Tag Archives: Arvada

Sister CEO sellers

Submitted by Tricia P.

Metro Denver

Arvada

Girl Scouts (and sisters) Hailey and Peyton heard about the CEO reward for selling 2,020 packages of cookies this year and they were on board! Mom, on the other hand, had her doubts. That is 4,040 packages in one house! But, these girls are go-getters and risk-takers. They were not taking caution for an answer.

About four weeks into the program, they were just half way to their gaol and getting very tired. We had a long talk and they said they wanted this and were going to do it! That’s when they sold 600 packages in one weekend. Together and with the support of family friends and local businesses, they did it. They finished with not just 2,020 each, but 2,151 each!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Julia Trujillo, Arvada, “The Period Project: Free and Accessible Menstrual Products for Colorado Schools”

What did you do for your Gold Award project? 

For my Gold Award project, I asked Colorado Representative Brianna Titone to introduce a bill on my behalf. House Bill 1131 creates a grant program to provide funding for free and accessible menstrual products/product dispensers in Title One Colorado schools. I rallied community support and started the conversation about period poverty and period stigma in our state’s government and in my community and beyond.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

The target audience of my Gold Award is girls/menstruators in schools with 75% or more students in free and reduced price  lunch programs. By creating a program that prioritizes getting products into these low-resource schools, I have been able to ensure that my Gold Award will impact those with the greatest need.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

The grant program created, if passed, will be sustained through the state. It has currently cleared the House Education committee and still needs to pass through the Senate, but I’m very hopeful and confident in this because of the bill’s success thus far. If the bill does not pass, my work has still inspired significant initiatives such as the commitments from Jefferson County and Denver Public Schools to provide district-wide products.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My efforts to eradicate period and poverty started small within my own high school and expanded from there to address the needs of students in my district and finally throughout my state. The attention the bill has gained through various media outlets including a podcast based out of New York will help spread this movement throughout the nation with the help of various organizations and nonprofits I partnered with and secured testimony from such groups as Period.Org, Period Kits Denver, and Free The Period Co. which have all been spreading the word about the bill through social media and blog posts. Period poverty and stigma is rampant worldwide. There is a lot of work to be done to solve this global epidemic. By normalizing periods and providing for menstruating minors in developing  countries, it will become easier for us to view periods as normal aspects of life. Providing products to those in need will become a matter of public health and safety. This will allow our society to begin to prioritize addressing the unmet needs of menstruators all around the world.

What did you learn about yourself?

I have learned that I am 100% capable of advocating for my ideas and beliefs, even in the face of opposition and I can respectfully and intelligently disagree and vocalize my disagreement. My project has shown me that my ideas and solutions are worthwhile and can help the world around me. By spending so much time outside of my comfort zone, I’ve expanded my comfort zone. Countless meetings, proposals, presentations, interviews, etc. have made me feel like I can handle any pressure or task.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

My Gold Award has entirely changed my idea of what my future will look like. Going into my project, I was fairly uncertain of what exactly I wanted to do. Throughout my Gold Award journey, I’ve discovered the passion and interest I have in policy and the legislative process. I’ve discovered I want to pursue a career in this area.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I feel that earning my Gold Award has allowed me to finally put all the leadership skills Girl Scouts armed me with to use. I was able to truly find real life applications to everything I’ve learned over the years about being assertive and creating change when I see a problem.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I truly feel that I have become a risk-taker. From speaking about taboo, vulnerable issues in a testimony before a legislative committee, to proposing a resolution to my school board, to lobbying to General Assembly members and senators, my Gold Award has put me in countless situations that would have terrified me a year ago. I have learned to believe in myself and believe that if I put in the work and research, I will be heard, and deserve to be heard. Taking risks throughout my Gold Award project has allowed me to become a braver, stronger, and more confident version of myself.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

 

 

Troop 66517 Bronze Award project

Submitted by Brittney T.

Metro Denver

Arvada

On December 23, 2019, we completed our Bronze Award project. We wanted to do something that would benefit our community and our peers. We’ve all had hard days at school, so we chose to paint sayings on the bathroom walls to remind our fellow students that everything is going to be ok! Things like, “Throw Kindness like Confetti” and “Believe you can and you will.”

First, we worked together to come up with our sayings, we wanted them to be inspirational, but easy to remember too. Next, we worked together to build our presentation for the principal. Once we were confident we had a good presentation, we made an appointment to present to the principal.

Once we had an agreement with the school, we rounded up our troop leaders and we went to school over Christmas Break! Our leaders stenciled our sayings on the wall for us, then set us loose with the paint! It was a little scary, because we really only had one chance to get it right with the paint. We worked together and cheered each other on and everything turned out great!

We hope our work will help to inspire students for years to come! Thank you, Campbell Elementary, for letting us come paint on your walls! A special thank you to the janitors for staying with us on their day off, as well!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Bri Wolle, Arvada, “Talent Turned Talented”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

Realizing that many primary schools in Kenya lack sufficient resources for music education, I took action. Partnering with SCOPE International, I connected with teachers at four schools in Kenya who agreed to teach the primary school kids the recorder. After extensive research, I bought and shipped 60 recorders, 15 to each school, in addition to recorder books. When I visited Kenya nine months later, I went to the four schools and evaluated the success of the recorder programs at each school. My hope to spark passion for music into the lives of the children in Kenya was achieved, and I created a website and spoke to my high school choir in hopes of instilling further passion to help abroad into the hearts of my peers and the local community. By bringing a taste of American music education into the lives of the Kenyans, and bringing evidence of the progress and passion in the Kenyans, I connected cultures and helped improve standards and awareness for worldwide primary music education.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured the impact my Gold Award project made on my target audience by first figuring out my target audience, which was at least three schools in Kenya, and American children. I measured how the recorders made an impact on the four schools in Kenya because I measured how many students learned how to play the recorder, which was 60 in total. In order to measure the impact on my target audience in America, I took note of the statistics regarding how many people look at my website.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

All 60 recorders are currently in use and accounted for, as are the recorder curriculums. Having visited each of the four schools that received the curriculum, I was able to connect with the teachers and receive verbal and written agreement to continue the recorder program with children in years to come. Additionally for the American audience and supporters, I created a website and online curriculum educating people on the importance of music education, and the startling realities that the world does not share the same luxury of a strong music education system like we have in America. My website contains a link which directs the patron to the SCOPE International website, where they can donate to the organization. My contacts at SCOPE have agreed to use those donations to further the recorder program in other schools. Don Howard is currently in Africa and getting letters of commitment from the heads of the schools with the recorders. Also, Professor On’gesa and I are currently making plans to organize a team for the remake of the talent show in 2020, so I will again be delegating with the SCOPE coordinators in Kenya to put that on, despite my inability to be at the actual talent show.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

The project dealt with problems both locally and globally. The reality of the situation is that it is a global issue. It is not just Kenya that suffers from a lack of music education, which is what my project aimed to help reverse. By sending recorders to Kenya and giving students access to instruments, I was able to bring that success back to American kids and adults to prove that everyone has the power to promote music education globally. The website curriculum I created also promotes music education advancement globally. I was able to connect personally with my school’s top two choirs, Shades of Blue and Concert Choir, and teach them the importance of utilizing the musical talents and resources they’ve been given in order to advocate for others who do not have the same. The local issue of people needing to be aware about the need abroad, and the global issue of people needing musical resources are connected and feed off of each other.

What did you learn about yourself?

From this project, I learned that music education is a luxury we take for granted in the United States, and that it is up to every individual to fuel passion in others. I learned the importance of expanding my circle, employing others’ help when need-be, and using my voice to speak for others. I was challenged to reach out to diplomats and volunteers outside of my circle, and outside of the country, in order to put my project into actions. I learned how to ship internationally, and I had to learn patience when it came to shipping. After learning to wait and give others the opportunity to complete their assigned task, but I also checked up on my delegates to ensure the completion of the task. Finally, I realized the significance of my voice in America telling others about the realities in Kenya and possibilities we have to change lives.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Earning my Gold Award will impact me in the future because it has provided me with great opportunities to network and learn how to delegate. It has increased my passion for spreading awareness for music education worldwide, and I hope to impact other people to action in the future. Being a Gold Award Girl Scout will allow me to join the community of other Gold Award Girl Scouts, and I am hopeful that being a Gold Award Girl Scout will provide me with opportunities for employment in areas that I’m passionate about.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award was an important part of my Girl Scout experience because it allowed me to take the last 13 years of the values that Girl Scouts has taught me and implement them into a project that would impact someone else. The Gold Award is special to me because I was completely in charge of the direction of the project – the Bronze and Silver were also significant, but it meant a lot to me that I led the project. It was so amazing to be able to take my passion for music and share it with other people, impacting a community outside of just my state.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

Earning my Gold Award helped me become a go-getter because I had to learn the difference between delegating and needing to take initiative. My project took place partially in America and partially in Kenya, so I had to be on top of my game regarding communication between the countries. In addition to just completing the project, I had to be a go-getter so I could fund a trip to Kenya and see my project’s progress. All in all, the project’s success depended on my motivation and passion towards music and helping others. I had to want it to get it.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Gold Award Girl Scout: Emma Graziano, Arvada, “Connecting Celiac Teens: Project CeliACT”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

Ever feel like you didn’t belong or imagine not being able to have dinner with friends because you can’t eat what they’re eating?  “Connecting Celiac Teens: Project CeliACT” was my effort to create a support group for teens living with celiac disease. This is personal for me because I have celiac disease, a serious autoimmune disorder where the ingestion of gluten leads to damage of the small intestines. Living with celiac disease can be challenging because the only known treatment is the adherence to a strict gluten-free diet. This support group was created for the Denver Celiac Support Group, a local chapter of the National Celiac Association (NCA), because the group had previously struggled to establish a teen program. The goal of my project was to connect with other teens living with celiac disease and create a bond with those facing similar issues; all while learning together how to advocate for ourselves and educate others about celiac disease. My effort included finding ways to identify new teen members while creating a sustainable operating framework for the Denver support group. Through various outreach, advertising, and publicity efforts to the public, I was able to gain 19 new members and successfully start a support group for teens living with celiac disease.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

When I started my project, the Denver Celiac Support Group organization had 311 adult members and approximately 70 youth members with only three teen members, including myself. In the past year, I’ve recruited 19 additional teen members to join the support group for a total of 22 members through my outreach efforts.

Additionally, I knew I was making an impact with the teens and their families by the various email feedback I was receiving along the way from my target audience:

“I would be thrilled to join this group!”- Morgan M., teen member

“Hi, I’m Nate’s mom and I think this is a fantastic idea.”- Nicole P., parent

“What a great thing you’re doing by organizing this! I wish you all the success and hope to have my little girl, she’s 8 now, participate in something like this in the future.”- Angela T., parent

“I’d love to join the group for dinner.  Looking forward to it, thanks for doing this!”- Ryan S., teen member

“I just wanted to say that it was so cool that you organized a group get together. It’s a great idea…thanks, again. Good luck!”- Michelle S., parent 

“I got your letter about Teens with Celiac Disease and would like to participate. I have celiac disease as well as my sister, mom, grandma, and best friend. Thank you.”- Lowri M., teen member

“This is so amazing, thank you so much! What a great project for you, and you’re helping so many people.”- Julie L., parent

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

The Denver Celiac Support Group has committed to continue to sponsor the teen support group program. My project advisor, Maria Brotherston, is the Children’s Program Director and she will oversee the group. More importantly, several of the younger teens in the group have expressed interest in leading the group when I leave for college.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My efforts to create a teen support group for those living with celiac disease began in the Denver area. While promoting my Celiac Disease Presentation and Panel Discussion event through publicity efforts with an interview with Reporter Karen Morfitt of CBS4/KCNC-TV and various Facebook posts about the event and the interview, I was contacted by Carla Carter, Director of Outreach and Programming for the National Celiac Association. Ms. Carter said she had been following my progress and asked if I would be interested in submitting my story for their spring magazine. I was thrilled to be asked and humbled by the opportunity.

The NCA magazine is circulated nationwide to more than 3,000 members as well as more than 500 libraries and hospitals nationwide. Not only was my picture (with my Girl Scout vest) on the cover of the magazine, my story was featured as the centerfold of the magazine. In my article, I offered my assistance to any other group or program wishing to start a similar experience in their state or hometown and hope that I will be contacted in the near future.

What did you learn about yourself?

Throughout the course of my project, I learned the importance of developing good communication, presentation, and writing skills. At each stage of my project, I was either talking with someone, writing to someone, or presenting to someone and telling them about my project mission and goals. As a result of my project, I learned to write better and improve my presentation skills. I knew it was important for me to be prepared in each of my presentations. I knew any emails that I sent had to be professional and well-written. Prior to my project, I had never done a phone interview, media interview, or acted as a moderator for an event. Through my project, I learned to go outside of my comfort zone to speak to others, ask for help from others, and be a better communicator.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future

Personally, I learned why I enjoy participating in the celiac teen support group so much is because I realized I like helping other people. In the future, I plan to pursue a Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing. I want to become a nurse because I enjoy assisting other people and I love making people feel better and feel supported. My Girl Scout Gold Award project caused me to realize my passion and solidify my career goals for the future.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

In addition to communication skills, I developed several important leadership skills during my project as well. I learned how to connect and collaborate with other organizations and people while advocating for myself and others with celiac disease. I learned how to plan and organize a large-scale event. Through my efforts, I learned about project management and time management. Through each of these efforts, I was building awareness for celiac disease, my project, and what I was trying to accomplish with the teen support group. I think each of these skills helped me to be a better leader as I worked to promote awareness of celiac disease and attract new teen members for the support group.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

Prior to earning my Gold Award, I considered myself usually adverse to taking risks or putting myself into strange or uncomfortable situations. However, during my journey to earn the Girl Scout Gold Award, I learned to take risks and go outside of my comfort zone to achieve my goals. The research and planning work I did for my project really helped me to realize that it’s okay to take risks in order to make progress. Additionally, I learned that sometimes taking risks means encountering a few challenges and making a few mistakes along the way. I realized that working closely with my mentor and learning from my mistakes is what enabled me to continue my efforts in order to earn my Gold Award.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scouts Family Information Night – Meiklejohn Elementary

K-5th grade girls and their families are invited to learn more about what it means to be a Girl Scout at our upcoming Girl Scouts Information Night. New troops are forming today, and now is your girl’s chance to secure her spot in a troop!

 

Girl Scouts is a place where your girl is free to try new things and just be herself! As a Girl Scout, your girl will practice leadership with grit like a go-getter, problem solve like an innovator, embrace challenges like a risk-taker, and show empathy like a leader—in an all-girl, girl-led, and girl-friendly environment where she can feel free to let her full, magnificent personality shine through every single time. And now there’s even more to explore, with new badges in robotics, outdoor adventuring, cybersecurity, and environmental stewardship—to name just a few!

 

Learn more on Wednesday, September 25th from 6:00 P.M. – 7:00 P.M. in Meiklejohn Elementary’s Art Room located at 13405 W 83rd Pl, Arvada, CO 80005.

 

To start your girl’s membership with Girl Scout of Colorado visit: www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/join

Girl Scouts Family Information Night – Three Creeks K-8

K-8th grade girls and their families are invited to learn more about what it means to be a Girl Scout at our upcoming Girl Scouts Information Night. New troops are forming today, and now is your girl’s chance to secure her spot in a troop!

 

Girl Scouts is a place where your girl is free to try new things and just be herself! As a Girl Scout, your girl will practice leadership with grit like a go-getter, problem solve like an innovator, embrace challenges like a risk-taker, and show empathy like a leader—in an all-girl, girl-led, and girl-friendly environment where she can feel free to let her full, magnificent personality shine through every single time. And now there’s even more to explore, with new badges in robotics, outdoor adventuring, cybersecurity, and environmental stewardship—to name just a few!

 

Learn more on Tuesday, September 17th from 6:00 P.M. – 7:00 P.M. in Three Creeks’ Cafeteria located at 19486 W 94th Ave, Arvada, CO 80007.

 

To start your girl’s membership with Girl Scout of Colorado visit: www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/join

Girl Scouts Family Information Night – Hackberry Hill Elementary

K-5th grade girls and their families are invited to learn more about what it means to be a Girl Scout at our upcoming Girl Scouts Information Night. New troops are forming today, and now is your girl’s chance to secure her spot in a troop!

 

Girl Scouts is a place where your girl is free to try new things and just be herself! As a Girl Scout, your girl will practice leadership with grit like a go-getter, problem solve like an innovator, embrace challenges like a risk-taker, and show empathy like a leader—in an all-girl, girl-led, and girl-friendly environment where she can feel free to let her full, magnificent personality shine through every single time. And now there’s even more to explore, with new badges in robotics, outdoor adventuring, cybersecurity, and environmental stewardship—to name just a few!

 

Learn more on Tuesday, September 10th from 6:00 P.M. – 7:00 P.M. in Hackberry Hill Elementary’s Library located at 7300 W 76th Ave. Arvada, CO 80003.

 

To start your girl’s membership with Girl Scout of Colorado visit: www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/join

Girl Scouts Family Information Night – Jefferson Academy

K-12th grade girls and their families are invited to learn more about what it means to be a Girl Scout at our upcoming Girl Scouts Information Night. New troops are forming today, and now is your girl’s chance to secure her spot in a troop!

 

Girl Scouts is a place where your girl is free to try new things and just be herself! As a Girl Scout, your girl will practice leadership with grit like a go-getter, problem solve like an innovator, embrace challenges like a risk-taker, and show empathy like a leader—in an all-girl, girl-led, and girl-friendly environment where she can feel free to let her full, magnificent personality shine through every single time. And now there’s even more to explore, with new badges in robotics, outdoor adventuring, cybersecurity, and environmental stewardship—to name just a few!

 

Learn more on Thursday, September 5th from 6:30 P.M. – 7:30 P.M. in Jefferson Academy’s Commons located at 9955 Yarrow St,
Broomfield, CO 80021.

 

To start your girl’s membership with Girl Scout of Colorado visit: www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/join

Gold Award Girl Scout: Cassandra Sterns, Arvada, “Simply Technology”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award project, Simply Technology, I created and taught six technology classes for independently living seniors in Arvada, Colorado that helped them learn how to use their Android smartphone. Each class taught the attendees how to use different apps on smartphones such as messages, camera, email, and Internet. Knowing how to use technology is a huge part of today’s society, and not knowing how to use it often ostracized people, namely senior citizens.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured the impact of my Gold Award through a survey I had each of the members of my class take, and by the appreciation I received personally from the attendees. Many of the seniors approached me to tell me how helpful the class was and that they are no longer afraid to try new things on their phone. Additionally, my project was requested again, which showed that people thought it was helpful and successful enough that other people should take the class too.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project is going to be sustained in two ways beyond my involvement. The first way that my project will be sustained is that the Jefferson County Public Library System will continue to hold classes that teach seniors about their smartphones. The second way is that I will have a website that can be accessed by anyone with the materials that I created for my classes and more cool tricks that I hope will encourage seniors to use their phones more often. The web address is https://sites.google.com/a/jeffcoschools.us/simply-technology.

What is your project’s global/or national connection?

I grew my Gold Award project from the original location at Stanley Lake Library to a second location, Brookdale Meridian Center in Boulder. The Brookdale Meridian Center is an independent living community for retired citizens (most are in the late 70s to 80s). At Brookdale Meridian, I taught a class to the residents and helped them to understand how their phones worked.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that I could have a voice that people pay attention to in a crowd and that I didn’t need to be handed a microphone when I wanted to talk to a crowd. I have always had a quieter voice and it gets overpowered a lot in discussions and conversations. I struggled during the first few classes to get my voice heard, but by the end, I was able to captivate my audience with a louder voice.

How will earning your Gold Award Impact you in the future?

Earning my Gold Award is going to impact my future because it allowed me to grow and learn more about myself. My project challenged me to overcome some of my reservedness and helped me to develop as a leader. In the future, I will be able to use the skills I learned during my Gold Award project to impact the world in other and hopefully, larger ways.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

Earning your Gold Award is an important part of your Girl Scout experience because it proves that you have learned something applicable through the organization. Additionally, it shows you that you can be an empowered young woman all by yourself and you can take on some of the problems of the world. The Gold Award is important because it culminates all that you have learned as a Girl Scout and focuses it into one project that you can be passionate about the rest of your life.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Through earning my Gold Award, I became a go-getter and a risk-taker. Taking on the project pushed me to pursue some of my own dreams and help the world around me; it enabled me to become purposeful. Additionally, putting myself up there in front of a group of people made me realize that taking risks aren’t so bad, in fact, my Gold Award made me more confident to put myself out there for people to see.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org