Tag Archives: younger girls

Book Craft for “The Bad Seed”

 

This easy craft is perfect for younger Girl Scouts (or younger siblings) and is a great follow-up to “The Bad Seed” by Jory John.

Materials Needed:

  • Glue
  • Scissors
  • White paper or colored construction paper
  • Markers

If the construction paper is not available, shapes can be drawn on white paper and colored.

You will need:

  • Two Seed bodies
  • Four Eyes
  • Two Black strips for eyebrows

Draw thick and thin stripes on seed shape.

Glue on eyes and draw mouth. The bad seed.

Repeat steps on second seed shape but give it a happy face. Glue on the band-aid. Now, you have the good seed!

Glue seeds on construction paper and draw hands and feet.

Which are you today? The bad seed? Or, the good seed?

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

LIVE! Awesome Girls: Engineer Your World

Join Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA) for a show and tell with Mary Barra, Chairman & CEO of General Motors, and Sylvia Acevedo, CEO of Girl Scouts. LIVE! Awesome Girls: Engineer Your World is Wednesday, August 5, 2020 from 12 – 1 p.m. (MDT). Register now: http://girlscoutsathome.girlscouts.org/girlscoutsathome/detail/231/1596650400000

This Awesome Girls online event will bring together two of America’s boldest leaders. Mary Barra is Chairman and CEO of General Motors, our country’s biggest car maker. Mary is changing the automotive industry, making cars safer and better for our environment. Sylvia Acevedo is CEO of Girl Scouts. As an actual rocket scientist, she’s leading the way for girls to take on some of the world’s biggest challenges. This event is recommended for girls in grades K-5, but open to anyone interested in the conversation!

Mary and Sylvia will share stories and show photos, tools, and videos that tell their stories about becoming both engineers and leaders. They’ll tell girls how they can follow in their footsteps with the new Automotive Engineering three-badge series for Daisies, Brownies, and Juniors. The event will wrap up with a live Q&A for girls to ask Mary and Sylvia questions. Girls will leave with next steps to dive into automotive engineering!

Leading this amazing conversation is Robin Roberts, Good Morning America Co-Anchor.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

“Fish Eyes” by Lois Ehlert: Book Craft

This easy craft is perfect for younger Girl Scouts (or younger siblings) and is a great follow-up to “Fish Eyes” by Lois Ehlert.

Materials Needed

  • Glue
  • Scissors
  • White paper or colored construction paper
  • Markers

If the construction paper is not available, shapes can be drawn on white paper and colored.

You will need:

  • Various shapes for fish bodies
  • Save paper scraps for decorating

Decide your fish design and how many to make. I have eight skinny fish. Glue down your fish.

Embellish your fish and seascape!

Don’t forget your COUNTING FISH!

Use your imagination on colorful fish. Bold colors, smiling, striped. What kind of fish will you make?

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Exploring My World

Submitted by Catherine D.

Metro Denver

Castle Rock

I am six-years-old and in my second year as a Daisy. I just moved with my family to Colorado, and because of the pandemic, it has been a little challenging to get to know our new area. But, the Girl Scouts Love the Outdoors Challenge has been so much fun and helped us find safe activities to do as we explore our new state.

This summer, I have been hiking and camping in the mountains, drawing the view from our deck, watching the sunrise, boating, learning how to cast a fishing pole, planting flowers at home, and many other fun outdoor activities, while learning to respect and protect the environment! I am working to conquer my fear of live fish (when fishing in the lake), and no longer scream when someone catches one. Most recently, I hiked four miles in the Rockies (more than 10,000-feet elevation). I learned about the thinner air at higher elevations, the importance of hydration while hiking, and how to “Leave No Trace” while in nature.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

“Three Billy Goats Gruff” Book Craft

This easy craft is perfect for younger Girl Scouts (or younger siblings) and is a great follow-up to the fairy tale “Three Billy Goats Gruff.”

You will need:

  • Brown, green, blue and white construction paper or you can just use all white and color
  • Crayons, markers, or colored pencils
  • Scissors
  • Glue

First, you need to take a full sheet of white paper and color the whole thing blue for sky (or use light blue paper).

Cut a wavy shape out of dark blue paper to represent the water. Water should cover a little more than half the background paper. Cut a green piece of paper to be the grass.

Next, cut a long strip to represent the bridge. The bridge needs to cover most of the page.

Now, we are ready to create our scene.

Glue the grass in the bottom right corner. Glue the water to the bottom left corner. The shapes should overlap just a little. Now, you want to glue your bridge right in the middle of the page.

Now, we need to create three billy goats: one big, one medium, and one small. They will need to all fit on your bridge, so watch your sizes!

Glue your goats starting on the left with the largest goat, then the medium, and finally, the small one.

Next, we need to cut out the troll. He can be any color you would like.

Your final step will be to glue the troll under the bridge!

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

“Clifford the Big Red Dog” Book Craft

 

This easy craft is perfect for younger Girl Scouts (or younger siblings) and is a great follow-up to reading “Clifford the Big Red Dog” by Norman Bridwell.

Materials needed:

  • Glue
  • Scissors
  • White paper or colored construction paper
  • Markers

If the construction paper is not available, shapes can be drawn on white paper and colored.

You will need:

  • Dog face (peanut shape)
  • Two Red ears (elongated teardrop shape)
  • One Nose (triangle shape)
  • Two Eyes

Glue red ears to backside of head.

Color black pupil on two eyes and glue on head. Add nose on lower portion of head.

Once head is dried, draw eyebrows and mouth.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Three Cheers for Art Club

Are you a Girl Scout Daisy, Brownie, or Junior who is interested in creating beautiful and fun works of art? GSCO is offering a Zoom-based art club just for you! With the help of two GSCO trained staff, you will dive into the following art topics (and many more) with other Girl Scouts from around the state in a welcoming, troop-like setting:

  • Color-Mixing
  • 3D Art and texture
  • Paper crafts/Beginner’s origami
  • Painting techniques
  • How-To Draw sessions
  • Season-Specific Crafts/Holiday crafts
  • Art and Décor
  • The “Art” of making gifts for others 😉

This club offers a simple supply list for each project that focuses on easy-to-find supplies as well as multiple options for each supply in order to help you create beautiful art with confidence and ease!

Didn’t get a chance to finish your project? All lessons will be paired with a “how-to” PowerPoint (with pictures) for you to review at your own pace.

Art can sometimes feel intimidating… Let us help you discover your talents and skills in a safe space and find the artist within!

If you are interested, feel free to join us bi-weekly, two Tuesdays a month at 2 p.m. The next Daisy, Brownie, Junior Art Club is July 14, 2020.

Register here: https://gscolorado.formstack.com/forms/summer_art_club_d_b_j_virtual_6_16_2020

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouting at Home: “The Cat in the Hat” by Dr. Seuss Book Craft

 

This easy craft is perfect for younger Girl Scouts (or younger siblings) and is a great follow-up to reading “The Cat in the Hat” by Dr. Seuss.

\

Materials needed:

  • Glue
  • Scissors
  • White paper or colored construction paper
  • Markers

If you don’t have construction paper, draw the shapes on white paper and color them.

You will need:

  • One Top hat
  • Three Red stripes for the hat
  • One Large circle for the face
  • Ears, nose, and whiskers

Glue red stripes on your hat. Glue your nose and whiskers on the cat’s face. Draw the eyes and mouth on the cat’s face.

Last step, glue the hat on your cat’s head and add his ears.

Now, you can embellish your cat. Give him some freckles. Can your cat balance a tea cup on his head?

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouts at Home: “Grumpy Monkey” book craft

 

 

 

 

 

This easy craft is perfect for younger Girl Scouts (or younger siblings) and is a great follow-up to “Grumpy Monkey” by Suzanne Lang.

Materials needed:

  • Scissors
  • Glue
  • Crayons, markers, or colored pencils
  • Green, brown and white construction paper

Cut a strip of brown paper to measure about five-inches wide by 11 inches long. This will be the body of your monkey. At each end, measure and cut a three-inch line from the top and bottom of the body. On one side, fold cut towards outside edge in a triangle shape. This will be the monkey’s feet.

To make the branch, cut an 11 inches long by two-inches wide piece of paper. Roll the paper tightly to form an 11 inch long tube. Alternate options are a pencil or straw.

To form the arms, roll the split piece around the tube you created or around a pencil or straw. You will need to put glue on the brown paper when you have it wrapped securely. Be careful not to glue the brown paper to the tube, you want to make sure the brown will swing around the tube.

Assemble and glue the monkey’s features. First, glue large white oval in center of the body, this is his belly. Glue the monkey’s face (head, mouth, and ears) and glue at top of belly.

The last step is to glue on the monkey’s tail. If you would like to add a leaf to the end of the branch you can color one or cut one from the green paper. Be sure to add a smile or frown on his mouth and add two small dots at the top of the face for nostrils. Now your Monkey is ready to swing.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouts at Home: Book Craft for Pigeon Series by Mo Willems

 

 

 

 

 

This easy craft is perfect for younger Girl Scouts (or younger siblings) and is a great follow-up to reading any of the books in Mo Willems’ pigeon series (Don’t Let The Pigeon Stay Up Late!, The Pigeon Finds A Hot Dog!, etc.)

Materials Needed:

  • Glue
  • Scissors
  • White paper or colored construction paper
  • Markers

If the construction paper is not available, shapes can be drawn on white paper and colored.

You will need:

  • Body
  • Head
  • Neck
  • Beak
  • Legs
  • Neck Ring
  • Eye

Assemble your pigeon in sections. Glue the eye and beak on the head. Once dried, glue the head on the neck. Position the white neck ring under the head and glue on. With thumb pointing up, glue the neck to the body. Finish with the legs.

Draw the pigeon’s wing on, and you’re done!

Is your pigeon trying to count the stars, so he doesn’t have to go to sleep? (Don’t Let The Pigeon Stay Up Late!)

OPTIONAL:



Make a cardboard template of a handprint and pieces, so you can use again.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.