Tag Archives: Metro Denver

When things go wrong, but it’s actually a good thing…

Submitted by Kate Goodman

Metro Denver

Centennial

Sometimes, when I’m in the throes of planning meetings and activities, I wonder, “What are we really doing? Is all my work as a troop leader or volunteer worth it?”

This past weekend, I got an answer. I want to share a story about a recent service unit campout, and my A-ha! moment with my troop of 8th grade Cadettes.

It was a hectic week to begin with – a few weeks into the school year. Another leader was planning to take our four Girl Scouts up to Tomahawk Ranch for the service unit campout on Friday night, because I was coming home from a work trip late Friday. I would come up Saturday morning with the materials our troop was using to do a craft with the younger girls: a quick flashlight using copper tape, craft sticks, and those little lightbulbs- LEDs.

On Tuesday, my co-leader reported her car was out of commission, so we scrambled and found another parent who could shuttle the five of them to Tomahawk Ranch on Friday. With that settled on late Tuesday, I got up early on Wednesday and assembled the health and permission forms. I worked, then hurried home and caught my flight to a conference. I arrived home late Friday to learn everyone had gotten off safely to the campout. Relieved, I fell into bed, planning to quickly pack first thing in the morning.

I woke and began assembling my sleeping bag and day pack. A quick search of the craft materials sent my heart into adrenaline-fueled thumping – I couldn’t find two of the essential items – the copper tape and the bag of LEDs. I’d had to special order these – I wasn’t going to breeze through the craft store and get more on my way out of town. After a staticky call to my service unit leader up at camp to verify my daughter hadn’t packed these things, I resigned myself to needing to brainstorm a NEW hour-long activity for the younger girls, and began my hour-plus long drive to reach Tomahawk. In the meantime, my co-leader shared the trouble with the Cadettes, and the girls began brainstorming.

An hour later, I arrived at camp, found the location of our station, and started talking to my co-leader and girls and a bonus Cadette from another troop.

They didn’t need my ideas. They had come up with a name-learning game, appropriate song, and activity around fire pit safety and how to start a fire, complete with hands-on gathering of ‘dead and down’ tinder, kindling, and fuel. The younger Girl Scouts had a great time at our station. They asked good questions. They joined in on the song. And they set up mock camp fires, using the “log cabin” structure – wait no, my troop taught them it was the “hashtag.” (Aaaand now I feel old.)

Five rotations later (with a lunch break in the middle) my troop had educated more than 100 other girls on these concepts. Mostly, I had stood back and watched. I occasionally pointed out the time to help them stay on schedule. I didn’t need to design the craft for them. I didn’t need to tell them how to simplify certain concepts or to make it fun. I didn’t have to tell them to split up the leading time and make sure they included our bonus Cadette. They just did it.

That was my answer. I needed to say less, suggest less, and listen more. It took a panicked-filled hour-long drive from home to camp to come to terms with it, but there it was. Girl Scouting was working exactly as designed, and my troop was living proof.

That evening, when my daughter set up and lit the campfire for the entire service unit, nearly single-handedly*, the younger girls called out encouragement and concern (she had to sit inside the extra-large stone ring to set up and start the fire). Here, I realized, was the whole Girl Scouting mission in one day: older Girl Scouts drawing upon their knowledge and skills to teach the younger girls, and then showing them that they, not the adults had the ability to do things for themselves. It didn’t hurt that it all ended with roasting marshmallows for s’mores!

* This is a whole other story!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

99’s Aviation Patch Day

Submitted by Theresa Monroe

Metro Denver

Denver

Juliette Gordon Low experienced her first flight eight years after the Wright brothers successfully flew the Wright Flyer I in 1903. The thrilling experience lead Juliette to introduce a “Girl Scouts Aviation” badge to the Girl Scouts Handbook.

Keeping with that tradition, on October 13, 2018, the Colorado 99s, an organization of all female pilots, is hosting Aviation Patch Day. This program is for Girl Scout Juniors and Cadettes who are interested in aviation-related activities. These include making and racing various paper airplanes, learning the language of aviation, understanding more about weather, hearing the history of aviation, and even sitting in the cockpit of an airplane.

Event details:

Saturday, October 13, 2018

1 – 4 p.m.

Rocky Mountain Metro’s Airport Terminal

11755 Airport Way

Broomfield, CO 80021

Cost of the event is $6 per Girl Scout
Register through the GSCO website: https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/content/girlscoutsofcolorado/en/events/events-calendar.html
*** Last day to register is October 6.

Questions? Contact Theresa Monroe at (719) 210 – 0890 or monroetheresa@ymail.com.

Some female pilots begin flying from birth when their parents take them flying where as others start later in life. I personally began flying my junior year of high school. That year I took my first flight and I fell in love with it! Every day since I’ve spent my time walking with my eyes turned to the sky. Now, I am a commercial pilot and I travel the world and enjoy my flying. You can be a pilot too, if you can dream it, you can achieve it. It’s never too late to start!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Juniors: Earn your “aMuse” Journey at Tomahawk Ranch

Submitted by Maria Cross

Northern & Northeastern CO

Lyons

Girl Scout Juniors are invited to join the Seniors of Troop 78527 for a fun night of camping at Tomahawk Ranch and a fun filled day as you earn your “aMuse” Journey. Through the “aMuse” Journey, girls will explore the different roles women and girls hold in the world and develop a Take Action project.

This exciting overnight activity will take place starting in the afternoon of Sunday, Jan. 20, 2019 and come to a close on Monday, Jan. 21. This is Martin Luther King Jr. Day. What better way to spend a day off from school than camping with your troop in comfy heated cabins, and earning your “aMuse” Journey?

Price is $70 per girl and $40 per adult. The “aMuse” Journey patch is included, but troops must register by Dec. 21 to be guaranteed a patch.

Troops must meet safety-wise ratios. Adults over safety-wise ratios must pay girl rate minus the cost of the patch.

Please contact Maria Cross at cross.maria.e@gmail.com with any questions.

Register by printing the registration form below and sending the
completed form to Troop 78527 (address is included in the form). Or, you can email cross.maria.e@gmail.com and request an electronic registration form.

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This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Save the date: 2019 Pajama Jam with the Denver Nuggets

Save the date for the 2019 Girl Scout Pajama Jam with the Denver Nuggets!

Denver Nuggets vs. New Orleans Pelicans
March 2, 2019
7 p.m.
Pepsi Center
Denver, CO

Prices coming soon!

Everyone who purchases tickets through this offer will get to participate in the sleepover after the game at the Pepsi Center!

Ticket package includes:

  • Ticket to Nuggets vs. Pelicans game
  • 2019 Girl Scout Pajama Jam Commemorative Patch
  • Post-Game shoot around on the Nuggets court
  • Midnight snack
  • Movie screening on Pepsi Vision
  • Sleepover at Pepsi Center
  • Breakfast in the morning

The top three ticket-referring troops can choose between:

  • Halftime high-five fan tunnel
  • Girl Scout Cookies booth in the Grand Atrium
  • Girl Scout Cookies booth in Club Lexus

The top five ticket-referring troops will ALL be invited to sit in VIP seats to watch both NBA teams warm up prior to the game.

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Email aimee.artzer@gscolorado.org to be added to the interest list. You’ll receive the registration link via email when it goes live!

Denver Leadership Summit: Register now for this training event

Join GSCO for a Leadership Summit on Saturday, September 29, 2018 at the Community College of Aurora. This is your chance to connect with other GSCO volunteers, share ideas, take enrichment classes and essential volunteer training, and get your Girl Scout year off to a great start!

Event Highlights:

Program level 101 courses are available – Multi-level, Cadette and Older Girls, Junior, and Daisy/Brownie. Want to know how to best work with the girls in your troop and make it a girl-led experience? Take a 101 class and the enrichment class, Troop Management Simplified .

Want more support from the families in your troop? Register for the Engaging Families class and get the tools that you need to get the support that you want!

Not sure how to tackle planning an event for the troops in your area? Take the Event Planning: Tips and Tricks class.

Want to put your years of experience as a Girl Scout volunteer to good use and learn how to recruit girls and adults and start more troops in your community? There’s a class for that –Community and School Recruitment Strategies.

Are you a new leader who would like to learn Girl Scout Traditions and Ceremonies, Songs, and Games? Perfect! You will find those classes during the afternoon session at the Leadership Summit.

Register Now! All GSCO volunteers are welcome at this event.

Schedule for Saturday, September 29:

8:30 – 8:45 a.m. – Registration and displays in the southwest lobby
9 a.m. – 12 p.m. – Morning courses
*12 – 1 p.m. – Lunch
1:15 – 2:45 p.m. – Early afternoon courses
3 – 4:30 p.m. – Late afternoon courses

*The event registration fee includes coffee and snacks through-out the day, and a catered lunch. Please bring a water bottle.

Location:

Community College of Aurora

16000 East CentreTech Parkway

Aurora, Colorado 80011-9036

Registration:

Click on the link below to read more information about classes offered and to register for the Denver Leadership Summit:

https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/content/girlscoutsofcolorado/en/events-repository/2018/leadership_summit_in_75499965.html

If you have any questions about this training or have trouble completing registration, please contact inquiry@gscolorado.org or 877-404-5708. Registration closes Tuesday, September 25 at midnight.

Helping the hungry and homeless

Submitted by Kristin Hurley

Metro Denver

Northglenn

Hello from Girl Scout Troop 61358! For our Silver Award project, we created a Care Cabinet in Northglenn to help the homeless and hungry. We are hoping for community participation in keeping it filled, and hoping that we can spread the word to people who need help.

From their leader/project advisor: These two Girl Scouts have worked so hard this summer to secure a location for their Care Cabinet so they can help the hungry and homeless, working with the cities of Thornton and Northglenn and the Rotary Clubs of those cities.

If you would be interested in making a donation, please contact GSCO public relations director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org and she will connect you with the troop leader.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Grace Matsey, Highlands Ranch, “Got Music?”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I created a music tutoring program for elementary and middle school musicians run by members of my high school’s Music Honor Society to help emphasize and educate about the importance of music and music education.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I compared the enrollment numbers from the orchestra classes in 2017-18 school year and the 2018-19 school year.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project is sustainable because it is run by the members of my high school’s Music National Honor Society. The president of next year will be in charge, and so on and so forth. It will continue to help increase the participation in music programs, as well as helping to educate the importance of music and music education.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I communicated with the Program Coordinator for the head of the National Music Honor Society, and they were able to obtain information about my project to post it on their websites and have workshops on how to effectively teach music. This enables it to now be a national music tutoring program.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that I can communicate with large groups of people. I spoke in front of an audience of 300 people, and it was really inspiring to see how you can connect with so many people at once, and how you know that they can all feel your passion for a project.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Earning my Gold Award will help me step forward with confidence in the future. I know that I can do anything, if I set a plan and work towards it.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I think that if I had not completed the Gold Award, Girl Scouts would not have been such an important part of my life. This project helped me spread the awareness of something that I am passionate about, while working with amazing people and creating connections.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

It helped me become a go-getter because I set a very aggressive timeline, while also working with lots of people. I completed the majority of my project in one semester, and was still able to see results.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Center for Colorado Women’s History to host International Day of the Girl essay contest

The Center for Colorado Women’s History at the Byers-Evans House in Denver will host an essay contest to celebrate International Day of the Girl on Thursday, October 11, 2018. Denver metro Girl Scouts in grades three through eighth are invited to learn about women who have made a difference in history, so that they can use them as inspiration to create a better tomorrow.

Participants will submit a 250 to 500 word essay responding to the prompt:

“We have many reasons to recognize and thank the women who came before us. We know that they have shown strength and determination in their vision for their community and their country. Their legacy still lives on today. How does their legacy inspire you to create a better future for yourself and your community?”

Three winners will be invited to attend an afternoon tea to celebrate International Day of the Girl on October 11, at 4 p.m., at the Center for Colorado Women’s History.

Essays should be submitted with a parent’s name, email, and student’s grade level, by Friday, September 21, at 4 p.m., online at www.historycolorado.org/dayofthegirl or by email to michael.erickson@state.co.us.

The Center for Colorado Women’s History is located inside the historic Byers-Evans House Museum at 1310 Bannock St. in Denver. For more information on the Center for Colorado Women’s History, visit www.h-co.org/ccwh, call (303) 620-4933, or visit the Center’s Facebook page.

About Center for Colorado Women’s History

The Center for Colorado Women’s History is the first state museum focused on the past, present, and future achievements of Colorado women. The Women’s History Center focuses on scholarship, research, public programs, narrative, lectures, and exhibits that expand the understanding and collective memory of the history of women in Colorado. The Center for Colorado Women’s History at Byers-Evans House is a Community Museum of History Colorado. For more information, visit www.h-co.org/ccwh.

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History Colorado’s mission is to inspire generations to find wonder and meaning in our past and to engage in creating a better Colorado. We serve as the state’s memory, preserving the places, stories, and material culture of Colorado through our museums, educational programs, historic preservation grants, research library, collections, and outreach to Colorado communities. Find History Colorado on all major social media platforms.

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Girl Scout Junior helps bunnies to earn Bronze Award

Submitted by Ana Martin Del Campo

Metro Denver

Thornton

Alison E., a Girl Scout Junior, has been in Troop 62816 only this Girl Scout year. When she joined this new troop, she realized all the Girl Scouts had already earned their Bronze Award and she wanted to earn hers as well!

Alison read all the requirements to earn the Bronze Award. Then, she saw a lot examples about what other Girl Scouts had done to become Bronze Award Girl Scouts.  We started the adventure with a visit to animal shelters. Alison visited dog shelters, cat shelters, bunny shelters, etc. all while looking for a problem that she could help solve.

During a visit to the Colorado House Rabbit Society, she noticed they have a lot of bunnies! She came up with an idea for how to help the organization by hosting a class to educate the community about adopting bunnies as pets. After that she told me, “This is it mom! I want to do my Bronze Award project to help bunnies to find a  home!”

This summer, she spent more than 35 hours preparing for this event. She talked with the president of Colorado House Rabbit Society, Nancy LaRoche, who authorized the project. The Colorado House Rabbit Society is in Broomfield. Then, she talked with people at the Anythink York Library in Thornton. She worked as a team with Michele Hawking from the library to make a flyer for the class and upload it on the library’s web-site.

Next, Alison took a four-hour class at the shelter and studied and read many articles to learn about bunnies. She visited the bunny shelter several times to have meetings with LaRoche so everything would be fine with the Colorado House Rabbit Society.

She also made a PowerPoint presentation for her class, and chose and prepared all the materials to do a craft bunny toy for the class. People could decide to keep the toy or donate it to the Colorado House Rabbit Society! She also convinced LaRoche to bring bunnies from the Colorado House Rabbit Society to the class, so people could meet and pet them.

On Saturday, September 1, 2018, Girl Scout Junior Alison earned her Bronze Award by hosting a class to educate the community about how to adopt bunnies from the Colorado House Rabbit Society. It was amazing  and she received a lot of compliments. The Colorado House Rabbit Society even donated stuffed animal bunnies as a gift for children who attended the class. It was a surprise for everybody!

Alison wanted to share her story to show other Girls Scouts that you can earn your Bronze Award as a team in your troop or by yourself. You can do it sometimes in one or two years or sometimes in few months over the summer. And most importantly, if you love your idea about what you want to do as a Bronze Award project, go for it! You can do it! If you work hard and are determined to do it, you will earn your Bronze Award!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Sister troops go backpacking

Submitted by Elizabeth Moore

Metro Denver

Conifer

The Cadettes of sister troops 2064 and 8242 went backpacking in the Mt. Evans Wilderness Area the weekend before Memorial Day. Seven girls and two leaders went on this challenging six-mile loop.

The girls were greeted with a massive thunderstorm five-minutes from the campsite, leaving them to take shelter in the forest until the lightning subsided. Once at the campsite, the girls took turns holding a large tarp over each others’ tents until they could be fully pitched with the rainfly on, preventing the inside from becoming soaked. Then, they worked together to gather and dry wood for a campfire. These Cadettes showed amazing teamwork in a tough situation.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.