Tag Archives: STEM

G.I.R.L. Stories: Becoming innovators and risk-takers with the new STEM badges

Submitted by Marie Williams

Metro Denver

Golden

Our Daisies do more than make friendship bracelets and sell cookies! The first-grade girls in Troop 65565 learned about the law of conservation of energy from one of the troop dads who is an engineer, and then had a chance to design and build their own roller coasters.

With just some cardboard, straws, ping pong balls, and a little hot glue, all of the girls got a hands-on STEM experience, and earned their Roller Coaster Design Challenge badge!

We’re teaching our girls to be innovators and risk-takers through some of the new STEM badges, and they’re having a blast doing it!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Microsoft Entrepreneurship Camp

Microsoft invites all Girl Scouts to participate in a special entrepreneurship camp as they celebrate National Entrepreneurship Month at the Microsoft Store on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018. This class is perfect for Cadettes interested in earning requirements towards their Entrepreneur Badge. Girl Scouts will walk through a series of engaging hands-on group activities to introduce key business concepts, including:

  • How to create a product or service
  • Marketing and promotion
  • Pricing and costs
  • Manufacturing and distribution

At the end, Girl Scouts will even have a chance to present their business plan and practice their pitching skills.

The event will be held at the Microsoft Store at Park Meadows Mall in Lone Tree from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. There’s no cost for the event, but girls must register to attend. Please register at aka.ms/GirlScoutCO. Space is limited, so registering early is recommended. Questions? Please contact Jessica Oeleis at Jessica.Oeleis@Microsoft.com.

GirlsGoCyberStart: Cybersecurity opportunity for older girls

Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper and Chief Information Security Officer Deborah Blyth have joined with the SANS Institute to educate and inspire the next generation of female cybersecurity professionals. Through the GirlsGoCyberStart program, Colorado’s high school girls in grades 9 through 12, or a homeschool equivalent, are invited to discover their talents in cybersecurity and learn about the field through a no-cost, online game of fun technical challenges.

Participating students do not need to have information technology or cybersecurity knowledge or experience; all that is required is a computer and an internet connection. Girls may play alone or in teams of two to four.

Colorado girls will be participating alongside students from across the country. The girls or teams who solve the most problems within the designated time will have the opportunity to win computers and other “techy” prizes as well as a trip, along with a parent, to the 2018 Women in CyberSecurity Conference. Additionally, the winning girls’ schools will receive a cash prize.

Registration will begin on Jan. 29 and end Feb. 16, 2018. The first 10,000 young women in high school who have registered by then will play the game online from Feb. 20 through Feb. 25.

Answers to other questions, a description of the game, and a sample challenge may be found on the GirlsGoCyberStart website at girlsgocyberstart.com.

Test the new older girl STEM Journey

Girl Scouts of the USA and Raytheon have teamed up with Girl Scouts of Colorado to test the NEW Computer Science Journey for Cadettes, Seniors, Ambassadors, and multi-level (6th -12th grade) troops. We are looking for troops to volunteer  to test the NEW Computer Science Journey for Cadettes, Seniors, Ambassadors, and Multi-Level (6th-12th grade) troops.

Why participate? Your girls will…

  • Be the first to use new STEM materials with fun and engaging activities.
  • Develop communication skills through providing feedback on the new program(s).
  • Help your troop earn a $100 Amazon gift card to support troop-related program expenses.
  • Help develop new STEM program, and be part of history!!

Selected troops would complete the program activities and surveys about the program between February 2 and April 1, 2018. Interested in participating? Fill out a brief form at www.tinyurl.com/6-12CompSciPilot no later than January 19, 2018.

Questions? Email Katie Singleton at katie.singleton@gscolorado.org.

Computer Science Journey Pilot Troop Recruitment Flier

Girl Scout Cadettes and Seniors from Aurora visit Challenger Learning Center

Submitted by Melissa Deal

Metro Denver

Aurora

Four Girl Scout Cadette and Senior troops from Aurora got together for a day of space exploration at the Challenger Learning Center in Colorado Springs. They participated in two space missions, and truly worked as a team to complete their mission! Good job Girl Scouts!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Snag one of 100 computer science scholarships

Colorado currently has 13,500+ open computing jobs with an average salary of $98,597, yet Colorado had only 785 computer science grads in 2015. These Colorado graduation rates and technology training opportunities impact the students and their families, businesses, community and the state economy. CTA, Colorado Succeeds and Silicon STEM Academy have partnered on a $20,000 scholarship fund for 100 Colorado students statewide to jumpstart their future in tech through online coding classes.

Funded by Silicon STEM Academy, the classes – available online – are just one piece of a multi-pronged approach to increase computer science education in our state. The goal is to offer the scholarship to 50 percent females and have 50 percent participate from outside the Denver-Boulder area.

Learn more and apply for the Computer Science Scholarship, then share with your network. Applications are due December 20, 2017. This is a can’t-miss opportunity!

GSCO STEM events this fall

Girl Scout Day at Dinosaur Ridge, Morrison

More than 200 Girl Scouts, friends, and family enjoyed Girl Scout Day at Dinosaur Ridge on Oct. 14, 2017. Girls met several badge requirements by doing hand-on activities with different STEM organizations and toured the fossils at Dinosaur Ridge. One of the best things about this event is that it is both a Girl Scout and a family event. While the event was geared towards Girl Scouts, there was something for everyone.

GSCO would like to thank the Molly Brown House, Western Interior Paleontological Seaway, National Park Service, Libby Talks, the Great Denver Gem, and Mineral Council and Women in Mining for providing great activities for our girls!

A BIG thank you also goes to GSCO Volunteer Support Specialist Toni Dondero for helping with registration! More than 70 percent of our participants paid through a walk-up registration, so Toni’s help was invaluable. A BIG thank you goes to Erin LaCount at Dinosaur Ridge and her amazing crew of volunteers that hosted a great event!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Engineering Day with the Society of Engineers at the Colorado School of Mines, Golden

More than 100 Girl Scout Juniors earned the first part of the new Robotics badge at Engineering Day hosted by the Society of Women Engineers (SWE) at the Colorado School of Mines in Golden on Oct. 7. SWE students planned and taught the whole event. A favorite activity was asphalt cookies, yummy treats made of chocolate and oats by rolling the ingredients between waxed paper and canned goods which girls brought for the activity and later donated.

Girl Scouts also had fun at over 10 different STEM stations where they made binary bracelets, lava lamps, engineering machines, and towers, statistics (thanks to the use of Skittles), and how germs spread at the Oogie Boogie table. The activities were taught by some of the most active SWE students as the Colorado School of Mines’ SWE chapter is the largest in the nation. A big thank you goes out to Jenna Lucas, SWE’s Engineering Day Chair; Agata Dean, faculty advisor, and the members of SWE who hosted this great event!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ford Girls Fast Track Race, Fort Collins

80 Girl Scouts from Northern Colorado and the Front Range raced pine wood derby cars at the Ford Girls Fast Tracks race on Sept. 30 in Fort Collins. Girls made their own cars, fine-tuned their car’s design with the help of a Ford Engineer, and competed fiercely to win.

Ford generously sponsored the race and GSCO was one of eight councils nationwide that received a grant to host the event. Girls received a free car kit, t-shirt, food, and a special event patch. Check out the racing action in this video aired on Fox 31/KWGN-TV here . Two Ford engineers were onsite and counseled girls on ways to alter their cars to win. A favorite part of the race was seeing each girl’s car and the thought and creativity they put into each design. Another favorite part was seeing the proud smiles of the girls racing their cars!

A BIG thank you goes to Julie Gallagher, Gayle Richardson, Elise Barrios, Carol Griffin, and Amy Myers for being the GSCO Race Pit Crew! We’d also like to thank Ford and their team for a great race day.

Upcoming Events

Check out these fun GSCO Events! GSCO Staff are welcome to stop by these events to check out what our Girl Scouts are doing first-hand or enjoy our Girl Scout discount at these sports and entertainment events.

Nov. 18 – Project C.U.R.E., Denver. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. (troops can choose 1 of 3 sessions). Cost: $6 per kit donated. Come learn about Project C.U.R.E. and pack a kit for donation. Fun activities and event patch included. Register here. This is our biggest event of the year, so GSCO staff members are welcome to stop by and check out what the girls are doing!

Dec. 2 – Girl Scout Teddy Bear Toss with Metro State Hockey, Westminster. 3:45 p.m. game start. Cost is $1+ teddy bear/stuffed animal to donate/person or $5/person without a teddy bear. Cheer on Metro State at they take on CU Hockey. Participants will toss their bears on the ice when Metro State scores their first goal. To register, please contact Victoria Fedorco atmsuvictoriaf@gmail.com  with contact info and number of tickets needed. She will follow-up with further instructions.

Dec. 8 – Disney on Ice, Denver. Cost: $17.75 + online fees. Disney on Ice presents “Follow Your Heart.” Post-performance Girl Scout clinic will highlight the Tech Crew and the special work they do to put on the show. Event patch included. Ticket information can be found here.

Closing the STEM gender gap, one Girl Scout badge at a time

From Girl Scouts of the USA 

It’s no secret that there are fewer women than men in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields today. In fact, women hold less than 25 percent of STEM jobs, despite filling close to half of all jobs in the U.S. economy. And women who do hold STEM jobs earn 33 percent more than those in other industries—making the gender wage gap comparatively smaller in STEM fields. 
At Girl Scouts, we’re more than ready for a change—and STEM leaders start here, with us. Since our founding in 1912, Girl Scouts has introduced girls of all ages, from five-year-old Daisies to high school Ambassadors, to these important fields to help them see for themselves how they can improve the world using valuable STEM skills.
We are the foremost experts in preparing the next generation of female STEM leaders. Want proof? Girl Scouts are almost twice as likely as non–Girl Scouts to participate in STEM activities (60 percent versus 35 percent), and 77 percent of girls say that because of Girl Scouts, they’re considering a career in technology. 

It all starts with a badge. Girl Scouts has more than 35 of them—many introduced earlier this year—that challenge girls to stretch their STEM skills to make the world a better place. And because everything behind our badges is girl-led and girl-approved, we believe each badge can be an important step a girl takes to help close the STEM gender gap once and for all. 

Only 1 out of 3 environmental engineers are women. 

Meet the Water badge for Girl Scout Ambassadors.
With the Water badge, Ambassadors learn innovative ways to find, treat, and conserve this natural resource. Girls can explore the engineering behind dams and water treatment plants and how they help the environment. They might look into hydroelectricity and how they can use it to power the community and address environmental concerns. Or they could get inspired to design their own water filters or initiate rainwater collections to save drinking water. Talk about innovative! Earn this badge

Meet the Trees badge for Girl Scout Cadettes.
Cadettes put their naturalist hats on when earning their Trees badge, digging into the science of trees—from identifying different species on a hike to learning about all the ways we can protect them. Girls make connections between how trees benefit the earth and the people on it, including as components of fuel, medicine, shelter, and more. And as any Girl Scout would, girls use their new tree knowledge to take action in their communities! Earn this badge

Just 1 in 3 chemists are women. 

Meet the Home Scientist badge for Girl Scout Brownies.
Thanks to the Home Scientist badge, Brownies can tap into their inner scientist by conducting various (fun!) experiments in their own home. Girls can test density, concoct tasty treats using the principles of science, discover how carbon dioxide reacts with other compounds, marvel at static electricity, and so much more! Get that periodic table ready! Earn this badge

Roughly 1 out of 10 physicists and astronomers are women. 

Meet the Sky badge for Girl Scout Seniors. 
Seniors are doing more than looking at the night sky when they earn their Sky badge. They’re studying specific stars, constellations, and planets. These girls can learn how telescopes work and how astronomers use them to study the universe. Seniors are also exploring the world of aviation and space missions! How cool is that?! Earn this badge.

Fewer than 1 in 5 women are industrial engineers. 

Meet the Inventor badge for Girl Scout Brownies.
On their way to earning the Inventor badge, Brownies put their STEM skills to use to solve key problems. After warming up their inventor’s mind, girls come up with a list of problems they see play out every day that they’d like to solve. They then pick one they’re especially passionate about and strategize an innovative solution—drafting designs, presenting their ideas to friends and family, and even building prototypes! Earn this badge.

Fewer than 1 in 4 computer and information scientists are women. 

Meet the Website Designer badge for Girl Scout Seniors.
What’s awesome about our Website Designer badge is that girls decide what their website will be about. They might elaborate on a favorite hobby, highlight progress on their Girl Scout Gold Award project, create a digital journal—whatever their passion! With this badge, girls can learn to build a website from scratch, program, and create site blueprints and wireframes. They can also dive into web design, learning about fonts, imaging, and more. And once their site launches, girls are tasked with getting the word out about it! Earn this badge.

Just 1 out of 10 electrical or computer hardware engineers are women. 

Meet the Robotics badges for Girl Scout Daisies.
Through earning these three badges, Daisies learn all about robots, including how they solve problems in STEM fields. Girls brainstorm ways a robot could solve one of their own problems, learn how engineers talk to robots by programming algorithms, and use their new skills to create a robot prototype! Did we mention Daisies start in kindergarten? Now if that’s not impressive… Earn these badges

Less than 8% of mechanical engineers are women. 

Meet the Programming Robots badge for Girl Scout Juniors.
Juniors put their coding skills to the test when earning their Programming Robots badge. After learning about the intricacies of robots, including the sensors that make up a robot’s “brain,” girls program their own algorithms to instruct robots to move and react in a certain situation. The algorithms are then translated into a special code that girls can test and correct using a device of their choosing. Earn this badge.

Discover more Girl Scout STEM badges (and our other fun badges!) via our Badge Explorer. And this is just the beginning! Over the next two years, Girl Scouts will launch 18 Cybersecurity badges and a series of Space Science badges. We’re so excited!

In related news, earlier this week we announced a brand new initiative to reduce the gender gap in STEM fields by bringing millions of girls into the STEM pipeline over the next eight years. The Girl Scout STEM Pledge is an initiative that seeks to raise $70 million by 2025, affecting 2.5 million girls. To support the Girl Scout STEM Pledge, visit www.girlscouts.org/STEMpledge.

 

Girl Scout STEM Pledge: Bridging the STEM gender gap

From Girl Scouts of the USA

Studies have predicted that within the next decade, the U.S. workforce will need 1 million more STEM professionals than it can produce. Girl Scouts has already been expanding opportunities for girls to explore STEM and today we announced the Girl Scout STEM Pledge. This groundbreaking national initiative pledge seeks to reduce the STEM gender gap by raising $70 million, impacting 2.5 million girls by 2025.

Sylvia Acevedo, CEO of Girl Scouts of the USA, announced the pledge during Dreamforce, Salesforce’s annual gathering and the largest software conference in the world. GSUSA was honored to be selected as a “Trailblazer” and nonprofit of choice at this year’s conference. By selecting the organization, Salesforce acknowledged Girl Scouts’ work in STEM and its ability to transform the lives of millions of girls across the country, in virtually every residential zip code, preparing the next generation of female leaders.

“Girl Scouts has the largest pipeline of future female leaders available, and no place is this more important than in STEM fields,” said Acevedo. “By working with individuals and companies that understand the importance of investing in all girls, we can fundamentally change the STEM pipeline and the future of its workforce. Girl Scouts is the only organization for girls with the expertise and reach to help pave the way for any young girl—no matter if she lives in Middle America or a major city—to break barriers and achieve any dream she may imagine. For millions of girls, this means excelling in STEM—and I’m incredibly proud that the Girl Scout STEM Pledge will make that dream a reality and change the dynamics of women in these exciting fields.”

Our commitment to encouraging girls to discover and excel in STEM fields is already yielding real results: Girl Scouts are almost twice as likely as non–Girl Scouts to participate in STEM activities (60 percent versus 35 percent), and 77 percent of girls say that because of Girl Scouts, they are considering a career in technology.

To support the Girl Scout STEM Pledge through individual and corporate donations, visit www.girlscouts.org/STEMpledge.

Read more about Girl Scouts’ STEM programming and initiatives.

Girl Scouts take over Fiske Planetarium

Submitted by Rebecca “Zap” Lankford

Metro Denver

Broomfield

Troop 3572 of Broomfield hosted a scouts only event on Sunday, Oct. 29 at CU Boulder’s Fiske Planetarium. With the help of Claire, the presenter, and Spencer, the pilot, girls were shown a number of constellations and nebulae, went flying by the International Space Station, learned how to find the North Star, and floated in Saturn’s rings. The planetarium was almost full with 195 scouts and family members present. The ooohs, aaahhhs, and general excitement about space made for an exhilarating afternoon. The visit to the planetarium fulfills some of the requirements for badges for Cadettes and Seniors. Great job, girls!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.