Tag Archives: volunteer spotlight

Volunteer Spotlight: Lorena Gambill-Maddox

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Lorena Gambill-Maddox of Grand Junction in the Western Colorado region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Lorena to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer? 

I was asked by my daughter’s troop leader to be her assistant. I love working with children. When I was younger, I was a Girl Scout and my older sister was my troop leader. My mother was also a troop leader. So when Elisha asked me, I was happy to join such a great organization. It has been a great experience for me.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout. 

As a Girl Scout volunteer, I have enjoyed giving back to our community. Our troop has done so many different things. We collected food or our local community food bank. We did a clothing drive and took clothes to a neighboring town that was doing a clothing distribution. We have served food at a extended table for those in need.  At Christmas, we went Christmas caroling at the V.A. hospital and local nursing home. For two of our local schools, we entered the craft fairs. Learning to make crafts and jewelry to sell taught us about being a business owner. We donated cookies to our local policemen and teachers. It feel so great to give like a G.I.R.L.!

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer? 

I have learned so much as a volunteer. I have a wonderful team of leadership on the western slope to guide me, especially Ashley Douglas, as well as a very knowledgeable service unit leader Rebecca Flesh and our troop leader Elisha Scarbrough is such a inspiring person. Our girls in our troop are fearless. They wanted to earn every badge they could as Juniors, so I made it my goal to learn everything I needed too in order to help them reach their goal– from Simple Cooking to Robotics.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope that I have taught our girls that anything is possible if you put your mind to it. That it is better to be kind to anyone you meet, because you don’t know why they are acting in the way that they are. Everyone deserves love and kindness. Not to let what others think cloud their beliefs, but to listen without judgement. Then, decide for themselves how they feel. That they are the ones who make themselves happy and successful. I also hope they know how proud of each and every one of them I am.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Girls Scouts has helped me become a go-getter because of our girls in our troop wanting to achieve all the badges. I became driven to help them achieve their goal. I am an innovator because I looked for ways to help our community and find ways to give back. Risk-taker because we tried things without knowing how it would turn out, but being determined to be successful in everything we tried. Last, a leader because I had to have confidence in things I wasn’t sure about, knowing whether or not we would succeed,  I was there beside them no matter what. Showing each one of them how to be brave.

Girl Scouts is a great opportunity for any girl no matter what her age is. It is such a honor to be apart of such a wonderful organization.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

Volunteer Spotlight: Elisha Scarbrough

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Elisha Scarbrough of Rifle in the Western Colorado region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Elisha to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I enjoyed Girl Scouts when I was younger and enrolled my daughters when they were in kindergarten; then the troop needed a leader, so I signed up. It’s a great thing for my daughters to be part of and I didn’t want them to miss out if there wasn’t a leader.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I have been both co-leader and main leader for my girls’ troop. I have also been the cookie and chocolate and nut lead.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

How to be more patient! I also have learned how to lead and enjoy time with my girls at the same time. Most importantly how to multi-task! I work full time and am taking night classes to complete my Bachelor’s degree. 

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

How important it is to set goals and met them and to be involved in the community. Also, the skills that they have gained through each of the badges that we have earned through the years.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

It has reminded me what is important; these girls are in a generation that is so involved with electronics that Girl Scouts helps teach them skills that they will be able to use forever. I also have had to learn new skills to help the girls earn badges; like how to make a robot and that is pretty cool that even as a leader I am learning with the girls in the troop.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

Volunteer Spotlight: Michelle Pierce

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Michelle Pierce of Lakewood in the Metro Denver region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Michelle to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer? 

When my oldest daughter was going to kindergarten, I knew I wanted her to have the Girl Scout experience I had as a child. My mom was the leader and I just knew I wanted to be one as well.  (That was 10 years ago now!)

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout. 

Well, I think I have had most every position you can have. I am a troop leader for two troops (both daughters), TCM for both troops, FPM for both troops, service unit manager for Rosewood, SUCM and SUFPM. Several years ago, I was the  school coordinator for Dennison Elementary.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer? 

The girls teach me new things all of the time. Teamwork with other leaders. Having support and friendships that are lasting because we have a same interest. Organization skills have improved. So much more.

What do you hope girls have learned from you? 

They are important. Leading and growing into strong young women. Know that they can accomplish anything they set their mind to.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Be able to set goals and and take risks in life both professionally and personally. Also, to lead others to to get a common goal accomplished.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

Volunteer Spotlight: Ashley Lampe

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Ashley Lampe of Eaton in the Northern & Northeastern CO region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Ashley to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a leader of my daughter’s troop during a leadership transition to ensure that all our girls could continue participating in Girl Scouts, doing things they love.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I’m a troop leader and TCM to a fantastic Cadette troop. Other than those specifics, I’ve helped at cookie pickup, the cookie cupboard, and as a mentor to others. Overall, I help where I can.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

Girls have the courage and power to do whatever they want, but only to the capacity that we allow, so remember to remove the roadblocks and tear off the roof to allow them to reach their fullest potential.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope each and every girl has learned that they can do absolutely anything they set their mind to, not to be afraid to advocate for themselves, to stand their ground when they need to, and be able to do so in a meaningful and respectful manner.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Being a Girl Scout volunteer has tested my very being, in every capacity. I’ve stretched in ways I’ve never thought possible, have been more creative than I’ve ever been, and expanded in every direction. Molding and leading our future leaders doesn’t come with a cookie cutter manual, but requires flexibility and continual development to be the best I can be.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Volunteer Spotlight: Nicole Lockwood

 

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Nicole Lockwood of Fort Collins in the Northern & Northeastern CO region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Nicole to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a Girl Scout volunteer, after I earned my Gold Award and wanted to continue sharing my Girl Scout story. Plus, I wanted to inspire girls to reach for their dreams and pursue their goals. I had a strong support system as a girl with a few key leaders and my mom. I wanted to share that same support with other girls, who may not have that same support. 

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

Like most volunteers I wear several hats within Girl Scouts, which has lead to taking on various different roles. Those include being a troop leader, service unit product program manager, Gold Award mentor, member of the Membership Connection Committee, and Colorado delegate for the 2017 National Convention. I also participate with the Girl Scout Choir. Each of these different roles has allowed me different opportunities and chances to work with several other volunteers and girls across the state. Of all the roles I have held, one of my favorite was being with the Girl Scout Choir and being able to attend the 95th and 100th Anniversary Singalong in Washington, D.C. Another favorite role of mine was being able to be a delegate at the 2017 convention. It was a first time experience for myself and I got to be part of some of the national decision making with GSUSA, along with being able to meet and interact with other volunteers and girls across the country and even worldwide, while also being able to meet some very important people from GSUSA. Most of my different volunteer roles I have held for almost six years. 

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

There are lots of things I have learned while being a Girl Scout volunteer. I have learned that any girl you work with, for no matter the length of time, will always look up to you as a role model. I’ve also learned that while being a volunteer, we still need to embody what the Girl Scout Law means as sometimes we are also the face of Girl Scouts. Most importantly, I have learned that sometimes the girls aren’t the only ones who get to have fun and try new adventures. 

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope that the girls I have been able to volunteer with have learned that you can do just about anything you set your mind to. Nothing is ever unattainable, unless you don’t try. Along with that, I hope the girls have learned that its always important to try something new, because you never know what new adventures or doors it may open up for you. 

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

My experience as a volunteer has helped become a G.I.R.L. in several different ways. I have become a go-getter by always willing to step up for a new challenge or task whether it be taking on a new role in one of my Girl Scout troops or just by being an extra helping hand whenever and wherever it may be needed. I’m innovator by always thinking outside of the box and trying to come up with new and creative ways to solve any problem or task that comes my way. Sometimes doing things a little different will lead to a unexpected outcome. Becoming a risk-taker has showed me that I should never be afraid to step out of my comfort zone or to try new activities. Becoming a leader with a troop for so many years has allowed me to watch my own leadership skills grow and blossom so much that, I was able to to take on some of the other roles that I currently have. Becoming a G.I.R.L. has showed me that there is so much more to being a Girl Scout volunteer and it has shown me some of the experiences and opportunities that I may have missed when I was a Girl Scout myself. 

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

Volunteer Spotlight: Jill Mann

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Jill Mann of Windsor in the Northern & Northeastern CO region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Jill to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

Originally to help my daughter’s troop when my oldest girl was a Daisy and they needed someone to coordinate the troop cookie sales. I’ve since helped out with troop and service unit level leadership.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I’ve been our troop cookie manager for four years now. This is my second year in a troop leadership position. Last year, I worked with our Brownies. This year, I’ve helped our Daisy and Cadette level troops (mixed level troop) with their badge goals, and assisted our other leaders with Brownie and Junior level activities. I have also assisted our troop leadership team on our yearly troop camping trips. This year, I’ve also assisted with our service unit leadership and was the service unit cookie manager.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I’ve learned that there are so many more opportunities for our girls to learn a variety of skills, all they need is a little guidance to see the possibilities and think outside the box.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope they have seen that they really can do anything they want to with a little determination and the ability to ask for help if they need to, and that there is something to be learned from every experience.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I have definitely had to leave my comfort zone on this adventure. I tend to be more of a quiet observer. Being a Girl Scout volunteer, I’ve had to get out, do things, and learn new skills I would not have otherwise picked up.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

Volunteer Spotlight: Jamie Buttermore

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Jamie Buttermore of Grand Junction in the Western Colorado region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Jamie to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I was a Girl Scout for a few years as a child. I knew that as soon as my oldest was in kindergarten, I was going to find a troop for her. A troop we found, but the leadership team decided to step down. A couple of parents approached me to help them lead. At the time, I was very pregnant and working full-time and questioned my ability to be successful, but I knew that I needed to step up, so that my daughter and the other girls in the troop could have a great experience like I had as a child. 

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

Initially, I started off as a troop support volunteer. That did not last long until I became a troop leader. I have been a troop leader now for six years. I also currently am on the Membership Connection Committee through Girl Scouts of Colorado. 

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

As a volunteer, I have learned how to effectively communicate with large groups of people, hone in on my multi-tasking and organizational skills, and have learned fun skills along the way. I have also learned the quirks of many girls over the years, learned their fears and dreams, and learned how to cherish my role and impact not their lives. 

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

My goal as a leader is to give the girls experiences they would not otherwise get. My goal is to role model kindness, hard work ethic, and a thirst for adventure. I want them to give back to the community, always believe in themselves, and try new things. I hope that the girls I have led over the years have fond memories of me and truly felt I was genuine and made some type of positive impact on their lives. 

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I have always been a G.I.R.L. It is in my innate personality. What I hope my volunteer experience has helped me do is create more G.I.R.L.s. I hope that I have empowered them to go after their dreams, get creative when problem solving, innovate new ways of doing things, take chances, try new things, and take ownership and lead the way. 

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

Volunteer Spotlight: Shauna Hodges

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Shauna Hodges of Westminster in the Metro Denver region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Shauna to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I was a Girl Scout as a girl and always loved my troops. I moved around a lot as a kid and the one consistent activity I always had no matter where I lived was Girl Scouts. When my daughter was in first grade, an email went out for an info night at our school and I figured I’d go check it out. I joke that I was tricked into being a leader because a friend offered to be co-leaders and then called me that night and had to back out herself.  We made it work with other parent volunteers and now we have an amazing troop!

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a GirlScout.

I’m a leader for my troop of fourth grade Juniors, a leader for a newly formed troop with an emphasis on traveling, on our service unit team for Dry Creek 622, and have recently volunteered to become a trainer and utilize my CPR/First Aid Instructor license!  

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I’ve learned so much! I love learning about new Girl Scout badges, initiatives like the G.I.R.L Agenda, and all the great things Girl Scouts is providing to girls. I am a teacher by trade, but I love that I have been able to utilize my classroom skills beyond the classroom to make the experience that much greater for the girls. I also finally learned how to make a decent fire, which trust me, for someone who camping is a challenge for, making a fire is a huge accomplishment!

I also learned what it’s like to have a strong Girl Scout family. In October 2017, in the midst of getting our troop going on our last year of Brownies, I was diagnosed with Stage Three breast cancer. Girl Scouts became the one activity I could keep doing with my daughter.  It became the way I showed her I was sick, but still okay enough to do things together. I went through 20 weeks of chemo, five weeks of radiation, two major surgeries, and have been receiving an infusion medication every three weeks that will continue for a few more months. Through all of that time, my troop of Girl Scouts, my service unit, and council remained by my side. They sent care packages, dinners, and the sweetest cards I could ever hope for. I went to as many meetings as I could, and the girls were amazing seeing me lose my hair and not look and act like myself.  They asked questions, but always in a supportive way. I knew I was part of an amazing Girl Scout family, but I never knew how amazing until I saw how everyone stuck by my side through everything.  

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope the girls learn problem solving, leadership, and perseverance. I feel like they shouldn’t be afraid of a situation where things don’t go as planned and should instead take it with grace and figure out how to make the situation a positive experience no matter what. I also hope they learn to see that there are adults in their lives other than their parents who are rooting for them, cheering them on, and wanting the very best for them!

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

My experience has really helped me to expand what I am comfortable with in many ways. I can organize a camping trip or plan a badge or meeting off the top of my head when things don’t go as planned, help girls solve conflicts between themselves, and show the girls how to balance a wide range of activities.  

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

Volunteer Spotlight: Amanda Brown

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Amanda Brown of Westminster in the Metro Denver region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Amanda to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I was a Girl Scout and loved it!  My mom was one of my leaders and my grandmother was her leader when she was younger. My daughter expressed interest when we received a flyer at her school in kindergarten. After that, I knew it was going to be such a great opportunity for her and all of the girls in the program. I have since realized that the need for these girls to have this sense of sisters and empowerment is my drive in being their leader.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I began as my daughter’s troop leader almost seven years ago and have since helped start our service unit up again. I am on our service unit team and assist in recruiting, running our meetings, assisting leaders throughout the year with issues, questions, etc. I also serve as a service unit cookie manager. 

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have learned so much from being a volunteer. This stretches from realizing how many opportunities there are for girls all the way to realizing that these girls look up to me. Learning how much they depend on my leadership and how I have impacted their lives is truly the best experience. I have also learned throughout the years that girls from all different backgrounds and experiences can come together and grow and impact the lives of each other. I learned that starting this journey with my daughter was one of the best things I have done for her and with her. 

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope girls have learned that they can be themselves and that they all have a place and can be anyone they want to be and they will succeed. I have shown them that being a leader is important, not only as an adult but as a girl. They can grow up to be a Girl Scout leader themselves and help others the same way I have helped them realize their full potential. Not everything is easy and there are stressors along the way, but when you put your mind to something, you can do it and help others along the way. 

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I am a go-getter and work hard to reach goals and help the girls get where they need to be. I am an innovator by creating new ways to do things tailored to the needs and wants of the girls. I am a risk-taker and will go into a troop meeting with my head high even when I am unprepared. If the girls think something is unachievable, we go for it and see what comes about from it. That is when I lead them in the right direction while they set their goals and always end up achieving them. 

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

Volunteer Spotlight: Kellie Lewis

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Kellie Lewis of Highlands Ranch in the Metro Denver region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Kellie to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a Girl Scout volunteer because my daughter wanted to be a Girl Scout and there was not a troop for her at our school.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I became the leader of my older daughter’s troop four years ago when they were in first grade and I am still the leader of her troop. I became the service unit manager for Starry Sky Girl Scouts two years ago. I started organizing and running events for the unit last year and this year, I have taken on a lot more because I want to help provide great programming for girls. I also started a Daisy troop for my daughter that is in kindergarten this year.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have learned a lot about the Girl Scout program. I was a Girl Scout when I was a kid, but the program has changed a lot since then. Every year, I learn more about the program and I value the organization even more the more I learn. I love that it is girl-led and really helps to shape girls into young women that are responsible, confident, and curious. I love that girls learn how to take risks to become better individuals and leaders in their communities. Every year, I am faced with new challenges and reap new rewards as the girls change, our troop changes, and the families in our troops change. I am also constantly challenged to learn new things and take new risks as I take on new and different roles within the organization. I have gained confidence as a leader, I have learned how to organize successful events, I have made connections in my community, and I am continually learning better and more effective ways to work with others and hopefully inspire others. I have also gained some great friends along the way and it is so fulfilling to watch the girls grow and thrive over the years.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope the girls have learned and will continue to learn how to be kind, responsible, and passionate individuals who know who they are and aren’t afraid to take risks. I hope they learn that they can make a difference in their communities. I also hope they learn that if they are true to themselves, thoughtful, and hard working that they will lead a fulfilling and happy life that inspires others to do the same. 

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Girl Scouts is all about being a go-getter and I have always been this kind of person. I think about what I want and what I think the world should be like and I then I do my best to do the things I need to do to go after the life I want and make a difference in my community.  Being a Girl Scout volunteer has made me a better innovator because I not only share my ideas, but I have wonderful opportunities to learn from the girls and other adults. Everyone has wonderful ideas. If we take the time to listen and work together, we come up with better ideas and achieve much more than when we work alone. Being a Girl Scout volunteer provides me with a lot of challenges and in my efforts to provide the best for girls, I have gained a lot of confidence and become more of a risk-taker to help them reach their goals. I feel my experience as a volunteer has made me a better leader because I have learned a lot about how to work with lots of different kinds of people, I have gotten much better at letting the girls take the lead and realizing that helping others become better leaders makes me a much better a leader. It really is about teaching and inspiring others.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.