Tag Archives: Aurora

Race Like A G.I.R.L Powder Puff Derby

Submitted by Barbara Light

Metro Denver

Aurora

Troop 71 of Aurora is putting on a Powder Puff Derby on April 23, 2018 from 5 – 8 p.m. Details and registration for the race available on our link.
https://race-like-a-g-i-r-l-powder-puff-derby.cheddarup.com

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Sisterhood of Strength

Submitted by Kristy Miller

Metro Denver

Aurora

Troop 60972 is hosting a free event as our Take Action project at the end of the “Mission Sisterhood” Journey. The girls have planned a morning of activities that they have titled a Sisterhood of Strength on Saturday, May 12, 2018. This event is geared toward older girls and a significant woman in their lives. We will have a panel of women in leadership, be teaching some basic self-defense moves, have a mindfulness/yoga session as a group, and then will have other self-directed activities for everyone to participate in while we strengthen ourselves and explore other relationships within our sisterhood. Registration is limited to the first 20 girls and we would love for you to be one of them. Please contact Kristy Miller directly at kristy@miller-rascals.net if you have further questions or to register. We look forward to seeing you there.

40963104_sisterhoodflyer

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Golf Workshops for Daisies, Brownies, and Juniors

Daisy, Brownies, and Juniors have a chance to try golf and earn badges in three workshops, May 5 and 6, 2018, planned by the Colorado Golf Association. Brownies can earn their Fair Play badge and Juniors can earn their Practice with Purpose badge. Daisies won’t earn a badge or petal, but will have a workshop specifically designed for their age group. All workshops will be taught by instructors through Colorado Golf Association.

Cost is $15 per Girl Scout for all workshops. Badges are included in the cost for the Brownie and Junior workshops. CGA will host the workshops at Common Grounds Golf Course in Aurora. Space is limited to 20 girls per session, so we anticipate these workshops will fill fast.

The Daisy golf workshop is planned for the afternoon of May 6 and the registration link is https://goo.gl/x1SB9S. The Brownies Fair Play badge workshop is planned for the morning of May 5. Interested Girl Scouts can register at https://goo.gl/uTqW8u. The Junior Practice with a Purpose badge workshop will be hosted on the morning of May 6. Juniors can register at https://goo.gl/zjvkZd.

Questions? For more information, please contact Lori Thompson at lori.thompson@gscolorado.org.

 

Girl Scout S’mores Booth Challenge: The winners are….

Thank you to all of the Girl Scouts who entered the 2018 Girl Scout S’mores Booth Challenge! We received dozens of entries from all across Colorado and are so impressed by your creativity and enthusiasm. Congratulations to the winners!

Girl Scout Brownie Troop 60061 is from Broomfield and their Hometown Hero is Broomfield FISH. The girls are in the second and third grade at Prospect Ridge Academy and Meridian Elementary School. Most of the girls set a goal of at least 150 packages of Girl Scout Cookies. They are hoping to use the money earned to do an overnight at the Denver Aquarium.

Girl Scout Brownie Troop 60035 is from Aurora. The girls chose Joshua Station as their Hometown. Their troop goal was 225 packages per selling girl and they surpassed it! At last check, the troop had sold more than 10,000 packages.

 

 

Aurora Cadettes go silver, lead state’s first vehicle smoking ban

From Girl Scouts of the USA

Five bold Girl Scouts—Makenna, Amelia, Julianna, Micaela, and Sofia—demonstrated the power and voices of a 100-woman army. How? This small but mighty group took on a complex and meaningful challenge to earn their Girl Scout Silver Award. As part of Troop 60789 from Girl Scouts of Colorado, the girls worked closely with their longtime troop leader Kristen Batcho and other community mentors for almost a year to champion and pass an ordinance that made smoking (whether tobacco, marijuana, or vaping) in a vehicle while a minor is present subject to community service or a fine. The ban, passed by the Aurora City Council, is the first of its kind in Colorado and an incredible accomplishment for these determined change-makers who are just 13 and 14 years old.

CH-A-GS-Colorado Smoking Ordinance 2

Amelia, Makenna, Micaela, Julianna, and Sofia present their smoking ordinance to the Aurora City Council on September 25, 2017.

Before starting their Silver Award project, the girls completed the Breathe Journey, part of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience, focusing on how the environment, air, and noise pollution all affect people. After completing the Journey, the girls discussed what they would do with all of the new information they had just learned and then brainstormed how they could apply it to their Silver Award project. During these discussions, they kept coming back to the topic of smoking, mainly the many different ways that it harms adults and children—smokers and nonsmokers alike. The girls researched the topic further and decided to try to ban smoking in cars with minors to minimize the effects of secondhand smoke and to protect young people’s health.

“We wanted to give a voice to the kids who don’t have a voice to tell the adult person to stop smoking,” said Makenna, age 13.

“We chose this project because people smoking in cars might not only get lung cancer themselves, they could also be making their kids sick,” Sophia, age 14, added. “The kids breathe in the smoke and are affected too.”

To begin creating this important change in their community, Kristen and the girls reached out to Aurora City Council member Charlie Richardson for guidance. He was 100 percent on board! Charlie attended one of the troop’s meetings and educated the girls on the ordinance process. He then connected them to city attorney Nancy Rogers, who helped them write the actual ordinance in the most effective way possible. Nancy also came to a troop meeting and engaged in a lively discussion with the girls during which they asked questions and talked through how they wanted the ordinance to proceed.

Initially the girls wanted to make smoking in a vehicle with minors a primary offense. In other words, a police officer could pull someone over for that without any other reason. But when the original ordinance came back with an amendment to make it a secondary offense, meaning a person would have to be pulled over for another offense first before they could be punished for smoking in a car with a minor, the girls realized they had a better chance of getting the legislation passed if they accepted the amendment, so they did.

When it came time for the ordinance to be discussed in detail at a city council meeting, the girls asked several speakers to testify on their behalf, including representatives from the American Lung Association, the American Cancer Society, UCHealth, and National Jewish Health.

Kathleen Moreira, the representative from UCHealth and a tobacco treatment specialist and smoking cessation expert, gave what Kristen calls “quite a compelling testimony” on secondhand smoke and the effects it has kids, especially as they’re still growing. Because Kathleen is a former smoker, the child of a parent who smoked in the car often, a mom, and a proud Girl Scout alum, UCHealth felt she would be the perfect person to represent the hospital and support the girls in their pursuit.

    • CH-A-GS-Colorado Smoking Ordinance 4

      Kathleen Moreira, Kristen Batcho, and Girl Scouts Makenna and Julianna smile for the camera after being interviewed by 9News morning anchor Cory Rose about the girls’ Silver Award project.

    • CH-A-GS-Colorado Smoking Ordinance 5

      Sophia, Amelia, Micaela, Makena and Julianna are recognized by Senator Rhoda Fields at the State Capitol for their efforts and work passing the smoking ordinance.

 

“I was overwhelmed with this powerful message that [the girls] were trying to send and that they were able to advocate for,” Kathleen said. “These girls made health history at 13 and 14 years old, and although I loved being a Girl Scout, I never did anything this important. Interacting with these girls reminded me that the power of girls is alive and well. What the girls are able to do now, utilizing outreach and being able to get so involved in civic matters, there is just a strength and a presence to Girl Scouts now that I think has really evolved over time.”


“These girls made health history at 13 and 14 years old.”


Kathleen explained how she urged council members to use this opportunity to educate parents to make a different choice. “Maybe it’s not about asking parents to quit smoking,” she suggested, “but once they know that doing so in the car with children is really harmful, then they have the information to say, ‘OK, maybe I won’t quit, but I won’t smoke in the car.’ Most of us, when we know better, we do better.”

And it’s not just secondhand smoke that Kathleen is worried about. Thirdhand smoke is also dangerous, especially for babies and toddlers. What is thirdhand smoke? It originates from the particles of a burning cigarette that are left on surfaces, for example, the chemicals and nicotine that stay behind on doors, windows, and everywhere else in a vehicle when someone smokes inside it. This means that even when children aren’t in a car at the time someone is smoking, they can still ingest all those chemicals later on as they touch different parts of the vehicle.

Kathleen revealed that when children are chronically exposed to nicotine and smoke, their chances of becoming a smoker greatly increase. By passing the ordinance, the girls and city council members are helping prevent 2,200 kids in Colorado from becoming daily smokers, she further explained.

To every young girl who wants to make a change in the world but isn’t sure she’s capable of doing so, Kathleen says, “There is power in numbers, and an organization like Girl Scouts can really boost [girls’] confidence in their ability to make change, get things done, and stay motivated through the obstacles. I have a four-year-old daughter, and I can’t wait for her to start as a Girl Scout Daisy. I was so proud to show her that I was working with Girl Scouts and what they were able to do.”


“There is power in numbers, and an organization like Girl Scouts can really boost [girls’] confidence in their ability to make change, get things done, and stay motivated through the obstacles.”


Even with all of the support the girls were able to garner, they also encountered some negativity and opposition. After their first meeting with the city council, a few not-so-nice comments cropped up on social media and in the form of other complaints. Because of this, Kristen and her co-leader, Michele Malchow, were concerned about having the girls attend the final council meeting in which a final vote for or against the ordinance would be made.

“We had been trying to keep the experience positive for the girls,” Kristen said. “But when we talked to them about it, they said, ‘This is part of life, and we have to deal with it.’” Kristen was impressed with the girls’ maturity and courage and decided to let them attend the meeting; they would leave only if things got too heated.

“What I have learned throughout this process is that everyone has an opinion on everything and not everyone will agree with what you’re trying to achieve, but that’s OK,” Makenna said.

“I have seen [the girls] blossom so much throughout this entire process,” Kristen praised. “Here are these young women who are changing the world and doing big things for the community. They’ve asked such good and insightful questions. They’ve embraced the project wholeheartedly, remained focused, and they’ve been willing to listen to feedback and be flexible. They’ve also just been so gracious and grateful with all of the adults and mentors who have helped them along the way. I am so proud of the young women they are becoming.”

Through this process, both the girls and their troop leaders discovered just how much girls can accomplish when they put their minds to it. “This is what Girl Scouts is all about,” beamed Kristen. “The idea of being girl-led, promoting the G.I.R.L. Agenda, and embodying all of the different facets of being a G.I.R.L. I don’t think my girls had truly realized their power until they were able to get this ordinance passed and make history.”


“This is what Girl Scouts is all about. The idea of being girl-led, promoting the G.I.R.L. Agenda, and embodying all of the different facets of being a G.I.R.L.”


Can you imagine what Troop 60789 will be able to accomplish in the years to come? Congratulations, girls, on a job extraordinarily done!

Best Cookie Dad contest: Our “Cookie Man”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Submitted by Troop 60071

Metro Denver

Aurora

We have nicknamed him “Cookie Man” and he is the best. He is our troop’s biggest cheerleader! He isn’t afraid to be silly and show us that it’s okay to do the same. He gives really good advice and is always trying to help us reach our goals, not just at cookie time, but always.

He gives a lot of his time and energy to our troop and Girl Scouts. He volunteers to help with cookie pick-up day at the cupboard getting other troops their cookies and then makes sure each of us is set up too. When we did our Powder Puff Derby, he helped us with our car designs and supported us while we ran the show. At our drive-thru cookie booth, he got all of us energized (the sign twirling he’s got down, but we’re helping him with his high kick).

We wanted to share how much we appreciate him because he genuinely wants all of us to succeed. It’s good to have someone like that in your corner.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form and is part of the 2018 contest for Best Cookie Dad.  Is your Cookie Dad the best? Tell us about him and he’ll win a cool prize!

What’s the big deal about volunteer recognitions?

Submitted by Caroline Cornell

Metro Denver

Aurora

Are you up for a quest?  My challenge to each service unit across Colorado is to find your outstanding volunteer for 2017/18 and nominate her (or him) for an adult recognition award.  It’s an easy process and will make a world of difference when you celebrate your success.  The deadline for submission is March 31, 2018.

Why bother recognizing our volunteers?

In a perfect world, girls would remember to thank their troop leaders every year on Leader Appreciation Day (pssst – it’s April 22).  To celebrate, parents might help their daughter write her troop leader a special note.  Or, bring her a small surprise like a plant or some homemade cupcakes.  But wait, who tells girls and their parents that it’s Leader Appreciation Day?  Yep, that’s the trap most of us fall into.  The reality is, troop leaders don’t.  Because it just feels weird.

I GET IT. We’re all volunteers.  We’re not in it for the recognition.  We don’t need a t-shirt.  We come back year after year to experience the satisfaction of watching a girl grow from a timid Daisy to a confident and strong Gold Award Girl Scout who’s ready to bridge to adulthood.  Let’s face it, we’re here for the hugs.

Formal volunteer recognition isn’t something a volunteer would ever ask for, but it is something that makes her feel valued and appreciated.  Kind of like when your kids magically clean their bedroom for your birthday and you didn’t need to remind them about it.

What does it fell like to receive an adult volunteer recognition?

About seven years ago, my service unit decided  to celebrate our volunteers by recognizing at least one person who’s done an outstanding job that year.  Just to make it interesting, we keep it top secret until we hold our end of year celebration.  It’s become a great tradition and has yielded some really big surprises.  Being a volunteer should be celebrated.

As the Membership Connection Committee chair, I know that Girl Scouts of Colorado recognized nearly twice as many volunteers in 2017 than we did the year before.  This increase still means we only recognized about 1% of our volunteers.

What do I do next?

Nominate someone today!  Applications are open now and must be completed by March 31, 2018, to qualify for this year’s award cycle.  http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/for-volunteers/volunteer-appreciation/adult-recognition-nominations.html. All of the details about the application process including the qualifications can be found in the Appreciation Award Packet.

Questions about the MCC?  Learn more at: http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/about-girl-scouts/membership-connection-committee.html

Girl Scout Brownie (and cancer survivor) gives hope to patients at Children’s Hospital

More than two dozen Girl Scouts, family, and friends joined Girl Scout Brownie Elena V.  for “Moonbeams for Sweet Dreams” at Children’s Colorado on Saturday,  Feb. 10, 2018. Elena battled leukemia for four years and won! Now that she has been cancer-free for two years, she wants to give back to children who are still fighting.  While the crowd was smaller than expected, Elena’s dedication never wavered. When asked if she still wanted to host “Moonbeams for Sweet Dreams” even though it was cold and snowy, Elena said, “Cancer doesn’t care if it is snowing. Cancer doesn’t stop if it is snowing.”

Moonbeams for Sweet Dreams is designed to show patients and their families they are not alone. Pediatric patients shine flashlights from the hospital windows and look for community members standing outside the hospital to flash them back. It only takes a few minutes, but means a great deal to young patients and families.  Moonbeams for Sweet Dreams was created by the Beaumont Children’s Pediatric Family Advisory Council at Beaumont Hospital in Royal Oak, Michigan.

When asked why she wanted to do this event, Elena wrote, “Many children get diagnosed with cancer and when you get cancer sometimes you have to stay at the hospital. I remember when I had cancer and I had to stay in the hospital, I loved to play in the playroom with Play Dough. Sometimes when you stay at the hospital, you can walk around and go to the playroom, but sometimes, like when your fever is going up and down, you can’t even leave your room. It feels sad when you are stuck in your room or when you have to stay at the hospital for a long time. By doing this event, I want to support the kids that have cancer. I want them to know that they can get through it too. I want to give them hope.”

 

 

Elena’s Moonbeams for Sweet Dreams

Submitted by Heather Quinn

Edgewater

I want you all to meet Elena! Elena is the toughest girl I know and I’m a better person for having her and her mom in my life. Elena battled cancer for FOUR years. She beat leukemia and will be 2 years cancer free on February 10!

This year, Elena wants to give back to the kids who are still fighting. She heard about this event called Moonbeams for Sweet Dreams, and with the support of Girl Scouts of Colorado and the amazing staff at the Children’s Hospital of Colorado, we officially have the green light!

With Moonbeams for Sweet Dreams, we will gather as large of a group as possible outside of the windows of the cancer ward of the Children’s Hospital and shine flashlights in their windows and they can shine them back at us. All Girl Scouts, friends, and family are welcome to join.

If you would like to donate a flashlight or glow stick for patients to use, you can leave them at Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Denver Corporate Office during business hours between Feb. 1 and Feb. 8. All donations will be sanitized and donated to Children’s Hospital patients.

Learn more about the event and sign up.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Volunteers needed: Cookie delivery day 2018

Delivery Day for the 2018 Girl Scout Cookie Program is fast approaching. The delivery sites are always needing more support and your help would be appreciated. If you haven’t already signed up for a time to support the delivery site, there is still time.

Broomfield **NEEDS VOLUNTEERS

1025 Eldorado Boulevard

Broomfield, CO 80021

Sign Up:

http://www.signupgenius.com/go/30e0d4dafae23a57-level1

*This is our largest site with the least volunteers signed up.

Red Rocks Community College

13300 West Sixth Ave.

Lakewood, CO 80228

Sign Up:

http://www.signupgenius.com/go/30e0d4dafae23a57-redrocks

Castle Rock- Castle View High School

5254 N. Meadows Dr.

Castle Rock, CO 80109

Sign Up:

http://www.signupgenius.com/go/30e0d4dafae23a57-douglas

 Summit Ridge Middle School

11809 W Coal Mine Ave

Littleton, CO 80127

Sign UP:

http://www.signupgenius.com/go/30e0d4dafae23a57-redrocks1

Elitch Gardens

2000 Elitch Cir,

Denver, CO 80204

Sign Up:

http://www.signupgenius.com/go/30e0d4dafae23a57-summit1

Baileys Moving

11755 E. Peakview Ave

Englewood, CO 80111

Sign Up:

http://www.signupgenius.com/go/30e0d4dafae23a57-baileys

Buehler

16456 E. Airport Cir #100

Aurora, CO 80011

Sign Up:

http://www.signupgenius.com/go/30e0d4dafae23a57-buehler

Northern Delivery/Loveland

5296 Harvest Lake Drive

Loveland, CO 80538

http://www.signupgenius.com/go/30e0f4fafa923a75-cookie2

If you are wanting to go to a delivery site that isn’t listed please reach out to the PPS for that region, to find out how to sign up. Don’t know who that is? Email inquiry@gscolorado.org.