Tag Archives: Aurora

Finding her place in Colorado

Submitted by Jaime F.

Metro Denver

Aurora

My daughter Claire is a military brat and second year Brownie that recently moved to Colorado from Washington state. I’m sharing this with you because she has had such a hard time since we had to leave her troop back in Washington this past summer. We weren’t sure if we would be able to find “the one” troop for her here. That recently changed. Ruby (our GSCO placement specialist) found her a new home with Troop 67285 out of Aurora. Her new troop leaders, Shelly and Amy, invited us to come meet them and pick up cookies. They embraced and included my daughter like she has been theirs all along. The girls that were there for cookie pick-up were kind and inclusive and played with her like they were long lost sisters. They are the perfect example of what being a Girl Scout is. We are so excited to continue her journey with Girl Scouts in Colorado now. Her smile says it all.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Elena’s Moonbeams for Sweet Dreams

Girl Scout Brownie Elena Valles invites you to join her for a special event to show patients at Children’s Hospital Colorado they are not alone. Moonbeams for Sweet Dreams is Saturday, February 9, 2019 from 6 – 6:30 p.m.  Elena, who is now 8-years-old, battled leukemia for four years and won! She will be cancer-free for three years on February 10! During the event, Elena and her supporters will gather outside of the cancer ward of Children’s Hospital Colorado and shine flashlights in patients’ windows. Patients will shine their flashlights in return.

In her own words: “Many children get diagnosed with cancer and when you get cancer sometimes you have to stay at the hospital. I remember when I had cancer and I had to stay in the hospital, I loved to play in the playroom with Play Dough. Sometimes when you stay at the hospital, you can walk around and go to the play room, but sometimes, like when your fever is going up and down, you can’t even leave your room. It feels sad when you’re stuck in your room or you have to stay at the hospital for a long time. By doing this event, I want to support the kids that have cancer. I want them to know that they can get through it too. I want to give them hope.”

Attendees should bring their own flashlight. The event will last about 10 minutes.

To learn more or register, use this link: https://gscolorado.formstack.com/forms/elena_s_moonbeams_for_sweet_dreams_md_02_09_2019 

See photos and media coverage from last year’s event here: http://gscoblog.org/2018/02/girl-scout-brownie-and-cancer-survivorgives-hope-to-patients-at-childrens-hospital/

If you would like to donate a flashlight or glow stick for patients to use, you can leave them at Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Denver Corporate Office during business hours between now and February 6. All donations will be sanitized and donated to Children’s Hospital patients.

“Once upon a time: Magical mystery escape room” camp

Submitted by Nicole Harmon

Metro Denver

Aurora

Senior Troop 64393 presents “Once upon a time: Magical mystery escape room” camp featuring a “Fairest of them all ball that lived happily never after” with seven different escape rooms with seven different magical themes, such as Star Wars, Nickelodeon, Harry Potter, Disney, Once Upon A Time, Riverdale, and even a Rick and Morty room for Juniors, Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors.

Date: April 5- 7, 2019

Location: Sky High Ranch

Price: $85 per girl and $55 per adult

This camp will sell out fast so get your tickets at https://girl-scout-senior-troop-64393-magical-escape-room-camp.cheddarup.com

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Gold Award Girl Scouts impact Colorado communities and beyond

Twelve Girl Scouts from across Colorado have earned the distinction of Gold Award Girl Scout, the highest honor in Girl Scouting, after completing Take Action projects benefiting their local communities and those around the world.

  • Brittany Argo from Aurora, Cherokee Trail High School, built a prayer garden at St. Michael’s the Archangel and aided in the construction of a prayer garden at a church in the Philippines.
  • Evyn Batie from Loveland, Mountain View High School, led a team of students to create the Northern Colorado Student Mental Health Resource Guide, an electronic compilation of some of the best youth mental health resources across the region.
  • Bryce Civiello from Evergreen, Conifer High School, designed a pamphlet for teens that can help them take the first steps toward getting help from a mental health professional.
  • Angela Foote from Centennial, Arapahoe High School, developed a relationship between the organizations Family Promise of Denver and Denver Tech for All to ensure low-resource students and families have ongoing access to computers.
  • Madeline Ford from Englewood, Cherry Creek High School, partnered with the Boys & Girls Club to create a five-session literacy program, which promotes a positive reading environment and teaches children new ways to express themselves through books and poetry.
  • Littlepage Green from Breckenridge, Summit High School, created a lesson plan and video to educate students about food allergies. In-person lessons also included training on how to properly use an epi-pen.
  • Maya Hegde from Englewood, Cherry Creek High School, partnered with the Mangala Seva Orphanage in India and Brydges Centre in Kenya to teach girls how to make reusable sanitary pads using materials they already have. The program she developed also taught the girls how to sell sanitary pads in their own communities to tackle the stigma around the menstrual cycle.
  • Grace Matsey from Highlands Ranch, Mountain Vista High School, created a music tutoring program for elementary and middle school musicians, which was run by members of her high school’s Music Honor Society.
  • Annarlene Nikolaus from Colorado Springs, Discovery Canyon High School, oversaw the construction of a series of buddy benches for local K-12 public schools. Students also participated in age-appropriate lessons led by Annarlene about buddy benches and what they can do to be better friends.
  • Bailey Stokes from Buena Vista, Buena Vista High School, created outdoor-based lesson plans for the use of fourth grade science teachers across Colorado. Topics covered included investigations, habitat, and adaptations.
  • Emma Lily from Longmont, Silver Creek High School, designed a website, created a podcast, and wrote a children’s book celebrating the Longmont Sugar Beet Factory and its historical significance.
  • Katherine Walden from Larkspur, Castle View High School, taught elementary school students about the importance of bees and how to install bee boxes that local bee species and other pollinators can call home.

Open only to girls in high school, the Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls—and the most difficult to earn. The Gold Award project involves seven steps: 1. Identify an issue, 2. Investigate it thoroughly, 3. Get help and build a team, 4. Create a plan, 5. Present the plan and gather feedback, 6. Take action, 7. Educate and inspire. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

“Earning the Girl Scout Gold Award designation is truly a remarkable achievement, and these young women exemplify leadership in all its forms,” said Stephanie Foote, President and Chief Executive Officer of Girl Scouts of Colorado. “They saw a need and took ownership of helping to develop a solution and took action to make it happen. Their extraordinary dedication, perseverance, and leadership is making the world a better place.”

Girl Scouts of Colorado is 32,000 strong—more than 22,000 girls and 10,000 adults who believe in the power of every G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader)™ to change the world. Our extraordinary journey began more than 100 years ago with the original G.I.R.L., Juliette Gordon “Daisy” Low. On March 12, 1912, in Savannah, Ga., she organized the very first Girl Scout troop, and every year since, we’ve honored her vision and legacy, building girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. We’re the preeminent leadership development organization for girls. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org.

FREE training for adult volunteers: Youth Mental Health First Aid

Submitted by Wendy Anderson

Metro Denver

Aurora

Important Note:  This is NOT a GSCO-sponsored training. It is a volunteer-run event. Please direct all questions and concerns to Wendy Anderson at girlscoutwendy@gmail.com.

Many of us know what to do if someone has a physical injury, if someone stops breathing, or if they have a bleeding wound, we would know what to do because we, or someone we know, likely took the time to complete a first aid class and learn the skills. What if someone you loved was having a mental health crisis? Are you confident that you would identify it in time and know what to do next?

With one in four Americans experiencing mental illness in their life time, the probability is very high that someday you may need the skills to help someone in a mental health emergency. Will it be someone in your family? Could it be one of the girls you serve as a Girl Scout volunteer? How will you get the skills you need to save a life?

Mental Health First Aid Colorado offers both adult and youth mental health first aid classes, and we are especially pleased that they are willing to offer a special class, Youth Mental Health First Aid,  for Girl Scout adult volunteers for FREE. It will take place December 8, 2018 at May Library (1471 S Parker Rd, Denver, CO 80231) 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Bring your own lunch (the listing says lunch may be provided, I don’t think it is.) Please find our listing http://www.mhfaco.org/findclass/attend/631, or another class in your area at http://www.mhfaco.org/findclass .

Youth Mental Health First Aid is a groundbreaking prevention program. The course teaches participants the risk factors and warning signs of a variety of mental health challenges that are common among adolescents and young adults. YMHFA is implemented around the U.S. and the world. Research has shown that the training enhances behavioral health literacy, reduces stigma, increases knowledge of professional and self-help resources, increases participants’ confidence helping in a crisis situation, and improves behavioral health of participants.

With so many things to do on a Saturday, it is hard make the time to devote to one more training. However, it is certainly more hard to hear one more story about a life lost and ask, “Didn’t someone know? Couldn’t someone do something?” Be that someone who knows what to do. This holiday season give a gift to yourself and your loved ones by attending this class to be prepared! After all, “Be Prepared” is the Girl Scout motto. In the 1947 Girl Scout Handbook, the motto was explained this way: “A Girl Scout is ready to help out wherever she is needed. Willingness to serve is not enough; you must know how to do the job well, even in an emergency.” We’ve seen too many victims of from mental health emergencies. Be the change our community needs.

Important Note:  This is NOT a GSCO-sponsored training. It is a volunteer-run event. Please direct all questions and concerns to Wendy Anderson at girlscoutwendy@gmail.com.

Juniors learn about cybersecurity and earn special patch

Submitted by Natalie Buike

Metro Denver

Aurora

We took a couple of our girls to a park to learn all about cybersecurity. The adults (senders) put together a message on cards that were sent down through the network (long strings of yarn) to each computer (each girl). Once the girls received the message, they had to send it on to the receiver (tree). Once the message made it to the receiver, we had the girls unscramble the message and put it all together. While doing the activity, we explained to the girls how the process works through a real network, just like how a train travels and makes several stops until it stops at its final destination. The parents also explained to the girls how important it is to be as safe as possible with what is sent through email, text, and other social media sites because you never know what information will stop at a computer that can be or has been compromised.

Some of the lessons our girls learned from this activity was that cybersecurity affects just more than a home computer. It is affects phones, tablets, and any other tech devices that can be connected to a network. One of the biggest lessons our girls realized through this is that nothing is really ever safe and that information can always have the potential to be compromised or stolen. The parents really worked on explaining to them that all of the modern day apps like Snapchat and Facebook are not safe and that whatever is posted will always be out there. At the age of 10, I would say that they now have a better understanding on the importance of doing their best to keep their information safe and to always be cautious about what is shared through email, text, social media, apps, etc.

Learn how you (or your troop) can earn this special cybersecurity patch. 

Power of cookie: Troop 64098 supports Special Olympics of Colorado

Submitted by Shannon Michel

Metro Denver

Centennial

Cadette Troop 64098 from Aurora/Centennial volunteered at the Special Olympics of Colorado’s Summer Classic in Colorado Springs. They brought 200 packages of Girl Scout Cookies donated through the Hometown Heroes program. These young ladies assisted at opening and closing ceremonies and events of tennis, bocce ball, and cycling.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Golf workshops for Daisies, Brownies, and Juniors

Girl Scout Daisies, Brownies, and Juniors have a chance to try golf and earn badges at a workshops on September 15 and 16, 2018 planned by the Colorado Golf Association.

Brownies can earn their Fair Play badge on Saturday, September 15 and Juniors can earn their Practice with Purpose badge on Sunday, September 16. Daisies won’t earn a badge or petal, but will have a workshop specifically designed for their age group on Sunday, September 16. All workshops will be taught by instructors through Colorado Golf Association.

Cost is $15 per Girl Scout for all workshops. Badges are included in the cost for the Brownie and Junior workshops. CGA will host the workshops at Common Grounds Golf Course in Aurora. Space is limited and we anticipate these workshops will fill fast, so register now.

Registration links:

Daisy: https://gscolorado.formstack.com/forms/daisy_day_with_colorado_golf_association_md_09_16_2018

Brownie: https://gscolorado.formstack.com/forms/brownie_fair_play_badge_workshop_with_the_colorado_golf_association_md_09_15_2018

Junior: https://gscolorado.formstack.com/forms/junior_practice_with_a_purpose_badge_workshop_with_the_colorado_golf_association_md_09_16_2018 

Questions? Contact Aimee Artzer at aimee.artzer@gscolorado.org.

Silver Award Girl Scouts special guests at Rockies game

Girl Scout Cadettes from Troop 60789 in Aurora were recently special guests at a Colorado Rockies baseball game. On August 7, 2018, the girls were recognized by UCHealth as part of the organization’s  “Moments to Shine” program.  They were on the field before the game, taking pictures with Dinger and catcher Tony Wolters.  The announcer told the crowd about their project and the girls were shown on the jumbo screen.

“FANS, PLEASE DIRECT YOUR ATTENTION TO THE FIELD.  THE COLORADO ROCKIES WOULD LIKE TO WELCOME A GROUP OF SPECIAL GUESTS WHO ARE HERE AS PART OF U-C-HEALTH’S “MOMENTS TO SHINE” PROGRAM.

TODAY, WE ARE EXITED TO WELCOME AURORA GIRL SCOUT TROOP 6-0-7-8-9. EARLIER THIS YEAR, THIS GROUP OF YOUNG WOMEN WERE ABLE TO ADVOCATE FOR CHILDREN BY WORKING WITH THE AURORA CITY COUNCIL TO PASS AN ORDINANCE BANNING ADULTS FROM SMOKING IN VEHICLES WHEN PASSENGERS YOUNGER THAN 18 ARE PRESENT. THE BAN IS THE FIRST OF ITS KIND IN COLORADO, AND WOULD NOT HAVE BEEN POSSIBLE WITHOUT THE HARD WORK OF MAKENNA, AMELIA, MICAELA, JULIANNA AND SOFIA TO LEND A VOICE TO THE VOICELESS. U-C-HEALTH SALUTES TROOP 6-0-7-8-9 FOR THEIR DETERMINATION, COMPASSION AND INSPIRING JOURNEY TO MAKE A CHANGE.

FANS, LET’S GIVE IT UP FOR THIS GROUP OF YOUNG WOMEN AND WELCOME THEM TO COORS FIELD FOR TODAY’S GAME!”

After the National Anthem, the girls went to their seats to enjoy the game. Unfortunately, the Rockies lost, but the girls were fortunate enough to be recognized for their efforts in passing the law.

Earlier this year, Troop 60789 made headlines around the world for their Silver Award project to pass an ordinance in the city of Aurora that made smoking (whether tobacco, marijuana, or vaping) in a vehicle while a minor is present subject to community service or a fine.

Silver Award project: Capes with “healing powers”

Submitted by Jennifer Redmond

Metro Denver

Aurora

We are creating “capes with healing powers” for our Silver Award project! We are designing a sewing class in conjunction with JOANN Fabrics where Girl Scouts and community members alike can learn to sew and create capes for sick kids in the hospital. We will hand deliver all of the capes along with care packages of crafty and fun things to do in the hospital.

Make a child’s day! Help them feel strong and have fun. Anyone can help. We created packets with sewing instructions and a pattern to hand out to people in the community who can sew. We will collect all of the capes and deliver them to the hospital. We have a goal of collecting 100 capes by January 1, 2019!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.