Tag Archives: Western Colorado

Girl Scouts announces 2019 Western Slope Women of Distinction: Three Extraordinary Women Honored

The 2019 Western Slope Women of Distinction were selected by a committee of their peers led by Selection Chair Jeni Brown, Woman of Distinction ‘18, and chosen based on their contributions to the community, both professionally and personally. They are shining examples of corporate, civic, and philanthropic leadership and serve as role models for our female leaders of tomorrow.

  • Jenn Moore, Executive Director of the EUREKA! McConnell Science Museum
  • Angelina Salazar, CEO, Western Healthcare Alliance
  • Diane Schwenke, President & CEO, Grand Junction Area Chamber of Commerce

Since 2013, including this year’s honorees, Girl Scouts of Colorado has recognized 18 women on the Western Slope as Women of Distinction. The Women of Distinction program brings together a group of women dedicated to raising funds to support Girl Scout leadership programs.

Girl Scouts of Colorado will publicly honor these inductees on November 7 at the annual Women of Distinction Breakfast. This year’s event will be held at the Two Rivers Convention Center. The 2019 Event Chair is LeAnn Zetmeir, Woman of Distinction ’18.

Event Sponsors: Gold Presenting Sponsor, US Bank; Silver Presenting Sponsor, FCI Constructors and Samoa Sponsor, Family Health West.

For information regarding tickets and sponsorships, visit www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/wodgj or contact Cindi Graves at (970) 628 – 8003 or cindi.graves@gscolorado.org.

Bronze and Silver Award Girl Scouts honored at Highest Awards Celebration in Western Colorado

More than a dozen Girl Scouts, along with their families and friends, gathered at Colorado Mesa University in Grand Junction on May 19, 2019, to honor the more than 1,200 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2018-19 Girl Scout awards program year, 14 Girl Scouts in the Western Colorado region earned the Bronze Award. 15 girls across the Western Colorado region earned the prestigious Silver Award. 42 girls across Colorado earned the prestigious Gold Award..

Gold Award Girl Scout and current Gold Award mentor Heidi Ragsdale served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Girl Scouts celebrate advancing to the next level of Girl Scouts

45 Girl Scouts from troops across the Western Colorado region gathered on May 1, 2019 at the GSCO regional office in Grand Junction to celebrate advancing from their current Girl Scout level to the next as part of a special event called a Bridging Ceremony.

Bridging is an important transition in a Girl Scout’s life. It’s a defining moment when a Girl Scout celebrates her achievements and looks forward to new adventures and responsibilities. The girls who walked across the bridge at this ceremony, just like the many who have before them, are modeling the progression that the Girl Scout Leadership Experience is known for. They have worked hard to not only earn and achieve, but to learn and to grow alongside their Girl Scout sisters.

Girl Scouts of Colorado invited members of the Junior Service League (JSL) to this special ceremony to thank them for their continued support of Girl Scouts throughout the Western Colorado region. The bridge, which is a symbolic piece of this ceremony, was graciously donated by JSL, and was officially rededicated to Girl Scouts.

Volunteer Spotlight: Mariah Emond

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Mariah Emond of Delta in the Western Colorado region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Mariah to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a Girl Scout volunteer as I wanted my daughter to have the same access to amazing opportunities I had as a girl in Girl Scouts. I enjoy the camaraderie with other mothers raising a Girl Scout. I love to be seen as a part of another girl’s life as a positive supporter- encouraging them to hang out another 15 minutes at the booth sale as I know their goal to earn their incentive is but another buying customer! I am truly a supporter of all prosocial, after school activities that work on skill development for our youth- these kids need it now more than ever. 

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

This is my first volunteer position as an adult! I enjoyed 11 years of being a Girl Scout and two years at summer camp near Deckers as the Challenge Course Facilitator. So far, I had been able to help at Applefest with the outreach table. I help with our bi-monthly troop meetings. I attended the cookie rally sleepover and made a short presentation on ways to sell more cookies! We created the first summer camp on the Western Slope in Delta County and had tons of fun exploring the history of Fort Uncompaghre and swimming. Most of all, I am a parent of an amazing little go-getter and love to help her sell nuts, magazines, and cookies.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

Everything is possible with teamwork and creative thinking! Having Ms. Mary Bucklin as our troop leader and SU, we are especially blessed to have her years of experience that she shares graciously. I watch her be attentive to all the girls, organize the parents, and make up a year of activities with us! I want to grow up and be just like her- giving, gracious, and so passionate about giving girls the opportunities to succeed. I also have learned so much from our co-leader, Kris Love, about the new Girl Scout processes of cookie buying, apps, and ways to keep everything organized in Girl Scouts. I also love to read on the Girl Scouts of Colorado Blog about al the things we can participate in statewide. It’s great information about the connectedness of an organization. The new online trainings are helpful and to the point on a wide variety of things- like outdoor cooking!

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope they see that they can be anyone they dream of, that they can be fierce with their dreams, and kind to the world while they achieve their dream. I want all girls to know that the level playing field of life exists, if we as women dare to recreate the perception of ourselves into authors of out life and the story is our own unique one to tell. I hope that we can grow a kind generation, one that cares for all the resources on the planet!

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I take more risks to get to know people. I am a social person, but not always with people I haven’t yet met. I feel more confident talking to people about the wide world of Girl Scouts and have pushed outside my normal comfort zone. It’s been fun getting to work on new projects that don’t require my professional self to show up- I can just be a caring parent/adult and enjoy having fun with our troop. I feel that Girl Scouts made my foundation for leadership skills and I have always love to learn more to be a better leader. I feel confident that we have the tools in Girl Scouts to share with every girl to grow up to be herself and good to the world!

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

Gold Award candidate fights hunger with container gardening kits

Girl Scout Ambassador Kyra T. from Grand Junction is working to earn the Gold Award, the highest honor in Girl Scouts. For her project, she partnered with the Grand Junction Community Food Bank to provide their clients with vegetable container gardening kits. Each kit contained soil, seeds, nutritional information, and a “how-to” brochure, which she created after experimenting with container gardening. GSCO asked Kyra to describe her project in her own words. She wrote, “By creating and distributing container gardening kits, my hope is to influence healthy food choices among low-resource or struggling families so they are able to provide their children and themselves with healthy produce at low or minimal cost, as well as teach their kids about good nutrition. Container gardens are suitable for a variety of plants and can be grown on a windowsill, a front porch, or balcony, making them suitable for many types of living environments and easy for families to use.”

Thanks to News11/KKCO-TVand Grand Junction Daily Sentinel for sharing Kyra’s story with their audiences.

Volunteer Spotlight: Amberly Petty

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Amberly Petty of Meeker in the Western Colorado region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Amberly to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

My daughter started begging to be a Girl Scout around the age of four. At that point, I’m pretty sure she was just in it for the cookies. Once she started kindergarten, I registered her and asked the local troop leader if she needed any help. Soon after, I was thrown unexpectedly into the world of Girl Scouts: camp outs, songs, field trips, badge work, and the Promise and Law. What started as just wanting a bit of extra bonding time with my daughter turned into finding a community and an organization that truly aligns with my values and morals. While growing up, I did not have the opportunity to be in this sisterhood, so now I am making up for lost time. I’m excited for the possibilities that await not only me, but my daughter and our troop. I want to not only be a living example of our Law and Promise, but also instill these values in all girls and help shape the leaders of tomorrow. 

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I’m currently serving as a co-leader for our troop. During my first year, I also jumped in to serve as the fall product program manager and a co-cookie manager. I am excited to see where my journey will take me and plan to continue to serve in different capacities. In time, I would love to one day help lead trainings for new leaders. 

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

Wow. I can’t possibly list all the things I’ve learned as we’d be here for hours… Some of the most recent things that come to mind are patience and conflict resolution. Being a leader has been incredibly rewarding, but there have also been many challenges as well. Learning to work with so many people (girls and adults) has been difficult, intriguing, and fun. There are so many different leadership styles, skills sets, strengths, and weaknesses that it can be overwhelming at times. I’m learning to do many things differently than I may have planned or expected, which is truly rewarding and extremely worthwhile. One of the other most impactful things I’ve learned is that this really is a girl-led program: even our youngest girls can lead in huge ways. The girls surprise me at every meeting with something new to learn. 

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

First and foremost, I hope the girls have learned I am their ally, partner, equal, and friend. I hope they see me as a safe person and resource for them to come to if they need help or have questions. I hope they view me as someone they can feel comfortable around. I hope they have learned that mistakes are okay and just the building blocks of larger successes. I hope they’ve learned that silliness is a large part in the recipe for happiness and fun. And, I hope they’ve learned that we are a team, a sisterhood, and will work together through fun times and challenging times. 

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

These girls have and are still shaping me into things I never thought possible for myself. They helped me set large goals for this year’s cookie season that I thought were impossible. I watched them prove me wrong week after week. They pushed me outside of my own comfort zone to be a go-getting risk-taker, while innovating new ways to sell and have fun. The girls in my troop push me to be the best leader I can be. They ask intriguing questions, keep me on my toes, and allow me room to be myself and make mistakes at times, too. I’m forever grateful for the person they are molding me into and I can only hope I am impacting them half as much as they are impacting me.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

Volunteer Spotlight: Jessica Heacock

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Jessica of Dolores in the Western Colorado region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Jessica to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I started out being talked into a co-leader position, and “all I needed to do was sign on the bank account.” Our original leader quit right after cookie season started last year, and at first I was terrified. I’ve been the leader since, and it’s been a blessing in disguise. 

My family has made friends with families that have common goals like we do, and we have planned set aside time (meetings), that we learn and work together.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I’ve been co-leader, leader, and troop cookie manager. I also distribute volunteer recruiting supplies as needed, and serve on the service unit team. All roles take different amounts of time, and some people are ready for cookies to be done right after they start. My family makes it a family time experience while selling cookies, and my girls love doing it.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I’ve learned a lot of things as a Girl Scout volunteer. I’ve learned different ways to teach and let girls help. I’ve learned the Girl Scout steps myself, as I was not one when I was younger. The things we learn at meetings help our daily life.  Most importantly, I’ve learned to be flexible, as not all girls learn the same way and at the same rate. 

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope girls have learned how to be a strong leader and valuable individual in our community and communication skills. All of those traits will take them a long way in life. 

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I’ve personally learned a lot of things, but the best part is I’m passing skills to my daughters as well.  We applied risk- taker when we made our initial cookie order. We also offered to take other troops’ stock because my girls were having fun selling. We transferred 102 packages of S’mores after March 1, so we could enter into the S’mores drawing, all not knowing if we could sell the cookies. I’ve learned a lot of leader skills teaching lessons, and using the VTK. We try to apply go-getter to everything we do, whether it’s selling cookies, or finishing homework. The best part is, everything we learn can be applied to everyday life. 

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

Volunteer Spotlight: Lorena Gambill-Maddox

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Lorena Gambill-Maddox of Grand Junction in the Western Colorado region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Lorena to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer? 

I was asked by my daughter’s troop leader to be her assistant. I love working with children. When I was younger, I was a Girl Scout and my older sister was my troop leader. My mother was also a troop leader. So when Elisha asked me, I was happy to join such a great organization. It has been a great experience for me.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout. 

As a Girl Scout volunteer, I have enjoyed giving back to our community. Our troop has done so many different things. We collected food or our local community food bank. We did a clothing drive and took clothes to a neighboring town that was doing a clothing distribution. We have served food at a extended table for those in need.  At Christmas, we went Christmas caroling at the V.A. hospital and local nursing home. For two of our local schools, we entered the craft fairs. Learning to make crafts and jewelry to sell taught us about being a business owner. We donated cookies to our local policemen and teachers. It feel so great to give like a G.I.R.L.!

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer? 

I have learned so much as a volunteer. I have a wonderful team of leadership on the western slope to guide me, especially Ashley Douglas, as well as a very knowledgeable service unit leader Rebecca Flesh and our troop leader Elisha Scarbrough is such a inspiring person. Our girls in our troop are fearless. They wanted to earn every badge they could as Juniors, so I made it my goal to learn everything I needed too in order to help them reach their goal– from Simple Cooking to Robotics.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope that I have taught our girls that anything is possible if you put your mind to it. That it is better to be kind to anyone you meet, because you don’t know why they are acting in the way that they are. Everyone deserves love and kindness. Not to let what others think cloud their beliefs, but to listen without judgement. Then, decide for themselves how they feel. That they are the ones who make themselves happy and successful. I also hope they know how proud of each and every one of them I am.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Girls Scouts has helped me become a go-getter because of our girls in our troop wanting to achieve all the badges. I became driven to help them achieve their goal. I am an innovator because I looked for ways to help our community and find ways to give back. Risk-taker because we tried things without knowing how it would turn out, but being determined to be successful in everything we tried. Last, a leader because I had to have confidence in things I wasn’t sure about, knowing whether or not we would succeed,  I was there beside them no matter what. Showing each one of them how to be brave.

Girl Scouts is a great opportunity for any girl no matter what her age is. It is such a honor to be apart of such a wonderful organization.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

Volunteer Spotlight: Elisha Scarbrough

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Elisha Scarbrough of Rifle in the Western Colorado region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Elisha to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I enjoyed Girl Scouts when I was younger and enrolled my daughters when they were in kindergarten; then the troop needed a leader, so I signed up. It’s a great thing for my daughters to be part of and I didn’t want them to miss out if there wasn’t a leader.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I have been both co-leader and main leader for my girls’ troop. I have also been the cookie and chocolate and nut lead.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

How to be more patient! I also have learned how to lead and enjoy time with my girls at the same time. Most importantly how to multi-task! I work full time and am taking night classes to complete my Bachelor’s degree. 

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

How important it is to set goals and met them and to be involved in the community. Also, the skills that they have gained through each of the badges that we have earned through the years.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

It has reminded me what is important; these girls are in a generation that is so involved with electronics that Girl Scouts helps teach them skills that they will be able to use forever. I also have had to learn new skills to help the girls earn badges; like how to make a robot and that is pretty cool that even as a leader I am learning with the girls in the troop.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

Volunteer Spotlight: Jamie Buttermore

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Jamie Buttermore of Grand Junction in the Western Colorado region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Jamie to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I was a Girl Scout for a few years as a child. I knew that as soon as my oldest was in kindergarten, I was going to find a troop for her. A troop we found, but the leadership team decided to step down. A couple of parents approached me to help them lead. At the time, I was very pregnant and working full-time and questioned my ability to be successful, but I knew that I needed to step up, so that my daughter and the other girls in the troop could have a great experience like I had as a child. 

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

Initially, I started off as a troop support volunteer. That did not last long until I became a troop leader. I have been a troop leader now for six years. I also currently am on the Membership Connection Committee through Girl Scouts of Colorado. 

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

As a volunteer, I have learned how to effectively communicate with large groups of people, hone in on my multi-tasking and organizational skills, and have learned fun skills along the way. I have also learned the quirks of many girls over the years, learned their fears and dreams, and learned how to cherish my role and impact not their lives. 

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

My goal as a leader is to give the girls experiences they would not otherwise get. My goal is to role model kindness, hard work ethic, and a thirst for adventure. I want them to give back to the community, always believe in themselves, and try new things. I hope that the girls I have led over the years have fond memories of me and truly felt I was genuine and made some type of positive impact on their lives. 

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I have always been a G.I.R.L. It is in my innate personality. What I hope my volunteer experience has helped me do is create more G.I.R.L.s. I hope that I have empowered them to go after their dreams, get creative when problem solving, innovate new ways of doing things, take chances, try new things, and take ownership and lead the way. 

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.