Tag Archives: STEM

Girl Scouts learn about watershed conversation and the environment

In partnership with Colorado Trout Unlimited (CTU) and Anadarko, 23 Girl Scouts had the opportunity to serve as citizen scientists, anglers, and artists on Saturday, August 17, 2019 at Bear Creek Nature Center in Colorado Springs. The goal of the event was to help girls develop an appreciation for watershed conservation and the environment. This outdoor watershed experience employed STEM-education (science, technology, engineering, math), plus recreation and arts to explore a local stream. CTU volunteers led Girl Scout Juniors and Cadettes in observing a stream, collecting flow data, sampling macroinvertebrates (aka aquatic bugs), fly tying, and fly casting. Girls also explored the natural area and recorded their thoughts and observations.

Several Girl Scouts from Lina Zimmer’s troop attended. They had a great time and couldn’t decide which activity they liked best.

“This outdoor STREAM was my favorite by far.”

“This experience brought to my attention the endangered Greenback Cutthroat Trout and need for watersheds.”

Colorado Trout Unlimited is dedicated to conserving, protecting, and restoring Colorado’s coldwater fisheries and their watersheds. With a grassroots base comprised of nearly 12,000 members in 24 local chapters across the state, CTU works both locally and statewide through advocacy, education, and on-the-ground restoration projects. For more information visit www.coloradotu.org.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Cassandra Sterns, Arvada, “Simply Technology”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award project, Simply Technology, I created and taught six technology classes for independently living seniors in Arvada, Colorado that helped them learn how to use their Android smartphone. Each class taught the attendees how to use different apps on smartphones such as messages, camera, email, and Internet. Knowing how to use technology is a huge part of today’s society, and not knowing how to use it often ostracized people, namely senior citizens.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured the impact of my Gold Award through a survey I had each of the members of my class take, and by the appreciation I received personally from the attendees. Many of the seniors approached me to tell me how helpful the class was and that they are no longer afraid to try new things on their phone. Additionally, my project was requested again, which showed that people thought it was helpful and successful enough that other people should take the class too.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project is going to be sustained in two ways beyond my involvement. The first way that my project will be sustained is that the Jefferson County Public Library System will continue to hold classes that teach seniors about their smartphones. The second way is that I will have a website that can be accessed by anyone with the materials that I created for my classes and more cool tricks that I hope will encourage seniors to use their phones more often. The web address is https://sites.google.com/a/jeffcoschools.us/simply-technology.

What is your project’s global/or national connection?

I grew my Gold Award project from the original location at Stanley Lake Library to a second location, Brookdale Meridian Center in Boulder. The Brookdale Meridian Center is an independent living community for retired citizens (most are in the late 70s to 80s). At Brookdale Meridian, I taught a class to the residents and helped them to understand how their phones worked.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that I could have a voice that people pay attention to in a crowd and that I didn’t need to be handed a microphone when I wanted to talk to a crowd. I have always had a quieter voice and it gets overpowered a lot in discussions and conversations. I struggled during the first few classes to get my voice heard, but by the end, I was able to captivate my audience with a louder voice.

How will earning your Gold Award Impact you in the future?

Earning my Gold Award is going to impact my future because it allowed me to grow and learn more about myself. My project challenged me to overcome some of my reservedness and helped me to develop as a leader. In the future, I will be able to use the skills I learned during my Gold Award project to impact the world in other and hopefully, larger ways.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

Earning your Gold Award is an important part of your Girl Scout experience because it proves that you have learned something applicable through the organization. Additionally, it shows you that you can be an empowered young woman all by yourself and you can take on some of the problems of the world. The Gold Award is important because it culminates all that you have learned as a Girl Scout and focuses it into one project that you can be passionate about the rest of your life.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Through earning my Gold Award, I became a go-getter and a risk-taker. Taking on the project pushed me to pursue some of my own dreams and help the world around me; it enabled me to become purposeful. Additionally, putting myself up there in front of a group of people made me realize that taking risks aren’t so bad, in fact, my Gold Award made me more confident to put myself out there for people to see.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

“Space Science Investigator” badge night for Juniors

Submitted by Marcy Kendall

Northern & Northeastern CO

Boulder

Girl Scout Juniors are welcome to join Troops 72418 and 73010 to earn their “Space Science Investigator” badge on Friday, October 4, 2019 from 4:30-6:30 p.m. at Fiske Planetarium (2414 Regent Drive. Boulder 80309). Cost is $12/girl. You must register by October 1. Space is limited!

All five steps will be available, so girls can earn the badge. The first step of the badge is a scale model. This starts OUTSIDE the planetarium and the leader/parent needs to do the walk with the girl(s). That is  NOT done by the volunteers at the planetarium.

The time is 4:30-6:30 p.m. and includes a show specifically for the Girl Scouts to earn their badge.

What’s included:

  • Dinner: pizza, veggies, and fruit
  • “Bake” your own spacecraft
  • Make a spectrometer
  • Planetarium show
  • Ball Aerospace engineer volunteers

What’s NOT included:

  • The “Space Science Investigator” badge itself – (can be added on separately)
  • Beverage: Bring your own water bottle
  • Enough volunteers to walk with your girls on the scale model (done before or after other stations with parents/leaders who brought the girls). This step is to be done by girls with their leaders/adults either before 4:30 or after the planetarium show. Directions for the scale walk will be provided to adults before the date.

For parking information use this website: https://www.colorado.edu/fiske/plan-your-visit/parking-bus-information

Registration link: https://junior-space-science-investigator-night.cheddarup.com

Questions? Please email Marcy Kendall at marcy.kendall@gmail.com.

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This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Register NOW for the Girl Scout Cyber Challenge

Brought to you by Raytheon, Girl Scout Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors are invited to detect, decode, and defend! The Girl Scout Cyber Challenge is Saturday, October 19, 2019 from 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m. at Arapahoe Community College. This full-day, scenario-based competition will engage 200+ girls in grades 6–12 in a series of cybersecurity challenges on topics such as cryptography, forensics, social engineering, and ethics. A futuristic scenario—a moon colony has been hacked! — will be presented and girls will be prompted to respond. Girls will learn cybersecurity skills and team up to identify the hackers, trace the origin of the cyberattack, and secure the colony’s safety.

Register online now! https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/events-repository/2019/girl_scout_cyber_cha.html

For this event, girls will be working collaboratively in randomly assigned small teams. This is to mimic the type of work cybersecurity professionals do in the field.

This Cyber Challenge and the launch of Girl Scouts’ first national computer science program is made possible through a multi-year commitment from Raytheon, who is partnering with Girl Scouts to help close the gender gap in STEM fields by helping prepare girls to pursue careers in fields like cybersecurity, computer science, artificial intelligence, and robotics. Together, Raytheon and Girl Scouts are reaching girls during formative school years, where research shows peer pressure can sometimes deter girls from pursing their interest in STEM.

The cost is $5 per girl. All supplies, lunch, snacks, and event patch will be provided. Opportunity grants available upon registration. Girls should wear their Girl Scout vest or sash and we encourage them to bring a full, reusable water bottle.

This is a drop off event. Girls will be required to bring a completed permission form with them to submit at check in. Permission form is linked on the registration page and will be linked in your confirmation email and emailed out ahead of time. To expedite check in, we recommend filling out the form ahead of time and bringing a completed copy.

Registration closes Tuesday, October 8. Late registrations will NOT be accepted. Please confirm girl’s availability to attend the event before registering.

Questions? girlexperience@gscolorado.org. If you have any questions or trouble completing registration, please contact inquiry@gscolorado.org.

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Colorado 99s Aviation Patch Day

Girl Scout Juniors and Cadettes are invited to join the female pilots of the Colorado 99s for Aviation Patch Day on Saturday, October 12, 2019 from 1-4 p.m. in Colorado Springs! The 99s is an international organization of women pilots who work to promote the advancement of aviation through education, scholarships, and mutual support while honoring their unique history and sharing their passion for flight.

This event has filled quickly in the past! Register online now: https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/events-repository/2019/colorado_99s_aviatio.html

This event will introduce 45 Girl Scouts to five different parts of aviation.

  • Aviation History: Take a trip through aviation history to the first pilots and their planes.
  • Aircraft Design: Tour a General Aviation hangar to view and explore different types of airplanes.
  • Airfield Design: Explore the meaning of the pavement markings, signs, and lights at an airport and learn how they help with traffic at an airport.
  • ATC (Air Traffic Control): Tour the Colorado Springs Air Traffic Control Tower (Located on Peterson Air Force Base).
  • Airline Maintenance: Tour SkyWest Airline’s Colorado Springs maintenance base.

Check-in is 12:30 – 1 p.m. The event starts at 1 p.m

Event locations:

  • Jet Center (1575 Aviation Way, Colorado Springs 80916)
  • SkyWest Maintenance Hanger (1945 Aviation Way, Colorado Springs 80916)
  • ATC Tower (460 Kinchloe Loop, Colorado Springs 80914)

Registration will close when capacity is met OR on October 3.

Please note: This is not a drop off event. All Girl Scouts must attend with a parent, guardian, or troop leader. This event takes place at three locations (listed below) and adults in attendance are expected to transport their girls to each location throughout the event. The whole group will move to each location together.

Questions? aimee.artzer@gscolorado.org

Build Like a Girl: Careers in Construction

Girl Scout Cadettes and Seniors are invited to join GE Johnson Construction Company for “Build Like a Girl: Careers in Construction” on Saturday, September 28, 2019 from 9:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. at the GJ Johnson Logistics Facility in Colorado Springs! Girls will learn about construction careers, work as a team to build a community library book stand that can be placed in their community, and participate in a behind-the-scenes construction tour at the U.S. Olympic Museum. Cadettes will work on requirements for the “Woodworker” badge and Seniors will work on requirements for the “Social Innovation” badge.

Register online: https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/events-repository/2019/build_like_a_girl_ca.html

All Girl Scouts will receive a special event patch. Waivers will need to be signed and submitted for each person at the event. Waivers will be emailed directly to all registrants when registration closes.

This is not a drop off event, all Girl Scouts must attend with a parent, guardian, or troop leader. Girl to adult ratios for events should be met. No tagalongs.

Around 2 p.m. the group will need to drive from GE Johnson to the Olympic Museum (130 West Vermijo Ave., Colorado Springs) for the tour. The event will end at the Olympic Museum at 3:30 p.m.

Capacity is 100 Girl Scouts. To secure your t-shirt size and dietary requests, please register before September 12. Registration will officially close when capacity is met OR on September 18. If you register after September 12, we cannot guarantee your t-shirt size or dietary request.

All attendees must be registered Girl Scout members. If girls are attending without their parent, adults attending must be approved volunteers.

Questions? Email aimee.artzer@gscolorado.org
If you have any questions or trouble completing registration, please contact inquiry@gscolorado.org.

Learn more about the NEW badges and Journeys in the Volunteer Toolkit

Have you heard the buzz about the 42 NEW Girl Scout badges and Journeys? Wondering where to find out more? The Volunteer Toolkit is the answer and FREE!

Accessing the Volunteer Toolkit

If you are a troop leader, you can access your troop’s Volunteer Toolkit through the Girl Scouts of Colorado website. You will have to have a membership for 2019-2020 to access this information. Not sure if you have renewed? Contact us, we can check and help you renew.

  1. Go to girlscoutsofcolorado.org
  2. Click on the “MY GS” tab at the top right of the webpage.
  3. Select “Volunteer Toolkit”
  4. Use your email and password for your MY GS account. Not sure what this is? Contact us, we can help!

Families, you can also access your girl’s troop’s Volunteer Toolkit the same way. You have view only privileges, but this is a great way to stay informed with the happenings in the troop!

Juliette Girl Scouts, hang tight, you will have access starting August 1, 2019. Questions? Contact GSCO Mission Delivery Manager Emily Speck at emily.speck@gscolorado.org.

Still have questions? Join us on Wednesday, July 31, 2019 at noon for a Facebook LIVE event! Can’t attend live, but have a question to ask? Email Emily your question and we will answer it! You can access the recording of the Facebook LIVE on our Facebook page under videos.

Ready to explore the Volunteer Toolkit? Check out these quick and awesome videos to walk you through using the system.

Setting up your year plan: https://youtu.be/n0nrh4NJBFk

Setting meeting dates, times, and locations: https://youtu.be/R_nGzg4Ux3w

Customizing your year plan: https://youtu.be/uTdSFjJcFu0

Meeting plan overview: https://youtu.be/AHw9W6YyOPU

Not into digital planning? You can also purchase copies of the new badge booklets through the GSCO Retail Shop: https://www.girlscoutshop.com/BADGES-PROGRAM/ALL-PROGRAM-MATERIALS/BADGE-REQUIREMENTS

Have questions? Email inquiry@gscolorado.org.

Power of Cookie: Colorado Springs Girl Scout graduates from Space Camp

Girl Scout Junior Vivienne S. of Colorado Springs recently attended Space Camp at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center, home of Space Camp®, Space Camp® Robotics™, Aviation Challenge®, U.S. Cyber Camp®, and NASA Marshall Space Flight Center’s Official Visitor Center. Her experience was funded entirely by funds earned through the Girl Scout Cookie Program!

The weeklong educational program promotes science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), while training students and with hands-on activities and missions based on teamwork, leadership and problem solving.

This program is specifically designed for trainees who have a passion for space exploration. Vivienne spent the week training with a team that flew a simulated space mission to the International Space Station (ISS), the Moon or Mars. The crew participated in experiments and successfully completed an extra-vehicular activity (EVA), or spacewalk. Vivienne and crew returned to earth in time to graduate with honors.

Now that Vivienne is back home in Colorado Springs, she is looking forward to earning three space science badges, as well as a coding badge. All four are new badges, released by Girl Scouts of the USA in July 2019. Vivienne earned the “Space Science Investigator” and “Designing Robots 1” badges while at Space Camp.

Space Camp operates year-round in Huntsville, Alabama, and uses astronaut training techniques to engage trainees in real-world applications of STEM subjects. Students sleep in quarters designed to resemble the ISS and train in simulators like those used by NASA.

More than 900,000 trainees have graduated from a Space Camp® program since its inception in Huntsville, Alabama, in 1982, including European Space Agency astronaut, Samantha Cristoforetti and NASA astronauts Dottie Metcalf-Lindenburger, Dr. Kate Rubins, Dr. Serena Auñón-Chancellor and Christina Koch, who is serving onboard the International Space Station. Children and teachers from all 50 states and almost 150 international locations have attended a Space Camp® program.

Interested in training like an astronaut?  Visit www.spacecamp.com or call 1-800-637-7223.

About U.S. Space & Rocket Center

The U.S. Space & Rocket Center, a Smithsonian Affiliate, is home to Space Camp® and Aviation Challenge®, the Apollo 16 capsule, the National Historic Landmark Saturn V rocket and world-class traveling exhibits. USSRC is the Official Visitor Center for NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and a showcase for national defense technologies developed at the U.S. Army’s Redstone Arsenal.

To learn more about the exciting programs and activities at the USSRC, go to www.rocketcenter.com.

Change the world with 42 NEW Girl Scout badges

Choose your next adventure and earn one of 42 NEW badges! New programming released by Girl Scouts of the USA on July 16, 2019 enhances existing girl-led activities and offers girls everything from high adventure in the outdoors to learning how to use code to solve problems. Among the 42 new offerings are Outdoor High Adventure badges which feature, for the first time in Girl Scouts’ history, two distinct activity options, letting girls choose how they want to earn each badge.

In addition to existing badge offerings, girls in grades 6–12 can now pursue:

  • Nine Cybersecurity badges, through which girls learn about the inner workings of computer technology and cybersecurity and apply concepts of safety and protection to the technology they use every day. Activities range from decrypting and encrypting messages, to learning proper protection methods for devices, to exploring real-world hacking scenarios (funded by Palo Alto Networks).
  • Three Space Science badges, through which girls explore topics such as the universe and their place in it, properties of light, and inspiring careers in space science (funded by NASA’s Science Mission Directorate and led by the SETI Institute).
  • Think Like a Citizen Scientist, a Girl Scout Leadership Journey during which girls participate in interactive activities to practice observation techniques; collect data; and share their findings with real-world scientists through an online network. As with all of Girl Scouts’ Leadership Journeys, girls use their newly honed skills to take action on a community issue of their choosing (funded by Johnson & Johnson and The Coca-Cola Foundation).
  • To prepare girls in grades 6–12 to pursue computer science careers, Girl Scouts will launch the organization’s first Cyber Challenge on October 19 at sites nationwide, including Arapahoe Community College in Littleton. This program aims to prepare girls to pursue computer science careers in fields such as cybersecurity, artificial intelligence, robotics, and data science. Girls will test their cybersecurity skills, team up with other girls, and meet with cybersecurity professionals!

The new programming for girls in grades K–12 includes:

  • 12 Outdoor High Adventure badges, designed for girls to explore nature and experience exciting outdoor adventures like backpacking, snowshoeing, cross-country skiing, rock climbing, and tree climbing—giving them the confidence to support one another, take healthy risks, and spend dedicated time in nature. These are the first Girl Scout badges that members can earn by choosing one of two self-directed paths (funded by The North Face).
  • 18 Coding for Good badges, which not only teach girls the basics of coding but also detail how every stage of the coding process provides girls with opportunities to use their skills for good. Girls will learn about algorithms through age-appropriate, creative activities, such as coding positive memes to spread a message about a cause they care about, designing a digital game to educate people about an issue, and developing an app to promote healthy habits. Every Coding for Good badge includes a plugged-in and unplugged version, so that all girls can learn the foundations of coding, regardless of their access to technology (funded by AT&T and Dell Technologies).

“Girl Scouts has ignited the power and potential of girls for over a century, and we are committed to ensuring that today’s girls are the future of American leadership,” said GSUSA CEO Sylvia Acevedo. “Girl Scouts is where girls can explore new subjects, discover their passions, learn to take smart risks, and become their best, most confident selves—whether they want to become a NASA astronaut, an entrepreneur, a mountain climber, a coder, or a cybersecurity agent.”

GSUSA works with top organizations in fields that interest today’s girls. Combined with Girl Scouts’ expertise in girl leadership, these organizations and specialists advise and weigh in on content to provide the most cutting-edge programming available to girls. Content collaborators include codeSpark, the National Integrated Cyber Education Research Center (NICERC), SciStarter, and Vidcode. In true girl-led fashion, girls also tested the new offerings.

Girl Scouts of Colorado is 32,000 strong—more than 22,000 girls and 10,000 adults who believe in the power of every G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader)™ to change the world. With Girl Scouts, she’ll discover who she is, what she’s passionate about, and what she wants to achieve—both today and in the future. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org.

Service unit trip to Kremmling Cretaceous Ammonite Site

Submitted by Katie DeBell

Mountain Communities

Kremmling

Girl Scout troops from Kremmling, Walden, Granby, Hot Sulphur Springs, and Grand Lake gathered for a tour of the Kremmling Cretaceous Ammonite Site led by Kremmling Girl Scout leader Katie DeBell. Katie did her internship for her bachelor’s degree in geology at the KCAL site. The girls learned a lot and had fun! It was really fun to get together with all the local girls.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.