Tag Archives: voting rights

Celebrate Women’s Equality Day and the Women’s Suffrage Centennial

Women’s Equality Day is August 26 each year and commemorates the passage of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which granted the right to vote to women. This year, we commemorate 100 years of women’s voting rights in the United States and we invite you to help us!

The deadline to submit your photos and videos is Thursday, September 10, 2020 at 4 p.m.

Option One – Join our video celebration

Ask your parent or caregiver to help make a video of you answering one or more of the questions below. Your video submission will be included in a special video to premiere during GSCO’s Civics Month in October 2020.

  1. What makes you wish you could vote? (If you are not 18 yet and wish you could vote!)
  2. What would you do first if you were an elected official?
  3. What is something you believe in enough to advocate or march for?

Please wear your Girl Scout vest or sash in your video, if you have one. Videos should be made horizontally ONLY and uploaded at: https://www.dropbox.com/request/u5ZkyaABV8J3ysQwXMkg.

By uploading a video, you are providing consent for Girl Scouts of Colorado to share your video publically.

Option Two – Make a sign showing your passion for women and girl’s equality

People fighting for women’s right to vote 100 years ago made signs that said things like, “Equality for women!” and “Votes for Women!” Consider decorating your sign with the colors of the women’s suffrage movement in the United States: purple, white, and gold.

Ask your parent or caregiver to snap a photo of you in your Girl Scout vest or sash holding your sign and email it to girlsexperience@gscolorado.org. Please include the Girl Scout’s first name only, city, and troop number in the email. By emailing your photo to us, you are providing consent for Girl Scouts of Colorado to share the photo publically.

Option Three – Color a suffrage cat

“Did you know that the cat was a symbol of the women’s suffrage movement? In April of 1916, suffragists Nell Richardson and Alice Burke started a cross-country road trip. Setting out from New York, these two women stopped in cities and towns across America to talk about the importance of women’s suffrage. Along the way, the women adopted a cat that became their unofficial mascot. The cat became a symbol of suffrage!”- National Parks Service, https://www.nps.gov/articles/suffrage-cat.htm

Color and decorate your own suffrage cat and send us a photo of your completed artwork! Ask your parent or caregiver to email your completed cat to girlsexperience@gscolorado.org. Please include the Girl Scout’s first name only, city, and troop number in the email. By emailing your photo to us, you are providing consent for Girl Scouts of Colorado to share the photo publically.

Please note: While we celebrate 100 years of women’s voting rights in the United States, we also need to take a closer look at the history of women of color’s voting rights. Did you know . . .

  • Full exercise of Black voting rights was intended with the Voting Rights Act of 1965.
  • Native American women were largely excluded from voting before the Indian Citizenship Act of 1924; some states and localities still passed laws effectively barring Natives from voting until the late 1940s.
  • Not until the late 1940s and 1950s were restrictions on Asian American voting removed.

Interested in learning more about the Women’s Suffrage Centennial? Check out the following:

Resource: 2020 Women’s Vote Centennial Initiative – https://www.2020centennial.org/faq#q6

Questions? Email aimee.artzer@gscolorado.org.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

A Closer Look at Women’s Voting Rights Around the World

Submitted by Marty Allison, Chair of the Girl Scouts of Colorado Global Action Team

As we recognize the centennial of the 19th amendment and the women’s suffrage movement, Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Global Action Team takes a closer look at women’s voting rights around the world .

Can you believe that in 1689 women landowners in the State of Friesland, what we call the Netherlands today, were first able to vote! Throughout history, women have had many restrictions to their right to vote. Age and marital status were just two of them. Younger men could vote before women could. Women could vote, but not run for elections. Single women or widows could only vote in local elections. A woman’s level of education might determine her eligibility to cast a vote. Or, how about how only mothers with legitimate children could vote in local elections? In South West Africa, only white women could vote and not the native African women. In 1945 in the Dutch East Indies, Indonesia today, only European women could vote. In Liberia, Africa, in 1946 indigenous men and women did not get to vote until 1951 while American women could vote much earlier than that.

In 1948, the United Nations adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and in 1952, they enacted the Convention of the Political Rights of Women. But, still it was 1962 before Australia allowed Aboriginal men and women to vote when South Australian women of European descent were able to vote way back in 1894!
In Kuwait, women were able to vote in 1985, but it was revoked in 1999 only to regain the vote in 2005. In Afghanistan, the Taliban revoked women’s right to vote in 1996 and after their fall in 2001, women regained the right to vote. Saudi Arabian women gained the right to vote in local elections in 2015 and be appointed to local positions.

While we celebrate 100 years since the ratification of the 19th Amendment in the United States, we also take a closer look at the history of women of color’s voting rights. Did you know . . .

  • Full exercise of Black voting rights was intended with the Voting Rights Act of 1965.
  • Native American women were largely excluded from voting before the Indian Citizenship Act of 1924; some states and localities still passed laws effectively barring Natives from voting until the late 1940s.
  • Not until the late 1940s and 1950s were restrictions on Asian American voting removed.

Today, we are proud that women in all of the 150 countries of the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGGS) (https://www.wagggs.org/en/our-world/) have the right to vote!

Resources

Interested in joining the Global Action Team? Email GSCO staff liaison, Aimee Artzer, at aimee.artzer@gscolorado.org.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Watch now: Women’s Suffrage Centennial with the Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame and the League of Women Voters of Colorado

Girl Scouts of Colorado gives special thanks to the Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame (CWHF) and the League of Women Voters of Colorado (LWVCO) for hosting two webinars for Girl Scouts to learn about the women’s suffrage movement and the ratification of the 19th Amendment in 1920. More than 40 Girl Scouts from across the country participated in the webinars on August 10 and August 14, 2020. You can now watch both webinars online.

Presenters from the CHWF and LWVCO included:

  • Beth Barela, Executive Director, Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame
  • ML Hanson, Founder of the Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame and Girl Scout Woman of Distinction
  • Beth Hendrix, Executive Director, League of Women Voters of Colorado
  • Jill Tietjen, Inductee of the Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame and the Colorado Author’s Hall of Fame, and Girl Scout Woman of Distinction
  • Andrea Wilkins, Legislative Liaison for the League of Women Voters of Colorado

Our presenters spoke to girls about what life was like for women 100 years ago, why suffragists fought for the right to vote, and about key suffragists in Colorado history. Girls also learned about how and why the CO Women’s Hall of Fame was started and the original suffragists were the founders of the League of Women Voters.

Through participating in this webinar girls:

  1. Earned their Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame patch! They completed the patch requirements by:
    • Learning about CWHF inductees
    • Attending a CWHF event
    • Watching a film from the CWHF website (D/B/J) OR completing a CWHF scavenger hunt (C/S/A)

Order your CWHF patch online now!

2. Completed the “Discover” part of the Girl Scout Suffrage Centennial patch by:

  • Finding out why it is important to vote.
  • Learning about women’s first time voting.
  • Learning why some people were opposed to voting.

To continue learning more about the women’s suffrage centennial and the 19th Amendment, Girl Scouts can:

  1. Finish earning the Girl Scout Suffrage Centennial patch.
  2. Earn the Girl Scout 19th Amendment Ranger patch.
  3. Explore all the resources on the special Suffrage Centennial blog post.

Questions? Email aimee.artzer@gscolorado.org.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.