Tag Archives: Pikes Peak

First-Year Daisies spread the love

Submitted by Jessica Gonzalez

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

As our local food pantry geared up to serve 100+ families this Thanksgiving holiday, our Daisy troop realized a need and put into action “Considerate and Caring” and partnered with families of our local elementary school to conduct a food drive.

Our troop spoke ofJuliette Gordon Low’s birthday and how special a day like that must be. We discussed what it might be like if we didn’t have enough to celebrate. The girls discussed their feelings and we came up with a solution of donating birthday bags to our food bank for families celebrating their special day!

Our Daisy troop has been working on our petal year and to put our lessons into action, we’ve been collecting food donations for our local food pantry, delivering 200+ items to help feed families for Thanksgiving!

To honor our founder Juliette Gordon Low, we donated 12 birthday bags to the food bank for families in need to enjoy their birthday celebration. The girls loved getting to put things together and watch as it carne full circle on delivery day!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Roald Dahl’s Matilda the Musical Day Event for Girl Scouts

Sunday, December 16, 2018

11 a.m. – 1:45 p.m.

Cost: $30

Girl Scout levels: Daisies, Brownies, Juniors, Cadettes

Day camps at the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center at Colorado College offer kids ages 6-13 a fun, educational adventure complete with a tour of the theatre, hands-on experiences with the set, a personal meet-and-greet with the cast members that includes learning a dance number from the show, and more! Girl Scout Brownies will complete the first three requirements for the “Dancer” badge.

30 child maximum for the camp.

Register for the “camp”/event for Girl Scouts: https://coloradospringsfineartscenter.secure.force.com/ticket/#sections_a0F4A00001gJrBSUA0

Registration Deadline for event: December 11

All Girl Scouts and their families are also invited to purchase tickets to any of the Matilda performances with a 25% discount (December 6 – January 6, 2019). We recommend getting tickets to the performance right after the camp! Discounted tickets (25%) off for Girl Scouts and their families. To redeem discount, call, visit the front desk, or buy online using promo code GS18. Discount does not apply to standard $20 tickets.

Buy tickets for all performances online: https://www.csfineartscenter.org/theatre-events/matilda-the-musical/ 

Questions? Email aimee.artzer@gscolorado.org

 

Roald Dahl’s Matilda the Musical

Location: Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center at Colorado College

Cost: Tickets starting a $20

Performances: December 6, 2018 – January 6, 2019

Recommended for ages 6+ (children under the age of 4 are not permitted in the mainstage theatre)

The Tony Award-winning Matilda The Musical, inspired by the twisted genius of Roald Dahl, revels in the anarchy of childhood, power of imagination, and inspiring story of a girl who dreams of a better life. Full of catchy songs, exciting dance numbers, and psychokinetic powers, Matilda will captivate audiences with the story of a courageous little girl with an extraordinary personality.

Discounted tickets (25% off) are available for Girl Scouts and their families. To redeem discount, call, visit the front desk, or buy online using promo code GS18. Discount does not apply to standard, $20 tickets.

Questions? Contact the theater at (719) 634 – 5583.

Learn more: https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/events-repository/2018/roald_dahl_s_matilda.html

Colorado Springs Gold Award candidate constructs special shelter for feral cats

Girl Scout Gold Award candidate Leah J. from Colorado Springs constructed a catio, an outdoor cat shelter for feral cats, for the rescue group Look What the Cat Brought In. On Sunday, November 4, 2018, she hosted an open house at the shelter to showcase the catio to the public.

Leah describes her project:

I have always been an animal person, but I am particularly drawn to animals in need. I know I cannot adopt every animal out there that needs a home, so I do everything I can to help make their lives better. Feral cats are a particular challenge. People don’t want them running loose and creating a bigger problem by having more cats. But, rescue organizations are often ill-equipped to adequately address the needs of cats that are used to roaming the great outdoors.  Until they are adopted to live out their lives as barn cats, feral cats must be kept safe at a rescue, which usually means in indoor spaces. To help improve the lives of these cats, I built a cat patio, a catio, where the cats can go to feel the sun and wind, but still be safe. My catio is connected to the rescue’s building so that cats may use the windows to go indoors or outdoors as they choose. The positive effect this choice has had on the cats has been seen in terms of calmer cats; they are no longer always afraid, they have become more accepting of humans, and some are even showing trust towards humans. It thrills me to have made such a difference in the lives of the 12 cats currently living with access to my catio. I hope other organizations with feral cats will build their own!

Open only to girls in high school, the Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls—and the most difficult to earn. The Gold Award project involves seven steps: 1. Identify an issue, 2. Investigate it thoroughly, 3. Get help and build a team, 4. Create a plan, 5. Present the plan and gather feedback, 6. Take action, 7. Educate and inspire. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Fox21News/ KXRM-TV featured Leah’s project during one of their broadcasts.

 

 

Gold Award Girl Scouts impact Colorado communities and beyond

Twelve Girl Scouts from across Colorado have earned the distinction of Gold Award Girl Scout, the highest honor in Girl Scouting, after completing Take Action projects benefiting their local communities and those around the world.

  • Brittany Argo from Aurora, Cherokee Trail High School, built a prayer garden at St. Michael’s the Archangel and aided in the construction of a prayer garden at a church in the Philippines.
  • Evyn Batie from Loveland, Mountain View High School, led a team of students to create the Northern Colorado Student Mental Health Resource Guide, an electronic compilation of some of the best youth mental health resources across the region.
  • Bryce Civiello from Evergreen, Conifer High School, designed a pamphlet for teens that can help them take the first steps toward getting help from a mental health professional.
  • Angela Foote from Centennial, Arapahoe High School, developed a relationship between the organizations Family Promise of Denver and Denver Tech for All to ensure low-resource students and families have ongoing access to computers.
  • Madeline Ford from Englewood, Cherry Creek High School, partnered with the Boys & Girls Club to create a five-session literacy program, which promotes a positive reading environment and teaches children new ways to express themselves through books and poetry.
  • Littlepage Green from Breckenridge, Summit High School, created a lesson plan and video to educate students about food allergies. In-person lessons also included training on how to properly use an epi-pen.
  • Maya Hegde from Englewood, Cherry Creek High School, partnered with the Mangala Seva Orphanage in India and Brydges Centre in Kenya to teach girls how to make reusable sanitary pads using materials they already have. The program she developed also taught the girls how to sell sanitary pads in their own communities to tackle the stigma around the menstrual cycle.
  • Grace Matsey from Highlands Ranch, Mountain Vista High School, created a music tutoring program for elementary and middle school musicians, which was run by members of her high school’s Music Honor Society.
  • Annarlene Nikolaus from Colorado Springs, Discovery Canyon High School, oversaw the construction of a series of buddy benches for local K-12 public schools. Students also participated in age-appropriate lessons led by Annarlene about buddy benches and what they can do to be better friends.
  • Bailey Stokes from Buena Vista, Buena Vista High School, created outdoor-based lesson plans for the use of fourth grade science teachers across Colorado. Topics covered included investigations, habitat, and adaptations.
  • Emma Lily from Longmont, Silver Creek High School, designed a website, created a podcast, and wrote a children’s book celebrating the Longmont Sugar Beet Factory and its historical significance.
  • Katherine Walden from Larkspur, Castle View High School, taught elementary school students about the importance of bees and how to install bee boxes that local bee species and other pollinators can call home.

Open only to girls in high school, the Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls—and the most difficult to earn. The Gold Award project involves seven steps: 1. Identify an issue, 2. Investigate it thoroughly, 3. Get help and build a team, 4. Create a plan, 5. Present the plan and gather feedback, 6. Take action, 7. Educate and inspire. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

“Earning the Girl Scout Gold Award designation is truly a remarkable achievement, and these young women exemplify leadership in all its forms,” said Stephanie Foote, President and Chief Executive Officer of Girl Scouts of Colorado. “They saw a need and took ownership of helping to develop a solution and took action to make it happen. Their extraordinary dedication, perseverance, and leadership is making the world a better place.”

Girl Scouts of Colorado is 32,000 strong—more than 22,000 girls and 10,000 adults who believe in the power of every G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader)™ to change the world. Our extraordinary journey began more than 100 years ago with the original G.I.R.L., Juliette Gordon “Daisy” Low. On March 12, 1912, in Savannah, Ga., she organized the very first Girl Scout troop, and every year since, we’ve honored her vision and legacy, building girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. We’re the preeminent leadership development organization for girls. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org.

Learning about cybersecurity, networking, and STEM

Submitted by Shannon Morris

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

My five Girl Scout Juniors learned about networking and how emails and texts are sent. The relationship between a network and train tracks helped all of them understand the concept clearly. They had so much fun passing messages from the sender to the receiver that they did it over and over three times. They would have kept going if there was more time.

My 4th and 5th grade Juniors are so excited about everything that is presented to them in Girl Scouts. They love to camp, hike, create arts and crafts, learn about important women in history, and are go-getters.

By completing this activity, the girls will earn this special cybersecurity patch. Learn how to earn yours.

AT&T invests in girls’ success

AT&T, a world leader in communications, media, and entertainment and technology, has invested in the success of Colorado girls.  Two programs, one in Colorado Springs and one in Grand Junction, invite middle and high school girls for a day of fast-paced career exploration. Support from AT&T provides girls with grants to cover the program fee, activity supplies, and refreshments and transportation.

Secrets to Success, powered by Girl Scouts of Colorado, was held at the University of Colorado-Colorado Springs on October 20, 2018.  As a first-time program in the Pikes Peak region, the event drew more than 70 girls to learn about an array of fascinating careers and connect with professional women.  Keynote Speaker Carissa Gump, a 2008 Olympic athlete, encouraged attendees to see “I’m possible” instead of “impossible” and dream big.  18 women hosted conversation stations to share information about their careers – from mining to law enforcement and culinary arts to healthcare.  Six breakout sessions enabled girls to ask more questions on topics of interest and a lunch networking session allowed everyone to network.

The fourth annual Secrets to Success will be held in Grand Junction on January 26, 2019. The program will feature 20 conversation stations and a keynote speaker. Any girl curious about career options won’t want to miss this! Grants for activity fees and travel are available during registration. Transportation from some areas may be provided.

Primary funding for Secrets to Success is provided by AT&T. For more information about additional sponsors, visit https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/support-us/fundraising-events/secrets-to-success-pikes-peak.html

 

Gold Award Girl Scout: Annie Nikolaus, Colorado Springs, “Building a Buddy Bench Community”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award project, I built buddy benches for my local K-12 public school. Each level of the K-12 school (high school, middle school, and elementary school) received their own decorated Buddy Bench, but also got to participate in an age-appropriate lesson about buddy benches and what they can do to be better friends to other students. As part of the high school lesson plan, the high school student council helped to decorate a Buddy Bench that was donated to the Air Force Academy Youth Center for them to use with their kids!

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured the impact of my project by having students take surveys after they went through the lesson I had made. I asked questions about what they learned and how they thought they would be able to use their new knowledge in the future. I also received a lot of feedback about my project from teachers, students, and families that I took into account when looking at the overall impact of the project.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project is sustainable because the Discovery Canyon High School Student Council decided to continue my project. They will be working with the counselors at Discovery Canyon to continue the friendship lessons for all the campuses and maintain the benches! Kids will continue to learn about friendship and have the tool of buddy benches years to come.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I compiled all of my lesson plans, bench designs, and materials into one large document and sent it out to schools in Colorado, across the country, and internationally. I thought that these plans would work great all over the world because kids everywhere deal with loneliness and can use the tools and learn new skills on how to be a good friend.

What did you learn about yourself?

The biggest thing I learned is that I can complete a project this big! It was hard to work on something for so long and not see the end, but every little bit of effort gets you closer to your goal! Now, I know I can accomplish projects like this (or even bigger) in the future!

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

My Gold Award will impact me in the future because it gives me an experience that I can rely on as a foundation when I take on bigger projects. It will give me the motivation that I can do great things in the future because I know I have accomplished something so big before.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award was an important part of my Girl Scout experience because it was an achievement to show off all the time and effort I had spent in the Girl Scout program over the last 12 years! It gave me a nice way to finish that experience and a bridge to the next chapters of my life!

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

Earning my Gold Award helped me become an innovator because throughout my project I faced many challenges. To finish my project and to make it the best it could be, I had to come up with creative solutions and think outside the box to overcome the problems I faced. Without trying new ideas I would have been stuck, but instead, I kept trying new things until something worked!

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Power of cookie

Submitted by Ariella Wells

Northern & Northeastern CO

Fort Collins

Participating in the Girl Scout Cookie Program can pay off. Earlier this month, girls from Troop 70720 got to go to Great Wolf Lodge in Colorado Springs because of all their hard work in February and March of 2018. They had to wait awhile, but it was worth it. It was a blast with their indoor water park and various activities.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Pikes Peak Derby Dames welcomes Girl Scouts

Pikes Peak Derby Dames welcomed Girl Scouts for Girl Scout Night with the Killer Queens. More than 100 parents and girls from Colorado Springs and Pueblo attended. The girls received a special patch, special seating, and time with the Derby Dames after the game. The girls were very excited to meet the ladies and had a chance to see another sport they could participate in.