Tag Archives: Aurora

Girl Scout Gold Award project: Elizabeth Hoelscher, Aurora, “Girls for girls library and welcome baskets”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award, I built a library and put together welcome baskets for a shelter (Avanti House) that houses girls 12-17 that have been victims of sex trafficking.  The issue I wanted to address with my project is the negative aftermath of sex trafficking as well as the continued prevalence of sex trafficking in our community. I wanted to improve lives of sex trafficking victims that need distractions and added normalcy to their lives after sex trafficking. While I cannot eliminate trafficking, by doing my project I spread awareness about sex trafficking and its continuing prevalence in our state, country, and world.

I made presentations on my project to raise awareness to the Green Hat Society and teachers at my school which subsequently lead to book donations. I presented to teachers at my school to spread awareness about the problem and help them identify the signs of sex trafficking as they see their students on a daily basis and would most easily be able to identify the problem. In all, I was able to collect 670 books through donations and the purchase of a couple of books I thought were must haves, which are now in the main living space and classroom for the girls, while the adults have one with their books in the office. I also supplied each girl a bookmark in their welcome basket to get them introduced to the library. The welcome baskets also included blankets, journals, coloring books, socks, water bottles, candy, and a couple of other items I felt were important that they have.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured the impact of my Gold Award project from the feedback on the books and items in the welcome baskets and also from the persons who heard my presentations.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

Kristen Harness from Avanti house has agreed to continue to make the welcome baskets for the home and other women they come across.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I have e-mailed several similar shelters that do similar work in other states in hopes that they might adopt the same projects.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned about my ability to be independent and take charge. From this project, I learned how to bear ALL of the responsibilities for my work. From organizing donation pick-ups and moving in the library and welcome bags, I learned a lot about myself, including my drive and passion for a cause I believe in.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Earning my Gold Award will make me more confident in being a leader as well as doing large projects and tasks on my own.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award allowed me to finish off my 12 years of Girl Scouting with one last impactful project that made a change.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

This helped me become a better leader as I have exposed myself to situations that require independence.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

 

Silver Award project: Hope Farms

Submitted by Nikki Goethals

Metro Denver

Aurora

For our Silver Award, Troop 2551 decided to help out at a nonprofit organization called Hope Farms in Elizabeth, Colorado. Their mission is to offer an opportunity for people and animals to learn, grow, and heal together in nature.

It was an amazing opportunity to help provide for people and animals at the farm. Hope Farms provides experiences for anyone in the community, regardless of ability, to learn about nature and animals on their farm.

There are a variety of animals on the farm that we learned about. There were horses, ponies, donkeys, cows, pigs, goats, chickens, ducks, alpacas, dogs, cats, and more.

We felt we could help provide some additions to the farm to greater benefit the farm volunteers and attendees. We completed three projects for their sensory trail to donate to Hope Farms. We built and stained two benches for people to sit on at the farm to either take a break or to enjoy the beautiful sights and sounds. We created a sign for their sensory trail and hand painted symbols for each sense. We also spray painted black tires bright colors for the participants to sit or play on outside. The troop used their remaining money to purchase a colorful wind chime for listening to. It was an amazing experience for us.

We learned various skills like woodworking, painting, planning, and most importantly, helping others and improving our community. We had an amazing time and Troop 2551 would like to do more volunteer work for Hope Farms in the future!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Girl Scout Days at Elitch Gardens: Patch contest winner

Congratulations to our Elitch Gardens Patch Contest Winner, Gianna G., from Aurora! Gianna’s design will be on our event patch that each participating Girl Scout will receive. Gianna also won two daily park passes, two VIP passes, and two special ride passes. A special thanks to Elitch Gardens for the generous prize pack for Gianna! We had 18 great entries, so thank you to everyone who participated.

Join us for our annual Girl Scout Days at Elitch Gardens! All Girl Scouts, friends, and families are invited.

Date: Friday, Aug.11 – Sunday, Aug. 13, 2017

Cost: $25.99/person. Tickets can be purchased here. A donation will be given back to GSCO for each ticket sold.

Not able to make it during the weekend? No problem! We have a great season-long deal offering a daily park ticket for $29.99/person that’s good through the end of October.

We hope to see you there!

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Kayleigh Cornell, Aurora, “Colorado Book Bank”

What did you do for your Gold Award project? 

In my project, Colorado Book Bank, I collected gently used children’s books from families in a local middle school. The middle school’s chapter of National Honor Society helped collect, sort, count, and box the books I collected.  I received even more books from an elementary school after their used book sale, which NJHS helped sort. After taking the books to the food bank I partnered with to give kids a lunch and a book over the summer, I received 1,360 books.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

By counting how many books I donated I determined that I could reach 1,360 kids as each kid got their own lunch and book. While I can’t see how my program affected their education level, I can impact kids right now by giving them a book to read.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement? 

Colorado Book Bank collected books from several different schools. The largest donor was an elementary school who has an existing used book sale that has always searched for a good donor partner to gift their leftover books to each year. I also worked with a local middle school to kick off the project. They are considering the project into another food bank they work with for an existing food drive they already conduct. The elementary school, Peakview, plans to continue donating books to JFS to support the lunchbox program. For the past decade, they have held a spring used book sale with a large number of books left over. The librarian has agreed to donate all leftover children’s book after each book sale to JFS to continue the project. JFS has agreed to pick up the books from the school since that has been the main stumbling block for book donations in the past. Peakview’s librarian also plans to share about the option to donate book sale leftovers to JFS.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

During my project, the chapter of National Honor Society at my school agreed to help move the books to JFS. They also helped me get in touch with the organization as a whole to get my project open on a wider scale. I connected several parts of my project by working with different National Honor Society (NHS) groups. One of the membership requirements of NHS is to provide community service. In support of this work, NHS has a national website that includes a searchable database of project ideas. Club sponsors and student members use the database to find new projects for their club. My project is being listed on that database with a link to my website so other chapters of NHS can create their own Book Bank in their community. In addition, NHS publishes an e-newsletter and have expressed interest in promoting Colorado Book Bank through that publication. Finally, I have created a website to provide supporting documents for other groups who would like to replicate the project.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned a lot about planning and how while it’s challenging, it has to be done. I also learned that leading a team of other people can be very tricky because you have to pull together the best parts of everyone and make sure all the parts you have work together seamlessly.  I’ve always known I like doing things, but during my project I learned how important it was to delegate tasks to my team to get everything done.  One of the biggest things I learned was that good communication played a key role in my project.  It’s important to ask for help because that is the only way people know you need it and it is important to be clear in written emails and phone calls.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

In the future, I want to be able to lead my own team of scientists and study the formation of planets. I need to be able to work with multiple teams to do this and pull together many different resources to achieve top-notch results from my team. Because of my project, I know how to contact different organizations and pull together people who wouldn’t have worked together otherwise.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I learned so much about myself and how to help others. I wouldn’t have been able to learn the same skills I did if I hadn’t done my Gold Award. I could learn how I could help my community and make a difference beyond what I thought possible.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

I became a go-getter because I saw a problem in my community that I wanted to solve, so I found a way that I could start solving it.

I was an innovator because I found a new way to try to start lowering rates of poverty while including people in my community.

A risk-taker meant being able to start something and talk to people that could have become a lot less popular than it actually did. But I wanted to try my project and it paid off in the end.

I became a leader because I created a team of people I relied on as they simultaneously relied on me. I took their strongest skills and combined them to form an amazing project and amazing team.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Cadette Troop 2551 does some urban orienteering

Submitted by Nikki Goethals

Metro Denver

Aurora

As we wrapped up our final year as Cadettes, the Girl Scouts were excited to do the new Urban Orienteering in the Capital badge offered by Girl Scouts of Colorado.

For many of the girls, it was their first time riding the lightrail or going to the 16th Street Mall.

They chose to have lunch at The Melt on the mall when we arrived, which was lovely. Then, they navigated quite a walk to the Little Man Ice Cream Shop.

We discussed pickpocketing and safety along the way while taking pictures of our adventure downtown.

On the way back, we split up and took two different light rail rides back home and met up again at the Nine Mile Station on Parker Road.

Everyone had a great time– easily one of our favorite badges to complete. Thank you for sharing it with the rest of us!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Cadettes from Troop 2551 help out at Terolyn Horse Rescue

Submitted by Jennifer Harrison

Metro Denver

Aurora

Cadette Girl Scouts from Troop 2551 wanted to earn their Silver Award by helping out animals, so we found Terolyn Horse Rescue in Elizabeth. Terolyn is run almost exclusively by Teri Allen, who rescues horses from dire situations, rehabilitates them, and finds them new homes. Teri works very hard and there were plenty of projects around her ranch for our girls. The girls decided to help by photographing and inventorying a trailer full of donations and building a set of obstacles to help Teri with training horses. The girls found plenty of time to love on some of Teri’s wonderful adoptable horses!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Hometown Hero Donation

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Submitted by Amy Caperton

Metro Denver

Littleton

Approximately 22 troops donated their Girl Scout Cookies to the South Jeffco Cupboard and then, many of them gathered to donate about 360 cases (that’s 4,230 packages) of cookies to Buckley Air Force Base. Four current soldiers came to speak to the girls and also gave them MRE’s (meals ready to eat) to try. Thank you to all the troops that donated!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Troop 64098 delivers cookies to Special Olympics

Submitted by Shannon Michel

Metro Denver

Aurora

Troop 64098 from Aurora, Colorado brought over 300 packages of Girl Scout Cookies to Special Olympics, the troop’s Hometown Hero. Girl Scouts Chloe, Avery, and Emily and Troop Leaders Jennifer and Shannon volunteered their day helping at the Denver North Regional Track Meet. We all had a wonderful time and plan on doing more volunteering with Special Olympics!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

We got a visit from the sheriff

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Submitted by Nikki Goethals

Metro Denver

Aurora

The Girl Scouts of Troop 35 in SE Aurora selected the Arapahoe County Sheriff’s Department as their Hometown Hero this year. They sold over 8,000 boxes of cookies – at least 500 of them donations for their local police station.

When we dropped the 500+ boxes of cookies off, a volunteer officer took some time out of his evening to give us a tour of their facility in Centennial. The girls got to see the different departments, interact with dispatch, and spend some time inside a police car.

A few days later, we were contacted by the Sheriff himself! He was so grateful for our generous donation that he insisted on coming out and thanking the girls in person. He came to our recent troop meeting and spent a good half hour with the Girl Scouts,  talking and answering questions. We were honored to have him with us and thrilled that the second grade Brownies got to have this experience.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Troop 4620 collects items for food bank

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Submitted by Katie Walker

Metro Denver

Aurora

Cadette Troop 4620 from Aurora chose to collect food and have the Smoky Hill Vineyard Food Bank as their Hometown Hero this year. The girls spent a Saturday morning handing out food to those in need. Eye opening to say the least for the girls. They hope to help out more in the future.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.