Tag Archives: Gold Award Girl Scout

Gold Award Girl Scout: Kimberly Jones, Colorado Springs, “Project B.A.R.K.”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

In order to earn my Gold Award, I worked with the Humane Society of the Pikes Peak Region to create a volunteer training program for an already existing Pets Day for children. After much collaboration, I created a handbook, which I shared with other humane societies around the United States and one shelter in Germany. I decided to do this project because as a volunteer for Pets Day in the past, I had noticed the difference in volunteers, specifically the inconsistency between volunteers on different Pets Days and the lack of volunteers on Pets Day. I wanted to change this. After talking with Lynda Grove, the Education Manager at HSPPR, about my ideas, she agreed that a training program would be necessary.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured the impact of my project using a Kahoot, electronic quiz, for the trainees after the training session. Using this, I was able to find out what needed to be tweaked within the training program in order to make it more effective. In addition, I created a survey for volunteers to fill out after they volunteered for Pets Day, in order to receive their feedback. Based on this, I changed the structure of the training program. Finally, I created a small game for the kids to play. This allowed me to find out what the kids at Pets Day think.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project will be sustained by HSPPR for many years to come by Lynda Grove, who is the Education Manager. Additionally, a handbook was created that can be referenced. It is planned to be run every year with one training on a Saturday and one training on a Friday in the same month as a Pets Day. My project will also be sustained by other humane societies, who have decided the implement Pets Day and training program. The handbook also helps with this. In this way, there will be plenty of volunteers for years to come.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

Since my project address the inconsistency of volunteers as well as the lack of volunteers at humane societies, I created a handbook, which was sent to multiple humane societies, who had interest in the program. I sent handbooks to shelters in Colorado, Tennessee, Germany, and the National Humane Education Society and all have agreed to take on the program. Therefore, my project trains volunteers to help at their local humane societies and helps educate young children about the importance of humane societies and proper care of animals around the country and internationally. Additionally, I have created a website with “digital materials” and a questions/comments form is located on the home page which allows other organizations to submit any feedback or questions they have.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that I am a bit impatient, but with waiting and proper timing I can overcome impatience. In addition, I learned that I am more creative than I thought and am quite tech savvy.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

As a Gold Award Girl Scout, I will carry the accomplishment with me for the rest of my life. Earning the Gold Award will help me with not only college and job applications, but also the knowledge I gained from earning my award is priceless.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

Growing up with a troop of older girls as mentors, inspired me to earn my Gold Award. Now, I get to say that I also earned my Gold Award and have a stronger bond with them. In addition, I was able to impact the community in such a way that I could not have done with out the push to do my Gold Award project.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

My Gold Award helped me become all four of the aspects of G.I.R.L. I became a go-getter because I had the drive to get my Gold Award and do a project that retains to something I love. I became an innovator when I started problem solving in order to create the training program. I had to think outside the box in order to create a fun training with hands-on materials. I also became a risk-taker because I jumped in to create the program without having any experience in training people. I had to try things that had a possibility of not working. Finally, I also strengthened my leadership skills because I lead three trainings full of volunteers. I was responsible for teaching them all of the items they needed to know. The training also taught the trainees to become leaders and equipped them with life-long skills.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Gold Award Girl Scout: Mackenzie Block, Colorado Springs, “Treasure Closets and Boredom Buster Kits”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I created a treasure closet and toy check-out system at the Ronald McDonald House to give residents a more positive and developmental atmosphere.  The pre-assembled kits directed towards different age groups in the treasure closet and gifts new residents receive, provide long term entertainment, comfort, and growth. These systems made the Ronald McDonald House more home-like to scared residents. I also painted the area with fish and marine life to display a kid-friendly under-the-sea feeling which gave immediate comfort to new residents.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

The Ronald McDonald House has handed out 463 toys since my project began.  The kits are checked out daily.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project is being sustained at the current Southern Colorado Springs Ronald McDonald House.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My project is addressing the comfort of patients and the healthcare crisis currently happening in the United States, as millions are insecure with constant care and comfort in their daily lives. To reach others across the country, I had my advisor at the Ronald McDonald House send the brochure of my project to all RMH volunteer coordinators across the nation in order to show how this project made a big impact to her location.  My project is also currently being implemented into the new North Colorado Springs Ronald McDonald House and at TESSA, a battered women’s shelter in Colorado Springs.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned many things about myself and how to differently approach the world through my project. I had to think critically to overcome the storage issues in the treasure closet, as well as gained time management skills, and how to relate my time management skills to my team in order to complete the “construction” phase of my project.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Earning my Gold Award will continue to impact my life until I can no longer remember my project. I have proved to myself what I am capable of, and how to find and to address the needs of anyone and everyone I can.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I believe that the Gold Award was essential to my Girl Scout career, applying all the principles I had learned about from Daisies to Ambassadors. I also felt it necessary to give back to my community, and found that my Gold Award was the perfect opportunity.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

My Gold Award has helped me become a go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, and a leader as I worked through my project. I became a leader on day one as I lead my team of over 20 people in order to complete my project. I became a go-getter on that same day as it was a huge leap of faith I was taking. Innovation was essential to the logistics and “construction” of my project and was gained as I worked through my project. I was a risk-taker through those innovations as well, using non-conventional solutions, proving myself a Gold Award recipient.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Survey for Girl Scout alumnae

Gold Award Girl Scout Jill Meyer has created a research study examining personality traits of Girl Scout alumnae. To participate in her study, click on this link: https://buffalostate.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_4H4PS8zkvePSvzL. Eligible participants are Girl Scout alumnae between the ages of 18-24. Participants must also have been in Girl Scouts until graduation from high school, or stopped participating in 9th, 10th, or 11th grade.

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International Women’s Day 2019

The goal of International Women’s Day 2019 is to bring focus to the inequality of women throughout the world and how it impacts the progress of girls. 2017 Gold Award Girl Scout Kayleigh Cornell, sophomore at CU Boulder and intern for the Global Action Committee, created this video about what equality means to women and girls across the United States.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Emma Conroy, Golden, “Educational Video called ‘EEGs Made Easy'”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I created an educational video explaining how to have an EEG (anelectroencephalogramused) to diagnose epilepsy. It is a step-by-step video explaining exactly what happens in a humorous way, so kids aren’t scared by the process.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience? 

I know that I reached the 40 people that came to my launch party, 20 people from my diagnostic community, at least 350 people on Facebook, and the 35 people at the Epilepsy Foundation’s open house. I currently have over 1,000 views on the video. I also have nine comments on the actual video. I have received comments from the epilepsy community such as:

“This video is so accurate, I wish there was a video like this when I was a kid.” – An adult at the Epilepsy foundation open house

“You covered exactly what happens.”- Katie (living with epilepsy)

“This has been so much help.”- Jean (working at the Epilepsy Foundation).

“It was just like the EEGs I’ve had.” – Grace (a girl living with epilepsy)

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement? 

This project is very sustainable because it is posted on the Internet via YouTube and everyone knows the Internet is forever.  It is also posted on the Epilepsy Foundation’s website, and Children’s Hospital. People will be able to continue to access it, and my partners will continue to spread the word. In addition, my neurologist Dr. Chapman will continue to direct people to the video, and the Epilepsy Foundation is handing out more than 500 business cards to newly diagnosed kids and adults to spread the word. I am also working with my pediatrician, Dr. Sorenna Kirkegard, at Kaiser Permanente to insure they use it for patient education as well.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

On a global scale, it can impact people all over the world because YouTube has subtitles, so people will know what is happening no matter which language they speak.

What did you learn about yourself? 

I learned that I wanted to ease the fears of children going into a frightening procedure.  As a child I had to have many EEGs and it was scary because the first one was when I was three-years-old.  I knew what others would feel going into have their first EEG and wanted to make sure that they didn’t feel how I felt. By doing this, I learned that I have to pick music that is funny, so even if what is happening isn’t amusing at least the music is. I learned that I wanted to help kids who are worried and so in order to make that happen, I had to show up to meetings with strangers like my advisor and representatives from the Epilepsy Foundation.  I had to be on time and professionally dressed.  I had to make phone calls.  I learned how to get back up when something had to be pushed back or cut out altogether. I gained communication skills that had I not done my Gold Award, I would not know. And one of the most important things I learned was time management, I needed to set deadlines and budget my time to make it possible to reach that deadline.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Since starting my Gold Award project, I have learned many valuable skills that I can use in the future including time management, good communication, perseverance, and self-confidence.  I can learn on the fly, like downloading a film editing program and watching myself on tape.   I will know what is expected of me in the future because of my Gold Award.  I will know what to do when entering a job interview and how to move on when something doesn’t go according to plan.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The decision to try for my Gold Award was an important part of my experience.  It goes above and beyond what the average Girl Scout does, and helps people not only on a community scale, but also on a national or global scale which helps make the world a better place. I wanted to earn it because it pushed me farther than I would have pushed myself. When I posted my video, I had the hope that it would get 100 views and now it’s been viewed over 1,000 times and it continues to grow. I hope that other Girl Scouts get their Gold Award because it introduces new challenges and you learn more about what you are capable of doing.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I took a big risk earning my Gold Award because I am not very tech savvy and I am an introvert, so being in front of a camera and having to edit what I did to make it look presentable was very challenging. I could have done a project that was better suited to my skill sets, but I saw a problem and wanted to fix it, so I took a risk to help others even though it may not have been easy for me. Deciding to pursue gold makes me a go-getter.  Deciding on an education video was innovative for me.  Delegating tasks to my troop and working with various agencies and CBS4 News definitely look leadership skills that I had to learn as I went along. Earning my Gold Award was a challenge I set for myself and I did not know all the things it would teach me along the way.  I am very happy I was able to rise and complete the goal I set for myself.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Gold Award Girl Scout: Victoria Ciccarelli-Tilden, Denver, “The fall in gymnastics”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I held a workshop for gymnasts ages 6-18 to learn about injuries, injury prevention, and techniques on how to fall safely. Being a gymnast, I was able to experience first-hand how injuries are a huge part of the sport. I thought it was important for everyone to understand injuries, and what to do about them, but mostly I taught young gymnasts how to fall safely. Falling is also a huge part of gymnastics and most injuries stem from unsafe falls. I invited a medical professional in to talk to everyone about injuries, and injury awareness. Then, my team and I showed the young gymnasts how to fall out of skills, off of equipment, and safe ways to land. To be able to be a great gymnast, you have to be able to understand the risks that are involved.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I created a survey that I handed out at the end of my workshop that asked questions such as what they knew about injuries before my workshop, what they knew after, and what their major takeaways were.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

I created a website that includes information about my project, and a video that can continue to be shown at multiple gyms all about safe ways to fall. The East High School gymnastics coach, Matthew Steele, is going to continue to show my video and spread my ideas.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My medical professional, Kasia Ilet, is a physical therapist and has presented at the National Congress. She gave a presentation at my workshop. She will continue to show the presentation to others.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that I am capable of a lot more than I thought. I was able to create a website, video, host an entire workshop, and teach young gymnasts important skills for their sport. I also learned that asking for help was okay. I am a very independent person. However, a project like this requires volunteers and lots of hands on deck.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

It will help my chances of getting into college, getting a job, getting a scholarship, and many other future thing that I need to apply for.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

It was important because it brought everything that I learned throughout my Girl Scout experience together in one project that I was passionate about. I was able to help my community as a Girl Scout, in a way that I wouldn’t have been able to if I wasn’t a Girl Scout.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

Earning my Gold Award helped me become an innovator because I was able to see a problem within the gymnastics community and research a solution. I was able to create a website and a YouTube video that addresses the problem of uneducated gymnasts. I came up with ideas to help lessen injuries in the gymnastics community.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Gold Award Girl Scout: Annie Nikolaus, Colorado Springs, “Building a Buddy Bench Community”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award project, I built buddy benches for my local K-12 public school. Each level of the K-12 school (high school, middle school, and elementary school) received their own decorated Buddy Bench, but also got to participate in an age-appropriate lesson about buddy benches and what they can do to be better friends to other students. As part of the high school lesson plan, the high school student council helped to decorate a Buddy Bench that was donated to the Air Force Academy Youth Center for them to use with their kids!

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured the impact of my project by having students take surveys after they went through the lesson I had made. I asked questions about what they learned and how they thought they would be able to use their new knowledge in the future. I also received a lot of feedback about my project from teachers, students, and families that I took into account when looking at the overall impact of the project.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project is sustainable because the Discovery Canyon High School Student Council decided to continue my project. They will be working with the counselors at Discovery Canyon to continue the friendship lessons for all the campuses and maintain the benches! Kids will continue to learn about friendship and have the tool of buddy benches years to come.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I compiled all of my lesson plans, bench designs, and materials into one large document and sent it out to schools in Colorado, across the country, and internationally. I thought that these plans would work great all over the world because kids everywhere deal with loneliness and can use the tools and learn new skills on how to be a good friend.

What did you learn about yourself?

The biggest thing I learned is that I can complete a project this big! It was hard to work on something for so long and not see the end, but every little bit of effort gets you closer to your goal! Now, I know I can accomplish projects like this (or even bigger) in the future!

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

My Gold Award will impact me in the future because it gives me an experience that I can rely on as a foundation when I take on bigger projects. It will give me the motivation that I can do great things in the future because I know I have accomplished something so big before.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award was an important part of my Girl Scout experience because it was an achievement to show off all the time and effort I had spent in the Girl Scout program over the last 12 years! It gave me a nice way to finish that experience and a bridge to the next chapters of my life!

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

Earning my Gold Award helped me become an innovator because throughout my project I faced many challenges. To finish my project and to make it the best it could be, I had to come up with creative solutions and think outside the box to overcome the problems I faced. Without trying new ideas I would have been stuck, but instead, I kept trying new things until something worked!

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Gold Award Girl Scout: Maya Hegde, Englewood, “Pad Power”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

After a recent trip to India, I learned that many girls don’t have access to sanitary pads and other important menstrual products. I was surprised by the effect of not having access to sanitary pads: falling behind in education and losing their standing in their communities. For my project, I partnered with the Mangala Seva Orphanage in India and the Brydges Centre in Kenya to teach girls how to make reusable sanitary pads using materials they already have and to teach the girls how to sell pads in their local communities to tackle the stigma surrounding periods. This also provided more affordable pads to other women in their communities.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

Over 130 girls in both orphanages have directly benefited by learning how to make reusable sanitary pads, using materials they already own, allowing them to continue going to classes on their period. Together, both orphanages have sold over 50 pads to other women, benefiting their communities through this cottage industry.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

The directors at both orphanages have agreed to continue teaching girls how to make reusable pads for years to come. This project not only personally benefits the girls, but it allows them to get experience with sewing machines and sewing classes which they are already required to take. Both orphanages will also continue selling pads to other women in their communities and will donate reusable pads to those in need. In addition, my website includes instructions and templates that can be used by other organizations to get the same benefit. Website: https://padpower.weebly.com/

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My project has a national connection because even in the United States, many women cannot afford feminine hygiene products. Even in developed countries, this lack of resources affects many women. In addition to being inexpensive, reusable pads are so much better for the environment.  The global connection my project has is that it gives access to pads for girls who otherwise would have to miss out on their education. The pads can even be made from old clothes and other recycled materials, reducing the price and eliminating the waste created by disposable pads.

What did you learn about yourself?

Through this project, I have learned how to lead others and delegate tasks in a team. I have also learned the importance of self advocating. This project was a little controversial, especially in developing countries, because of the topic of menstruation. I found that I would often have to advocate for the project and  convince cynics to keep the project going.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

This project will continue to impact me in the future because I believe it has helped me become more confident. As I continue my education in the STEM field, where there are fewer women, I feel like I will be ready to take on any challenge that comes my way! I have a deep sense of accomplishment and am looking forward to taking on more challenges that will have wider impact.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award was an important part of my Girl Scout experience because I used skills that I had learned in previous Journeys and my Silver Award to reach a larger number of people and increase my impact. I feel like the Gold Award has shaped me as a girl and given me a lot more confidence that I otherwise would not have gained.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

My Gold Award helped me become a risk-taker because it pushed me outside my comfort zone. The biggest risk I took was basing my project in other countries: India and Kenya. This was risky because it was difficult to communicate with the directors and the girls directly due to the time zone differences. Another risk was that the topic because it is largely controversial and highly stigmatized, especially in developing countries. I went into this project not knowing exactly what the reaction would be, but I still went ahead with it.  In the future I will have the self confidence and the ability to take risks and go for what I believe in – even if I might fail or it is not easy. I faced a lot of obstacles throughout the project, but I believe this project has allowed me to face it gracefully.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Gold Award Girl Scout Bailey Stokes awarded Johanna Farrar Girl Scout Memorial Scholarship

Gold Award Girl Scout Bailey Stokes of Buena Vista is the 2018 recipient of the Johanna Farrar Girl Scout Memorial Scholarship. She earned her Gold Award, the highest honor in Girl Scouts, earlier this summer for creating a nature program that will be sustained by teachers in her community.

Johanna Farrar’s husband and children started this scholarship in 2015 to celebrate all of her accomplishments, particularly those within the Girl Scout community. Born in London, England and raised in a small village on the south coast of England, Johanna was a Girl Guide in her childhood. She was also the youngest ever to have achieved the Queen’s Guide Award at that time, the English equivalent of the Girl Scout Gold Award. After earning a software engineering degree from Loughborough University, Johanna moved to New Jersey to work for Bell Labs. In 1985, she accepted a position with FedEx in Colorado Springs, where she met and married Gene Farrar in 1990. Johanna and Gene lived and worked in the Colorado Springs area, moving to Monument in 1992 when their oldest daughter, Hannah, was born. In 1995, after their second daughter, Rachel, was born, Johanna retired from a successful career as a Technical Advisor at FedEx for an even more successful and rewarding career as a dedicated full-time mother.

Johanna introduced her daughters to Girl Scouts at the first opportunity and became a local leader in Monument, then again after relocating to Buena Vista. When Johanna first arrived in Buena Vista, she learned Girl Scouts had all but disappeared in Chaffee County. Johanna believed so strongly in the values and skills that Girl Scouts develops, it became a passion to reestablish Girl Scouts for girls in the high Rockies. Known to many of her friends as the “Engergizer Bunny” because of her seemingly never-ending energy and indomitable spirit, Johanna provided the leadership and drive to rejuvenate Girl Scouts in the valley. Now, for the first time, there are troops for all ages.  Additionally, Johanna loved the outdoors, including skiing, hiking, biking, mountain climbing, and especially gardening – passions she loved to share and instill in young women.

 

 

Gold Award Girl Scout Zoi Johns named VFW Colorado Scout of the Year

Gold Award Girl Scout Zoi Johns of Golden was honored by the Veterans of Foreign Wars as the Colorado Scout of the Year in June 2018. VFW recognizes the impact scouting has on not only the nation but the world. Zoi told Girl Scouts of Colorado, “Thank you for being a part of my story and my success. THIS is why we do what we do.”

Learn more about Zoi’s Gold Award project on GSCO blog: http://gscoblog.org/2017/10/girl-scout-gold-award-project-zoi-johns-golden-project-waterwise/