Tag Archives: denver metro

Daisy Troop 65742 Take Action project

Submitted by Rebecca Lipman, GSCO Volunteer Support Specialist

Metro Denver

Denver

This past year, Troop 65742 from Cherry Creek Challenge School discussed numerous Take Action project ideas and the girls kept going back to the idea of planting flowers in a garden. We have expanded on this idea throughout the year and a seed was planted as we began to collaborate with other organizations and sponsors. One sponsor that our troop collaborated with was CampExperience™. Their mission is fundraising and contributing money to non-profit organizations in Colorado. Creating a community garden at St. Anthony’s North Health Campus has been a goal of both the hospital and CampExperience™. Our troop leaders asked how our troop could be involved in the community garden project. In meetings and discussions, we started looking at the idea of having Daisy Troop 65742 decorate/paint terra-cotta pots that CampExperience™ would have at the Health Summit. The artistic pots decorated by the girls and local artists were gifts for individuals who donated to the community garden.  The project was supported by Home Depot and Lowes who together contributed over 100 terra-cotta pots. All the art supplies used during troop meetings to decorate the pots were donated by Guiry’s. Many other individuals and artists contributed to making this project possible. Troop 65742 participated in financially contributing $5,000 to St. Anthony’s North Health Campus Community Garden. The girls were present at the Spring Success Health Summit to present the work they did and share what they learned from this project!

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Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award recipients celebrated in Denver

Nearly 1,000 Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at the Denver Marriott Tech Center on May 7, 2017, to honor the more than 1,400 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts are groundbreakers, big thinkers, and role models. Giving back is in their blood. So is standing up to the challenge, no matter how big or small,” she said.

2016 Gold Award recipient and National Young Woman of Distinction Sarah Greichen served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about her journey to earn the Gold Award and how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

“I cannot remember a day when Girl Scout flags, supplies, sashes, cookies, and girls planning events weren’t covering multiple floors of my house. We (the girls in my troop) each earned our Bronze and Silver Awards, while constantly practicing the leadership skills necessary to passionately lead, serve, and change the world,” she said. “Girl Scouts and in particular the Gold Award has given me unique opportunities to become courageous, caring, and confident, while actively practicing leadership skills that greatly impact the world. Girl Scouts also gave me the opportunity to identify and pursue my passion. I found that following your passion is the key to choosing and accomplishing highest awards projects.”

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

I guess I’m doing something right

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Submitted by Marti Shuster

Metro Denver

Westminster

My kindergarten granddaughter has been in my Daisy troop for the past year. She had a school assignment to say what they want to be when they grow up. Most kids said doctor or police. This is what my granddaughter wrote. I guess I am doing something right.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award recipients honored at Highest Awards celebration in Loveland

More than 300 Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at the Embassy Suites by Hilton in Loveland on April 23, 2017, to honor the more than 1,400 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts are groundbreakers, big thinkers, and role models. Giving back is in their blood. So is standing up to the challenge, no matter how big or small,” she said.

2016 Gold Award recipient and National Young Woman of Distinction Sarah Greichen served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about her journey to earn the Gold Award and how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

“I cannot remember a day when Girl Scout flags, supplies, sashes, cookies, and girls planning events weren’t covering multiple floors of my house. We (the girls in my troop) each earned our Bronze and Silver Awards, while constantly practicing the leadership skills necessary to passionately lead, serve, and change the world,” she said. “Girl Scouts and in particular the Gold Award has given me unique opportunities to become courageous, caring, and confident, while actively practicing leadership skills that greatly impact the world. Girl Scouts also gave me the opportunity to identify and pursue my passion. I found that following your passion is the key to choosing and accomplishing highest awards projects.”

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Before the celebration, Stephanie Foote presented Gold Award recipient and 2017 winner of the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize for Gold Award Excellence Emma Albertoni with an engraved silver medallion from The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards. Emma, from Arvada and senior at Ralston Valley Senior High School, was named one of Colorado’s top youth volunteers of 2017 by The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards. This is a nationwide program honoring young people for outstanding acts of volunteerism. As a State Honoree, Emma will receive $1,000, the medallion, and an all-expense-paid trip in early May to Washington, D.C. She will join top honorees from other states and the District of Columbia for four days of national recognition events. During the trip, 10 students will be named America’s top youth volunteers of 2017.

 

Older girl opportunity: Colorado Girls Elevated Reach Your Peak Expo

Submitted by Katie Singleton, Girl Experience Manager for Girl Scouts of Colorado

Join Girl Scouts of Colorado at the Colorado Girls Elevated Reach Your Peak Expo on Sunday, April 23, 2017. This event, which is specifically for girls ages 11-19 and their parents, will take place from 12 – 4 p.m. at the Arapahoe County Fair Grounds Expo Center. This annual event, which is produced by The Aurora Sentinel, Mix100 Radio, and KMGH Denver 7, is free to the public.

The event will feature powerful seminars, a runway fashion show, STEM activities, and inspirational speakers. There will also be a number of interactive exhibits and workshops focused on topics such as cyber safety, healthy relationships, body image, distracted driving, and more!

Contact Katie Singleton at katie.singleton@gscolorado.org with questions about this older girl opportunity.

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Troop 66542 delivers cookies to Arvada Food Bank

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Submitted by Michelle Lucero

Metro Denver

Arvada

Our troop more than quadrupled last year’s Hometown Hero numbers and delivered 665 packages of Girl Scout Cookies to the backpack program at the Arvada Food Bank. One of our Girl Scouts (Marlee L.) sold 434 packages of Hometown Heroes cookies for the backpack program. The backpack program at the Arvada Food Bank sends food home over the weekend for in need kiddos from area elementary schools.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Basic self defense workshop

Submitted by Shawna Fisch

Metro Denver

Highlands Ranch/Denver

Come participate in this fun and informative event lead by a Girl Scout whose mission now is to empower girls and women in teaching basic self defense awareness, knowledge, and skills!

This workshop is appropriate for Girl Scouts 12 years and older (as well as moms!) However, there are only a handful of remaining spots open; and we expect this event to sell out very soon! Register BEFORE April 8, 2017 to get your tickets for just $25 per person.

Topics will include:

-How to walk confidently
-How to use your voice with authority (in a Self Defense situation as well as in everyday situations)
-How to avoid a potentially dangerous situation
-How to stick up for a friend who is being bullied
-How to assert yourself in asking for help when necessary
-How not to be identified as a potential victim
-What are “good instincts” vs. reactions that we can change when necessary and informed?
-What is a “must fight” situation?
-What are the four most important striking targets and how to strike when absolutely necessary?

Some non-strenuous exercises for beginners during the second 1/2 of the one hour Workshop. Wear comfortable clothing. We do not go into advanced techniques.

Register/tickets available at ironcladfit.zenplanner.com

Hosted by: Iron Clad Fitness (Shari Wagner): 2171 South Trenton Way, Suite 225, Denver
720-900-IRON
info@ironcladfit.com

Date: Saturday, April 29, 2017

Time: 10 – 11 a.m.

Presenter: Sensei Shawna Fisch: Girl Scout, 3rd Degree Black Belt Instructor; Certified Basic Archery Instructor:
720-290-7398. See the Anytime Activities/Athletic section to book your own private session for your troop at Sensei Shawna’s state-of-the-art home Dojo or on-site. Content is modified for younger Scouts.

Girl Scouts will learn that being empowered comes from knowledge, awareness, fitness, confidence and action.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Victoria Fedorco, Aurora, “Caring Cots for Senior Pets”

Victoria Fedorco

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

My Gold Award project was manufacturing and providing raised PVC pipe pet beds to help senior pets be more comfortable in shelters as they await adoption.  I decided to make these type of beds because they are beneficial to pets and shelters in that: the elevated design allows the dog’s weight to be evenly distributed and keep them off any cold, hard floor. They worked great for both dogs and cats. The light, durable nature of these beds also allows them to be easily placed outdoors as well. They were durable and can last for a long time.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

The way I measured my impact was when I helped people and their families realize that there are challenges that exist when owning a senior pet, they asked questions and wanted to help me with my project.  I witnessed their understanding that leaving these animals in a shelter, for whatever reason, that there are factors that can hinder the senior pet’s quality of life. Specifically, I saw that I had impacted Troop 550 the most in that: they are going to work towards their own Gold Award Projects and work to make a difference in their community.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project is sustainable in that these beds can be easily built and are already in use by the shelter I worked with. In addition, I have provided a master copy of instructions for the shelter to use when building new beds for themselves along with sharing that list with others, spreading the word of “Caring Cots” further. My project will also be sustained beyond my involvement by a signed letter of commitment by Andrew Brooks, the Lead Volunteer Coordinator at the Adams County Animal Shelter in Commerce City.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I have created a Powerpoint presentation/tutorial that has a materials list and step-by-step instructions on the construction of these beds along with a some pictures to go along with it. I have posted a link to the powerpoint on my Facebook page to spread my project through this social media platform. The same link has been posted to my Pinterest page, available for all the view. Both of these pages have been created as a Gold Award Project.

What did you learn about yourself?

What I learned about myself is the level of determination and focus that I have. “Caring Cots” has helped me improve my leadership skills by having me organize an entire workshop and overnight for my building team. This allowed me to really get a sense of being in charge and having to instruct others. This project has also helped me improve my public speaking skills; I’ve started to feel more comfortable talking in front of a group of people about my project and my opinions.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

By earning my Gold Award I have cemented my name in the Gold Award Hall of Fame and proven to myself that I am capable of doing amazing things to give back to my community. This project will also be on my resume, which will help me get into college and get the job I’m looking for. I also think this project will impact my future in that I will be an example to other girls working on their own Gold Awards.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I’ve earned my Bronze and Silver Award previously and getting my Gold Award was a huge goal for me. I absolutely love everything about Girls Scouts and I feel that earning my Gold Award was the perfect way to show my love and appreciation for this organization. I feel extremely honored to be a recipient of the Gold Award and I feel that my Girl Scout experience has made me a Girl Scout for life.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org
 

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Julie Monington, Aurora, “Milkweed for Monarchs”

Julie Monington

What did you do for your Gold Award project? 

In 2014, the Monarch Butterfly was on the verge of being on the endangered animals watch due to the large decrease in the population size.   After doing some research, I found several articles and learned  that the reason the population is struggling is because farmers and the general population were killing off milkweed. I created a butterfly garden at a horse sanctuary, and made several presentations on how to save the Monarch Butterfly to my sister’s troop and a preschool class.  In addition, I made a sign and website full of information on the Monarch Butterfly based on information from Monarch Watch and why they are endangered. I registered my butterfly garden on their site as a waystation, and it provides a connection and information for others to learn.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

In addition to seeing an increase in butterflies due to the milkweed, I also chose to measure the impact by seeing what the students learned as well as measure their excitement to create their own garden.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement? 

The sustainable aspect of my project relies on the owner of Friends of Horses, the rescue I made the garden, to maintain it. I have also provided the educational materials I used for my presentations to the owner so he would be able to offer the lessons at his summer camps.  In addition to this, the property maintainer and volunteers will take care of the garden.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

The first portion for the global link was I had my sister’s troop create their own mini-milkweed gardens. The second portion is the garden was registered on the national program Monarch Watch. The third portion is the sign and website I created to pass on the ideas and information I used. The last part was teaching younger students about the garden and encouraging them to develop their own garden.  The teacher at the school received a flash drive so this information can be shared annually.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that I am good under a time crunch. I found a way to do many things in the limited time that I had to do it.  In addition to this, I learned to work with different adults and children as I tried to address this issue.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Earning the Gold Award will be useful to show how I had leadership capabilities at a younger age and help me be successful in college and also assist me in getting  a job in the near future.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award was an important part of my Girl Scout experience because it was the final part of my journey, and makes me feel like the whole trip led up to this big project.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Lindsay Iannone, Castle Rock, “Revitalization and Organization of the Faith Lutheran Church Library”

 

Lindsay Iannone

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I addressed the library functionality at Faith Lutheran Church (FLC) and the shortage of public computer availability in the city of Castle Rock. I removed unwanted books, received new donations, and purchased books and DVDs. In addition, I created an online cataloging/organization system for the library. I also added a public computer that church members, visitors at the church waiting on financial aid, and anyone in the community can use as a resource.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

The biggest example of the project’s impact on the community is the overall turnaround of the library. The library is completely organized and accessible to all members and visitors of the church and anyone in the community. Multiple members and staff of the FLC commented on how grateful they were that I completed this project and how they will be able to use the space in the future. I also reached out to different community organizations to educate them about the new computer and book resources so that they could refer their clients to the church as well.

Howis your project sustainable?Howwillyourprojectcontinue to impact after yourinvolvement?

A group within FLC will be continuing the maintenance of the library for years to come. I wrote a guide about how to keep the library organized, how the cataloging system works, and how the computer should be kept up to date, so that the group has all of the details and expectations laid out clearly. This will keep the library organized, accessible, modern, and interesting for the congregation and community to use.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My global link was with the Lutheran Church of South Sudan (LCSS). The LCSS is building the Trinity Lutheran Seminary in Gambella, Ethiopia to train local and regional pastors. One of their most important buildings will be, of course, a library. However, the LCSS does not have the funds to buy thousands of resources for their seminary library. We donated 223 books, VHS, and Bibles that were not being used in the FLC library to the LCSS seminary. These books will help them reach their goal of 10,000 copies, and allow them to train even more pastors in the region.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned so many valuable things from doing this project! The most obvious skills I have developed are communication skills. Additionally, I learned more about multi-tasking, organization, and adult-life skills. I also greatly expanded my leadership experience and skills through this project, and discovered that I actually really enjoy leading teams and individuals.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Earning my Gold Award has set me on a road to success. With all the skills I’ve learned, I feel very prepared to enter college and the adult world as a strong and contributing member of society. The Gold Award has also given me an advantage in select college and scholarship programs, which will help advance my knowledge and fund my education.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I have been in Girl Scouts since kindergarten, so earning my Gold Award felt like the greatest culmination to my Girl Scout journey. It was a way to combine all of the skills I had learned in Girl Scouts over the years into one great project that could serve the community. There is not better way to honor and celebrate your time as a Girl Scout than through the Gold Award.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org