Tag Archives: Volunteer News

Volunteer Spotlight: Terri Dayton

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Terri Dayton of Colorado Springs in the Pikes Peak region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Terri to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

While I was in the Air Force, stationed in Norway, several high school girls needed a leader. Since I grew up as a Girl Scout, I figured why not.  We had a blast together. I continued as a leader in Maryland for my daughter, Erica. Continuing that tradition when we moved to Colorado. It was an instant way to make friends. I have now been a leader for five troops.  Some my girls have been in an one that my daughters were not in. I love witnessing the growth of the girls from Daisies and Brownies, to young adults. It is so much fun teaching and mentoring them.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

Wow:  I have had soooo many roles. 

  1. Leader and co-leader of five troops in Colorado and Maryland
  2. SU Camp Director in Maryland
  3. SU Secretary in SU 16
  4. SU Manager/Director SU 16
  5. SU Treasurer SU 16
  6. Gold Award Mentor

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

How to be flexible. There is rarely a time where I have something planned and we stick to it. I have often gone from Plan A all the way to Plan L. To have extra ideas, games, songs, crafts, explanations, and reasons in my back and front pockets. I have learned to listen and watch the girls for cues of what works and what isn’t working. Each girl is special whether she is mine or someone else’s. We all have something special, unique to bring to the table.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

Hopefully, some life skills, flexibility, mentoring and leadership.  Most of all: love for each other. I think all the time we have spent together over the years, that my girls have learned that if something is not working, then we need to move on to something else. I have witnessed girls grow from timid young people to leaders in their career field, watching that one “tomboy” girl in elementary, middle, and high school become a fashion designer, helping girls find their passion, their dream, making a goal, then a plan, watching them live their dream is awesome. 

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I:  I have learned to be more flexible. Looking for ways to meet all the girls needs not just one or two and to help girls at every level. The girls have taught me to listen, think, discuss ways to improve, and or change an idea.

L:  I am a far better Girl Scout leader by taking this journey with the girls. Instead of leading all the time, I love to mentor them to become leaders, to find the best part of themselves all the time, believe it and live it.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

 

Volunteer Spotlight: Tressa Jukes

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Tressa Jukes of Mancos in the Southwestern Colorado region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Tressa to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer? 

I became a Girl Scout leader, so that I could provide another age group of girls in our community opportunities through my knowledge and experiences. When we relocated to the area, there was only one troop in our small town with no troops for younger girls. I also like to use the opportunity to be a positive role model and show girls that you can be fearless, dedicated, and determined.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I’ve been volunteering with Girl Scouts for six years. I started as a troop parent volunteer while my husband was stationed in Juneau, Alaska and added troop cookie manager to my resume while there. After we moved to Mancos, I became a troop co-leader. I have also been TCM for our troop, as well as our service unit cookie cupboard manager for the Mesa Verde Service Unit, and within the past two years I have acquired the title of co-director of Camp Conundrum with my partner in crime/friend/mentor, Frieda Knezek.  It is the only volunteer-run Girl Scout Camp in our area, providing our girls with a weekend in July full of of mystery solving shenanigans and fun.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have learned many things over the course of the last six or so years, including improvisation; as nothing really goes as planned. My girls have taught me selflessness, and that no matter how small they are, given the chance, they will move mountains. I have also learned that giving these girls the world and encouraging them in a positive way is the best way to help  them to reach their dreams and goals. 

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope that they take away a lot of things from me, most importantly their conviction to do what is right and to stand up for the people who don’t otherwise have a voice. I hope that they continue to see how important it is to volunteer in their communities, even if it is as simple as doing random acts of kindness and paying things forward. Most important, I hope they have learned that being fearless and determined will help them go far in life and to not back down when they believe strongly in something.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Prior to volunteering, I was happy to sit on the sidelines and follow the crowd, not realizing the impact one person could have. With volunteering, I have learned that if you want something done, the best way to do it is to do it yourself and get the ball moving. Being newer to the area has given me the opportunity to meet and connect with people to enhance my troop’s experiences and pave the way for younger troops to get involved, as well.  Organizing activities with other community organizations has opened many doors for our troop and exposes them to many other positive women, whom they wouldn’t probably have otherwise met.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

Volunteer Spotlight: Mariah Emond

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Mariah Emond of Delta in the Western Colorado region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Mariah to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a Girl Scout volunteer as I wanted my daughter to have the same access to amazing opportunities I had as a girl in Girl Scouts. I enjoy the camaraderie with other mothers raising a Girl Scout. I love to be seen as a part of another girl’s life as a positive supporter- encouraging them to hang out another 15 minutes at the booth sale as I know their goal to earn their incentive is but another buying customer! I am truly a supporter of all prosocial, after school activities that work on skill development for our youth- these kids need it now more than ever. 

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

This is my first volunteer position as an adult! I enjoyed 11 years of being a Girl Scout and two years at summer camp near Deckers as the Challenge Course Facilitator. So far, I had been able to help at Applefest with the outreach table. I help with our bi-monthly troop meetings. I attended the cookie rally sleepover and made a short presentation on ways to sell more cookies! We created the first summer camp on the Western Slope in Delta County and had tons of fun exploring the history of Fort Uncompaghre and swimming. Most of all, I am a parent of an amazing little go-getter and love to help her sell nuts, magazines, and cookies.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

Everything is possible with teamwork and creative thinking! Having Ms. Mary Bucklin as our troop leader and SU, we are especially blessed to have her years of experience that she shares graciously. I watch her be attentive to all the girls, organize the parents, and make up a year of activities with us! I want to grow up and be just like her- giving, gracious, and so passionate about giving girls the opportunities to succeed. I also have learned so much from our co-leader, Kris Love, about the new Girl Scout processes of cookie buying, apps, and ways to keep everything organized in Girl Scouts. I also love to read on the Girl Scouts of Colorado Blog about al the things we can participate in statewide. It’s great information about the connectedness of an organization. The new online trainings are helpful and to the point on a wide variety of things- like outdoor cooking!

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope they see that they can be anyone they dream of, that they can be fierce with their dreams, and kind to the world while they achieve their dream. I want all girls to know that the level playing field of life exists, if we as women dare to recreate the perception of ourselves into authors of out life and the story is our own unique one to tell. I hope that we can grow a kind generation, one that cares for all the resources on the planet!

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I take more risks to get to know people. I am a social person, but not always with people I haven’t yet met. I feel more confident talking to people about the wide world of Girl Scouts and have pushed outside my normal comfort zone. It’s been fun getting to work on new projects that don’t require my professional self to show up- I can just be a caring parent/adult and enjoy having fun with our troop. I feel that Girl Scouts made my foundation for leadership skills and I have always love to learn more to be a better leader. I feel confident that we have the tools in Girl Scouts to share with every girl to grow up to be herself and good to the world!

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

Volunteer Spotlight: PJ Chenoweth

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. PJ Chenoweth in the Pueblo & Southeastern CO region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked PJ to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a Girl Scout volunteer after my daughter had been a Girl Scout for about three years. I loved what the program had done for her self-confidence, her ability to speak in front of others, and how it had expanded her circle of friends to include Girl Scouts in other towns. I completely believe this program does amazing things for the girls who participate, and I want to continue to keep this program available in my town.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

As a Girl Scout volunteer, I have worked with girls to earn badges and complete Journeys, guided them through small community service projects, and for the past two years, I have served as the troop’s cookie manager.

I was also fortunate to have assisted with day camp for a couple of years.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have learned several valuable skills including inventory management, meeting planning including planning on the fly, great camping skills, and more. But, the best thing I’ve learned being a Girl Scout volunteer is that there is a vast group of women and girls that does their best to live by the Girl Scout Promise and Law, and it’s a great feeling to know there are so many who are ready to take action in times of need.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope that the girls I have interacted with have learned skills that they can use later in life, I hope they have learned not to limit themselves in setting goals, and I hope they have learned to always do their best to live by the Law and Promise, but to know that everyone slips up sometimes.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

My experience as a volunteer helped me become a G.I.R.L. by getting me out of my comfort zone. I had to become a go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, and leader by jumping in as the troop’s leader and cookie manager shortly after beginning a new Girl Scout year. Suddenly, it was all on me to keep the troop going. I quickly recruited another parent to become my co-leader, and we were off on adventure!

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

Girl Scout alumna summits all 58 of Colorado’s peaks over 14,000 feet as solo climber

Submitted by Debbie Swanson

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

Laura Clark, a Girl Scout alum and current troop leader in the Pikes Peak Region, summited all of Colorado’s 58 peaks over 14,000 ft. solo. She completed them in under 14 months, finishing in September of 2018. Laura is a Lifetime Girl Scout and contributes much of her success to the experiences she had in the Girl Scout program. In Girl Scouts, Laura found a space where she could be herself, unlike at school where she felt pressured to fit in. Laura became a Girl Scout in 1986 and was a member of Girl Scout Troop 1494 and later Troop 1503 in Mission Viejo, CA. Her leadership journey began as troop treasurer, collecting 50-cent meeting dues. Her troop rotated through leadership positions, learning how to run effective meetings, set agendas, keep accurate records, and plan activities. Because of Girl Scouts, Laura was able to try new things. If she was interested in sewing or hiking or camping or cooking or first-aid, there was always a Girl Scout badge where she could learn more. She made lifelong friends in Girl Scouts, of whom with many she’s stayed in contact. Her favorite Girl Scout experience was camp. And, of course, singing Girl Scout songs!

“Girl Scout Camp is where I first learned how to shoot a bow and arrow, start a fire, cook outdoors, use a compass, hike at night, rock climb, swim and canoe in a pond, tack and ride and care for a horse (while backpacking in all types of weather) and successful problem solving and conflict resolution strategies. I was encouraged to lead where I could and to try new things.”

Summitting all 58 of Colorado’s peaks over 14,000 feet usually takes years, if not decades, to complete. Laura credits Girl Scouts for the physical and mental strength, endurance, careful planning, determination, adaptability, high-risk tolerance, willingness to ask questions and research, and love of the outdoors, animals, and all types of weather needed to complete the feat. Laura carefully chose her ‘finisher,’  the last peak a climber needs to summit, to say they have summited them all, and it is usually chosen for a special reason. 14er enthusiasts are known for choosing their finisher well in advance. Laura chose Mt. Sherman in honor of Camp Sherman, the Girl Scout Camp in California that started her on her path towards loving the outdoors, adventure, goal-setting, leadership, and girl power.

Laura currently leads Girl Scout Senior Troop 2393 and the troop’s Outdoor Survival Team and has assisted seven girls in earning the Girl Scout Gold Award (and has several more working towards this goal). Last year, she led the first-ever Girl Scout Rocket Troop 46319.
Laura works in marketing and also writes for her blog where she reflects on hiking and Girl Scouts. Laura credits the interpersonal skills, business skills, goal- setting, and marketing she learned from the Girl Scout Cookie Program to helping her in her marketing career.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Volunteer Spotlight: Catherine Bendl

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Catherine Bendl of Golden in the Metro Denver region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Catherine to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a Girl Scout volunteer because my girls were interested in trying Girl Scouts and I wanted to make sure their experience was a good one. Now that I’m a troop leader, I appreciate those volunteers who help to make events and outings possible because they are willing to help.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I am currently troop leader for our Cadette troop. It is such a rewarding experience and I’m so glad I took the leap to start a troop. Watching these older girls connect is so wonderful! Previously, I volunteered as an adult member of troops and helped with overnights, cookie sales, badge work, and meeting prep.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have learned that volunteering is usually so easy and ends up being so worth it in the end. 

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope the girls have learned that giving time to help others is a vital part of what makes us successful people. I hope that they see that giving of yourself brings joy to others and to self.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I started my own business just before we started the new troop last fall. This experience has helped me to pursue my business in going after new clients and taking risks doing tasks I’ve never done before. I hope by making my business successful that the girls will learn that being a leader is a positive thing and will help them in the future. 

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

 

Volunteer Spotlight: Aneida Slomski

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Aneida Slomski of Colorado Springs in the Pikes Peak region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Aneida to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I got my daughters into Girl Scouts because I enjoyed being a Girl Scout when I was a girl. It’s a great program and after a couple years, the troop needed a new leader, so I volunteered.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I started out as a Brownie Leader, and then we became a multi-level troop and I went up through the levels with my daughters. I work with the Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors now and I’m the treasurer for our troop. I love working with this level because they’re so capable and have such good ideas. I have volunteered at day camps and service units. Now, I’m a service unit co-director. I’m on various committees on the service unit level to help plan our fall campout and World Thinking Day activities. I help coordinate summer activities with our troop, like campouts and trips to go caving (the crawling on your knees kind, not the walking kind) and whitewater rafting. We have camped at three different Girl Scout camps in Colorado through the years. I’ve also helped coordinate many trips to local businesses and organizations, so the girls can learn how things work in our area and the girls can get service project ideas.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I am a homebody. The girls really get me out of my comfort zone and I like it. I started out not even knowing how to start a fire. I had to learn to cook outdoors; I think sometimes I cook better outdoors than indoors! I learned PowerPoint and Excel to help the troop. The first spreadsheet I made added the phone number. I had to learn knots, map and compass, lashing, and other outdoor skills, so I could teach the girls for the Reach for the Peak camping competition. They learned from the leaders, and then they just ran with it. They got so good at it that they reached the point where they told the leaders where to sign and where to drive them and they won the highest award.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope the girls have learned to try new things. If a girl has an idea (and they always have amazing ideas), there are adults who will help them get to where they want to be, cheering them on. I hope the girls learn about the outdoors and how capable they are in that environment. In a multi-level troop, they really get the opportunity to work with girls of different ages and cultural backgrounds. I hope they have learned that our differences are no big deal.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Being a leader has taught me to be on the lookout for exciting things to share with the girls and to work with others to make them happen. As an innovator, I’ve learned to create events from scratch like day camps and cultural events. I am not the type to take a lot of risks, but I was a risk-taker and a leader when I organized a townhall meeting to save Sky High Ranch. I have never gotten involved like that before, and it was really amazing to see my adult daughters, the girls from our area, former camp counselors, and so many local leaders coming together to speak up and save our camp. Council listened, they were very supportive, and Sky High Ranch was open for summer camp again. We did it for the girls.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

 

 

Volunteer Spotlight: Christine Kucera

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Christine Kucera of Steamboat Springs in the Mountain Communities region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Christine to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I’ve become a Girl Scout volunteer for many reasons. First, I volunteered to become a troop leader while in college at Illinois State University. I missed all of the fun activities and my connection to younger girls. I felt that I had a lot to share with a group of Brownies. I had a wonderful time taking them camping and teaching them what I remembered as most special to me.

After I got married and moved to California, I volunteered again. I wasn’t ready to have children of my own yet, but again missed my connection with girls. I became very involved with a troop of girls through Juniors and Cadettes. We taught them life skills, took them canoeing, camping, and skiing.  One of them had never seen snow and now takes her family skiing.

We moved to Colorado and took a break from volunteering to spend more time on the slopes and raising children. I resisted volunteering for a while because I felt that I was too busy with my two children. My kids went to a small local charter school north of Steamboat Springs and I realized that my daughter needs to get to know more town kids to help ease her eventual integration into the high school. I was able to find a Girl Scout troop that would hold off starting the meeting after school until we could arrive. This was a nice sized troop that had lots of fun playing games and singing songs, but was not doing any badges. I was hoping to have my daughter enjoy Girl Scouts without her mom as the leader, but I stepped in and helped. I led this troop through Bronze and Silver awards, trained them to win Reach for the Peak, and am guiding them down their paths to the Gold Award. Girl Scouts has become an important part of my soul.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I now have many roles in Girl Scouts. I am a Senior/Ambassador troop leader, member of the local Girl Scout grant committee, Mountain Communities region volunteer trainer, local troop camp director, and 2018 National Delegate. My troop and I lead many local events each year, ranging from bridging, World Thinking Day, cookie rallies, monthly multiage group meetings, and annual troop camp. I am a trainer for adults, especially 101 and Camping and Cooking. I am the trainer for Program Aides and soon Volunteer in Training. I plan and implement PA-run troop camp for Juniors and older each summer. I was honored to be selected as a National Delegate and want to take my troop to the National Convention in Florida in October 2020.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have learned that when girls are challenged, they step up and can accomplish anything. I have seen Daisies learn how to use a compass, tie lashing, and do dishes for all of camp with more maturity than the average middle schooler. I have seen girls struggle with the stress of the Reach for the Peak Competition, immediately start planning their next year’s theme and come back two years later to win the Peak Award. My troop ran a local older girl super troop, teaching outdoor skills, Girl Scout ceremonies, songs and games, and had girls repeatedly ask me when I will be healthy enough to start it up again this year until I got it scheduled. I have watched my daughter work diligently for a year and a half on her Gold Award, only to say “I know I could be done at this point, but I want to go bigger and make a real difference.” I have girls from my California troop who contacted me over Facebook and reminisce with me about the things we did and how they are sharing those things with their families. I have learned that everything I do with Girl Scouts makes a lasting impact on young women and it makes me feel inspired every time I see an unspoken thank you.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope that girls learn to pass on their strengths while improving their weaknesses. My greatest hope is they realize that they are role models for people younger and older than themselves and they can make as big of an impact as they desire.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

My greatest desire is to give my daughter amazing experiences that help her through her life journey. While trying to accomplish this, I have stepped up and become a go-getter. I have had to come up with innovative ways to share everything I know and teach her things I am learning for the first time. I have taken risks that I would not have dreamed of before that have made me a stronger person. Have I become a better leader than before? I think that goes without saying. Even more importantly than my personal growth, I have watched all the girls I’ve interacted with turn in a G.I.R.L. by following my example. Girl Scouts makes all of us better women.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

 

Volunteer Spotlight: Cindy Miller

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Cindy Miller of Denver in the Metro Denver region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Cindy to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I am passionate about women in leadership and have always been active in women’s leadership organizations. Girl Scouts provides the most amazing leadership development programs for girls. The broad membership of Girl Scouts means that we impact so many girls as an organization. As a volunteer, I get to impact the organization as a whole and also individual girls, which I love.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I am a Gold Award mentor and committee member. I mentor up to five girls at a time. I serve on the GSCO Board of Directors and as a Committee Chair, and I volunteer to support events around the state whenever or wherever I can. I help with the 99’s Aviation Patch Day each year (I’m also a member of the 99’s), and I love working at a cookie distribution site each year. 

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

That our future is a good one because there are so many smart, engaged young women in Girl Scouts, who are already making an impact on the world. I can’t wait to see what they do next. I’ve also learned that there are so many dedicated volunteers, who do so much for Girl Scouts. I am humbled by the time and energy  that so many of them invest.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope that girls learn to approach challenges as opportunities to learn, that solving a problem is rewarding, and that learning new things is always exciting even if you don’t think you will “use” that skill or information again. I learn a great deal from girls (and other volunteers) – especially the highest awards girls. The problems they see in the community and the world, and how they go about making an impact, inspires me.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I think I was already a G.I.R.L. I just didn’t have that acronym to describe it. Volunteering with Girl Scouts, however, has given me the opportunity to apply my leadership skills in new ways. Being around other G.I.R.L.s, I have learned to see and think about problems in new ways (innovator).

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

Volunteer Spotlight: Becky Woodbridge

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Becky Woodbridge of Durango in the Southwestern Colorado region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Becky to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

My daughter was the main reason why I volunteered for Girl Scouts. However, I became a leader because I wanted to support as many girls as I can in my community. I am an advocate for women to use their voice and live with dignity. Beliefs are formed when we are young and I feel strongly that girls need support early on, so they grow into being a strong leader and to build the belief that they have the right to use their voice and what they say and do matters. I was a Girl Scout and it was a tremendous foundation for my morals, values, and character.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout. 

I am the troop founder and leader of 26243 in Durango. We started in July 2018 and currently have 12 girls: Daisies, Brownies, and a Junior. We are expanding our troop in the fall and adding a third co-leader. I am a very active troop leader and we are very involved in the community events.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

Oh boy where do I start… I had wonderful memories of Girl Scouts, but mostly it was Girl Scout Camp, selling cookies (1970’s), and doing a craft at a meeting. Beyond that, I was not really familiar what a Girl Scout meeting was all about. There was so much to learn and especially all of the new products, learning tools and resources like the Volunteer Toolkit. I have learned how to listen to what the girls want in a meeting, structure a meeting, and manage different age groups. The Daisies operate so differently than the Brownies.

What do you hope girls have learned from you? 

I hope girls have learned by my example. Leadership has many different facets. Listening to concerns and addressing them. Be polite and treat everyone of all ages with respect and follow the Girl Scout Law. To be adventurous, enjoy the journey, and take risks.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

I’ve been a leader of my own real estate company, a lead purser with American Airlines, and now Girl Scouts. Applying it to children with the right degree of go getting, inspiring innovation, taking risk in new territory has pushed me to be better and more effective leader. Without a doubt Girl Scouts is playing a very important role for me as a leader with my new start up business. It’s making me stronger!

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.