Tag Archives: volunteer spotlight

Volunteer Spotlight: Elan Robinson

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state. Elan Robinson of Aurora in the Denver Metro region was nominated by a GSCO staff member as a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Elan to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a Girl Scout volunteer because I wanted to spend more time with my granddaughter. I was a Girl Scout for seven years as a child and remembered all the interesting things I learned. I wanted my granddaughter to have those same experiences. Now, four granddaughters later I’m having the time of my life! I’ve never regretted the decision to become a leader.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I’ve been a leader for four different troops. I’m a GSCO trainer, I especially love doing PA training. I’m also part of the service unit leadership team, helping to plan service unit events. I’m the service unit fall product program manager, as well as the TCM and FSM for my own troop,

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

As a volunteer, I’ve learned that anything is possible as long as you’re following your heart and your dream. I’ve never expected that my girls would do anything that I wouldn’t do. I’ve learned that I can do anything because of that. I’ve learned to be comfortable talking in front of a group.  I’ve learned that it’s okay for things to not go exactly according to plan and it will be fine. I’ve learned that as long as you keep exploring you keep growing.

What do you hope girls have learned from you? 

I hope my girls have learned to be compassionate. I hope they’ve learned that they can do anything that they set their mind too. I hope they have learned that they can and will make a difference as long as they set their mind to it. I hope they’ve learn to explore the world around them to try to make a difference.  I hope they’ve learned to look around them at what needs to be done and do it because they want to make a difference in someone else’s life or the world that they live in. I’ve watched my older girls look at their world and decide how they can make a difference in their high honor projects. I’ve watched my Brownies look around their immediate world and make a difference by seeing what needs to be done and do it without guidance or question.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

As a volunteer I’ve learned to just step into the moment and make it happen. I’ve learned that not all things are going to go exactly as planned, and that’s okay. I’ve learned that most things that are worth doing require some risk. Whether that risk is simply getting in front of a group of people or trying something that I never thought I would or could do. I’ve learned to be the best person I can be so I can be the best leader I can be.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Volunteer Spotlight: Rusty Merill

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state. Rusty Merill of Woodland Park in the Pikes Peak region was nominated by a GSCO staff member as a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Rusty to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I was a girl member for 10 years, started as a Brownie in 1948, and continued through INTERMEDIATES, and Seniors, receiving my Curved Bar award in 1957. I enjoyed Girl Scouting so much, I wanted to continue and share it with other girls.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

Assistant leader to an Intermediate troop, leader of one of the first JUNIOR troops in Jamestown, N.Y in 1963, then was leader of Brownie, Junior, Cadette and Senior troops, including being the Skipper of Mariner Ship 10 in Newport, R.I. Camping was was kept me in Girl Scouting, so became a camp counselor, unit leader, riding counselor at Tomahawk Ranch, program specialist, program director, and camp director at Girl Scout camps around the U.S. Have also been a Neighborhood Chairperson, Troop Consultant, Council Delegate to local council and national council meetings, and Master Council Trainer and curriculum design, a role I still hold.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

That you learn as much as the girls,  you make hundreds of lifetime friends, and you learn how to be FLEXIBLE and keep your sense of humor even in the middle of a disaster!

What do you hope girls have learned from you? 

That it really IS COOL to be a Girl Scout, no matter your age.  You get to experience wonderful opportunities, make lifetime friends, and learn skills that help you your entire life!

I recently reconnected with a former troop member on Facebook, and renewed a friendship after an absence of over 50 years!

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

G-I was very shy as a young girl, but being in Girl Scouting helped me gain confidence, that has carried over to my adult life. Now I am able to lead a group, teach skills, and speak to a large group.

I.Innovator-I have learned by trial and error, not afraid to learn from my mistakes, and how to be creative, especially in primitive camping, when you realize you don’t always have what you need. We devised an “architectural victory” on a backpacking trip, when we were on a 10 day donkey pack trip and it rained for 7 days, using our creative GS skills.

RISK TAKER-As a Girl Scout, you can be faced with a lot of challenges, either as a girl or adult, but the skills and experiences you learn as a girl or adult Girl Scout, helps you face new things with courage and confidence. I love trying new experiences!

LEADER-In the old program, troop government was the basis of all Girl Scouting, so I learned leadership when I became a PATROL LEADER, and eventually a TROOP PRESIDENT, and a member of the STATEWIDE SENIOR PLANNING BOARD. All these experiences continued to build on my leadership skills which continues in my adult life in and out of Girl Scouting.

As a retired teacher, and a current camp and outdoor professional, all my leadership skills have helped me in my varied careers of teaching, recreation, physical therapy, and above all camping and outdoor skills.
Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Volunteer Spotlight: Laurie Stragand

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state. Laurie Stragand of Littleton in the Metro Denver region was nominated by her daughter as a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Laurie to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a volunteer first to help with the Brownie group in our troop.  They had a lot of girls and the leaders seemed stretched thin. I thought I could make a difference with the group my daughter was in.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

My volunteering started with the Brownies and during my daughter’s second Brownie year. I have continued being a leader during my daughter’s time as a Junior and will carry on as a Cadette leader. I became our troop cookie mom in 2014-15 and have served as our cookie mom every year since.  Last year, I also volunteered for the treasurer position. 

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

Girl Scouts has given me a surprising benefit from being both cookie mom and treasurer; with both of these positions my skill with Excel has increased dramatically.  On a serious note, I have learned that you get out of Girl Scouting what you put into it and my daughter’s experience, along with the other girls, is better for my being actively involved.

What do you hope girls have learned from you? 

I hope the girls have learned from me while helping them with the badges.  As second year Juniors, the girls worked in groups and presented a badge for the rest of the Junior group.  I hope this helps the girls learn to be more independent, purchase within a set budget, take the initiative to research and lead the badges, and practice public speaking skills to overcome the fear of presenting to a group.  I also hope my own daughter has personally learned that it may not be easy to volunteer but with the right group/troop support it can be very rewarding.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Before taking on the roles I have in our troop, I was not used to being out in front of people. I am very comfortable doing things in the background.  As TCM for a troop of over 50 girls, I have created spreadsheets for booths to account for physical sales and the new digital side, for planning the initial cookie order, organizing cookie pickup times, and to schedule the last day for cookie return/settlement.  Holding parents and girls accountable for money and the schedule forces you to be assertive to achieve a better outcome for the whole troop. 

As treasurer, I have tried to make sure all the leaders are repaid the money they spend for badges and supplies in a timely manner.  To do that, we had to raise our troop dues and explain why the increase was necessary.  I feel in a smaller single level troop that would have been much easier than explaining to the parents of 50 girls in a multi-level troop why we needed a 60% increase in troop dues to continue to provide and an excellent program without the volunteer leaders personally covering the fees and expenses.
Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Volunteer Spotlight: Jordan Cadena

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Jordan Cadena of Thornton in the Metro Denver region volunteers at both the troop and service unit levels. She is also a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Jordan to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a volunteer to spend more time with my daughter and make a positive impact on girls’ lives. 

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I started out just helping at meetings. Last year, I became a co-leader and service unit treasurer. This year, I have my own multi-level troop (with an incredible leadership team and very involved families). I am also the service unit treasurer and service unit product program manager.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

Oh man!! Haha! So much and I never stop learning. I have learned and grown as a mom and woman. 

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope girls have learned how to be a good role model and teacher to younger girls. I hope they have learned how to be patient and compassionate, how to lead other girls, and celebrate others’ accomplishments. I hope they have learned how to set goals and know how to plan the process of achieving those goals. I hope they’ve learned to reflect and see where they can do more or make a positive difference or influence for/on others.  

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Girl Scouts has helped me become a G.I.R.L. on many different levels. I find myself being more outgoing and ready to take on new tasks with a higher level of confidence. Being a troop leader and service unit team member encourages me to be innovative often. I’m always trying to find ways to do things better in my troop and make suggestions where I see fit in the service unit. I will go the extra mile to ensure the success of my girls, my families, and our leaders in the service unit. I hold myself to a higher level of discipline and accountability because of Girl Scouts. Whatever I can accomplish now, I know there is always more and that I am capable of more. I’m constantly looking for ways to learn, improve, make a difference and inspire.  

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Volunteer Spotlight: Teri Shafer

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Teri Shafer of Westminster in the Metro Denver region is both a troop leader and a Product Program volunteer. She is also a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Teri to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

My oldest daughter joined Girl Scouts in kindergarten.  When my younger daughter entered kindergarten, she too wanted to be a Girl Scout. At back to school, I filled out an interest form and, knowing someone needs to start a troop, decided to check the box that I was willing to volunteer. Eight years later, I never once regretted checking that box!

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I was almost immediately contacted and asked if I wanted to start a troop so I very quickly became a troop leader.  Along the way, I’ve enjoyed mentoring other troops and new leaders.  I have participated in recruiting events. I also have volunteered as a SUFSM for our service unit and this year took on the role of SUCM. I annually take on the jobs of FSM and TCM for our troop which readily prepared me for stepping into the SU roles.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I would have a hard time listing all the things I’ve learned as a Girl Scout volunteer! I have learned to allow the girls more and more control of everything about the troop as they have grown and matured. They now run all meetings and plan out everything they are going to do. I’ve really loved watching this progression and they have all stepped up to be amazing leaders. Not only CAN they take charge, but they love doing it and it has been very empowering for each of the girls. I’ve also learned that I enjoy working with kids and it encouraged me to start a new career as a substitute teacher. I doubt I would have started on this path without my experience in Girl Scouts!

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope the girls have learned from me to not be afraid to step up and take on a new challenge. They were so nervous when they first started leading meetings and I just kept encouraging them to have fun with it and not worry so much about fitting everything in or doing everything perfectly. They really seem to have embraced this and are absolute pros at it! I also hope they’ve learned a lot (and I’m pretty sure they have!) about running a business from selling cookies. I have always expected them to take it seriously and although they can have fun while selling cookies they do have a job to perform. They are all so amazing at it and have enjoyed running cookie rallies to share their talents and knowledge with younger girls. Any one of the girls in my troop could get a job today with what they have learned from selling cookies!

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

My experience with Girl Scouts has definitely encouraged me to take on additional leadership roles in my life such as joining the PTO or stepping into service unit leadership roles. It also led to my career as a substitute teacher. I hope that taking on new challenges shows the girls in my troop and my own daughters that it can be rewarding and they shouldn’t be afraid of new challenges.  

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Volunteer Spotlight: Fran Brown

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Fran Brown of Woodland Park in the Pikes Peak region has been a troop leader for 30 years, in addition to filling many other volunteer roles. She is also a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Fran to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a Girl Scout volunteer because my most memorable and enjoyable years as a girl were those as a Girl Scout in an intermediate troop with the best leader ever!

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

My volunteer roles as a Girl Scout: 

  • Troop leader for 30 years: Brownies (one year), Juniors (27 years), and Cadettes (two years)
  • Neighborhood/service unit director (10 years)
  • Council trainer (40 years)
  • Leader of a Wider Opportunity
  • Camp cook
  • Many more

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

As a Girl Scout volunteer, I have learned that every girl and woman with the desire and willingness to learn, has the potential for greatness.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

My hope is that every girl that I have interacted with has learned something of value to enrich her life.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I am a G.I.R.L. as evidenced by the fact that I am proud to be a Girl Scout volunteer following the Girl Scout Promise and Law, with 68 years of experience!

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Volunteer Spotlight: Cassie Aymami

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Cassie Aymami of Littleton in the Metro Denver region is the manager of the South JeffCo Cookie Cupboard. She is also a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Cassie to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

A few years ago, my daughter was asking to join Girl Scouts. Unfortunately, there was not a troop at her school. So, I started a troop with a great co-leader. There are many girls who don’t get opportunities to try new things, explore, be brave, take risks, and go after their goals and dreams. I love the thrill of new adventures and thought it’d be fun and rewarding to share adventures with the girls. 

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

Troop leader, cookie cupboard,  service unit fall sale and cookie sale manager. And anything else Girl Scouts of Colorado asks for help with.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

1. Everyone has a story. Each person has their own unique story and it’s important to respect, appreciate, and take the time to learn their story.

2. The smallest of things can have a big impact. One new opportunity or one kind message can open a whole new world to these young girls. They will see that what they thought was impossible is possible. They will know they can accomplish anything.

3. Gratitude. Being a volunteer has changed how I look at things. It reminds me on a daily basis what really matters: family, friends, health, and to remember the small things that give me joy.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope they learn what I have learned: everyone has a story, the smallest of things can have a big impact and gratitude. I hope they also learn making mistakes is okay. Mistakes mean you are trying and you are learning. Taking risks might mean a mistake along the way, but it’s okay. Take the path that is needed to get to your goal and to fulfill your dreams.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I have always been these things and have raised my children this way. The G.I.R.L is part of being a strong, independent, honest, positive, respectful, loving, courageous, and successful young lady. All the qualities of the leaders we need and are making through Girl Scouts. 

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Volunteer Spotlight: Marcia Roe

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Marcia Roe of Westminster in the Metro Denver region volunteers with the Outdoor Adventure Club, in addition to leading a troop of older girls, running a day camp in the summer, and helping lead the Peak to Peak service unit. She is also a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Marcia to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

When my daughters were five they were watching a show on TV that showed a fictional version of Girl Scouting. They were into asking if things were real or not real for things they saw on TV, so when I told them the show was not real but that being a Girl Scout was real, and that I had been one too, they begged to try it out and we have been living real Girl Scout adventures together for the last eight years. It was an amazing thing to start together as a family tradition and the girls in our troop have become like family after all this time.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I am a leader for Troop 1359. Our troop has 16 girls 4th grade- 8th grade. I am also the cookie mom. 

I am a co-service unit manager for the Peak to Peak service unit. We are small, but mighty. 

I volunteer with GSCO’s Outdoor Adventure Club where once a month I work with an amazing team doing outdoor adventures, like dog sledding, with older Girl Scouts.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have learned that it is always necessary to be prepared with a song, riddle, and good story. 

Live the good stories, they make better tales to tell later. 

I have learned to ask for help when I need it. Elaborate plans and themes can be awesome, but not nearly as awesome as spontaneous free opportunities. 

Girl-led is always the way to go. 

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope that I am a role model to them that adventure is always out there. That they can accomplish great things with commitment and a big heart. 

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I feel that being a Girl Scout volunteer is to live all the aspects of being a G.I.R.L. Go-getter because I never dreamed we would have such big cookie program goals as to set and meet goals that can get our whole troop to super sellers and that we are planning and saving to go on an EF tour. Innovator because I don’t have to be an expert at everything, I just have to be open to trying new things, experiences, badges, etc. Risk-taker because outdoor adventures are equal parts of risk and awe. I am always up for the next adventure. Finally, a leader, I am humbled and honored that my girls look to me for guidance in their own leadership.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Volunteer Spotlight: Linda Gibbs

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Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Linda Gibbs of Cheyenne Wells in the Pikes Peak region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Linda to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I started out as a volunteer for my daughter’s troop. As the years went on and all three of my girls graduated and moved on, I continued as a volunteer because I enjoy what I do. The girls’ enthusiasm for something new and different makes me happy.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I started out as a co-leader.  Through the years, I have been a leader for all age groups. I have been a troop leader, group leader, day camp director, camp coordinator with awesome helpers, TCM, SUCM, SUM, and trainer.  I may have missed some …or not, but after 30 plus years of Girl Scouts, I just never thought to keep track.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

l have learned how to be a group leader, how to do public speaking without stammering too much, and have learned a bit about organization.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope the girls have learned to be kind and caring, to give without expecting something in return, respectful, leave any place they use clean or cleaner than when they started, and have fun while doing whatever they are doing. I always hope that they have learned one or two life skills, whether it be cooking, camping, or sewing.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I have learned that people are not always going to do everything for you.  If you want something to happen: Go do it. Sometimes what works for one person or group, doesn’t always work for everyone. Change things, make them work for you. Sometimes you just have to try something new and hope it works, if it doesn’t work, you try something different the next time. Taking the lead is how it all starts, it doesn’t mean you have to do it all!

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Volunteer Spotlight: Jennifer Ayers

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Jennifer Ayers of Johnstown in the Northern & Northeastern CO region started as a troop leader, but quickly became a product program volunteer as well. She is also a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Jennifer to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

When we first moved to Colorado from California a few years ago, my daughter wanted to join Girl Scouts and had asked me to be her leader. Knowing it would be beneficial to meeting people in our new community, I registered, but wasn’t able to get a troop formed right away, so she ended up joining a local multi-level troop. The next year, they needed someone to lead the Brownies and I gladly volunteered! Now, that both of my daughters are in Girl Scouts, I love being involved in their troop and doing something with them, instead of watching from the sidelines. I know that Girl Scouts has helped my family find an amazing group of people and I LOVE seeing these girls outside of Girl Scout activities and getting the biggest and warmest hugs! 

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I started volunteering as a troop leader and fall product program manager. This year, I added the role of cookie program manager and am becoming a service unit manager. We have a multi-level troop ranging from Daisies to Seniors. Although I’m officially leading the Brownies, our leadership team works well together and we all help each other out wherever needed. It is definitely a team effort to make sure we are helping our girls develop their G.I.R.L. skills.

I wasn’t sure where to start as a leader and the flexibility of the Girl Scout Program was kind of intimidating to me, so the volunteer online and in-person training summits have been a huge help. Networking with other leaders has been reassuring and inspiring on how to lead meetings and get ideas for activities so the girls can gain a lot from their time with Girl Scouts.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer? 

The girls have taught me more than I could have ever imagined. Our troop is full of incredible girls from all different backgrounds with different interests. It’s really been wonderful trying to make sure each girl is getting her own experience, helping them earn all of the badges that they want, and keeping things fun and character building. I have definitely had to learn to let them lead a lot more. Girl-led isn’t something that I excel at because I tend to take charge and over plan, but I am working on stepping back a bit and letting the girls have more opportunities to figure things out for themselves. 

These girls have also taught me the importance of getting outside my comfort zone and having some fun. I’m not exactly the most adventurous person, but leading our girls is pushing me to be a better version of myself and to just try new things. I am excited to see where our troop takes us as they get older! 

What do you hope girls have learned from you? 

As a troop leader, I really love being able to devote my time and energy into helping our girls grow and succeed, not only by earning badges and awards, but also as a valuable member of our community. I hope they have learned that they are fully capable of making the world a better place, no matter what their age is.

I also hope they have learned the Girl Scout Promise and Law is not just something they pledge at the beginning of our meetings and is something that really applies to our daily lives through our actions.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Volunteering has definitely helped me become a G.I.R.L. These girls deserve the best and I absolutely do not want to let any of them down so I have had to push through my own insecurities and hesitations and support our girls wherever I can. Life certainly has been a lot more fun and fulfilling because of volunteering with Girl Scouts and encouraging our troop to be more G.I.R.L. strong!

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.