Tag Archives: volunteer spotlight

Volunteer Spotlight: Julie Southern

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Julie Southern of Arvada in the Metro Denver region currently volunteers with her daughter’s troop and the Outdoor Adventure Club. She is also a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Julie to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

When my daughter joined Girl Scouts, I just naturally volunteered to be with her and experience the activities with her. I had not been a Girl Scout, so I was not sure what to expect. I continue to be overly impressed with the entire organization and lovely women in the program. The quality of programming and adventures that are planned for these young women is awesome. I am a middle school teacher and I truly appreciate that my own middle school girl has these opportunities. Therefore, I want to give back to this wonderful group and help out in anyway possible.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I volunteer with the troop and also with the Outdoor Adventure Club. When I volunteer with the troop, I take on many different roles from leading meetings, to traveling with the troop to Girl Scout properties and being a camp leader, and just being a support for our leaders.  

With the Outdoor Adventure Club, I have had the amazing opportunity to support the girls in the countless adventures they have been challenged to accomplish. I have lead small groups, games, night time discussions and recaps, and just been their to support the organization. Anna Danilla has planned such amazing opportunities for these girls. I have been by the Girl Scouts as they encouraged each other through small cave spaces, down the face of a mountain, bouldering up a rock field, biking through the field, dog sledding, swimming, wilderness survival skills, archery, and so much more. To witness the growth, leadership, and encouragement that these girls give to each other is an honor.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have learned as a Girl Scout volunteer that being able to be by the sides of these young women is an honor. If I can continue to turn the responsibility of the experience and problem solving on the girls, they will learn and grow. I have to be willing to step aside and let these girl’s thrive. They never cease to amaze me.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope that the Girl Scouts learn that anything is truly possible if you keep trying. I also hope they learn to set personal goals, to try THEIR best, to do THEIR hardest, and to have FUN! By focusing on doing their own best, then they can achieve their goals.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

See answers above.  I know that working with Girl Scouts has challenged me as well. Trusting that the girl is going to safely handle a bow and arrow, a kayak, to hold the line as you mountain climb is truly being a risk-taker. Also, the Girl Scouts are so encouraging of each other and of the adults that are choosing to take the challenge by choice. In the cave, we all had to guide each other through the crevices and tunnels because you literally could not see what was up in front of you. This made me be very clear in the directions and questions to the girls around me to help me get through the experience as well.

In nature, you can make plans and be prepared, but sometimes you have to adjust to plan C and plan D.  I think that is when the natural innovator in me and the girls comes out. It is so great to have the girls modify and come up with solutions when the first ideas get washed away with the weather. It is such a great experience to be by these girls as well and I continue to learn from them.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Volunteer Spotlight: Melissa Ellenberger

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Melissa Ellenberger of Colorado Springs in the Pikes Peak region is both a troop leader and service unit volunteer. She is also a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Melissa to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

Girl Scouting is a family tradition.  My mother was my troop leader and earned the Curved Bar Award. As a Girl Scout, I earned the Gold Award.  I volunteered to ensure my daughter had a great Girl Scout experience.  

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

At first, I was a leader.  As I got more involved, I became the service unit cookie manager,  trainer, and service unit manager.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

That the Girl Scout experience is just as valid and important today as it was 20, 40, and 60 years ago.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

That following the Girl Scout Law means you can live an amazing life and have a whole lot of fun.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I’m a teacher as well as Girl Scout volunteer. The two go hand-in-hand in showing off my G.I.R.L. skills.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Volunteer Spotlight: Toni Rath

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Toni Rath of Berthoud in the Northern & Northeastern CO region is  a troop leader, service unit manager, service unit cookie manager, and member of GSCO’s Membership Connection Committee.  She is also a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Toni to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

My husband is retired Air Force so volunteering was just what we do as a family. My girls wanted to join Girl Scouts and the troop needed a leader so I said “Sure, why not!”

The girls were young so they would have no idea that I didn’t know at the time (or anytime we do something new!) what I was doing as long as we had fun.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

This list keeps getting longer.. troop leader, service unit manager, PA/VIT girl trainer, service unit cookie manager and trainer, day camp unit leader, and I just started on MCC.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

WOW, I have learned A LOT!!  When doing a badge or a patch with the girls, I learn more about them and how much I actually didn’t know about the topic of the badge. I think the girls teach me more than anything. They show me a new perspective and different ways something can be accomplished.  As a service unit manager, I have learned how important each and every volunteer in our area is, no matter how big or small their roll is. Each comes with a  gift or expertise that our girls can really learn from. I have also learned how important it is to know my fellow service unit managers in other areas to get troop ideas, information and support and hopefully able to do the same for them.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope that the girls have learned to ask more questions of each other and of themselves and really listen to better know those around them, and know themselves. Activities really rule their lives these days and it is important to really listen and reflect on what is important to them. I also hope that they have learned how to be encouraging. A kind word and the ability to notice when someone has made the right choice can go a long way! They need to know if I am willing to be patient with them and go down the rabbit hole to learn to recover from a mistake, as they get older, they can do the same for themselves and their peers.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Well, those cookies aren’t going to walk to a booth and sell themselves! Ok, maybe they will as long as someone gets them there.. As the girls in our troop get older, it seems the push to get them to go and get gets harder. I have to model that for them.  If I want them to be a go-getter, innovator, risk-taker and a leader, I have to do the same. They push me to at least try something new, make something better, and ask others to join me on my crazy journey. I can’t ask them to do something if I am not willing to do the same.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

 

Volunteer Spotlight: Erin Wogaman

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Erin Wogaman of Canon City in the Pikes Peak region has served as a troop leader and Product Program volunteer for many years. She is also a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Erin to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a Girl Scout volunteer because of my daughter. She is the youngest of three and has two older brothers. I still remember my time as a Brownie, with my mom as my troop leader, making place mats, sit-upons, camping, and so much more. I knew that I wanted my daughter to have those memories to cherish. I did end up bridging to Junior, but we had moved and it wasn’t the same without my mom being involved. I promised my daughter that for as long as she is a Girl Scout, I will be one as well…possibly longer.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

After the role of parent to an amazing Cadette, I am a troop leader of a multi-level troop. I am in my 9th year as an adult volunteer and have started several troops in New Mexico and Colorado. My troop consists of nine Daisies, twelve Brownies, four Juniors, and five Cadettes. Next year, we will add Seniors to our troop family. I am a service unit manager and service unit product program manager. I love working with the other leaders in my service unit and we have become a second family. We have grown in the last year and have plans to continue that growth. I am also an adult advisory member for our older girl group called SPLAT. We are still in the beginning stages, as this is our first year. The SPLAT girls represent different troops in our service unit. The girls planned and led our Cookie Rally this year and will be planning summer and fall activities. I am a member of the Pikes Peak Region Cookie Committee, an adult trainer, and recruiter for my service unit.  

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

Working with girls of different ages and with different abilities requires patience and the understanding that all girls can do anything they set their minds to. Every girl, in every troop, brings something new to the troop and they need the opportunity to shine and lead to their ability. I have learned that Daisies can start campfires, cook meals, participate in a flag ceremony, and so much more. I have the ability to give girls an amazing experience of leadership, courage, and learning life skills. I have learned that I must provide them with the opportunities to be the girl-led troop that they are.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I want them to learn to take risks, to challenge themselves, and to try out for that sport, solo, or part in the play. I want them to know that Girl Scouts is something they should be proud of. This is their experience and that they each have a voice. I hope they have learned that living the Girl Scout Law every day will take them far and they will make the world a better place.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Being a Girl Scout volunteer has pushed me to challenge myself to be a better person and to put others first more often. Getting up in front of strangers has never been something I enjoy, other than with girls. This year, I challenged myself to take on new roles and those roles require me to break those walls, to take risks, to lead with other adults, and to challenge our service unit to grow and offer the best experience for our girls. As a leader, I will never ask my girls to do something that I am not willing to do. I even challenged myself (after much coaxing) to walk across the Royal Gorge Bridge. I have always said that I would be the one crawling down the middle of the bridge. I won’t say that I thoroughly enjoyed the experience. My heart was racing and my legs were shaking, but I did it. I want my girls to know that they have my support to try those scary things in life and I will be here to cheer them on.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Volunteer Spotlight: Elizabeth Moore

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Elizabeth Moore of Conifer in the Metro Denver region has served as a troop leader and service unit volunteer for many years. She is also a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Elizabeth to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

Initially, I began volunteering because it was the only way for my daughters to get the Girl Scout experience I wanted for them. As my role expanded, however, my motivation became to deliver the Girl Scout experience to as many girls within my sphere of influence that I could.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout?

First and foremost, I am a troop leader. My troop spans from kindergarten Daisies to a 9th grade Senior. I have many co-leaders that help me manage all the different levels of girls, but I manage most of the administrative work and a lot of the activity planning. Right now, I am actively leading the Daisy and Cadette levels. I also serve as service unit manager (a natural outgrowth from managing such a large troop) and a trainer (primarily to fill the need I saw within my service unit).

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have learned a lot about event planning and communication. I’ve learned about teaching girls at all ages. I’ve also learned a lot about myself – what I’m capable of, what my strengths are, and where I can still use some help.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope that girls have learned how to be confident, how to pursue things they are interested in learning about, and how to take risks that they might not otherwise.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

My experiences in Girl Scouts have enabled me to reenter the workforce after 10 years of raising my children. I never would have had the skills – or the confidence! – I needed without having volunteered.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Volunteer Spotlight: Amy Caperton

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Amy Caperton of Littleton in the Metro Denver region has served as a troop leader and Product Program volunteer for many years. She is also a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Amy to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a leader when my younger daughter started kindergarten. My older daughter was already involved in Girl Scouts, so I wanted to be sure my younger daughter also had an opportunity to do so. I was not sure I would have time to do it with working full-time and having three children, however it has been a great experience that I have thoroughly enjoyed. I would not change it for anything.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I started as troop cookie manager for my older daughter’s troop. I did that for 12 years. I was also my service unit’s cookie cupboard for two years. I moved on to service unit cookie manager, a role which I have done now for eight years. I have also been fall product program manager for my service unit for the last three years. Finally, and most importantly, I have been a leader for my troop since kindergarten, so this is my 11th year as their leader.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have learned that it is important to listen to what the girls have to say, be patient and understanding, and have lots of resources available to accomplish our troop goals.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope the girls in my troop, wether presently or not, have learned to stand up for what they believe in, speak for themselves, be accountable for their words and actions, not be afraid to take risks, think outside the box, and be kind to others– truly live by the Girl Scout Law.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I have become a go-getter in figuring out what I needed to do to accomplish my troop’s goals. I had to be an innovator by rolling with the punches. When things don’t go as planned, I’ve learned you have to adapt.  I’ve had to be a risk-taker by trying new things and getting outside my comfort zone at times. My role as leader has benefitted me by helping me be more outspoken in other aspects of my life as well. I think overall it has benefitted me to know I can accomplish what I set out to do and also be more confident in myself.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Gold Award mentors statewide awarded President’s Award

Adult recognition awards are designed to recognize volunteers who have gone above and beyond the expectations of the volunteer role they hold, and who have deeply impacted Girl Scouts in ways that support and further GSCO’s goals and mission. The prestigious President’s Award recognizes the efforts of a service-delivery team or committee whose exemplary service in support of delivering the Girl Scout Leadership Experience surpassed team goals and resulted in significant, measurable, impact toward reaching the council’s overall goals.

As girls earn the highest distinction in Girl Scouts, we expect their mentors to help them meet our high standards and expectations of team building, measurability, sustainability, global/national connection, and uniqueness – the foundations of the Gold Award. Gold Award mentors/committee members across the state went above and beyond to support the development and implementation of the Girl Scout Gold Award program in the 2015-16 membership year and continue to do so today. The position asks that each member attend a Gold Award training and stay up to date on changes, review all project proposals, final reports, and presentation, work individually with mentees, observe girls in action, attend 75% of monthly meetings, and participate in celebrations. All members have met each expectation and exceeded expectations.

Several members reviewed the Gold Award training design, made improvements, and are now active Gold Award trainers who facilitate in-person trainings across the state. In the 2015-16 membership year, more than 200 girls and 115 adults received Gold Award training across the state.

Gold Award brainstorming sessions were offered in Denver, Longmont, and Grand Junction with mentors attending all and helping girls one-on-one explore ideas and establish next steps.

Six regional Highest Awards celebrations were held across the state and each one of them was volunteer supported. These events would not have been successful without the participation/support from all the Gold Award mentors/committee members.

Sarah Greichen, 2016 Gold Award Girl Scout and National Young Woman of Distinction wrote in her endorsement for this award, “Girl Scouts in pursuit of their Gold Awards are greatly impacted by their Gold Award mentors. Gold Award mentors teach girls vital skills such as organization, public speaking, leadership, business skills, etc. They serve as role models who provide guidance, advice, and critique. All Girl Scouts are positively impacted by their mentors.”

Jan Lucas, Gold Award Girl Scout and member of the GSCO Board of Directors, wrote in her endorsement of the award, “The Girl Scouts pursing their Gold Award are motivated, challenged, and supported through their mentor. This is an invaluable and life long relationship that is developed to even help them through other challenging times in their life. This committee is more than just a committee to help with this one project – the mission of this committee has given way to a bigger vision and that is a relationship for a lifetime.”

Highlights from 2015-16 include:

– Total Highest Awardees statewide = 1,618
– 48 Gold Award recipients (mentored by 17 different mentors)
– 393 Silver Award recipients (increase of 10.1% from 2015)
– 1,177 Bronze Award recipients (increase of 14.7% from 2015)
– Approximate total of girls who RSVP’d for celebrations = 692
– Approximate total girls at celebrations = 637
– Mentor/volunteer lead trainings and brainstorming sessions
– Mentor assistance with conflict resolution
– Mentor support for staff decisions and implementation
– Second annual Gold Award mentor retreat with representation from each region

27 Gold Award mentors were officially given their award spring 2017 and many were presented with their certificate at the 2017 Gold Award Mentor Retreat in November at Hamp Hut. The mentors who received this exciting award are:

Alison Clark-Hardesty
Alyssa Street
Amy Bissell
Bonnie Ledet
Cara Heist
Carey Hofner
Cindy Miller
Connie Campbell
Debbie Haskins
Diana Smith
Eva Bauer
Heidi Ragsdale
Jennifer Colosimo
Karen Wilson
Kathi Reddan
Katie Hess
Kay Shaw
Leslee Randolph
Linda Robinson
Lorrie Marzulla
Maggie Murray
Nancy Mucklow
Rachael TerLouw
Sandy Jackson
Shauna Clemmer
Sheryl Blish
Stephani Vick

Since spring 2017, nine new Gold Award mentors have joined and we continue to onboard new members each month.

Congratulations GSCO Gold Award mentors! We appreciate all your hard work and dedication to the Gold Award program in Colorado!

Volunteer Spotlight: Linda Fuller, MCC member

I joined Girl Scouts as a snaggle-toothed second grade Brownie (which was the age at which Girl Scouting began, back in the olden days of the early ‘60’s).  I’m not aware of any burning desire to be a Girl Scout.  At the time, there were few after-school activities and perhaps, my mother was glad to have me participate in one of them.  But, oh what a difference it made in my life!  Girl Scouting provided consistency and a safe place from a chaotic home life.  We moved a fair amount and I could always count on Girl Scouts to provide me an opportunity for new friends and adventures.  And soon after I relocated to Colorado with my husband and children, signing up as a Girl Scout allowed me to make friends quickly.  After nearly 30 years in Colorado, my friends are mostly Girl Scouts, with whom I gather, meet and greet, and travel.  Retiring from the staff of the former Mile Hi Legacy Council ten years ago, I continue to lunch with my former colleagues.  Now, who else can claim such a long-lived, inspiring network of former co-workers as friends?

I was retired, however, not willing to be left out of the loop of Girl Scout doings, hence my interest in the Membership Connection Committee (MCC).  What’s kept me involved with the MCC for the last 10 years?  Kept in the loop, indeed, with an understanding of the current direction and efforts of Girl Scouts in Colorado.  Able to make a small contribution on matters of governance and membership.  Meeting other Girl Scouts, girls and adults, with a responsibility to inspire, educate, and support.  My term will soon come to an end and I hope I’ll be welcomed back after the required hiatus.

I’ve served as a troop leader, trainer, service unit manager, event organizer, and now board member in my nearly 50 years of Girl Scouting.  I’m a Lifetime Member of GSUSA.  I currently support two troops and continue to train in leadership and outdoor skills.  Serving as an MCC member gives me a great deal of satisfaction since it allows me to share my skills and opinions in ways that influence the future of our organization and our members.  I have two sons [“huge, handsome and handy”, former Boy Scouts and “Girl Scout boys (until they became too distracting at Girl Scout events)”] and had, at one time, 26,000 ‘daughters’.  A terrific experience that enriched my world, provided me with adventures (around the state, the USA and the world) and made me a better person, trying to live by the Promise and Law.  Through my mentoring of young Girl Scouts, I know I’ve made a difference and that feels good.

Girl Scouts of Colorado is lucky to have a unique governance system with the Membership Connection Committee as the centerpiece of our democratic process and a way to give our members a strong voice in the issues they care most about. Would you like to be a voice for Girl Scouts of Colorado? Speak up and contribute our success together! To reach the MCC, e-mail GSCO.MCC@gscolorado.org

 

Volunteer Spotlight: Marti Shuster, MCC member

How long have you been a Girl Scout?

45 years

How long have you been on MCC?

Less than a year

What inspired you to join MCC?

Back in Michigan, I had been a part of a similar committee and wanted to play my part in keeping communication open between staff and volunteers.

What have you learned through being part of this committee?

This is a hard working group of people from all over Colorado who strive to make Girl Scouts a great experience for all girls.

Why would you recommend being a member of MCC to other volunteers?

It’s a great way to get involved and stay involved and make a difference to Girl Scouts in Colorado.

Tell us about yourself.

I moved to Colorado four years ago from Florida (and Michigan where I grew up). I truly believe in what Girl Scouts represents and what it teaches girls. That’s why I have stayed in so long. I am currently the leader of my granddaughter’s Daisy troop and I love working with these young girls. I can tell how they have grown in just one year. Can’t wait to see how they progress over the next eleven!

I am also a member of GSCO History Committee.

Girl Scouts of Colorado is lucky to have a unique governance system with the Membership Connection Committee as the centerpiece of our democratic process and a way to give our members a strong voice in the issues they care most about. Would you like to be a voice for Girl Scouts of Colorado? Speak up and contribute our success together! To reach the MCC, e-mail GSCO.MCC@gscolorado.org

Volunteer Spotlight: Amy Bissell, MCC member

How long have you been a Girl Scout?

I have been a Girl Scout for 47 years.  Some of those were girl years, but most of them are adult years. I have  been a leader of every level except Girl Scout Daisies. My favorites were 30+ years as an older girl leader/advisor. Those were great years and I have kept in touch with many of “my girls.”  It is wonderful to see how they have changed from girl to woman.

How long have you been on MCC? 

This will be my second time to be on the MCC. My first time was in 2012 for two terms, I think.

What inspired you to join MCC? 

I love Girl Scouts and I want as many girls as possible to get to be a Girl Scout. My part of Colorado covers lots of miles and there are very few girls who participate in Girl Scouting in this area.  I want to make Girl Scouting available to girls in small towns.  I want to be able to help them achieve Highest Awards, travel abroad, and go on Destinations.  I also want to show girls and leaders that they can lead and that their dreams and goals can be met through Girl Scouting.  Lack of communication is a real problem here because so many do not have internet access and, since so much of Girls Scouting is now online, I would like to see more communications through other ways. I hope that progress can be made through MCC to help GSCO realize that there are big gaps in online communications that is not the girls’ faults.  There has to be another way to deliver program.

What have you learned through being part of this committee?

The more people work together to achieve a common goal, the better the experience and the outcome.  Working together is also a great example for girls to learn.  When they see what can happen with a group working together for a common goal, they will be more likely to use that in their lives, too.  Usually, the more people that share a goal and are willing to work for it, the better the committee will be in the future and the more likely that they will share their skills in team building with their troops who, in turn, will use it as they work for a girl-led troop and the more confidence that they will have to achieve it.

Why would you recommend being a member of MCC to other volunteers?

I have noticed, when I do trainings, that most of the leaders have no idea as to how GSCO works, how decisions are made, and what it takes to make Girl Scouting possible.  MCC is a good way to “get your feet wet.”  It does a lot of it’s work by phone, isn’t so expensive that most people could handle it.  You don’t have to travel a long way several times a year. An MCC member gets to know a lot of people in her territory as she talks to them about various concerns. I like it because I get to talk face-to-face with them and can answer questions, and, most of all, establish and a network of people who want to help the troop and the girl and the adult succeed, a relationship that can lead to better understanding of how GSCO works and they have someone they have met who is an person who really cares about girls and the Girl Scout program.

Tell us about yourself.

I am 71-years-old and my husband, Wayne, and I will celebrate our 50th wedding anniversary this summer.  I was born in Texas, went to school in Texas, married in Texas, lived for 2 1/2 years in Canada teaching in a coed boarding school while my husband was in Vietnam.  We have two children, a son, Terry (he and his wife Heather live in Broomfield) and a daughter, Beth (she and her husband Todd, live in Fort Worth and they have our three grandsons, Justyn, Jaxson, and Joshua.  Beth is a Gold Award recipient and Lifetime Girl Scout  and is the principal of an elementary school. Terry will be starting a new job in June.

Wayne and I love to travel.  We have been to almost all 50 states, all but two of the Canadian provinces, Europe, Africa, Ukraine, Vietnam, Ireland, and Central America.  Both of us are now retired and we were in Vietnam, Hong Kong, Singapore, and China in January and our anniversary gift to each other will be a trip to England and Scotland in August.

My Girl Scout experience began as a Brownie in Texas when cookies were around $1 a package.  I earned my First Class Award in high school.  I have been a day camp director, took girls to Macy Conference Center in New York, attended the WAGGGS international conference the year it was held at Macy. I was an alternate to the Vermont Round-Up and, as an adult was on the program staff twice  for a Wider Opportunity with 1,200 girls in   Tennessee. One year I was the music leader and another year I was the ceremonies director.  I was elected for two terms as the president of the Board of Directors for the Columbine Girl Scout  region here in southeastern Colorado.  I am currently a trainer, program resource person, on three different Gold Award Mentors committees right now, the GSCO History Committee,  GSCO Global Girl Scouting committee, and will begin my second time to be on MCC. I am also a Lifetime member of GSUSA and I am looking forward to 2020 to celebrate 50 years as a Girl Scout.  I was on the 100th GSUSA celebration state committee in 2012. I coordinated the library display here in Pueblo and did the Flat Juliette activities for the state event.  AND…I love being a Girl Scout!

I am the youth ministry leader at our church.  One of my duties with that is Vacation Bible School.  This is my  5th year to write my own curriculum and it’s a lot of fun!  I am responsible for the children’s classes at our church and I teach two classes every week.  I am retired from Dillards.  My favorite hobbies are reading and music.  I am currently trying to declutter our house and it should be finished some time in the next century! I love romance books and historical books and my favorite book is the Bible.  I have an Associate of Arts degree from Lubbock Christian University (College back then) and a Bachelor of Science in Education from Abilene Christian University (College back then).  I also did some post -graduate work at ACC, but, I never finished it.

I may have left something out, but, this is MORE than enough!

Girl Scouts of Colorado is lucky to have a unique governance system with the Membership Connection Committee as the centerpiece of our democratic process and a way to give our members a strong voice in the issues they care most about. Would you like to be a voice for Girl Scouts of Colorado? Speak up and contribute our success together! To reach the MCC, e-mail GSCO.MCC@gscolorado.org