Category Archives: Gold Award Honorees

Gold Award Recipients

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Sarah Ness, Centennial, “Destressing Art Sessions”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

My Gold Award project was created to address the high amount of stress seen in the student body at my high school, Eaglecrest High School. I held art sessions after school in the art rooms in order to help kids at my school be able to relieve stress. I worked with the National Art Honor Society and Art Club, along with the teachers that sponsor both of those clubs, in order to hold the art sessions. At the end, I had held 23 sessions.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured my impact by giving students a survey I had made and asking them if they were feeling stressed and if they thought that the session helped to relieve their stress. In the surveys, 100% of the people surveyed answered that they were feeling stressed, with the reasons why being “family,” “schoolwork,” “work,” “sleep or the lack thereof,” and “expectations for the future.” Along with that, 100% of the survey takers said that the session did help them feel less stressed.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My global/national connection is made through the access to free downloads of a manual for the sessions, and some project examples, on the website teacherspayteachers.com. I’ve also created an Instagram account that is dedicated to examples of project ideas and step-by-step instructions for how to do the projects.

What did you learn about yourself?

I’ve learned that I’m a lot more adaptable to situations that I wasn’t expecting and that I’m more capable of being a leader than what I was expecting.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

I think earning my Gold Award will help show others that I am a hard worker and very dedicated. It has also taught me better ways to deal with stress around me and to help others around me deal with their stress in a healthier way.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I think the Gold Award was an important part of my Girl Scout experience because it allowed me to use all of the skills that I have gained through my years of being a Girl Scout, along with helping me gain new ones, to make a lasting difference in the world. It helped me draw on all of my past experiences and really make the most out of everything that Girl Scouts has taught me.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

My Gold Award helped me become a

-G (Go-getter): by forcing me to do what I needed to do right now and not allowing me time to procrastinate or not try and do something that was needed.

-I (Innovator): by making me come up with ways to describe every step of an artistic process so that even someone who might think he or she isn’t artistic is able to do the same project as everyone else.

-R (Risk Taker): by causing me to step out of my comfort zone with talking to large groups and teachers, even though I knew that there was a chance that no one would want to help me. I also took a risk with doing an art-centered project because many people aren’t interested in the arts or don’t believe that they could do any projects, so I was taking a risk in the possibility that no one would even come to my sessions.

-L (Leader): by making me step into a leadership position and have to become a kind of teacher to the other students in the sessions along with having to come up with all of the projects and getting ready all of the materials that might be needed to do each of the projects.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Kayleigh Cornell, Aurora, “Colorado Book Bank”

What did you do for your Gold Award project? 

In my project, Colorado Book Bank, I collected gently used children’s books from families in a local middle school. The middle school’s chapter of National Honor Society helped collect, sort, count, and box the books I collected.  I received even more books from an elementary school after their used book sale, which NJHS helped sort. After taking the books to the food bank I partnered with to give kids a lunch and a book over the summer, I received 1,360 books.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

By counting how many books I donated I determined that I could reach 1,360 kids as each kid got their own lunch and book. While I can’t see how my program affected their education level, I can impact kids right now by giving them a book to read.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement? 

Colorado Book Bank collected books from several different schools. The largest donor was an elementary school who has an existing used book sale that has always searched for a good donor partner to gift their leftover books to each year. I also worked with a local middle school to kick off the project. They are considering the project into another food bank they work with for an existing food drive they already conduct. The elementary school, Peakview, plans to continue donating books to JFS to support the lunchbox program. For the past decade, they have held a spring used book sale with a large number of books left over. The librarian has agreed to donate all leftover children’s book after each book sale to JFS to continue the project. JFS has agreed to pick up the books from the school since that has been the main stumbling block for book donations in the past. Peakview’s librarian also plans to share about the option to donate book sale leftovers to JFS.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

During my project, the chapter of National Honor Society at my school agreed to help move the books to JFS. They also helped me get in touch with the organization as a whole to get my project open on a wider scale. I connected several parts of my project by working with different National Honor Society (NHS) groups. One of the membership requirements of NHS is to provide community service. In support of this work, NHS has a national website that includes a searchable database of project ideas. Club sponsors and student members use the database to find new projects for their club. My project is being listed on that database with a link to my website so other chapters of NHS can create their own Book Bank in their community. In addition, NHS publishes an e-newsletter and have expressed interest in promoting Colorado Book Bank through that publication. Finally, I have created a website to provide supporting documents for other groups who would like to replicate the project.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned a lot about planning and how while it’s challenging, it has to be done. I also learned that leading a team of other people can be very tricky because you have to pull together the best parts of everyone and make sure all the parts you have work together seamlessly.  I’ve always known I like doing things, but during my project I learned how important it was to delegate tasks to my team to get everything done.  One of the biggest things I learned was that good communication played a key role in my project.  It’s important to ask for help because that is the only way people know you need it and it is important to be clear in written emails and phone calls.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

In the future, I want to be able to lead my own team of scientists and study the formation of planets. I need to be able to work with multiple teams to do this and pull together many different resources to achieve top-notch results from my team. Because of my project, I know how to contact different organizations and pull together people who wouldn’t have worked together otherwise.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I learned so much about myself and how to help others. I wouldn’t have been able to learn the same skills I did if I hadn’t done my Gold Award. I could learn how I could help my community and make a difference beyond what I thought possible.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

I became a go-getter because I saw a problem in my community that I wanted to solve, so I found a way that I could start solving it.

I was an innovator because I found a new way to try to start lowering rates of poverty while including people in my community.

A risk-taker meant being able to start something and talk to people that could have become a lot less popular than it actually did. But I wanted to try my project and it paid off in the end.

I became a leader because I created a team of people I relied on as they simultaneously relied on me. I took their strongest skills and combined them to form an amazing project and amazing team.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Emma Deutsch, Denver, “Feline Family Fix-Up”

 

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

The Feline Family Fix-Up project was designed to draw greater attention to, and promote adoption, of the adoptable cats at the Denver Animal Shelter. Every year approximately 6-8 million animals are brought into shelters. Of those, about 25% will be adopted, but about 70% of the cats will be euthanized. Of those euthanized, approximately 80% are healthy, treatable, and could have been adopted into new homes. (Source: American Humane Society, 2013) By highlighting the cat rooms with bright decorations, I will be able get more people to notice and look closer at the cat rooms. Some people will choose a cat quickly based on looks alone. Color can be attractive and can greatly affect people’s moods and actions. By creating inviting and happy environments, I could help potential adopters fall in love. The playful decorations will allow people to visualize the cats in a more positive light, and even imagine the cat in their own home. This helps more cats find their forever home by increasing the number cat adoptions and ultimately save more cats lives.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I looked at the adoption data reports from the Denver Animal Shelter over the course of three years. Each report showed how many cats were adopted out of the shelter over the course of three years since I did my project. For example, in the first year the adoption rate increased 12.38%. While the following year it increased by 33.89%. There seemed to be a more positive view on cats.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

Other volunteers and interested community members learned how to continue to decorate and brighten up other rooms/areas of the shelter to increase adoptions. By sharing information and pictures on how to improve other rooms, there have been increased animal adoptions at the Denver Animal Shelter. I extended my reach out to a wider community by sharing my project, including information on how to create rooms in other facilities. Community education and inspiration was done during a presentation at school during Academic Showcase. I created tri-fold display board, included pictures, and prepared and delivered a speech about my project, needs, and the good work of the DAS. I created a detailed instruction sheet on how to apply the decals.  Also, the volunteer coordinator at the shelter helped spread the word via social media and other methods.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

Homeless animals exist in every community, every city, every state, and every country in the world. Homeless animals are uncared for and do not receive the medical care they need to live healthy lives. They are also freely able to breed at will, creating and multiplying the problem exponentially. If more people are made aware of adoptable animals at neighborhood shelters, they are less likely to buy pets. As people are made aware, they will look to do the right thing and adopt. This will decrease the sheer numbers of homeless and sickly animals. It also helped to increase personal wellness in the owners as it has been proven that pets decrease stress and increase happiness and content feelings in people. I also connected my project to other shelters with the help of the volunteer coordinator at DAS.

What did you learn about yourself?

From this project, I have learned that when I set out to help someone, I will not stop until it is done. If what I am doing is meaningful to me, then chances are the cause will be meaningful to others. Because of this project, I have learned that I am a strong leader. I advocated for myself and I can get a task done on my own, as well as being able to talk to other people and tell them my ideas.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Because of this project, I can talk with more confidence when speaking publicly.  While leading a project, I learned how to be more adaptable and work within changing time frames and demands from complete strangers. I discovered a new determination within myself that I did not know I had.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I feel like the Gold Award was an important part of this journey because it not only had me step out of my comfort zone on multiple occasions, but it also helped me find who I am as a person and know what my role is not only in Girl Scouts but in other parts of my life as well.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

Earning the Gold Award has helped me to become a go- getter. I had to become persistent when talking to people to get the permission that I needed to start the project. Learning to become a go-getter has taught me that I can get anything done if I put my mind to it.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

2017 Highest Awards booklet: Now available online

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Nearly 1,800 Girl Scouts, families, and friends celebrated this year’s 1,400 Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award recipients at five regional celebrations across the state throughout late April and early May. These young women have taken charge to identify issues in their community and develop and implement original plans to create positive change. We couldn’t be more proud of their accomplishments!

Stephanie Foote, President and Chief Executive Officer of Girl Scouts of Colorado, spoke at all five celebrations. These are some of her favorite events of the year because they are the only times she gets to be in the room with so many Highest Awards recipients at once.

Sarah Greichen, a 2016 Gold Award recipient, Stephanie Foote Leadership Prize winner, and National Young Woman of Distinction, was the emcee in Pueblo, Loveland, and Denver and a keynote speaker in Pikes Peak.

Jessica Mills, a 2016 Gold Award recipient, was the emcee in Pikes Peak while Shauna Clemmer, a Gold Award recipient and current member of the Western Slope Gold Award Committee, was the emcee in Grand Junction.

The Highest Awards Celebrations are incredibly special events where girls are recognized among their family and fellow Girl Scouts for their achievements. Additionally, this is a special time for younger girls to see older girls in action and get inspired to go for their Silver and/or Gold Awards.

Check out the electronic version of our 2017 Highest Awards booklet online (http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/content/dam/girlscoutsofcolorado/documents/GSCO_2017_HA_Booklet.pdf) and view our “Best of Highest Awards 2017” photo album on Flickr (https://www.flickr.com/photos/gscolorado/albums/72157679203803063/page1).

Gold Award recipient honored for volunteerism at national award ceremony in Washington, D.C.

Olympic gold medalist Michael Phelps congratulates Emma Albertoni, 18, of Arvada (center) and Breanna Remigio, 14, of Aurora (right) on being named Colorado's top two youth volunteers for 2017 by The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards. Emma and Breanna were honored at a ceremony on Sunday, May 7 at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History, where they each received a $1,000 award. (PRNewsfoto/Prudential Insurance)
Olympic gold medalist Michael Phelps congratulates Emma Albertoni, 18, of Arvada (center) and Breanna Remigio, 14, of Aurora (right) on being named Colorado’s top two youth volunteers for 2017 by The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards. Emma and Breanna were honored at a ceremony on Sunday, May 7 at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, where they each received a $1,000 award. (PRNewsfoto/Prudential Insurance)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Girl Scout Gold Award recipient Emma Albertoni of Arvada was honored in the nation’s capital on May 7, 2017 for her outstanding volunteer service during the 22nd annual presentation of The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards. In February, the Prudential Spirit of Community Awards named Emma one of Colorado’s top youth volunteers of 2017 and awarded her the title of State Honoree. Emma – along with more than 100 other top youth volunteers from across the country – received a $1,000 award and personal congratulations from Olympic gold medalist Michael Phelps at an award ceremony and gala dinner reception held at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. Emma also received an engraved silver medallion, which Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie A. Foote presented to her at last month’s Highest Awards Celebration in Loveland. 

Emma, a senior at Ralston Valley Senior High School, earned the highest honor in Girl Scouting for her work to improve financial literacy education and ensure students across Colorado are prepared to make sound financial decisions when they graduate. The idea hit Emma one summer when she was working at a summer job, shopping for her first car, and looking at college tuitions. “I was dealing with larger sums of money than ever before and I realized I didn’t know anything about using it wisely,” she said. After discussing with her parents such foreign concepts as credit scores, loans, budgeting and taxes, Emma decided she and her peers needed help.

She began by researching financial education in Colorado and found large gaps. For example, “In Algebra II, students are taught how to calculate interest; what they are not taught is how interest could affect their credit scores or how to figure interest into the cost of a purchase,” she said. Emma discussed her concerns with her principal, who put her in touch with the teacher of her school’s Family Consumer Science class. Emma offered to develop a unit on financial safety online for the class, and then created presentations, videos, discussion outlines, and quizzes to use in the classroom. Next, she persuaded the local school board to strengthen the teaching of financial literacy throughout the district, and she is now working with state legislators on guidelines for educators across the state to follow in teaching students about financial topics.

Youth volunteers in grades 5-12 were invited to apply for 2017 Prudential Spirit of Community Awards last fall through schools, Girl Scout councils, county 4-H organizations, American Red Cross chapters, YMCAs and affiliates of the HandsOn Network. More than 31,000 middle level and high school students nationwide participated in this year’s program.

The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards program was created in 1995 to identify and recognize young people for outstanding volunteer service – and, in so doing, inspire others to volunteer, too. In the past 22 years, the program has honored more than 120,000 young volunteers at the local, state and national level.

For more information about The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards and this year’s honorees, visit  http://spirit.prudential.com or www.nassp.org/spirit.

 

 

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award recipients celebrated in Denver

Nearly 1,000 Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at the Denver Marriott Tech Center on May 7, 2017, to honor the more than 1,400 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts are groundbreakers, big thinkers, and role models. Giving back is in their blood. So is standing up to the challenge, no matter how big or small,” she said.

2016 Gold Award recipient and National Young Woman of Distinction Sarah Greichen served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about her journey to earn the Gold Award and how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

“I cannot remember a day when Girl Scout flags, supplies, sashes, cookies, and girls planning events weren’t covering multiple floors of my house. We (the girls in my troop) each earned our Bronze and Silver Awards, while constantly practicing the leadership skills necessary to passionately lead, serve, and change the world,” she said. “Girl Scouts and in particular the Gold Award has given me unique opportunities to become courageous, caring, and confident, while actively practicing leadership skills that greatly impact the world. Girl Scouts also gave me the opportunity to identify and pursue my passion. I found that following your passion is the key to choosing and accomplishing highest awards projects.”

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award recipients honored at Highest Awards celebration in Colorado Springs

Nearly 300 Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at the Penrose House Garden Pavilion in Colorado Springs on May 5, 2017 to honor the more than 1,400 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts are groundbreakers, big thinkers, and role models. Giving back is in their blood. So is standing up to the challenge, no matter how big or small,” she said.

Jessica Mills, 2016 Gold Award recipient, served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked about her own journey to earn her Highest Awards and encouraged all the girls to continue to make a difference in their communities.

“I encourage you to reflect on the person you were at the beginning of your project, and look at the person you are today. I hope you find that you have grown confident in your ability to make a difference in the world,” she said. “Completing my Gold Award project made me find who I truly was – it defined my character. Gold Awardees, I encourage you to look back on your experiences in Girl Scouts. Your commitment to making the world a better place has instilled courage, confidence, and character within you.”

2016 Gold Award recipient and National Young Woman of Distinction Sarah Greichen was the celebration’s keynote speaker. She talked briefly about her journey to earn the Gold Award and how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

“I cannot remember a day when Girl Scout flags, supplies, sashes, cookies, and girls planning events weren’t covering multiple floors of my house. We (the girls in my troop) each earned our Bronze and Silver Awards, while constantly practicing the leadership skills necessary to passionately lead, serve, and change the world,” she said. “Girl Scouts and in particular the Gold Award has given me unique opportunities to become courageous, caring, and confident, while actively practicing leadership skills that greatly impact the world. Girl Scouts also gave me the opportunity to identify and pursue my passion. I found that following your passion is the key to choosing and accomplishing Highest Awards projects.”

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

 

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award recipients honored at Highest Awards celebration in Loveland

More than 300 Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at the Embassy Suites by Hilton in Loveland on April 23, 2017, to honor the more than 1,400 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts are groundbreakers, big thinkers, and role models. Giving back is in their blood. So is standing up to the challenge, no matter how big or small,” she said.

2016 Gold Award recipient and National Young Woman of Distinction Sarah Greichen served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about her journey to earn the Gold Award and how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

“I cannot remember a day when Girl Scout flags, supplies, sashes, cookies, and girls planning events weren’t covering multiple floors of my house. We (the girls in my troop) each earned our Bronze and Silver Awards, while constantly practicing the leadership skills necessary to passionately lead, serve, and change the world,” she said. “Girl Scouts and in particular the Gold Award has given me unique opportunities to become courageous, caring, and confident, while actively practicing leadership skills that greatly impact the world. Girl Scouts also gave me the opportunity to identify and pursue my passion. I found that following your passion is the key to choosing and accomplishing highest awards projects.”

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Before the celebration, Stephanie Foote presented Gold Award recipient and 2017 winner of the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize for Gold Award Excellence Emma Albertoni with an engraved silver medallion from The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards. Emma, from Arvada and senior at Ralston Valley Senior High School, was named one of Colorado’s top youth volunteers of 2017 by The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards. This is a nationwide program honoring young people for outstanding acts of volunteerism. As a State Honoree, Emma will receive $1,000, the medallion, and an all-expense-paid trip in early May to Washington, D.C. She will join top honorees from other states and the District of Columbia for four days of national recognition events. During the trip, 10 students will be named America’s top youth volunteers of 2017.

 

My Gold Award experience at the Colorado State Capitol

Submitted by Anastasia Rosen

Northern & Northeastern CO

Fort Collins

On Monday, April 10, 2017, Gold Award recipient Anastasia Rosen attended Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Gold Award Day at the Colorado Capitol. The Kay Rugeley Shaw Gold Travelship helped to support her trip to Denver for this exciting and exclusive event!

Read more about Anastasia’s experience below.

My day at the Colorado State Capitol started out with a breakfast buffet at The University Club and pictures with Girl Scout Gold Award committee. We then walked to the capitol for more pictures on the West staircase. We started our tour of the capitol off in the Old Supreme Court Chamber. We then moved to the floor of The House of Representatives and said the Pledge of Allegiance, then we saw how they voted and passed bills.

After listening to the Representatives, we moved on to Mr. Brown’s attic, which is a really neat museum just below the dome. We toured the dome and took pictures and heard some interesting facts about the building as well as the surrounding suburbs. After coming down from the dome, we toured Mr. Brown’s attic and heard stories as well as some interesting facts about Mr. Brown, his journey into Denver, and the capitol. Throughout the day, I learned a lot of history about the capitol building and Denver itself.

After the tour of Mr. Brown’s attic, we went back to the Old Supreme Court Chambers and heard a great speech from our host, Representative Faith Winter. I had such a great time celebrating my Gold Award achievement with my sister Girl Scouts.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

City of Centennial honors Girl Scout Gold Award recipient Sarah Greichen

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The City of Centennial honored Girl Scout Gold Award recipient Sarah Greichen as one of six outstanding Centennial high school students with a Youth Achievement Award during a City Council meeting in April. The Youth Achievement Award honors and recognizes Centennial youth who have made a significant impact in the community through volunteer work or other special deeds that demonstrate exceptional leadership. All 2017 Youth Achievement recipients received a $500 scholarship.

Sarah, a senior at Front Range Christian School, was chosen for serving as an Adam’s Camp volunteer and as president of various unified sports clubs at both Heritage and Front Range Christian schools. She sits on the Special Olympics Youth Activation Committee and earned the Girl Scout Gold Award and Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize for Gold Award Excellence. Her Girl Scout Gold Award project led her to create the Score A Friend, Inc., a nonprofit organization which works to include students of all abilities in school activities. Currently, there are Score A Friend clubs at Front Range Christian School, Louisiana State University, and Northern Arizona University. Sarah is also in the process of implementing nine new clubs in local area schools.

The Centennial Youth Commission and the City of Centennial’s Building Services provider, SAFEbuilt, provided $1,500 each to recognize these outstanding youth in the community.