Tag Archives: Volunteer Appreciation Month

Volunteer Spotlight: Toni Rath

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Toni Rath of Berthoud in the Northern & Northeastern CO region is  a troop leader, service unit manager, service unit cookie manager, and member of GSCO’s Membership Connection Committee.  She is also a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Toni to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

My husband is retired Air Force so volunteering was just what we do as a family. My girls wanted to join Girl Scouts and the troop needed a leader so I said “Sure, why not!”

The girls were young so they would have no idea that I didn’t know at the time (or anytime we do something new!) what I was doing as long as we had fun.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

This list keeps getting longer.. troop leader, service unit manager, PA/VIT girl trainer, service unit cookie manager and trainer, day camp unit leader, and I just started on MCC.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

WOW, I have learned A LOT!!  When doing a badge or a patch with the girls, I learn more about them and how much I actually didn’t know about the topic of the badge. I think the girls teach me more than anything. They show me a new perspective and different ways something can be accomplished.  As a service unit manager, I have learned how important each and every volunteer in our area is, no matter how big or small their roll is. Each comes with a  gift or expertise that our girls can really learn from. I have also learned how important it is to know my fellow service unit managers in other areas to get troop ideas, information and support and hopefully able to do the same for them.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope that the girls have learned to ask more questions of each other and of themselves and really listen to better know those around them, and know themselves. Activities really rule their lives these days and it is important to really listen and reflect on what is important to them. I also hope that they have learned how to be encouraging. A kind word and the ability to notice when someone has made the right choice can go a long way! They need to know if I am willing to be patient with them and go down the rabbit hole to learn to recover from a mistake, as they get older, they can do the same for themselves and their peers.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Well, those cookies aren’t going to walk to a booth and sell themselves! Ok, maybe they will as long as someone gets them there.. As the girls in our troop get older, it seems the push to get them to go and get gets harder. I have to model that for them.  If I want them to be a go-getter, innovator, risk-taker and a leader, I have to do the same. They push me to at least try something new, make something better, and ask others to join me on my crazy journey. I can’t ask them to do something if I am not willing to do the same.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

 

Volunteer Spotlight: Elizabeth Moore

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Elizabeth Moore of Conifer in the Metro Denver region has served as a troop leader and service unit volunteer for many years. She is also a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Elizabeth to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

Initially, I began volunteering because it was the only way for my daughters to get the Girl Scout experience I wanted for them. As my role expanded, however, my motivation became to deliver the Girl Scout experience to as many girls within my sphere of influence that I could.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout?

First and foremost, I am a troop leader. My troop spans from kindergarten Daisies to a 9th grade Senior. I have many co-leaders that help me manage all the different levels of girls, but I manage most of the administrative work and a lot of the activity planning. Right now, I am actively leading the Daisy and Cadette levels. I also serve as service unit manager (a natural outgrowth from managing such a large troop) and a trainer (primarily to fill the need I saw within my service unit).

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have learned a lot about event planning and communication. I’ve learned about teaching girls at all ages. I’ve also learned a lot about myself – what I’m capable of, what my strengths are, and where I can still use some help.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope that girls have learned how to be confident, how to pursue things they are interested in learning about, and how to take risks that they might not otherwise.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

My experiences in Girl Scouts have enabled me to reenter the workforce after 10 years of raising my children. I never would have had the skills – or the confidence! – I needed without having volunteered.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Volunteer Spotlight: Amy Caperton

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Amy Caperton of Littleton in the Metro Denver region has served as a troop leader and Product Program volunteer for many years. She is also a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Amy to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a leader when my younger daughter started kindergarten. My older daughter was already involved in Girl Scouts, so I wanted to be sure my younger daughter also had an opportunity to do so. I was not sure I would have time to do it with working full-time and having three children, however it has been a great experience that I have thoroughly enjoyed. I would not change it for anything.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I started as troop cookie manager for my older daughter’s troop. I did that for 12 years. I was also my service unit’s cookie cupboard for two years. I moved on to service unit cookie manager, a role which I have done now for eight years. I have also been fall product program manager for my service unit for the last three years. Finally, and most importantly, I have been a leader for my troop since kindergarten, so this is my 11th year as their leader.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have learned that it is important to listen to what the girls have to say, be patient and understanding, and have lots of resources available to accomplish our troop goals.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope the girls in my troop, wether presently or not, have learned to stand up for what they believe in, speak for themselves, be accountable for their words and actions, not be afraid to take risks, think outside the box, and be kind to others– truly live by the Girl Scout Law.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I have become a go-getter in figuring out what I needed to do to accomplish my troop’s goals. I had to be an innovator by rolling with the punches. When things don’t go as planned, I’ve learned you have to adapt.  I’ve had to be a risk-taker by trying new things and getting outside my comfort zone at times. My role as leader has benefitted me by helping me be more outspoken in other aspects of my life as well. I think overall it has benefitted me to know I can accomplish what I set out to do and also be more confident in myself.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

What’s the big deal about volunteer recognitions?

Submitted by Caroline Cornell

Metro Denver

Aurora

Are you up for a quest?  My challenge to each service unit across Colorado is to find your outstanding volunteer for 2017/18 and nominate her (or him) for an adult recognition award.  It’s an easy process and will make a world of difference when you celebrate your success.  The deadline for submission is March 31, 2018.

Why bother recognizing our volunteers?

In a perfect world, girls would remember to thank their troop leaders every year on Leader Appreciation Day (pssst – it’s April 22).  To celebrate, parents might help their daughter write her troop leader a special note.  Or, bring her a small surprise like a plant or some homemade cupcakes.  But wait, who tells girls and their parents that it’s Leader Appreciation Day?  Yep, that’s the trap most of us fall into.  The reality is, troop leaders don’t.  Because it just feels weird.

I GET IT. We’re all volunteers.  We’re not in it for the recognition.  We don’t need a t-shirt.  We come back year after year to experience the satisfaction of watching a girl grow from a timid Daisy to a confident and strong Gold Award Girl Scout who’s ready to bridge to adulthood.  Let’s face it, we’re here for the hugs.

Formal volunteer recognition isn’t something a volunteer would ever ask for, but it is something that makes her feel valued and appreciated.  Kind of like when your kids magically clean their bedroom for your birthday and you didn’t need to remind them about it.

What does it fell like to receive an adult volunteer recognition?

About seven years ago, my service unit decided  to celebrate our volunteers by recognizing at least one person who’s done an outstanding job that year.  Just to make it interesting, we keep it top secret until we hold our end of year celebration.  It’s become a great tradition and has yielded some really big surprises.  Being a volunteer should be celebrated.

As the Membership Connection Committee chair, I know that Girl Scouts of Colorado recognized nearly twice as many volunteers in 2017 than we did the year before.  This increase still means we only recognized about 1% of our volunteers.

What do I do next?

Nominate someone today!  Applications are open now and must be completed by March 31, 2018, to qualify for this year’s award cycle.  http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/for-volunteers/volunteer-appreciation/adult-recognition-nominations.html. All of the details about the application process including the qualifications can be found in the Appreciation Award Packet.

Questions about the MCC?  Learn more at: http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/about-girl-scouts/membership-connection-committee.html

Volunteer Spotlight: Inez Winter

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In honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month, Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state. Troop Leader Inez Winter in Pagosa Springs was nominated as a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community. She recently shared the following letter about why she is a GSCO volunteer.

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I have always known that I wanted to be a Girl Scout leader. I remember being of Brownie-age and watching the kids down the street heading for their Girl Scout meeting. I don’t know why my mom didn’t let me be in Girl Scouts at that time. I told myself at a young age that if I couldn’t be a Girl Scout I would someday be a leader. I was so excited when my daughter started kindergarten and brought home the flyer to join. I went to the organizational meeting and of course, I was the first person to raise my hand to be a leader. I was able to be a leader for my oldest daughter for almost seven years and for my youngest for two years. Now, many years later, I am into my second year as a leader for my two granddaughters. We currently have 12 girls in our troop. This is the beginning of my 10th year as a Girl Scout leader. I can honestly say that being a Girl Scout leader was one of the choices that I made with my heart and a choice that I have never regretted making. I have many girls who, still to this day, tell me about how much of a difference that I have made in their lives. I am still in contact with many of “my girls.” Many of them are mothers themselves now and it always puts a smile on my face when we talk about the “old days,” going to Rancho Girl Scout Camp, camping at the Sand Dunes, Mesa Verde, and so many other places that we went to. We always made memories that will truly last a lifetime. If you have an extra couple of hours a week, we’d love to have you join us as an assistant leader or better yet start your own troop as a leader.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

 

Volunteer Spotlight: Melissa Palka

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In honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month, Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state. Melissa Palka in the Pikes Peak region is a lifetime Girl Scout and a leader for Troop 40910.  She is a very dedicated volunteer who juggles her medical career, family, and her Girl Scout leadership role with a lot of energy and grace.  Melissa is very highly spoken of by her peers and is well loved by the girls she leads. We asked her to answer a few questions about her experiences as a Girl Scout volunteer. We hope you find her story as inspiring as we did!

How long have you been a Girl Scout?

I have been a Girl Scout for 27 years, 11 as a Girl Scout, 16 as a leader.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a Girl Scout volunteer because I believe in the Girl Scout mission. I want to assist you ladies in recognizing, and achieving their maximal potential. 

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I have had the privilege of holding various leadership positions. I have worked in outreach multi-level troops at Boys and Girls clubs, military posts, and in the community. I currently am a Brownie troop leader.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer? What do you hope girls have learned from you?

As a Girl Scout volunteer, I have learned many things. Girl Scouts teaches me new things often. I have learned organization, communication, and leadership skills. Most important lesson I have learned: let the girls lead!

I hope the girls have learned: this world is full of amazing opportunities, believe in yourself, be persistent while working hard, and you will be successful.

What is your favorite Girl Scout memory?

My favorite Girl Scout memory was a trip to Our Chalet in Switzerland, where me met international Girl Guides, hiked in the Swiss Alps, and traveled to various cities in Europe. What an incredible experience!

What words of advice do you have for other volunteers?

Words of advice for volunteers: use a planner to stay organized, communicate often with parents (I love email updates), value Girl Scout input in the planning, you do NOT have to coordinate everything as the leader, have fun and the girls will too!

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Volunteer Spotlight: Nawal Shahril

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In honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month, Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state. Nawal Shahril in the Pikes Peak region was nominated as a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community. Although she is only in her second year of leadership, Nawal has been described by her co-leaders as a “dynamo,” who puts a tremendous amount of love and energy into leading her girls in the troop.  She is creative, fun, and works very hard.

GSCO asked Nawal to answer a few questions about her experiences as a Girl Scout volunteer. We hope you find her story as inspiring as we did!

How long have you been a Girl Scout?

Two years

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

It was a no-brainer when my girls expressed an interest in joining Girl Scouts. I always wanted to be one back in my hometown in Malaysia. When the opportunity of joining Girl Scouts with my kids came up, I jumped on it and embarked on this wonderful journey.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

Before we start any badges or journey, I always question myself “What can I do/offer more to these girls to create an experience that they will never forget?” Activities don’t just limit to follow certain guidelines, but to go beyond what is expected in every facet of Girl Scouting. My team and I brainstorm, plan, and execute activities that excite, build confidence, are fun, and out of the norm to challenge the girl’s thinking and expose them to various cultures and aspects of life. I act as a planner, the go-to person, a buddy, and most importantly, a sister to every Girl Scout.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer? What do you hope girls have learned from you?

By just looking at the badges chart, I know instantly that we are going to learn so much and have the best adventure ahead. I’ve learned to be more creative in my approach and be a better planner and at time management. I’ve learned that different individuals have different needs and you just have to have different tricks up your sleeves. I hope that my enthusiasm, fun, and positivity inspire every girl that I met to be bold, brave, and not to be afraid to dream big. Girls can achieve anything that they have set to achieve.

What is your favorite Girl Scout memory?

I would say every event that brought the girls together is my favorite memory so far! Camping, World Thinking Day.. you name it! I just love the giggles, cheers, laughter, and fun time the girls had together. Reminded me of myself when I was that age 🙂

What words of advice do you have for other volunteers?

The moment you feel like quitting or giving up because Girl Scouts’ activities took almost 60% of your free time, just stop and reevaluate. Your kids will grow up pretty fast and you might not have the chance to be with them to do all sorts of activities. As long as they are enjoying and making a difference in their lives through Girl Scouting, you know that you are not going to quit just yet. Just enjoy the process and absorb as much as you can. It’s all worth it!

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Volunteer Spotlight: Lorrie Marzulla

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In honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month, Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state. Lorrie Marzulla in the Pikes Peak region was nominated as a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community. She has several GSCO volunteer roles, including:

  • Longtime Service Unit Product Sales Manager for Service Units 412 and 406
  • Member of the Gold Award Committee for the Pikes Peak region and mentor to Gold Award candidates
  • Active member of the Pikes Peak region’s Cookie Committee

We asked Lorrie to answer a few questions about her experiences as a Girl Scout volunteer. We hope you find her story as inspiring as we did!

How long have you been a Girl Scout?

I was a Girl Scout as a Brownie, Junior, and two years as a Cadette. Our troop’s leader could no longer be a leader for our troop and we could not find another leader or troop to join, so we had to disband. It was a big disappointment for all of us.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

Due to my Girl Scout experience, I felt that there would be dedicated adult leadership for my daughter’s troop. I felt that the Girl Scout legacy would be different for the girls in my troop. I wanted them to experience all of the wonderful skills and leadership opportunities that Girl Scouts had to offer.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I was always the Troop Cookie Mom for our troop and enjoyed helping the girls to achieve their goals in selling. Selling cookies was a necessary part of our agenda – raising funds to support lofty goals that were decided by the girls. We had a girl run troop from their first day of Juniors. It was expected and well-received.

I also am a judge for Reach for the Peak. I find it fascinating to watch these teams compete using their camping skills, but love to watch the teams figure out how to actually perform as a team. I feel anyone can learn the correct way to tie a knot, but working as a high performance team is a skill you learn with practice and with others to be successful.

I also volunteer as a mentor on the Gold Award Committee. I love helping these high achieving ladies develop wonderful projects that enhance our community and turn their ideas into a program that continues long after they graduate from high school. It is fun to watch their confidence and leadership grow as they establish their goals and then achieve them. It still amazes me how they achieve and close out a Gold Award project and still keep up their academics, sports, jobs, and everything else they are committed to in life. The girls really learn how to juggle priorities and learn how to put 10 lbs. of stuff in a 5 lb. can.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer? What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope they learn that if they set their mind to a goal, they can achieve it with proper planning. I hope girls learn how to work with others to achieve their goals and how to reach out to other women to gain support in all areas of life. Teamwork, teamwork, teamwork!

What is your favorite Girl Scout memory?

My favorite memory was camping as a troop when I was a Junior. I was a Girl Scout in Michigan and the camping experience was diverse and varied from the shores of the Great Lakes to canoeing and camping at the Girl Scout camps in Michigan. We loved to sled and winter camp at Camp Holly and loved sleeping in the cabin’s loft full of bunk beds. We used to make ‘spider webs’ out of string throughout the loft and then try to get from one end to the other without touching the string— very difficult and a lot of fun.

What words of advice do you have for other volunteers?

Every volunteer will encounter tough situations be it tough troop dynamics, parents who choose to not get involved or provide support, or well-intentioned plans going south. Just know that you are being observed by the girls in your troop and you are their role model. Solve dynamics and tough outcomes with a smile on your face. Use the words “oh well – what change can I make to have a better outcome next time.”   I also believe that “girl-led” troops have the best outcomes. Start the girls early in learning how to run their own show. These troops are the most successful and stay together. Everyone likes making their own choices and this is very true in Girl Scouting. Keep it fun!

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Volunteer Appreciation Event: An evening of painting and fun

Submitted by Girl Scouts of Colorado Volunteer Support Specialist Carmen Valdez

On Tuesday, April 4, 2017, GSCO staff celebrated and honored the accomplishments of superstar volunteers in Pueblo. The evening also featured an investiture for our newest stars by our vested Girl Scouts. Lively music filled the air, as volunteers created a one-of-a-kind of masterpiece on canvas. Fun, laughter, and sisterhood was shared by all!

Volunteer Spotlight: Anita Lucero

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In honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month, Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state. Anita Lucero in the Pikes Peak region was nominated as a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community!

Anita has been a troop leader for the last six years, but her commitment to our girls doesn’t stop there! She is also a Service Unit Manager, Service Unit Product Sales Manager, Cookie Cupboard Manager, Site Delivery Manager for a Colorado Springs delivery site, active member of the region’s Cookie Committee, and GPS Leader (putting on Product Sales rallies and the local mall lock-in). Under her leadership as Service Unit Manager, she has grown the service unit and for the past two years, the service unit has met its goals.

We asked Anita to answer a few questions about her experiences as a Girl Scout volunteer. We hope you find her story as inspiring as we did!

How long have you been a Girl Scout?

This is my 16th year in Girl Scouting, 10 years as a girl with this year being my sixth as an adult.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

Seven years ago, my daughter joined Girl Scouts with my niece and I was just the drop and go parent for the first part of the year. As I continued to see coloring sheets coming home after every meeting, I decided to check it out some more. She was bored with the activities that they were doing and so the two of us decided that if we were going to stay in Girl Scouts, we were going to start our own troop. I knew that as time would go on my Girl Scout past would catch up with me and help me along the way. However, I figured out many things had changed over the years, but the core values were the same and you learn as you go.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

Well, my first and most important role is being a parent. I have to remember that the reason I became a volunteer was because of my daughters.  It is very important to give them as much time and support as I do to every other girl.  I have to remember to treat them like girls and not as assistants.  Although they will be amazing, but it’s not their time yet.  Secondly, I am a troop leader of six amazing girls: two Brownies, one Junior, one Cadette, and two Seniors. They are all very motivating in their own way and we have a ton of fun.  Next, I am Service Unit Manager and Service Unit Cookie Manager of 414 in the southeast area of Colorado Springs. I support about 25 troops all year long and mentor them in the beginning of their troop set-up until they feel comfortable to support their girls on their own. I always remember my first year and how nervous I was, so if I can take a little stress off their shoulders and teach each them a few tips and tricks to help along the way I do. The past two years I have also been on the Cookie Committee in Colorado Springs supporting troops, parents, girls, and staff in anything cookies. My husband and I have also been a cookie cupboard during the selling season, supporting troops in keeping inventory available for girls to sell.  Four years ago, I helped start a group in Colorado Springs called GPS (Girl Planning System).  They were all 6th to 12th graders already PA’s or wanted to be Program Aide trained.  Our first year we planned and carried out the annual Mall Lock-In.  This group has evolved over the years and we currently have 12 girls that have planned many programs to include Fall Rallies, Cookie Rallies, Badge Workshops, Mall Lock-In, and some of the girls are currently planning a day camp for this summer.  Lastly, I just help were needed, I do a ton of recruiting events, I teach at training’s, and support the staff in Pikes Peak Region with anything else they need.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer? What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I have learned that without these girls in Girl Scouting I would have a lot more free time.  Just kidding! I love to stay busy. I have learned that all of these girls are like good smelling onions. Every girl is different and sometimes we have to peel off more or less layers to find out who they really are and how to guide them through Girl Scouts. Some come because they are told to and others can’t get enough of it. Each girl has their own talents and their own weaknesses and we have to love them for the whole package. We have to be patient and caring. I have learned that as girls grow older their outlook on Girl Scouts changes and we have to respect their emotional feelings. I have also learned that some girls come to Girl Scouts because they obtain opportunities that they can’t get anywhere else. For example, it maybe something simple like how to build a bird house, or how sew a sit upon, or to camp, or travel out of state, or travel to Europe. Whatever it might be for some it could be building memories that last a life time, and I am privileged to be apart of that.

I hope that girls have learned how cool it can be to be a Girl Scout and how you don’t have to be ashamed to tell people at school that you are. I hope that girls learned that they are worth it in this world. They can be who they want to be and no one can stop them. I hope they have learned that you can be super-women without having all the super powers. You don’t have to be perfect you just have to be you, there are always people around you that have the strengths of your own weaknesses, and that what makes teams so great.  

What is your favorite Girl Scout memory?

Man this question is so hard!!! I have so many amazing memories from when I was a girl. But, the one that means the most to me is “Senior Trip 2000”  my best friend Sara and I were the only ones left in my troop. The year prior we completed our Silver Award and went to Disney World. But, the summer of 2000 we went on a trip of our lifetime.  We went to Europe with a group of selected Girl Scouts from what was the Wagon Wheel Council in Colorado Springs. We traveled through 7+ countries in just over 20 days. It was absolutely amazing. I saw so many beautiful things and made many new friends. I got to visit Pax Lodge and Our Chalet, two very beautiful Girl Scout World Centers. We went to Buckingham Palace, The Eiffel Tower,  a salt mine, The Louvre, and ate chicken everyday, but one amazingly enough cooked a different way every time. I learned how to pack and unpack and how to call home with a calling card. This trip gave me so many learning lessons that I would have never got sitting in a classroom. I learned on this trip and many years since that even though I may not see those same girls today I still know in my heart that they are sister Girl Scouts and we will forever have a connection.

What words of advice do you have for other volunteers?

The best advice I can give to every volunteer (and staff) is without the girls we won’t have an organization. Each and every thing that we do daily, weekly, or monthly is for the girls. To my fellow volunteers, we are here to support and guide.  Girl Scouting is supposed to be girl-led so let it happen. No matter how bad our OCD is for control or for their success that we want them to have we have to remember it is okay to fail let them learn from their mistakes. Working with girls and teaching them something new will help them on their path. Listening and understanding of what they want to accomplish and volunteers supporting them will better them for their future roles of Girl Scouting. I encourage everyone to take updated training’s, ask questions, and be more involved. The more networking that you do with others the more educated you become.  Attend your Service Unit meetings and check/reply to your email. Shadow other troops and invite older girls to come with your Daisies and Brownies. Put those crayons down and take your girls (EVEN DAISIES) on a hike, go to camp (Sky High is AMAZING!!!!!), and tackle a fear or two.  Girl Scouting can be anything you want it to be sometimes you just have to try-it.  

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.