Tag Archives: Arvada

Gold Award recipient honored for volunteerism at national award ceremony in Washington, D.C.

Olympic gold medalist Michael Phelps congratulates Emma Albertoni, 18, of Arvada (center) and Breanna Remigio, 14, of Aurora (right) on being named Colorado's top two youth volunteers for 2017 by The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards. Emma and Breanna were honored at a ceremony on Sunday, May 7 at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History, where they each received a $1,000 award. (PRNewsfoto/Prudential Insurance)
Olympic gold medalist Michael Phelps congratulates Emma Albertoni, 18, of Arvada (center) and Breanna Remigio, 14, of Aurora (right) on being named Colorado’s top two youth volunteers for 2017 by The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards. Emma and Breanna were honored at a ceremony on Sunday, May 7 at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, where they each received a $1,000 award. (PRNewsfoto/Prudential Insurance)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Girl Scout Gold Award recipient Emma Albertoni of Arvada was honored in the nation’s capital on May 7, 2017 for her outstanding volunteer service during the 22nd annual presentation of The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards. In February, the Prudential Spirit of Community Awards named Emma one of Colorado’s top youth volunteers of 2017 and awarded her the title of State Honoree. Emma – along with more than 100 other top youth volunteers from across the country – received a $1,000 award and personal congratulations from Olympic gold medalist Michael Phelps at an award ceremony and gala dinner reception held at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. Emma also received an engraved silver medallion, which Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie A. Foote presented to her at last month’s Highest Awards Celebration in Loveland. 

Emma, a senior at Ralston Valley Senior High School, earned the highest honor in Girl Scouting for her work to improve financial literacy education and ensure students across Colorado are prepared to make sound financial decisions when they graduate. The idea hit Emma one summer when she was working at a summer job, shopping for her first car, and looking at college tuitions. “I was dealing with larger sums of money than ever before and I realized I didn’t know anything about using it wisely,” she said. After discussing with her parents such foreign concepts as credit scores, loans, budgeting and taxes, Emma decided she and her peers needed help.

She began by researching financial education in Colorado and found large gaps. For example, “In Algebra II, students are taught how to calculate interest; what they are not taught is how interest could affect their credit scores or how to figure interest into the cost of a purchase,” she said. Emma discussed her concerns with her principal, who put her in touch with the teacher of her school’s Family Consumer Science class. Emma offered to develop a unit on financial safety online for the class, and then created presentations, videos, discussion outlines, and quizzes to use in the classroom. Next, she persuaded the local school board to strengthen the teaching of financial literacy throughout the district, and she is now working with state legislators on guidelines for educators across the state to follow in teaching students about financial topics.

Youth volunteers in grades 5-12 were invited to apply for 2017 Prudential Spirit of Community Awards last fall through schools, Girl Scout councils, county 4-H organizations, American Red Cross chapters, YMCAs and affiliates of the HandsOn Network. More than 31,000 middle level and high school students nationwide participated in this year’s program.

The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards program was created in 1995 to identify and recognize young people for outstanding volunteer service – and, in so doing, inspire others to volunteer, too. In the past 22 years, the program has honored more than 120,000 young volunteers at the local, state and national level.

For more information about The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards and this year’s honorees, visit  http://spirit.prudential.com or www.nassp.org/spirit.

 

 

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award recipients honored at Highest Awards celebration in Loveland

More than 300 Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at the Embassy Suites by Hilton in Loveland on April 23, 2017, to honor the more than 1,400 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts are groundbreakers, big thinkers, and role models. Giving back is in their blood. So is standing up to the challenge, no matter how big or small,” she said.

2016 Gold Award recipient and National Young Woman of Distinction Sarah Greichen served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about her journey to earn the Gold Award and how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

“I cannot remember a day when Girl Scout flags, supplies, sashes, cookies, and girls planning events weren’t covering multiple floors of my house. We (the girls in my troop) each earned our Bronze and Silver Awards, while constantly practicing the leadership skills necessary to passionately lead, serve, and change the world,” she said. “Girl Scouts and in particular the Gold Award has given me unique opportunities to become courageous, caring, and confident, while actively practicing leadership skills that greatly impact the world. Girl Scouts also gave me the opportunity to identify and pursue my passion. I found that following your passion is the key to choosing and accomplishing highest awards projects.”

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Before the celebration, Stephanie Foote presented Gold Award recipient and 2017 winner of the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize for Gold Award Excellence Emma Albertoni with an engraved silver medallion from The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards. Emma, from Arvada and senior at Ralston Valley Senior High School, was named one of Colorado’s top youth volunteers of 2017 by The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards. This is a nationwide program honoring young people for outstanding acts of volunteerism. As a State Honoree, Emma will receive $1,000, the medallion, and an all-expense-paid trip in early May to Washington, D.C. She will join top honorees from other states and the District of Columbia for four days of national recognition events. During the trip, 10 students will be named America’s top youth volunteers of 2017.

 

Troop 66542 delivers cookies to Arvada Food Bank

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Submitted by Michelle Lucero

Metro Denver

Arvada

Our troop more than quadrupled last year’s Hometown Hero numbers and delivered 665 packages of Girl Scout Cookies to the backpack program at the Arvada Food Bank. One of our Girl Scouts (Marlee L.) sold 434 packages of Hometown Heroes cookies for the backpack program. The backpack program at the Arvada Food Bank sends food home over the weekend for in need kiddos from area elementary schools.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Arvada Girl Scout travels to Costa Rica

Costa Rica

Arvada Girl Scout Charlotte B. traveled to Costa Rica for an unforgettable adventure! She was able to make the trip after receiving the “Look Wider” International Travel Scholarship. After returning home, Charlotte shared her memories with her Girl Scout sisters:

During the trip when we were at the beach, we had the opportunity to help and pick up the trash. When we were picking up the trash on the last day, we were able to see the sick sea turtles come to land to either die or lay their eggs when the other turtles weren’t there, so they wouldn’t make the others sick. That showed me how most of us didn’t really think about the sick turtles and what would happen to them. Going sure opened my eyes to what happens down there and how that can effect the community.”

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The “Look Wider” International Travel Scholarships are made possible by the Rae Ann and Richard Dougherty Look Wider International Travel Fund Endowment at Rose Community Foundation. Thanks to this generous commitment, Girl Scouts of Colorado will award scholarships to girls every year.

Learn more about Girl Scout destinations and other international travel at forgirls.girlscouts.org/travel. Applications for destinations travel are due before Thanksgiving each fall. The application for the “Look Wider” International Travel Scholarship is available from November through February and is meant for individual girl travel. Read more about Global Girl Scouting and how to get involved atgirlscoutsofcolorado.org/global-girl-scouting.

Gold Award recipient named State Honoree by The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards

emma-albertoni

Congratulations to Girl Scout Gold Award recipient Emma Albertoni of Arvada! Emma, a senior at Ralston Valley Senior High School, was named one of Colorado’s top youth volunteers of 2017 by The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards. This is a nationwide program honoring young people for outstanding acts of volunteerism. As a State Honoree, Emma will receive $1,000, an engraved silver medallion, and an all-expense-paid trip in early May to Washington, D.C. She will join top honorees from other states and the District of Columbia for four days of national recognition events. During the trip, 10 students will be named America’s top youth volunteers of 2017.

Emma earned the highest honor in Girl Scouting for her work to improve financial literacy education to ensure that students in her school district and ultimately her entire state are prepared to make sound financial decisions when they graduate. The idea hit Emma one summer when she was working at a summer job, shopping for her first car, and looking at college tuitions. “I was dealing with larger sums of money than ever before and I realized I didn’t know anything about using it wisely,” she said. After discussing with her parents such foreign concepts as credit scores, loans, budgeting and taxes, Emma decided she and her peers needed help.

She began by researching financial education in Colorado and found large gaps. For example, “In Algebra II, students are taught how to calculate interest; what they are not taught is how interest could affect their credit scores or how to figure interest into the cost of a purchase,” she said. Emma discussed her concerns with her principal, who put her in touch with the teacher of her school’s Family Consumer Science class. Emma offered to develop a unit on financial safety online for the class, and then created presentations, videos, discussion outlines, and quizzes to use in the classroom. Next, she persuaded the local school board to strengthen the teaching of financial literacy throughout the district, and she is now working with state legislators on guidelines for educators across the state to follow in teaching students about financial topics.

In 2016, Girl Scout Gold Award recipient Christina Bear of Golden was named a Distinguished Finalist for The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards. She received an engraved bronze medallion.

The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards represents the United States’ largest youth recognition program based solely on volunteer service. All public and private middle level and high schools in the country, as well as all Girl Scout councils, county 4-H organizations, American Red Cross chapters, YMCAs and HandsOn Network affiliates, were eligible to select a student or member for a local Prudential Spirit of Community Award. These Local Honorees were then reviewed by an independent judging panel, which selected State Honorees and Distinguished Finalists based on criteria including personal initiative, effort, impact and personal growth.

For information on this year’s Prudential Spirit of Community State Honorees and Distinguished Finalists, visit http://spirit.prudential.com.

 

 

 

 

Cookie video contest: First time Girl Scout

Submitted by Gia

Metro Denver

Arvada

This is my first year in Girl Scouts. I love going on field trips with my friends. I am excited for booth sales. It’s like having our own store! I hope my troop can earn enough for an overnight!

This video was submitted for the 2017 Best Cookie Video contest.

Troop 2510 bridges to Seniors

Submitted by Rachelle Trujillo

Metro Denver

Arvada

Four beautiful freshman from Troop 62510 bridged to Senior Girl Scouts last week. They bridged at Ralston Creek in Arvada, returning to the site where they bridged as Juniors.

While our troop has tightened up from the 20 girls we started with in kindergarten, my Seniors are dedicated and passionate about making the world a better place and going for their Gold.

My girls have grown to be a diverse group with different interests, yet I see them valuing the role each girl has played in their lives, the lessons learned, and the sisterhood that will always unite them through Girl Scouts.

I’m so proud to be an advisor to these young ladies and excited to see where their passion takes them!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

My Gold Award project continues

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Submitted by Debra Zerr

Metro Denver

Arvada

When I received the news that my project was approved and I earned the Gold Award in March 2016, I leaped with joy. My favorite part was sharing the good news with all the military I worked with. They were ecstatic and couldn’t wait to celebrate with me at my private ceremony in August.

The greatest part about doing Gold or any project with Girl Scouts is you can easily fall in love with what you did or are doing. I love “Connecting & Protecting” so much. What it stands for, who stands behind it, and the stories of results. It feels so amazing to know I started it and people are noticing.

There’s so many exciting updates I have to share with all of you! “Connecting & Protecting” (aka me) took on the 22 Push-Up challenge for 22Kill and started a Youtube channel! I also launched the first C&P t-shirt to raise money for 22Kill! Finally, the most exciting news of all. I’ve been working hard on delivering more fun events/challenges. This past summer, I hosted the very first obstacle course and now, after speaking with people I have received ten requests for the obstacle course to occur summer 2017! Jeffco Libraries and my church will be hosting, so keep a look out!

I strongly encourage more girls to do projects they absolutely love with all their heart and soul. You will not ever regret it.

website: connectingprotecting.com

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

11 Colorado Girl Scouts earn Gold Award, the highest honor in Girl Scouts

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11 Girl Scouts from across Colorado have earned the Gold Award, the highest award in Girl Scouts.

  • Emma Albertoni from Arvada, Ralston Valley High School, took action after noticing that many of her peers lacked financial literacy. She wrote a curriculum that will be implemented in her school and proposed to the Jefferson County School Board to add a required Financial Literacy class.
  • Megan Beaudoin from Monument, St. Mary’s High School, created a ten-minute video for middle school students to help ease the transition to high school. Topics covered included: academics, social interactions, and self-esteem.
  • Megan Burnett from Colorado Springs, James Irwin Charter High School,worked with community leaders and businesses to build a softball practice field at the school. The project would have cost the school $25,000.
  • Michayla Cassano from Colorado Springs, Pine Creek High School, created a memorial to recognize the sacrifices made by women who have served in the military.
  • Kelsey Collins from Aurora, Grandview High School, created a curriculum to teach preschool and elementary school children about park safety and Colorado history.
  • Carissa Flores from Westminster, Broomfield High School, shared her knowledge and passion for Taekwondo by creating, coordinating, and leading self-defense seminars for children, teens, and adults.
  • Baily Holsinger from Larkspur, Castle View High School, not only crocheted hundreds of beanies for newborn babies at Denver Health Medical Center and Baby Haven in Fort Collins, she also held classes to teach people of all ages how to make the beanies.
  • Kathleen Otto from Fort Collins, Fossil Ridge High School, worked to increase awareness for dyslexia by hosting a viewing of “The Big Picture: Rethinking Dyslexia” and leading a panel discussion afterwards.
  • Daniell Plomodon from Erie, Niwot High School, organized several “Disability for a Day” presentations to educate others about living with a disability. Activities included: trying to button a shirt while wearing mittens, playing patty cake while wearing Vaseline covered glasses, and using person first language.
  • Anastasia Rosen from Fort Collins, Rocky Mountain High School, created a workshop to educate others about human trafficking, tactics recruiters use, and how to prevent it.
  • Debra Zerr from Arvada addressed the problem of the lack of connection between the military and general public. Through a series of events, she worked to educate the public about the importance of the military and the men and women who serve.

These young women have demonstrated exceptional commitment to taking action to make their world a better place. By earning their Gold Award now, these Girl Scouts will also be part of this spring’s celebration of Girl Scouts’ highest honor. Since 1916, Girl Scouts have been making meaningful, sustainable change in their communities and around the world.

The Girl Scout Gold Award culminates with a project led by one young woman between 9th and 12th grades who builds a purpose-based team to work with the larger community to meet a need. The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others and providing sustainability for the project.