Tag Archives: Metro Denver

“Go for Bold” cookie rally

Submitted by Jordan Cadena

Metro Denver

Thornton

Troops 66742 and 65791, along with the Woods Service Unit 646, proudly present the “Go For Bold” cookie rally! Walk on the wild side for the 2019 Girl Scout Cookie Program!

Girls will inspire their inner goal-getter, go for bold in their marketing, race for money management, root for their favorite cookie, master safety tips, perfect their cookie pitches, and more!

Date: 

Friday, January 25, 2019

6 – 8 p.m.

Where:

Northglenn Christian Church

1800 E. 105th Pl., Northglenn 80233

Registration fee: $5 per Girl Scout  (includes activities and patch)

Dinner will be from 5:30 until 6 p.m. Pizza must be purchased in advanced via the link below for $1/slice

Payment due via https://squareup.com/store/TheWoods646 (Payment is your RSVP). Registration closes January 23.

Limited to 200 attendees

Questions?  Contact Jordan at (720) 384 – 8420.

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This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Cadette troop visits Lockheed Martin CHIL Lab

Submitted by Christi Bontempo

Metro Denver

Littleton

Littleton Cadettes from Troop 62252 toured the Lockheed Martin CHIL (Collaborative Human Immersive Laboratory) on October 30, 2018. In this space, Lockheed Martin uses virtual reality to create and analyze simulations that are used for engineering solutions before manufacturing begins on products used in space exploration, solar arrays, and imaging satellites. These Girl Scouts have been building and creating in virtual reality through the DECTech program at the Colorado School of Mines. This STEM outreach program is designed especially for girls. The leaders are female Mines students with a passion for engineering, who want to engage the next generation of girls by introducing them to hands-on applications via virtual reality, chemistry, computers, and mathematics. The girls from Troop 62252 have ventured into coding and become familiar with the computer and engineering atmosphere at one of the best engineering schools in the country. Their experience has been amazing and their work was extremely fun. They have attended three out of four classes at the School of Mines and are looking forward to finishing their assignments at the last class.

For more information on STEM classes for all girls: https://tech.mines.edu/

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Gold Award Girl Scouts impact Colorado communities and beyond

Twelve Girl Scouts from across Colorado have earned the distinction of Gold Award Girl Scout, the highest honor in Girl Scouting, after completing Take Action projects benefiting their local communities and those around the world.

  • Brittany Argo from Aurora, Cherokee Trail High School, built a prayer garden at St. Michael’s the Archangel and aided in the construction of a prayer garden at a church in the Philippines.
  • Evyn Batie from Loveland, Mountain View High School, led a team of students to create the Northern Colorado Student Mental Health Resource Guide, an electronic compilation of some of the best youth mental health resources across the region.
  • Bryce Civiello from Evergreen, Conifer High School, designed a pamphlet for teens that can help them take the first steps toward getting help from a mental health professional.
  • Angela Foote from Centennial, Arapahoe High School, developed a relationship between the organizations Family Promise of Denver and Denver Tech for All to ensure low-resource students and families have ongoing access to computers.
  • Madeline Ford from Englewood, Cherry Creek High School, partnered with the Boys & Girls Club to create a five-session literacy program, which promotes a positive reading environment and teaches children new ways to express themselves through books and poetry.
  • Littlepage Green from Breckenridge, Summit High School, created a lesson plan and video to educate students about food allergies. In-person lessons also included training on how to properly use an epi-pen.
  • Maya Hegde from Englewood, Cherry Creek High School, partnered with the Mangala Seva Orphanage in India and Brydges Centre in Kenya to teach girls how to make reusable sanitary pads using materials they already have. The program she developed also taught the girls how to sell sanitary pads in their own communities to tackle the stigma around the menstrual cycle.
  • Grace Matsey from Highlands Ranch, Mountain Vista High School, created a music tutoring program for elementary and middle school musicians, which was run by members of her high school’s Music Honor Society.
  • Annarlene Nikolaus from Colorado Springs, Discovery Canyon High School, oversaw the construction of a series of buddy benches for local K-12 public schools. Students also participated in age-appropriate lessons led by Annarlene about buddy benches and what they can do to be better friends.
  • Bailey Stokes from Buena Vista, Buena Vista High School, created outdoor-based lesson plans for the use of fourth grade science teachers across Colorado. Topics covered included investigations, habitat, and adaptations.
  • Emma Lily from Longmont, Silver Creek High School, designed a website, created a podcast, and wrote a children’s book celebrating the Longmont Sugar Beet Factory and its historical significance.
  • Katherine Walden from Larkspur, Castle View High School, taught elementary school students about the importance of bees and how to install bee boxes that local bee species and other pollinators can call home.

Open only to girls in high school, the Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls—and the most difficult to earn. The Gold Award project involves seven steps: 1. Identify an issue, 2. Investigate it thoroughly, 3. Get help and build a team, 4. Create a plan, 5. Present the plan and gather feedback, 6. Take action, 7. Educate and inspire. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

“Earning the Girl Scout Gold Award designation is truly a remarkable achievement, and these young women exemplify leadership in all its forms,” said Stephanie Foote, President and Chief Executive Officer of Girl Scouts of Colorado. “They saw a need and took ownership of helping to develop a solution and took action to make it happen. Their extraordinary dedication, perseverance, and leadership is making the world a better place.”

Girl Scouts of Colorado is 32,000 strong—more than 22,000 girls and 10,000 adults who believe in the power of every G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader)™ to change the world. Our extraordinary journey began more than 100 years ago with the original G.I.R.L., Juliette Gordon “Daisy” Low. On March 12, 1912, in Savannah, Ga., she organized the very first Girl Scout troop, and every year since, we’ve honored her vision and legacy, building girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. We’re the preeminent leadership development organization for girls. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org.

Junior Troop 416 earns “Business Owner” badge at Rita’s

Submitted by Christy Knight

Metro Denver

Castle Rock

Junior Troop 416 earned the “Business Owner” badge at Rita’s Italian Ice Creamery in Castle Rock. The girls learned how the owners decided to open the small business and some of the steps of setting up the store. They learned about marketing and customer service. They toured the store, watched how the ice was made, and learned about day-to-day operations. The girls also got to taste some of the ice! The owners answered all the girls questions about the business. They had a first-hand experience about small business and learned a lot of new information.

We loved learning about this small business that does a lot to help their community. Knowing about future options is exciting! We were able to ask so many questions.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Brownies learn the importance of cybersecurity and STEM

Submitted by Courtney Ryan

Metro Denver

Denver

The internet and media are a daily part of our Girl Scouts’ lives and we felt it was important to arm them with the knowledge and understanding of how to stay safe while engaging with these sources. This is why we selected to pursue the cybersecurity badges and patches for our troop! Please enjoy the story about defending our castles, but tread carefully, you may find an alligator, a bear trap, or a grenade disguised as candy…

One high-energy afternoon, a bunch of Girl Scouts in Troop 65709
eagerly awaited the starting tune to learn how to keep themselves safe
in cyberland, all while running a race from alligators, bears, and secret predators.

They brainstormed and created elaborate defenses to keep out enemies pretenses, creating trap doors, moats, secret entrances, invisible castles, and candy tricks.

They discussed and debated the best shields and learned how it related  to keeping them safe in daily practice fields.

These G.I.R.L.s are armed and ready to take on the world and be safe when it comes to cyberland!

The girls came up with very creative ideas on defending their castles, family, and friends. They learned about how to layer defenses and how that relates to online defenses with passwords and safeguards they use every day. It was a great start to arming them with the knowledge to keep themselves safe while online! Our troop is pursing the cybersecurity trifecta of badges: Basics, Safeguards, and Investigator.

By completing this activity, the girls will earn this special cybersecurity patch. Learn how to earn yours.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Angela Foote, Centennial, “Computers for All”

 What did you do for your Gold Award project?

My project helps provide computers to families in need. My project works directly with Family Promise of Greater Denver. Family Promise of Greater Denver is an organization that is dedicated to serving families experiencing homelessness. I chose to work with Family Promise of Greater Denver to help provide them with computers for high school students enrolled in their program. My project then grew to getting computers for the entire family.

I learned about Family Promise of Greater Denver through my church. Our church hosts families four times a year. I volunteer for them by making meals and by providing babysitting when the families are at our church. I have met several homeless teens going to school without a computer. I couldn’t imagine not having a computer for school. This is what has helped me identify the need for my project.

In my search for computers, I found another non-profit, Denver Tech for All.  Denver Tech for All has agreed to provide the computers to Family Promise of Greater Denver families in need. Currently, more than 100 computers have been distributed since January 2018.

I wanted to help Denver Tech for All by hosting a computer equipment collection. This allowed my project to help other individuals that needed a computer that are not part of Family Promise of Greater Denver.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

One long-term impact for my target audience is learning computer skills that will serve them over their lifetime. Family Promise of Greater Denver shared this success story.

“A single mom and her two teenage daughters all got laptops.  Because of that, the mom (who had been unemployed) was able to search for jobs and apply online, and she got hired and is now employed full-time!  And her daughters are able to do their schoolwork at home now – and one of them made the honor roll and won an award for ‘most improved 9th grader’.”   

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

Denver Tech for All has agreed to provide computers to five families every week through Family Promise of Greater Denver.  These computers are free and the individual can come back to Denver Tech for All for technical support at any time.  Additionally, six companies have agreed to provide Denver Tech for All any computer equipment they no longer need.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I have shared the success of my project with Family Promise headquarters in New Jersey.  There is an article published on their website about this project (https://familypromise.org/category/the-latest/) and it was shared on social media.  Additionally, my project success has been shared with over 200 Family Promise affiliates around the United States.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned I am a hard worker and I really enjoy helping in the community. I learned how to communicate with people and get my point across.

At the computer equipment drive, I learned I had great leadership skills. I helped organize the collection of the computer equipment and trained my volunteers.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Earning the Gold Award has prepared me not to give up, even if I receive rejection or run into obstacles. During my project, I had times when it became difficult, but I pushed past the obstacles and completed strong.  Knowing I can do this will be invaluable in my future.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award was an important part of my Girl Scout experience because I identified a need in my community and I found a solution. I have my troop to thank. The years leading up to my Gold Award, we did several projects and I learned a lot about completing projects. I was lucky to belong to a great troop full of love, friends, and support.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Earning the Gold Award helped me become a go-getter.  All of the goals that I set; I have surpassed. I wanted two tons of computer equipment for Denver Tech for All to be donated and so far, they have received 2.5 tons; I wanted all teens enrolled in Family Promise of Greater Denver to receive computers (about 20-30 teens) which they did plus computers have been given to all family members over the age of five enrolled in Family Promise of Greater Denver. I wanted to get five companies to continue donating computer equipment to Denver Tech for All and I have six companies.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Gold Award Girl Scout: Madeline Ford, Englewood, “The Little Children Who Could”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

Most children are uninterested in reading, so they lack the understanding of why reading is important. They do not like reading because they lack support and encouragement to read. Because of this, I created a program at the Boys and Girls Club that is a five-session literacy program to promote a positive reading environment by teaching books with good values and morals and then teaching the children about different authors and poets to show new ways to express themselves. I brought in several volunteers to create a small volunteer to child ratio, so children could get the attention they need to work on their reading skills. I also noticed that they do not like to read because it lacks physical activity, so I made hands-on activities to keep the children engaged and active. Afterwards, I created reading tool boxes that consist of 15 to 20 books and reusable activities that can be used alongside them. Through a book drive, I was able to collect more than 400 books that allowed me to make 22 tool boxes that were passed out to organizations that serve at risk children around Colorado. By encouraging a positive reading environment at an early age, children will develop a lifelong love for learning which will cause a positive impact in their future.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I created a survey the children filled out before and after the five-session program to get a sense of how they feel about reading. Overall, there was a 45% increase for the statement “Reading is Important” and an 18% increase for the question “Do I learn new things in my books?” Also, I interviewed the teachers from the Boys and Girls Club and they were very happy on how the program turned out. At that moment was when I felt like my project was coming together. I knew I had made a difference in a child’s life and that they learned ideas that will help them in the future. Seeing these results gave me motivation to write a program manual with all the activities so other children can be impacted as well.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

The children of Godsman Elementary School brought home several projects that are reminders for the children to embrace themselves and show their best selves and to motivate them to read and write more. My school’s National Honor Society will continue my program using my step by step instruction manual in my school district so over one hundred children each year can experience this program.

I created 22 tool boxes that had 15 to 20 books inside of them with several comprehension activities from my five-session program to understand books better and gain excitement from them. They allow children who were unable to experience my five-session program to be able to try my activities and be inspired by them.

My five-session program and book tool boxes can be accessed on my website: www.thelittlechildrenwhocould.weebly.com

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

Reading affects children everywhere. There are several reasons why children do not take reading seriously, which is why it is important to look at each reason and find a solution to fix it. I shared my project to several national organizations such as Reach Out and Read, National Honor Society, and the Boys and Girls Club. They can do my program anywhere and affect children around the nation. I put all of the materials and templates on a website that organizations could easily access to make the program successful and efficient.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned to embrace my creativity. Before my project, I was afraid to share my ideas because I believed no one would like them. However, having free reins on this project let me create whatever I wanted to promote reading literacy and I became very open with promoting ideas. I enjoyed bouncing off ideas with other people and receiving constructive criticism because it helped my ideas be more successful. I gained critical thinking skills that allowed me to create new and innovative ideas that made my project more appealing.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Working on this project helped increase my self-confidence. While working on this project, I began to branch out more in my community. As a result of this increase, I decided to apply for more leadership positions at my school. I became a board member for National Honor Society and Big Sisters and through these organizations, I am able to promote the values of this project to a bigger audience.  My Gold Award will always remind me that I take action and am able to create a better community.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award was a perfect way to show my abilities and strengths that I developed through my years in Girl Scouts. Through Girl Scouts, I was able to create a stronger version of myself that pushed me to make my voice heard. Girls in a safe space gain confidence in themselves and they allow others to see their personalities and their abilities and I think that the Gold Award is a perfect way to challenge a girl in that way.  I gained knowledge and skills that will help me accomplish with any of my future endeavors.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Earning my Gold Award helped me become an innovator. I had to come up with new ways to keep children engaged and involved while reading and writing.  I talked to several literacy aides and teachers to learn more how children focus and with their help I was able to create an interactive project. I enjoyed bouncing off ideas with other people and receiving constructive criticism because it helped my ideas be more successful.  I gained critical thinking skills that allowed me to create new and innovative ideas that made my project more appealing.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Dinosaur Ridge: Winter and spring break camps

Submitted by Fran Taffer

Metro Denver

Morrison

Looking for real science and outdoor fun for your girl over school breaks? Dinosaur Ridge is offering winter break and spring break camps for kids ages 6-10.

Each camp offers exploration of the Dinosaur Ridge fossil sites, hands-on science projects, as well as expert guest presenters in the fields of paleontology, geology, art, earth science, survival skills, and local plants and animals.

Winter Break- January 2, 3, and 4, 2019 (W/Th/F) 9 a.m. – 3 p.m

  • January 2 —Creative in the Cretaceous
  • January 3 —Earth Science: From Crystals to Quakes
  • January 4 —Nature in Your Backyard

Spring Break- March 26, 27, and 28 (T/W/Th) 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.

  • March 26—Creative in the Cretaceous
  • March 27—Earth Science: From Crystals to Quakes
  • March 28—Nature in Your Backyard

Sign up for one day for $70 or register for multiple days for $60 per day.

Registration opens on November 15 at http://www.dinoridge.org/ 

Contact Fran at fran@dinoridge.org with any questions.

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This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

FREE training for adult volunteers: Youth Mental Health First Aid

Submitted by Wendy Anderson

Metro Denver

Aurora

Important Note:  This is NOT a GSCO-sponsored training. It is a volunteer-run event. Please direct all questions and concerns to Wendy Anderson at girlscoutwendy@gmail.com.

Many of us know what to do if someone has a physical injury, if someone stops breathing, or if they have a bleeding wound, we would know what to do because we, or someone we know, likely took the time to complete a first aid class and learn the skills. What if someone you loved was having a mental health crisis? Are you confident that you would identify it in time and know what to do next?

With one in four Americans experiencing mental illness in their life time, the probability is very high that someday you may need the skills to help someone in a mental health emergency. Will it be someone in your family? Could it be one of the girls you serve as a Girl Scout volunteer? How will you get the skills you need to save a life?

Mental Health First Aid Colorado offers both adult and youth mental health first aid classes, and we are especially pleased that they are willing to offer a special class, Youth Mental Health First Aid,  for Girl Scout adult volunteers for FREE. It will take place December 8, 2018 at May Library (1471 S Parker Rd, Denver, CO 80231) 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Bring your own lunch (the listing says lunch may be provided, I don’t think it is.) Please find our listing http://www.mhfaco.org/findclass/attend/631, or another class in your area at http://www.mhfaco.org/findclass .

Youth Mental Health First Aid is a groundbreaking prevention program. The course teaches participants the risk factors and warning signs of a variety of mental health challenges that are common among adolescents and young adults. YMHFA is implemented around the U.S. and the world. Research has shown that the training enhances behavioral health literacy, reduces stigma, increases knowledge of professional and self-help resources, increases participants’ confidence helping in a crisis situation, and improves behavioral health of participants.

With so many things to do on a Saturday, it is hard make the time to devote to one more training. However, it is certainly more hard to hear one more story about a life lost and ask, “Didn’t someone know? Couldn’t someone do something?” Be that someone who knows what to do. This holiday season give a gift to yourself and your loved ones by attending this class to be prepared! After all, “Be Prepared” is the Girl Scout motto. In the 1947 Girl Scout Handbook, the motto was explained this way: “A Girl Scout is ready to help out wherever she is needed. Willingness to serve is not enough; you must know how to do the job well, even in an emergency.” We’ve seen too many victims of from mental health emergencies. Be the change our community needs.

Important Note:  This is NOT a GSCO-sponsored training. It is a volunteer-run event. Please direct all questions and concerns to Wendy Anderson at girlscoutwendy@gmail.com.

Girl Scout Craft Fair

Submitted by Tiffany Stone

Metro Denver

Denver

Join the Urban Trails Service Unit and Troop 66711 for the second Denver Girl Scout Craft Fair on Saturday, November 10, 2018 from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. More information is in the flyer below.

All vendors are Denver Girl Scout troops and all crafts are handmade by girls.

This event is open to the public. Bring your girls and your family to get some inspiration, meet other Girls Scouts, AND start your holiday shopping, all while SUPPORTING local Girl Scouts!!

Note: Registration to be a vendor is closed for this year.

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This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.