Tag Archives: Metro Denver

Buy, sell, or trade Girl Scout materials

Submitted by Tricia Pearson

Metro Denver

Arvada

Does your troop have extra patches, glue, string, or other supplies that you would like to sell or trade for new supplies for the upcoming year? Troop 66517 from Arvada is hosting an event on August 24, 2017 at Campbell Elementary School from 6:30 – 8 p.m. We will have ready made patch kits, as well as swap kits available for purchase. It is $2 to reserve your table space, so text Tricia at (720) 363-3377. Touring is free! This is open to all Girl Scouts and leaders.

Supply Swap Flyer

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Edna “Skipper” Hollis

Submitted by Nancy Riddle

Metro Denver

Jackson

Edna “Skipper” Hollis. What an amazing woman, and I am so very proud and lucky to have had her as a Girl Scout leader. She taught valuable life lessons and remains an inspiration.

My fondest memory was of a 17-day, 4,000 mile bus trip in 1962 with 27 Girl Scouts, four leaders, and an intrepid bus driver, “Daddy Jim”. We camped through five states and Canada with a four-day stopover at the World’s Fair in Seattle. What adult in their right mind takes this on? Skipper Hollis!

With four patrols responsible for daily cooking, clean-up, log keeping, photography, programs, and other tasks, we learned more that summer than can be imparted in this simple missive.

Skipper always hand-wrote annual messages to me through her 103rd year. I especially cherish a note she wrote at the end of the afore-mentioned trip: “…but-in in my way- if I’ve helped you to know personally the true values that Scouting should unveil, then I’m happy to have been an interpreter of its realness. Scouting is a very fine guide to living. May it always be an enrichment to you…”

May Skipper’s legacy live on as it has for members of Troop 362 and may Girl Scouts continue to inspire young women.

Girl Scouts of Colorado is proud to celebrate the legacy of one of our most cherished alumnae, Edna “Skipper” Hollis. In 2016, Skipper passed away at the age of 104, leaving a 94-year history of Girl Scouting as a girl and an adult volunteer.  Skipper touched the lives of hundreds of girls, families, and volunteers and will be remembered for her love of the outdoors and the annual troop gathering she hosted at her Colorado cabin for more than six decades.

To make a gift in honor of Skipper, which will support opportunity grants to ensure any girl is able to attend camp, or  to honor an alum who has made a difference in your life, go to the Girl Scouts of Colorado website: http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/support-us/alumnae.html 

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Wizarding weekend at Tomahawk Ranch

Submitted by Amy Caperton

Metro Denver

Littleton

Come join us at Tomahawk Ranch for a weekend of Quidditch, wand making, potion making, games, and crafts.

August 25- 27, 2017
Juniors and Cadettes

$100 per girl. $35 for Safety Wise adults. (Extra adults can join for full price IF there is room)
Visit http://troop2904.ksibusinesssolutions.com

Questions: Please e-mail us at troop62904@gmail.com

A $25 deposit per person is required to hold your spot. Please send one check for all participants.

Deadline for registration is July 15

Sponsored by Troop 2904

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Service project: The Solitary Bee Hotel

Girl Scouts have a great service opportunity to help build nests for The Solitary Bee Hotel located at Waterton Canyon in Littleton. Girls can build simple bee nests and then install them on July 21, 2017.

The Solitary Bee Hotel project is a community project which will construct a nesting site for solitary bees at the canyon. The Solitary Bee Hotel will be an active nesting site, and will also educate visitors at Waterton Canyon about solitary bees and their importance in the ecosystem.

Solitary bees make up the majority of bees in Colorado (around 70%), and play an important role in the pollination of plants that are in our food chain. Honey bees are well known as pollinators, but in recent years their populations have been in decline. This makes the role of solitary bees as pollinators more important than ever.

Home Depot is partnering with Denver Water and local bee experts at The Bees Waggle (TheBeesWaggle.com) on this project. Local scout groups are being asked to create the solitary bee nesting houses which will then be placed in the hotel structure at the “Grand Opening” event on July 21, 2017.

For more information, contact Philip Cuka at (303) 489-4521 or send email to SolitaryBeeBandB@yahoo.com

 

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Kayleigh Cornell, Aurora, “Colorado Book Bank”

What did you do for your Gold Award project? 

In my project, Colorado Book Bank, I collected gently used children’s books from families in a local middle school. The middle school’s chapter of National Honor Society helped collect, sort, count, and box the books I collected.  I received even more books from an elementary school after their used book sale, which NJHS helped sort. After taking the books to the food bank I partnered with to give kids a lunch and a book over the summer, I received 1,360 books.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

By counting how many books I donated I determined that I could reach 1,360 kids as each kid got their own lunch and book. While I can’t see how my program affected their education level, I can impact kids right now by giving them a book to read.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement? 

Colorado Book Bank collected books from several different schools. The largest donor was an elementary school who has an existing used book sale that has always searched for a good donor partner to gift their leftover books to each year. I also worked with a local middle school to kick off the project. They are considering the project into another food bank they work with for an existing food drive they already conduct. The elementary school, Peakview, plans to continue donating books to JFS to support the lunchbox program. For the past decade, they have held a spring used book sale with a large number of books left over. The librarian has agreed to donate all leftover children’s book after each book sale to JFS to continue the project. JFS has agreed to pick up the books from the school since that has been the main stumbling block for book donations in the past. Peakview’s librarian also plans to share about the option to donate book sale leftovers to JFS.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

During my project, the chapter of National Honor Society at my school agreed to help move the books to JFS. They also helped me get in touch with the organization as a whole to get my project open on a wider scale. I connected several parts of my project by working with different National Honor Society (NHS) groups. One of the membership requirements of NHS is to provide community service. In support of this work, NHS has a national website that includes a searchable database of project ideas. Club sponsors and student members use the database to find new projects for their club. My project is being listed on that database with a link to my website so other chapters of NHS can create their own Book Bank in their community. In addition, NHS publishes an e-newsletter and have expressed interest in promoting Colorado Book Bank through that publication. Finally, I have created a website to provide supporting documents for other groups who would like to replicate the project.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned a lot about planning and how while it’s challenging, it has to be done. I also learned that leading a team of other people can be very tricky because you have to pull together the best parts of everyone and make sure all the parts you have work together seamlessly.  I’ve always known I like doing things, but during my project I learned how important it was to delegate tasks to my team to get everything done.  One of the biggest things I learned was that good communication played a key role in my project.  It’s important to ask for help because that is the only way people know you need it and it is important to be clear in written emails and phone calls.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

In the future, I want to be able to lead my own team of scientists and study the formation of planets. I need to be able to work with multiple teams to do this and pull together many different resources to achieve top-notch results from my team. Because of my project, I know how to contact different organizations and pull together people who wouldn’t have worked together otherwise.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I learned so much about myself and how to help others. I wouldn’t have been able to learn the same skills I did if I hadn’t done my Gold Award. I could learn how I could help my community and make a difference beyond what I thought possible.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

I became a go-getter because I saw a problem in my community that I wanted to solve, so I found a way that I could start solving it.

I was an innovator because I found a new way to try to start lowering rates of poverty while including people in my community.

A risk-taker meant being able to start something and talk to people that could have become a lot less popular than it actually did. But I wanted to try my project and it paid off in the end.

I became a leader because I created a team of people I relied on as they simultaneously relied on me. I took their strongest skills and combined them to form an amazing project and amazing team.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Top Sellers celebrate at Elitch Gardens

185 Girl Scouts and guests gathered on Saturday, June 24, 2017 at Elitch Gardens in Denver to celebrate Top Sellers who sold 750 packages or more of Girl Scout Cookies during the 2017 Girl Scout Cookie Sale Program. Top Sellers and their guests enjoyed the park’s many rides and attractions while also being treated to a cookout inspired lunch buffet, during which the girls were presented with their Top Seller medallions by the GSCO Product Sales staff. The event at Elitch Gardens was attended by 19 of the state’s top 100 sellers for the 2017 sale, including Ciara Leal, the state’s #1 top seller.

 

 

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Emma Deutsch, Denver, “Feline Family Fix-Up”

 

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

The Feline Family Fix-Up project was designed to draw greater attention to, and promote adoption, of the adoptable cats at the Denver Animal Shelter. Every year approximately 6-8 million animals are brought into shelters. Of those, about 25% will be adopted, but about 70% of the cats will be euthanized. Of those euthanized, approximately 80% are healthy, treatable, and could have been adopted into new homes. (Source: American Humane Society, 2013) By highlighting the cat rooms with bright decorations, I will be able get more people to notice and look closer at the cat rooms. Some people will choose a cat quickly based on looks alone. Color can be attractive and can greatly affect people’s moods and actions. By creating inviting and happy environments, I could help potential adopters fall in love. The playful decorations will allow people to visualize the cats in a more positive light, and even imagine the cat in their own home. This helps more cats find their forever home by increasing the number cat adoptions and ultimately save more cats lives.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I looked at the adoption data reports from the Denver Animal Shelter over the course of three years. Each report showed how many cats were adopted out of the shelter over the course of three years since I did my project. For example, in the first year the adoption rate increased 12.38%. While the following year it increased by 33.89%. There seemed to be a more positive view on cats.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

Other volunteers and interested community members learned how to continue to decorate and brighten up other rooms/areas of the shelter to increase adoptions. By sharing information and pictures on how to improve other rooms, there have been increased animal adoptions at the Denver Animal Shelter. I extended my reach out to a wider community by sharing my project, including information on how to create rooms in other facilities. Community education and inspiration was done during a presentation at school during Academic Showcase. I created tri-fold display board, included pictures, and prepared and delivered a speech about my project, needs, and the good work of the DAS. I created a detailed instruction sheet on how to apply the decals.  Also, the volunteer coordinator at the shelter helped spread the word via social media and other methods.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

Homeless animals exist in every community, every city, every state, and every country in the world. Homeless animals are uncared for and do not receive the medical care they need to live healthy lives. They are also freely able to breed at will, creating and multiplying the problem exponentially. If more people are made aware of adoptable animals at neighborhood shelters, they are less likely to buy pets. As people are made aware, they will look to do the right thing and adopt. This will decrease the sheer numbers of homeless and sickly animals. It also helped to increase personal wellness in the owners as it has been proven that pets decrease stress and increase happiness and content feelings in people. I also connected my project to other shelters with the help of the volunteer coordinator at DAS.

What did you learn about yourself?

From this project, I have learned that when I set out to help someone, I will not stop until it is done. If what I am doing is meaningful to me, then chances are the cause will be meaningful to others. Because of this project, I have learned that I am a strong leader. I advocated for myself and I can get a task done on my own, as well as being able to talk to other people and tell them my ideas.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Because of this project, I can talk with more confidence when speaking publicly.  While leading a project, I learned how to be more adaptable and work within changing time frames and demands from complete strangers. I discovered a new determination within myself that I did not know I had.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I feel like the Gold Award was an important part of this journey because it not only had me step out of my comfort zone on multiple occasions, but it also helped me find who I am as a person and know what my role is not only in Girl Scouts but in other parts of my life as well.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

Earning the Gold Award has helped me to become a go- getter. I had to become persistent when talking to people to get the permission that I needed to start the project. Learning to become a go-getter has taught me that I can get anything done if I put my mind to it.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Colorado Rockies Scout Day

08 Jun 2015: The Colorado Rockies play the St. Louis Cardinals at Coors Field in Denver, CO. Michael Pierce/Clarkson Creative

Submitted by Lori Thompson

Metro Denver

Denver

Join us for the Colorado Rockies annual Scout Day on Saturday, September 16, 2017. Cheer on the Rockies as they take on the San Diego Padres.

The Rockies are having a great season! We expect tickets to sell quickly, so get your soon so you don’t miss out. All Girl Scouts, friends, and family are invited.

Date: Saturday, Sept. 16th

Game Start: 6:10 p.m.

Location: Coors Field, Denver

Discounted Ticket Options:

$25 Outfield Box
$25 Corner Outfield Box
$18 Right Field Mezzanine
$16 Upper Reserved, Infield

Your Scout Day Ticket Package includes:

•A ticket to watch the Rockies take on the Padres
•A Colorado Rockies Scout Day Patch

Ticket Link: www.rockies.com/scoutday. Look for our GSCO promo code GS2017 at the bottom of the page. A portion of each ticket purchased through this link will be donated back to GSCO!

Questions? Please contact Lori Thompson at lori.thompson@gscolorado.org.

We hope to see you there!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

See the “Great Russian Nutcracker” in December

Moscow Ballet will bring its 25th Anniversary North American tour to Denver’s Paramount Theatre on December 8 and 9, 2017 with three performances of its acclaimed Great Russian Nutcracker. They will have a performance in Grand Junction at the Avalon on Monday, December 11. Girl Scouts are invited to attend at discounted rates, and receive a free fun patch with purchase of ticket. For a group of 25 or more (including chaperones, friends, and siblings), there will be a meet-and-greet with one of the dancers.

I’m Bobbie Fachini, Market Manager for Moscow Ballet. I had the chance to talk to the company’s co-founder and choreographer, Mary Talmi, about her experiences bringing international ballet to the United States and Canada.

BF: What was that first show like, 25 years ago? Where was it and how different was it than the show 250,000 patrons will see this year?

MT: The first show was very exciting. We started the six city tour in Reading, PA. At that time, if you wanted to see a Russian ballet company perform you had to travel to NYC or Washington, DC. We were one of the first groups to bring Russian ballet to smaller cities, so there was a great deal of anticipation. The interest is even greater now. Americans love dance and it is widely known that Russian ballet dancers are among the best in the world.

BF: You’re a choreographer. What is it like to envision these pieces and watch some of the world’s best dancers bring your vision to life on stage?

MT: I love working with these beautiful dancers. They can do just about anything you give them and they are hungry for new ideas. We have added new characters, props, and puppets to the traditional Russian choreography. The dancers have embraced the changes and that is very rewarding. This production is now a visual treat as well as great dance.

BF: What’s your favorite scene in Moscow Ballet’s Great Russian Nutcracker and why?

MT: The Dance of the Snowflakes, or Winter Forest, is my favorite. Everything about it is gorgeous, the white and silver tutus, the lighting, and the dancers in precise formations is thrilling.

BF: I’ve been watching the show evolve for some years now… and I’m in love with the way the costumes keep getting more and more beautiful. Can you tell us a little bit about the design and creation process?

MT: Arthur Oliver, Moscow Ballet’s costume designer, has a background in theater and historic costumes. He is truly talented and has brought a very unique artistry to the show. His costumes are so rich in color and detail, and they are all handcrafted by artisans in St. Petersburg, Russia. One critic raved that every costume is a work of art. I agree… they are getting more beautiful every year! 

BF: Do you have any advice for children who want to dance professionally, or be more involved in the arts?

MT: My hope for children is that they can experience the arts as self-expression and fun… and as an exploration of what makes us human. I hope that they can bring a curiosity to their experiences that opens them up to what is possible in their own lives.

Learn more about Mary here:
http://www.nutcracker.com/about-us/directors

Troops can sign up for Girl Scout tickets here:
http://www.nutcracker.com/buy-tickets/girl-scout-groups

The contact for the performance in Grand Junction is tim@nutcracker.com.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Girl Scouts win first place float (Youth Division) at Evergreen Rodeo Parade

Submitted by Girl Scouts of Colorado Recruitment Specialist Sarah Scalise

Metro Denver

Evergreen

Blue Spruce volunteers worked together to create an amazing entry in the Evergreen Rodeo Parade! The float was a birthday theme, celebrating 100 years of Girl Scouting in Colorado. In addition to a spectacular float, more than 50 girls and adults dressed in historical uniforms dating back to the 1940’s. Girl Scouts are thrilled to have won first place in their division. Thank you Blue Spruce Girl Scouts for your energy, spirit, and dedication! Thank you to the GSCO Archives Committee for lending girls and volunteers the uniforms!

Link to pics: https://pix.sfly.com/yArjoK

Media coverage: http://www.canyoncourier.com/content/rodeo-parade-displays-best-americana

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.