Tag Archives: Western Colorado

Earning the Healthy at Home Patch

GSCO Media Star Maddie in Grand Junction earned the Healthy at Home patch! She made this video to tell you how she did it.

Healthy at Home Transcript

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Meet an Expert: National Weather Service Meteorologist

Girl Scouts of Colorado thanks Megan Stackhouse for co-hosting our “Meet an Expert – National Weather Service Meteorologist” webinar! More than 20 Girl Scouts from across Colorado participated in this webinar on June 4, 2020. Missed it? Listen to the recording now.

Megan is a Meteorologist for the National Weather Service in Grand Junction, Colorado. She taught girls about the different tools she uses to predict the weather, her education and background, and walked everyone through a “cloud in a jar” experiment. Megan also showed a video of her team launching a weather balloon and taught us about the lifecycle of a weather balloon. We learned that Megan’s favorite weather experiment is a flash flood display in her office in Grand Junction and her favorite Girl Scout cookie is a Thin Mint!

This “Meet an Expert” session falls under the STEM pillar of Girl Scouts.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Meet a Meteorologist: NOAA and On TV Meteorologists Together

Girl Scouts of all ages are invited to a special webinar with two expert meteorologists on Thursday, June 4, 2020 at 4 p.m.

Register now: https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/events-repository/2020/meet_a_meteorologist.html

Registration closes June 3.

Lightning, tornadoes, and storms… meteorologists work with all kinds of weather! Meet NOAA Meteorologist Megan Stackhouse and KREX5 Meteorologist Megan Montgomery. They will talk about what it is like to forecast the weather and their jobs working at the National Weather Service (NWS) and on television. Learn about launching weather balloons, issuing weather warnings to keep you safe at home, and how they talk about weather behind the scenes and in front of the camera. We will also do a weather experiment to show you how to make your own cloud at home! After the presentation there will be a live Q&A session.

We will use Zoom to host this webinar. All information on how to join online or via phone will be emailed out to registrants the day before the webinar. Capacity is limited; each individual participant should be registered so we can track capacity. Please do not share the information on how to join with others who have not registered.

Questions? Email aimee.artzer@gscolorado.org.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

 

I am a Cyber Hero

Submitted by Lexi

Western Colorado

Glenwood Springs

I found the Cyber Hero cybersecurity patch work interesting. I learned how messages travel and how important it is to be careful. It is important because you don’t want the information to get to the wrong people.

I love the Girl Scouts! It has a lot of fun activities to learn new and  interesting things.

By completing this activity, the girls will earn this special cybersecurity patch. Learn how to earn yours.

Volunteer Spotlight: Danielle Malott

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Danielle Malott of Fruita in the Western Colorado region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Danielle to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a leader because there was not space in a troop for my daughter to join. I have fond memories of Girl Scouts from my youth and I wanted my daughter to have those as well 

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I have been a troop leader and volunteered on the service unit leadership team. As a troop leader, I have worked with Daisies, Brownies, and Juniors. Having a multi-level troop is amazing. You get to see the older girls help the younger girls. When this happens, the girls gain confidence and leadership skills by leaps and bounds. My favorite troop event has been all of the camping trips! On the service unit leadership team, I focused on events. Living on the Western Slope, we don’t get many council events. My goal was to bring similar events to the Western Slope, but on a smaller scale. My favorite event was an art day with a local pottery shop. I am most looking forward to a astronomy lock in once COVID-19 is over.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

The biggest skill I have learned is how to teach things I have no clue about.  My girls always pick a few badges that are way out of my wheelhouse. Figuring out how to teach those has been an adventure.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

How to be inclusive and determined. We have a wide range of abilities and challenges in my troop. I hope that the girls have learned how to accept others and over come the challenge that come along while having FUN!!

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

My girls pick new and exciting activities that constantly push me and them. By helping them grow, I get to grow with them.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

The nomination deadline for 2020 Volunteer Recognition Awards is April 30. GSCO invites members statewide to take this opportunity to recognize an outstanding volunteer by nominating them for a Volunteer Recognition Award. Nominators are responsible for ensuring enough endorsements are submitted to support their nomination of a volunteer for an award. Your volunteer support specialist can check nomination and endorsement submissions for you. Learn more.

 

 

Volunteer Spotlight: Silvia Santana

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Silvia Santana of Rifle in the Western Colorado region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Silvia to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

While attending a kindergarten roundup event, there was a table with some Girl Scout volunteers. I had heard a little about it and having a daughter, I loved the idea of empowering girls. We attended our first meeting, and I thought to myself that I could see myself do that. After the second meeting, I signed up to assist the Daisy leader. I wanted to be part of an organization that provided opportunities for all girls regardless of their background and help in their development to become strong, confident, and independent girls.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

Well, I started just helping the Daisy leader a little over six years ago. When that troop closed, I started my own Brownie troop. I have served as Daisy leader, Brownie leader, Junior leader, cookie mom, treasurer, planner,  you name it. Anything the troop needs, I have stepped up to help.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

We definitely learn to love each girl in our troop. Each one of them has a special part in my heart. I have seen many of them grow and will be bridging to Cadettes this next year. I have leaned that no matter how much time we can volunteer, we can all make a difference in these girls’ lives. I see the sisterhood they have developed and I am very proud of all of them.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I like to lead by example, so I hope that each one of them learns to be strong, independent, and confident. I want them to know that they can be anything they put their minds to. They have learned to set goals and create plans to achieve them. They have learned responsibility, how to use their resources, and be kind and caring for others.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I feel I have always been a leader since young age, however I was not a go-getter or risk-taker. Being a volunteer has helped me set goal for my personal growth, just like we set goals with the girls. I took a risk and went back to school a year ago. I knew there would be a possibility I would not be able to handle work, school, home, and volunteering. I was determined not to let that get in the way, and in May I will be graduating. I am glad I can teach the girls that all things are possible.   

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

The nomination deadline for 2020 Volunteer Recognition Awards is April 30. GSCO invites members statewide to take this opportunity to recognize an outstanding volunteer by nominating them for a Volunteer Recognition Award. Nominators are responsible for ensuring enough endorsements are submitted to support their nomination of a volunteer for an award. Your volunteer support specialist can check nomination and endorsement submissions for you. Learn more.

 

 

Volunteer Spotlight: Rachael TerLouw

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Rachael TerLouw of Grand Junction in the Western Colorado region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Rachael to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

Girl Scouts has always been a meaningful part of my life. As a girl, Girl Scouts was a place where I thrived as an individual. I loved the friendships, badge work, trips, and earning my Gold Award. I knew I wanted to provide those same opportunities to other young women.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

While in college, I volunteered with a local troop and knew I wanted to continue volunteering when I moved to Colorado. Since 2003, I have been an assistant troop leader, troop leader, troop cookie manager, service unit manager, events organizer (including Western Slope 100th Anniversary event), and Gold Award mentor.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

Girls are unique! Yet, they have similar goals in Girl Scouts. They are looking for a place to feel valued, make a difference, and where they can pursue their dreams. While these dreams might be different, Girl Scouts can provide those girls with a personalized experience and lasting friendships.

What do you hope the girls have learned from you?

I hope the girls I’ve supported through Girl Scouts pursue their passions and discover new ones, are brave and try new experiences, and look to lead others forward. Ultimately, I hope they see the world as bigger than themselves. I’ve tried to instill a love of travel and new experiences in all the girls I’ve supported. Some of my proudest moments are seeing girls achieve their dreams or overcome their fears such as sleeping away from home for the first time, getting on a horse, or leading a Public Speaking badge because it was something they were afraid of, but wanted to conquer that fear. Finally, service to others has been a cornerstone goal in my mentoring of girls. This includes supporting girls through community service and Take Action projects, leading to Bronze, Silver, and Gold Awards. Being on the Gold Award committee is incredibly rewarding, and I am inspired by these young women and their passion to make a difference. If girls look back at the friendships, skills, experiences, and service learned from Girl Scouts and want to give that back to the next generation of girls, then I’d say my time in Girl Scouts was well spent.

How has your experience as a volunteer help you become a G.I.R.L?

Girl Scouts has given me the opportunity to try things I might never have experienced otherwise. Girl-chosen adventures have led me to take girls backpacking, canoeing in Boundary Waters, rafting, horseback riding, and on the streets of Washington D.C. and New York City. I’ve tried rock climbing, woodworking, digital movie making, art of different kinds, stargazing, and countless other badge related skills. To help girls achieve their dreams, I’ve had to ask community members for support, something out of my comfort zone, as well as brave hours of booth sales talking to customers, another challenge for me. Several years ago, I chose to go back to school to pursue a career dream of mine, and I believe Girl Scouts gave me the courage to do so. Girl Scouts has given me the opportunity to meet and connect with many adults, and I appreciate those relationships and our shared connection to improving the world, one girl at a time.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

The nomination deadline for 2020 Volunteer Recognition Awards is April 30. GSCO invites members statewide to take this opportunity to recognize an outstanding volunteer by nominating them for a Volunteer Recognition Award. Nominators are responsible for ensuring enough endorsements are submitted to support their nomination of a volunteer for an award. Your volunteer support specialist can check nomination and endorsement submissions for you. Learn more.

Volunteer Spotlight: Amy Deschamp

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Amy Deschamp of Fruita in the Western Colorado region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Amy to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

My daughter’s troop needed a “little bit of help” and it turned out to be leading the Daisy level of our multi-level troop once we had so many girls join. I was a Girl Scout myself, so definitely wanted to be a part of it.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I led the Daisy level of our multi-level troop for three years and now with my school schedule changing, I do a lot of administrative support for our troop, cookie mom, and Bronze Award project support.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

That it is a team effort to do it all, girls and leaders get so much out of the experiences; girl-led is a challenge and a blessing; and some of my best friends are my fellow leaders!

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

  • Strength
  • Making mistakes is ok
  • Leading looks different all the time
  • They can come to any of us at any time

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

It was a huge risk-taking move to say yes to volunteering in the first place–and I encourage other women to say yes to it when they can. Every meeting and every event is an exercise in innovating as typically the best laid plans do not work. And, knowing a whole bunch of girls and other women are looking to me as a leader has made me a better one.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

The nomination deadline for 2020 Volunteer Recognition Awards is April 30. GSCO invites members statewide to take this opportunity to recognize an outstanding volunteer by nominating them for a Volunteer Recognition Award. Nominators are responsible for ensuring enough endorsements are submitted to support their nomination of a volunteer for an award. Your volunteer support specialist can check nomination and endorsement submissions for you. Learn more.

 

Volunteer Spotlight: Deena Buffington

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Deena Buffington of Gunnison in the Western Colorado region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Deena to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

My youngest daughter wanted to join Girl Scouts and the troop here in Gunnison is parent and girl-led and they needed volunteers.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I have been helping lead the troop since 2016 and started as the Fall Product Program Manager and Cookie Manager in the 2018/2019 seasons.I now serve as the fall product, cookie, and service unit manager.  We are a small town and small community, so many people take on several roles.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have learned how to handle many different situations, personalities, and ways of dealing with them all. There have been so many funny, fun, and interesting situations. I’ve learned a lot about different troops and people who have been Girl Scouts at one point in their lives.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope the girls have learned hard work, life skills, fun crafting, traveling, and also dealing with different personalities and situations. My favorite time was last year when we took the troop on a cruise… to see the excitement in the girls’ eyes as some of them had never been on a plane much less a cruise ship. It was great to share that excitement and fun with them.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

There is so much that goes into everything from planning a meeting to taking care of cookies, start to finish.  It’s fun to help girls set goals and help them achieve them.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

The nomination deadline for 2020 Volunteer Recognition Awards is April 30. GSCO invites members statewide to take this opportunity to recognize an outstanding volunteer by nominating them for a Volunteer Recognition Award. Nominators are responsible for ensuring enough endorsements are submitted to support their nomination of a volunteer for an award. Your volunteer support specialist can check nomination and endorsement submissions for you. Learn more.

Girl Scouting at home: “Drawing” badge for Girl Scout Juniors

This resource was created by Jenni Grossman, a troop leader in the Western Colorado region.

Vocabulary you might need to know

Medium

your favorite dearing tool (pens, colored pencils, crayons, markers, pastels)

Still Life:

An object that doesn’t move like a bowl, fruit, or a vase

Shading:

A major part of drawing and it means showing the dark areas of a drawing.  It adds depth to help the picture look more real. 

Value in art:

is how light or dark something is on a scale of white to black 

Hatching:

Using a bunch of little or big lines to make a value

Cross Hatching:

Making a grid with the hatching lines

Stippling:

Using dots to shade by repeating them over and over

Smudging:

When something touches the graphic (lead in the pencil) and smears it

Perspective:

Some objects in the picture look farther away than others

Graphic Artist:

An artist whose job is to communicate messages or ideas in visual form, like a logo for a company.  They often use a computer.  

Portfolio:

All the work an artist has completed that can easily be shown to others

 

Step 1: Experiment with different materials

Supplies: depends on what you choose from the three options below.

Choose a still life you want to draw.  We are going to draw it three times so choose one way below: 

#1 draw it with black pen, black colored pencil, and a regular pencil 

                                              Or

#2 draw it with colored pens, colored pencils, and crayons

                                             Or

#3 choose your own 3 mediums and draw the still life with each

Step 2: Learn how to add shading

Supplies: pencil, paper

HOW TO ART – How to Shade with Pencil

Watch this video and then do your own value scale (she will tell you what it is in the video) and practice the kinds of shading she explains

Step 3: Get some perspective

Supplies: pencil, ruler (or something that can help you draw straight), colored pencils, black marker

Watch this video and do your own perspective landscape drawing

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SFNRxfaCKLw

Step 4: Use your imagination like a graphic artist

Supplies: paper and whatever mediums you choose

Watch this video to learn more about graphic artists:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sTi5SNgxE3U&list=PLnFwNzPWa3kCq6sUokAIWga4Z5gI2QlZh

Then, draw a new cover for a book.  What do the words make you think about? How do they make you feel?  What does this book mean to you? How could you show that in your drawing? Have fun being a graphic artist.

Step 5: Make your masterpiece–and show it off!

Supplies: It’s totally up to you!

It’s time to show off your things you learned!  Create a new masterpiece with some techniques you learned like shading, mediums, and perspective and be ready to show it to your sister scouts (and maybe we can invite parents to see it too) at an upcoming meeting either in person or virtually.  

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.