more! RSVP and learn more here: https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/events-repository/2020/girl_scouts_love_sta.html

Leading up to this event, we want to showcase a fantastic Girl Scout Gold Award project related to state parks, “Project Greenify,” from Sidney B.  Read on to learn more about Sidney’s project:

My name is Sidney. I am currently a Junior in high school at Steamboat Mountain School. I have been a Girl Scout since I was in kindergarten and am currently working towards earning my Gold Award, which is the highest honor you can receive as a Girl Scout. My project is focused on state park waste diversion. However, a huge part of my project is focused on educating the public on the basics of recycling and waste diversion in hopes to inspire and empower future generations to make a difference and share their knowledge with the world! My project branched into a variety of pieces such as a staff orientation to educate staff at state parks on the basics of waste diversion so that they can help share their knowledge. I worked to create a Junior Ranger curriculum that includes reduce, reuse, and recycle guidelines. I did my own in-person waste sorts with the public in order to bring awareness and get helpful data as an insight into the issue of recycling contamination. To help further knowledge of recycling, I developed and posted signage that is both sustainable and durable that will help educate people and empower them to make the right choice! Every piece of my project aims at sustainability of our amazing state parks for future generations of girls to enjoy.

As you may know, September 12 and 13 is Girl Scouts Love State Parks Weekend! This is a chance to celebrate our state parks and the amazing opportunities and wild spaces they protect while giving way for changing our environment for the better.

As a piece of my Gold Award project, I have created a YouTube Channel called Project Greenify to share fun and educational videos for Girl Scouts across Routt County and Colorado. I have created a series of three different videos along with attached resources. The first is a general overarching introduction to waste diversion and recycling, and teaches the basics of environmental stewardship. The second video teaches how to do your very own waste sort at home and learn why our waste matters. The third video is a fun activity called “Birds and Worms’ and is designed for young Brownies and Daisies. By watching these videos and completing these activities, Girl Scouts are continuing the legacy of environmental stewardship, using resources wisely, and making the world a better place! In addition, Girls will be able to work towards earning their “eco” badges.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

You’re Invited! Animal Dance Party! (Mountain Communities)

 

Future Girl Scouts of the Mountain Communities! Join us on Zoom to have a-rockin’ Animal Dance Party! Bring a friend and make new friends as we dance, sing, and play games. Let’s get wild! FREE event for girls and their families interested in learning about Girl Scouts of Colorado!

Before this event, please take the time to review the Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Internet Safety Pledge, and then virtually sign it with your girl. As always, safety is a top priority at Girl Scouts of Colorado. Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Internet Safety Pledge.

Sign up here for the Animal Dance Party!

Note: Caregivers need to be present.

This party is for future Girl Scouts only. Please pass this invitation to your friends who wish to become a Girl Scouts! Who better than you to invite them to join?

If you are a current Girl Scouts – please check out the Girl Scouts at Home and  July 2020 Badge series!  

Questions? Call or text Carole at 720-450-4199; Carole.Vowell@gscolorado.org

Mountain Communities cover Eagle, Summit, Chaffee, Lake, Grand, Routt and Jackson Counties!

World Thinking Day 2020 Activities

Submitted by Debby Burnett

Mountain Communities

Cowdrey

Gracelyn read the World Thinking Day 2020 Activity Guide and came up with a plan to focus on diversity. She made a DEI (diversity, equity, inclusion) collage with pictures of diverse people, as well as the word “diversity” printed in various languages around the perimeter. She made a word web with her name in the middle, listing various characteristics and qualities that define her (for the “I Am” Circles game). Gracelyn and I (her fellow Girl Scout troop member due to the pandemic restrictions) made observations at our local (tiny) post office as it pertains to inclusion of those with disabilities in our community. She decided that there are several limiting factors that need to be addressed.

She and I went “shopping” in the Global Marketplace and learned a lot of hard lessons about how it might be to live with much less than we have right now, what is the most important (clean water, good food, education), and how to spend our money in the best way. This made us both very appreciative of the good fortune in our lives, even if we are struggling to live with the social distancing restrictions imposed by the pandemic.

Finally, Gracelyn focused on a group of people in our community whom she feels may not be treated with the respect that they deserve, our seniors. Gracelyn designed a Take Action project to focus on senior residents at Casey’s Pond in Steamboat Springs. She folded approximately 80 origami cranes and wrote the word “RESPECT” on their backs. Then, she made little pieces of paper with the word “RESPECT” written on it, with the words detailed out: Really Epic Senior People Existing Community Treasures. She was trying to send each resident at Casey’s Pond the message that they are truly community treasures and deserve our respect.

Gracelyn enjoyed this activity, improved her origami skills, and felt good about sending a positive message to the senior residents at Casey’s Pond.

Gracelyn is a member of Troop 50315 in Steamboat Springs. She is completing Girl Scout activities at home, with her mother as her main troop member at this time due to pandemic restrictions, but is eagerly looking forward to troop meetings in the future.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Celebrate Earth Day with a Girl Scout Gold Award candidate

Submitted by Sidney B.

Mountain Communities

Steamboat Springs

I have been a Girl Scout since I was in kindergarten and am currently working towards earning my Gold Award, which is the highest honor you can receive as a Girl Scout. My project is focused on state park waste diversion. However, a huge part of my project is focused on educating the public on the basics of recycling and waste diversion in hopes to inspire and empower future generations to make a difference and share their knowledge with the world! As you may know, April 22 is Earth Day! This is a chance to celebrate our planet and raise our voices for changing our environment for the better.

As a piece of my Gold Award project, I have created a YouTube Channel called Project Greenify to share fun and educational videos for Girl Scouts across Routt Country and Colorado. I have created a series of three different videos along with attached resources. The first is a general overarching introduction to waste diversion and recycling and teaches the basics of environmental stewardship. The second video teaches how to do your very own waste sort at home and learn why our waste matters. The third video is a fun activity called “Birds and Worms” and is designed for Brownies and Daisies.

By watching these videos and completing these activities, Girl Scouts are continuing the legacy of environmental stewardship, using resources wisely, and making the world a better place! In addition, Girl Scouts will be able to work towards earning their “eco” badges. Check out the Girl Scouts Badge Explorer to see what may be of interest to you.

Virtual meeting for badge work

Submitted by Samantha K.

Mountain Communities

Steamboat Springs

My Ambassador Troop 54313 in Steamboat Springs was working on the “Water” badge before the COVID-19 social distancing and school closures started. We met with our biology teacher, Ms. Frithsen, about water issues. She introduced us to many shocking issues. We spent many meetings narrowing down and researching the topics. As we were ready to put together our final project, school was cancelled. We missed each other, so we set up a web call, started a Google Doc, and all worked on our project together. Social distancing can’t keep a good troop down!

Here is the link to our project: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Ewakt6uhHSNlpOD32z4wNfiqFZjv_wAkbtmtkEO9lkA/edit?usp=sharing

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Uniform to Uniform in Steamboat Springs

Submitted by Christine Kucera

Mountain Communities

Steamboat Springs

A police officer visited our cookie booth. She wanted to purchase a package of cookies. We had just had a customer donate 19 Hometown Hero packages!!! We tried to give her one, but she insisted on purchasing a package to support us. We were so thrilled. We discussed with her about running an event to visit the police station and doing any activities we want to earn an award. We are so excited for this opportunity and can’t wait to make it a reality. Our Hometown Heroes really are our heroes!

These Girl Scouts also earned the Uniform to Uniform patch! Learn how to earn yours: http://gscoblog.org/2020/01/uniform-to-uniform-patch-for-the-2020-girl-scout-cookie-program/ 

Cookie Rally helps Girl Scouts find their wings

Submitted by Nancy Mucklow

Mountain Communities

Steamboat Springs

Cookie Captain Samantha K. rallied plenty of Girl Scout Juliettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors to help launch the cookie season in Steamboat with a Find Your Wings Cookie Rally!

Older Girl Scouts set up skill booths to help girls to learn more about each cookie and many of the aspects of selling Girl Scout Cookies. They were able to do a butterfly craft to remind them to “find their wings” and soar as a cookie seller. They got a chance to make a cookie sale poster to use at their own booth. Girls also got to see the cookie sale incentives up close and personal as a reminder to set their goals high. They were excited about the Cookie Rally patch they earned by participating!

Leaders and girls attending the rally were given a check sheet as to which requirements of each level’s financial literacy badges were addressed at the rally. Such a helpful idea!

Troops were able to connect with our service unit cookie manager to ask any questions of him and make a personal connection for later on.

Of course, all of the various cookies were on hand to taste, including the new Lemon-Ups!

Go-Getter Juliettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors showed their leadership skills in planning and implementing a very informative cookie rally for all ages of  Girl Scouts in Steamboat Springs. Innovative ways to learn about the cookie program included a pop-up tent decorated as an example! All our Girl Scouts are risk-takers in making the commitment to sell Girl Scout Cookies and improve their personal finance and communication and organizational skills.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Snowshoe adventure

Submitted by Nancy Mucklow

Mountain Communities

Steamboat Springs

On a recent snowy afternoon, Steamboat’s Girl Scout Junior Troop 56342 wrapped up their work on the “Snow Adventure” and “Animal Habitats” badges by taking a snowshoe outing with a Yampatika guide. The very knowledgeable naturalist taught the girls about identifying animal tracks in the snow.

“Meg and the staff at Yampatika were so welcoming and helpful and the girls had a really great time,” said troop co-leader Lisa Thornhill.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.