Tag Archives: Pikes Peak

Girl Scout siblings inspire cookie donation to Children’s Hospital

Submitted by Cindy Opong

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

Daisy/Brownie Troop 43483 in Colorado Springs donated 192 packages of Girl Scout Cookies to Children’s Hospital and the Ronald McDonald House in Aurora. The troop has a special connection with Children’s Hospital as two younger siblings of girls in the troop have been patients there this year and their families experienced first-hand the wonderful resources Children’s provides.

The troop honored their Sister Scout siblings by donating cookies plus “craft gift bags” to be handed out to patients. The cookies are already being enjoyed by patients in the hospital’s family resource room.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Sand Creek Massacre community service

Submitted by Chere Johnson

Pikes Peak

Cheyenne Wells

On May 12, 2018, Girl Scout Troop 80909 of Cheyenne Wells traveled to the Sand Creek Massacre site and did some volunteer work. They planted more than 2,000 grass plugs and worked from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. This group included Daisies thru Cadettes. What a way to give back!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Girl Scout bridging and overnight with Colorado Springs Sky Sox baseball

Join us for our annual Girl Scout Night, Bridging Celebration and Overnight with the Colorado Sky Sox, Friday June 15, 2018 in Colorado Springs! The Sky Sox are celebrating 45 years of baseball in Colorado Springs, so the theme for this game is the 80’s. Come dressed in your neon 80’s outfits and big hair and cheer on the Sky Sox as they take on the Las Vegas 51’s! Girl Scouts can participate in a bridging ceremony before the game and enjoy an optional overnight at the game. The game starts at 6:40 p.m. with the bridging around 6 p.m. so come early to enjoy the bridging ceremony and the Fun Zone before the game. The overnight starts after the game, with breakfast at 7:00 a.m. Each participating Girl Scout will get a patch.

Cost is $22/person and includes game ticket, parking or Fun Zone Pass, meal voucher, bridging, optional overnight & special event patch. Registration deadline is Monday, June 4, 2018. Tickets can be purchased at https://goo.gl/Yxwtbi. This event is for all Girl Scouts and their families and friends, whether they are bridging or not. Not planning to stay overnight? No problem! You are welcome to just come enjoy the game. Also, the sleepover will happen if we sell more than 100 tickets, so share game info with any interested friends and family. No refunds will be offered on tickets due to our event agreement with the Sky Sox.

Questions? For more information, please contact Lori Thompson at lori.thompson@gscolorado.org.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Volunteer Spotlight: Rusty Merill

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state. Rusty Merill of Woodland Park in the Pikes Peak region was nominated by a GSCO staff member as a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Rusty to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I was a girl member for 10 years, started as a Brownie in 1948, and continued through INTERMEDIATES, and Seniors, receiving my Curved Bar award in 1957. I enjoyed Girl Scouting so much, I wanted to continue and share it with other girls.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

Assistant leader to an Intermediate troop, leader of one of the first JUNIOR troops in Jamestown, N.Y in 1963, then was leader of Brownie, Junior, Cadette and Senior troops, including being the Skipper of Mariner Ship 10 in Newport, R.I. Camping was was kept me in Girl Scouting, so became a camp counselor, unit leader, riding counselor at Tomahawk Ranch, program specialist, program director, and camp director at Girl Scout camps around the U.S. Have also been a Neighborhood Chairperson, Troop Consultant, Council Delegate to local council and national council meetings, and Master Council Trainer and curriculum design, a role I still hold.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

That you learn as much as the girls,  you make hundreds of lifetime friends, and you learn how to be FLEXIBLE and keep your sense of humor even in the middle of a disaster!

What do you hope girls have learned from you? 

That it really IS COOL to be a Girl Scout, no matter your age.  You get to experience wonderful opportunities, make lifetime friends, and learn skills that help you your entire life!

I recently reconnected with a former troop member on Facebook, and renewed a friendship after an absence of over 50 years!

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

G-I was very shy as a young girl, but being in Girl Scouting helped me gain confidence, that has carried over to my adult life. Now I am able to lead a group, teach skills, and speak to a large group.

I.Innovator-I have learned by trial and error, not afraid to learn from my mistakes, and how to be creative, especially in primitive camping, when you realize you don’t always have what you need. We devised an “architectural victory” on a backpacking trip, when we were on a 10 day donkey pack trip and it rained for 7 days, using our creative GS skills.

RISK TAKER-As a Girl Scout, you can be faced with a lot of challenges, either as a girl or adult, but the skills and experiences you learn as a girl or adult Girl Scout, helps you face new things with courage and confidence. I love trying new experiences!

LEADER-In the old program, troop government was the basis of all Girl Scouting, so I learned leadership when I became a PATROL LEADER, and eventually a TROOP PRESIDENT, and a member of the STATEWIDE SENIOR PLANNING BOARD. All these experiences continued to build on my leadership skills which continues in my adult life in and out of Girl Scouting.

As a retired teacher, and a current camp and outdoor professional, all my leadership skills have helped me in my varied careers of teaching, recreation, physical therapy, and above all camping and outdoor skills.
Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award Girl Scouts honored at highest awards celebration in Colorado Springs

More than 300 Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at the Penrose House at El Pomar in Colorado Springs on May 4, 2018, to honor the more than 1,300 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2017-18 Girl Scout awards program year, nearly 1,000 girls across the state and 191 in the Pikes Peak region earned the Bronze Award. 105 girls in the region earned the prestigious Silver Award and six became Gold Award Girl Scouts.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts gives girls the skills and experiences they need to thrive and lead in today’s world. The world needs female leaders now more than ever. You’re making a difference,” she said.

2016 Gold Award Girl Scout Megan Burnett served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about her journey to earn the Gold Award and how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

“All the skills you learn in Girl Scouts, through the meetings you plan and the badges you earn, are all intended to prepare you for the future,” she said.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Volunteer Spotlight: Fran Brown

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Fran Brown of Woodland Park in the Pikes Peak region has been a troop leader for 30 years, in addition to filling many other volunteer roles. She is also a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Fran to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a Girl Scout volunteer because my most memorable and enjoyable years as a girl were those as a Girl Scout in an intermediate troop with the best leader ever!

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

My volunteer roles as a Girl Scout: 

  • Troop leader for 30 years: Brownies (one year), Juniors (27 years), and Cadettes (two years)
  • Neighborhood/service unit director (10 years)
  • Council trainer (40 years)
  • Leader of a Wider Opportunity
  • Camp cook
  • Many more

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

As a Girl Scout volunteer, I have learned that every girl and woman with the desire and willingness to learn, has the potential for greatness.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

My hope is that every girl that I have interacted with has learned something of value to enrich her life.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I am a G.I.R.L. as evidenced by the fact that I am proud to be a Girl Scout volunteer following the Girl Scout Promise and Law, with 68 years of experience!

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Girl Scout Cookies for Honor Flight veterans

Submitted by Aydin Hoo

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

Troop 43893 chose Honor Flight of Southern Colorado as one of our Hometown Heroes this year. This organization transports heroes to Washington D.C. to visit and reflect at war memorials. A few of our girls were able to meet two of the amazing veterans flying out on the next Honor Flight and give them 60 packages of Girl Scout Cookies. It was a thrill to meet these heroes and send them off to with some delicious treats.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Volunteer Spotlight: Linda Gibbs

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Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Linda Gibbs of Cheyenne Wells in the Pikes Peak region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Linda to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I started out as a volunteer for my daughter’s troop. As the years went on and all three of my girls graduated and moved on, I continued as a volunteer because I enjoy what I do. The girls’ enthusiasm for something new and different makes me happy.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I started out as a co-leader.  Through the years, I have been a leader for all age groups. I have been a troop leader, group leader, day camp director, camp coordinator with awesome helpers, TCM, SUCM, SUM, and trainer.  I may have missed some …or not, but after 30 plus years of Girl Scouts, I just never thought to keep track.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

l have learned how to be a group leader, how to do public speaking without stammering too much, and have learned a bit about organization.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope the girls have learned to be kind and caring, to give without expecting something in return, respectful, leave any place they use clean or cleaner than when they started, and have fun while doing whatever they are doing. I always hope that they have learned one or two life skills, whether it be cooking, camping, or sewing.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I have learned that people are not always going to do everything for you.  If you want something to happen: Go do it. Sometimes what works for one person or group, doesn’t always work for everyone. Change things, make them work for you. Sometimes you just have to try something new and hope it works, if it doesn’t work, you try something different the next time. Taking the lead is how it all starts, it doesn’t mean you have to do it all!

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Volunteer Spotlight: Jenni Esser

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Jenni Esser of Peyton in the Pikes Peak region has had many different volunteer positions at both the troop and service unit levels. She is also a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Jenni to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I was pretty much “volun-told.” Haha. I took my oldest to the first Girl Scout meeting of the year in Peyton and told them, while holding my three-month old second daughter, that I’d help where I could but that I had the little one. At the end of the meeting, I was introduced as the new Daisy leader.  Lol.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I know how important and influential Girl Scouts was to me. When I was 12 or 13, my Girl Scout troop traveled from Ohio to Rocky Mountain National Park via the Badlands and Cheyenne, WY. It was the trip of a lifetime to me. I knew from that trip that I wanted to be a geologist for the U.S. Geological Survey and live in Colorado. I made that goal happen at age 22. I want to make sure my girls (and others too!) have a great experience through Girl Scouts so they too can experience and explore new places and things and find their goals and have them become reality. 

And that role has expanded. I started out as a Daisy Leader and have moved up with my oldest daughter through Brownies, Juniors, and Cadettes. I will soon be her Senior leader when she bridges this summer. I am also the Service Unit Manager for SU 10 (both before the merge and after the split from SU 13).

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have learned that my Girl Scouts leaders were saints. It is a lot of work leading girls, but it is also an enriching experience. I love seeing the girls explore something new. I love their excitement and energy. It’s contagious.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope the girls have learned how to lead and to be great women by living the Girl Scout Law. I hope they continue to learn and explore throughout their lives and that they also become leaders and role-models to younger and future Girl Scouts.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Being a leader hasn’t helped me become a G.I.R.L. I have been one because I grew up a Girl Scout. Being a leader has given me the opportunity to help girls become a G.I.R.L.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Volunteer Spotlight: Elba Barr

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Elba Barr of Colorado Springs in the Pikes Peak region has been a Girl Scout volunteer for more than a decade, serving in many different roles. She is also a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Elba to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have been a volunteer with Girl Scouts in some capacity for nearly 15 years. I became a volunteer because the direct impact my leaders had on me as a kid. I decided to continue volunteering because I understand that I have a generational impact working with these amazing young ladies. ​In these young ladies, I have intense hope and faith in our future, cause they are trailblazers!

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I have been a Gold Award mentor (in other councils), multi-level troop leader, service unit fall program and cookie program manager.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have learned that actively trying failing at something is the greatest achievement someone can take​. We as a society focus so much on perfection and not how many chances/failed attempts it takes to get there. I think celebrating and recognizing failure and how to learn from it is the greatest thing I have learned and share with these girls. 

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope my girls have learned from me that the answer to a question will always b​e no if never asked. I want them to ask all the “stupid” or “obvious” questions and continue to learn/grow to be the best versions of themselves they can be.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I have started and failed in business adventures. I have learned that being a leader is not the easy option and that taken the “hard left over the easy right” is a constant challenge and that billions of new ideas every day waiting to be discovered you just have to try. But, the most important thing I have learned being a volunteer is that I don’t need to be the best in someone else’s vision, I just need to be the best version of me I can be at this time, because next year or five years from now, I’m going to be different.  

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.