Tag Archives: Volunteer Appreciation Month

The hidden talent of a faithful Girl Scout leader

Submitted by Debbie Swanson

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

Noreen Landis-Tyson is President and CEO of CPCD…giving children a head start since 2002, one of the largest and most complex nonprofits in GSCO’s Pikes Peak region. She is nationally recognized by her peers for her leadership, knowledge, and expertise, serving as a mentor through UCLA’s New Director Mentor Program, supporting the development of new Head Start directors, and is regularly asked for advice and support to other programs throughout the country. She brings her expertise and innovation to managing El Paso County’s Head Start program, and is an expert in building partnerships, having nurtured collaborations with six school districts to blend Head Start services with the state-funded Colorado Preschool Program to serve almost 1,800 of the county’s most vulnerable young children and their families. Noreen has created partnerships with three early care and education programs to offer Head Start services in their centers, supporting increased quality for all children in those centers.

As if that wasn’t enough, Noreen is also an internationally-ranked bicycle race official, one of only 50 women in the world to hold that rank, and frequently officiates bike races around the world. She was the first female president of the commissaire’s panel at the UCI Track World Championship this year in Berlin, and was to be the first woman to hold that same position at the Tokyo Olympics this year before they were cancelled.

Noreen has participated as a leader of a Conversation Stations at Secrets to Success for the past two years. In this role, Noreen talks to more than 100 girls about her work, why she loves it, and how she is changing the world with it. She does this with more than 20 other professional women who network with girls to have them learn the myriad options open to them for their own future work. She also serves as a board member to the Girl Scouts of Colorado Board of Directors. Noreen truly appreciates how Girl Scouts are preparing girls to be our future leaders and innovators, and leads the way by her own example.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

The nomination deadline for 2020 Volunteer Recognition Awards is April 30. GSCO invites members statewide to take this opportunity to recognize an outstanding volunteer by nominating them for a Volunteer Recognition Award. Nominators are responsible for ensuring enough endorsements are submitted to support their nomination of a volunteer for an award. Your volunteer support specialist can check nomination and endorsement submissions for you. Learn more.

Volunteer Spotlight: Danielle Malott

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Danielle Malott of Fruita in the Western Colorado region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Danielle to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a leader because there was not space in a troop for my daughter to join. I have fond memories of Girl Scouts from my youth and I wanted my daughter to have those as well 

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I have been a troop leader and volunteered on the service unit leadership team. As a troop leader, I have worked with Daisies, Brownies, and Juniors. Having a multi-level troop is amazing. You get to see the older girls help the younger girls. When this happens, the girls gain confidence and leadership skills by leaps and bounds. My favorite troop event has been all of the camping trips! On the service unit leadership team, I focused on events. Living on the Western Slope, we don’t get many council events. My goal was to bring similar events to the Western Slope, but on a smaller scale. My favorite event was an art day with a local pottery shop. I am most looking forward to a astronomy lock in once COVID-19 is over.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

The biggest skill I have learned is how to teach things I have no clue about.  My girls always pick a few badges that are way out of my wheelhouse. Figuring out how to teach those has been an adventure.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

How to be inclusive and determined. We have a wide range of abilities and challenges in my troop. I hope that the girls have learned how to accept others and over come the challenge that come along while having FUN!!

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

My girls pick new and exciting activities that constantly push me and them. By helping them grow, I get to grow with them.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

The nomination deadline for 2020 Volunteer Recognition Awards is April 30. GSCO invites members statewide to take this opportunity to recognize an outstanding volunteer by nominating them for a Volunteer Recognition Award. Nominators are responsible for ensuring enough endorsements are submitted to support their nomination of a volunteer for an award. Your volunteer support specialist can check nomination and endorsement submissions for you. Learn more.

 

 

Volunteer Spotlight: Shana Barbera

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Shana Barbera of Colorado Springs in the Pikes Peak region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Shana to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a Girl Scout volunteer when I signed my daughter up when she was entering Kindergarten. There was a table set up at her ice cream social at her school with a volunteer talking about all the opportunities in Girl Scouts. My daughter is now in sixth grade and about to finish up her seventh year in Girl Scouts.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I started out as a assistant leader. Then, I quickly took over the group of Daisy girls as the other leader moved away. At year three, I housed Girl Scout Cookies for our troop cookie mom and learned about the process of being the TCM. The following year I took over as our troop TCM and I just completed my fourth year being the TCM for our troop. Then, two years ago I took over as the fall product manager for my troop. I recently took on another role this past year as service unit fall product manager and service unit cookie manager for two different service units in the Pikes Peak region, as well as continuing in all my other roles. I think I’m going to do it again next year.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have learned so much by being a Girl Scout volunteer. I was only a Girl Scout for one year when I was in fifth grade. So, I have learned about all the badges, songs, and traditions. Now, that my daughter is competing in Reach for the Peak, I have been learning all the same skills we are teaching them for the competition, such as fire building, nature identification, proper ways to set up camp, etc.– thanks to some wonderful knowledgeable volunteers in my troop. I am now CPR and First Aid certified. I have always loved giving back. But, I have a newfound hobby. I love mentoring these young ladies and providing them with once in a lifetime opportunities, liking sleeping under the shark tank at the Denver Aquarium, and so much more! I will probably continue to volunteer even after my daughter graduates high school.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope that the girls I lead are learning some value life skills. I hope they have fun and make life long friends. Hopefully they will continue Girl Scouts through high school and one day become a volunteer or find other ways to give back to their community.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Thank you to Girl Scouts of Colorado, all your volunteers,  and all the wonderful leaders I have worked with over the years. You have shaped me into the volunteer I am today. I have gained more confidence in myself and I have the courage to try things I wouldn’t normally do.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

The nomination deadline for 2020 Volunteer Recognition Awards is April 30. GSCO invites members statewide to take this opportunity to recognize an outstanding volunteer by nominating them for a Volunteer Recognition Award. Nominators are responsible for ensuring enough endorsements are submitted to support their nomination of a volunteer for an award. Your volunteer support specialist can check nomination and endorsement submissions for you. Learn more.

Volunteer Spotlight: Shawnda Staten

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Shawnda Staten of Fort Lupton in the Northern & Northeastern CO region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Shawnda to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a Girl Scout volunteer at 18, so I could work at a resident camp after I graduated high school and then it just worked out that I was needed for my little cousins troop as a co-leader, so she could do all the “cool stuff” (her words not mine) that I got to do growing up. Then, a very short time later my daughter was old enough and wanted to be in Girl Scouts and of course, we had no leaders, so it just happened and then I had another daughter ten years later who wanted to be a Girl Scout too. I had to start a new troop for her and when I thought I was going to take some other roles in council, I was blessed with a granddaughter, so I haven’t changed roles just yet because now I am honored to be her leader.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

Different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout started for me as a Girl Scout member: helping Brownie leaders that needed help, and at the local nature centers doing educational tours for scouts and the community. I wasn’t working on a Program Aide or any awards or badges, but for fun and the experience. Then, as a legal adult, I volunteered as a camp counselor a couple times, co-leader/leader from early 1990’s til now in a couple states, special events manager/coordinator a couple times, and in a couple states, service unit registrar, service unit and troop product program manager/coordinator a couple times (even back when we had calendars/candies and of course cookie season), service unit co-manager/ manger. I have been secretary on the service unit team, mentor for leaders and various other positions on the team, and helped in adult training. I think for about three months in the very beginning I was just a registered parent. LOL. They have all been an experience to remember and most I enjoyed for the terms they were assigned because of the fellow volunteers I had on the team with me.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

Being a Girl Scout volunteer, I have learned I’m only human, I am flawed, and I make mistakes, but it’s how you handle them that makes you a better leader and person. I have learned that I have lots still to learn from a program aspect, from the parents and fellow volunteers, and most importantly ,to me is learning from the girls. Its great to let the girls explore and grow in their own time and in there own way. Not all girls are created equal and that is perfect! Be flexible, open minded, non-judgmental and easy going as much as possible. That not all Girl Scouts; girls and adults will like everyone else, look at their troop the same way, or with the same dedication level, which can be frustrating, but its always good to accept for the sake of being a mentor/ role model and living by the Promise and Law. I have learned basic things like how to live by the Promise and Law, not just say the words. I think a lot of volunteers miss that when they sign up for a volunteer role, and cookies is not a competition between girls/troops, it’s a learning tool. How to hike and camp correctly with a bunch of rambunctious and social young ladies. How to cook with a solar oven and better at dutch oven. How to make better knots and teach girls edible knots and campfires, so they get it at a young age. How to have a cleaner camping kitchen. How to canoe down a river and in the lake without swamping it, as well as archery and gun safety. How to use badge requirements to benefit the girls and how to use their everyday experiences to fulfill badge requirements without double dipping.  How to track paperwork.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

What I hope my girls have learned from me is emotional for me when I think about it. Being a Girl Scout, growing up when we had basically no guideline rules other than Susie Safety and having a lifetime of lasting memories and friends. I want that for all of my girls too, but it goes deeper. I want them to accept others for who they are, not what society expects them to be. To accept everyone with or without disabilities because it doesn’t define them as a person. To love themselves and know they have worth. That because I was open and honest with my girls that they will be as well. That they learned to give back to themselves, their families, their communities, and this country. To accept their accomplishments and defeats equally and with pride and humility. To be independent, responsible, take charge, role models. To be good mommies or not, spouses or not, businesswomen or house wives, and Girl Scout leaders if that is what they want in their journeys. That I will always support them, that I am here for them throughout Girl Scouts and beyond. That they touched my heart even if they were only mine for a short time and I am proud of them and the growth I see within them. That when I say at the beginning of the year that our troop is a family not just a bunch of people who get together once a week that I meant it and their sisters in scouts are their friends for life.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

My experience as a volunteer helped me become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader) through my personal growth and experiences with the girls and the good friends I have made through the years. Its all been trial and error and preconceived notions of what is right or wrong and how to accomplish a task. How you deal with the unknown events and the gratitude you have from the mistakes as well as the accomplishments. To always be the girls safe heaven and their biggest cheerleader because sometimes that is all they need from you. To show them that you care and are dedicated to their success makes you a success. Be their friend even when they drive you crazy because it helps you grow. For me, it meant looking for a bigger picture and getting outside my comfort zone and moving my family across country for a chance at something different, and then again for a better long term future goal. To set goals and not give up until you have no other option and even then keep moving forward with your head high, to take the necessary risks in life to achieve your journeys goal. Over the years I am now blessed with being a Girl Scout grandma several times and It has given me a sense of pride I didn’t know I would get from being a leader. I step outside myself and what I think I know to help myself grow and move out of the way of my own ego. I always am willing to try something new and push boundaries and stereotypes. That is how I became a G.I.R.L.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

The nomination deadline for 2020 Volunteer Recognition Awards is April 30. GSCO invites members statewide to take this opportunity to recognize an outstanding volunteer by nominating them for a Volunteer Recognition Award. Nominators are responsible for ensuring enough endorsements are submitted to support their nomination of a volunteer for an award. Your volunteer support specialist can check nomination and endorsement submissions for you. Learn more.

 

 

Volunteer Spotlight: Jen Vaughn

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Jen Vaughn of Fountain in the Pikes Peak region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Jen to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a volunteer because my daughter asked me to join Girl Scouts with her. She heard about it from friends at school, but didn’t want to join alone. I am so glad that she did, because I think I have had more fun than she did, and I have stayed around through all four of my daughters now.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I am currently a Girl Scout leader for a Junior/Cadette troop, as well as the service unit leader for Ft. Carson Service Unit 417.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have learned that there is always something new to learn, and always multiple ways to get something done. I have also learned that friends you make through Girl Scouts are forever friends. A lot like GORP, there are a lot of different kinds of people in the world, and once you mix them all together you learn things about yourself that you never knew.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope that they have learned that you can be yourself, and will never be judged. I hope that my girls have learned that we learn things together and I will never expect anything out of them that I will not try myself. They have taught me better ways of doing many things, and if we didn’t work together, we would never learn as much.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I think that Girl Scouting has given me a voice that I didn’t know was in there before. I have learned things that I would not have necessarily tried before, and loved them. I have pushed myself to be a better person so that my girls can know that I believe in them and that they can be anything they want to be. I have realized that without risks we would never get to our full potential.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

The nomination deadline for 2020 Volunteer Recognition Awards is April 30. GSCO invites members statewide to take this opportunity to recognize an outstanding volunteer by nominating them for a Volunteer Recognition Award. Nominators are responsible for ensuring enough endorsements are submitted to support their nomination of a volunteer for an award. Your volunteer support specialist can check nomination and endorsement submissions for you. Learn more.

 

Happy Volunteer Appreciation Month

Girl Scouts of Colorado simply couldn’t achieve its mission of building girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place without the everyday heroism of our amazing volunteers. Every April, we celebrate the meaningful and inspiring contributions our volunteers make all year long.

This year, in celebration of Volunteer Appreciation Month, Girl Scouts of Colorado will make a donation to the Restoring Colorado’s Forest Fund in honor of our tree-rific volunteers who change the world every day with their passion and hard work. This donation will provide much-needed seedlings for planting on lands throughout Colorado which have been most severely impacted by wildfire or other disasters.

In addition to this gift to the Restoring Colorado’s Forest Fund, Girl Scouts of Colorado will also be issuing a special patch to troop leaders. Due to current health concerns, these patches will be handed out to leaders at a later date during service unit leader meetings. We hope that when you receive your patch that you wear or display it proudly, so it can serve as a reminder to you and others of the outstanding difference you make in both Colorado’s beautiful natural landscape and in our girls’ lives.

Thank you so much to all of the volunteers who make Girl Scouting possible! There truly is no Girl Scouting without your commitment, and we are forever grateful for all that you do and give.

Volunteer Spotlight: Denise Krohn

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Denise Krohn of Littleton in the Metro Denver region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Denise to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

When my older daughter’s troop leader couldn’t continue, I decided to take over that role. It was important to me that the girls were given the opportunity to continue to learn and have fun together.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

Over my more than 20 years as a Girl Scout, there have been many roles. I was the troop leader for both my daughters’ troops and school coordinator at their elementary school. For product programs I’ve been troop fall product program manager, service unit fall product program manager, troop cookie manager, service unit cookie manager, area cookie manager, cookie cupboard manager, site delivery manager, and cookie committee member. As I gained experience and knowledge, I took on the next level of responsibility.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

Many changes have come to Girl Scouts during my volunteer years and thus, new skills: using email for communications, having eBudde for tracking cookie sales instead of recording everything on paper, social media, etc. Some I’ve mastered, but others I’m still learning. I’ve gained self-confidence and public speaking skills from training troop cookie managers. Mostly, I’ve learned that there is always more to learn.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope girls learn to persevere! Never give up – no matter the difficulties. Set goals and work hard to achieve them. And, remember that you will learn more from your mistakes and hardships then when everything is smooth-sailing.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Since I’ve experienced so many volunteer positions, I feel I have a unique perspective of Girl Scouts and especially the product programs. By listening to others, it’s easier to lead others with best practices. I’ve learned to speak up with suggestions when I recognize something that could be improved. At the Waterstone delivery site the last two years, we’ve tried a couple new procedures to speed-up the pickup process for troops. And, we’ve asked troops to step-up with volunteers to make the day better for everyone, lessening everyone’s workload and stress level. It is important to me to evaluate and adapt quickly to changing policies and procedures, and to communicate information effectively to other volunteers, caregivers, and girls.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

The nomination deadline for 2020 Volunteer Recognition Awards is April 30. GSCO invites members statewide to take this opportunity to recognize an outstanding volunteer by nominating them for a Volunteer Recognition Award. Nominators are responsible for ensuring enough endorsements are submitted to support their nomination of a volunteer for an award. Your volunteer support specialist can check nomination and endorsement submissions for you. Learn more.

 

Volunteer Spotlight: Jody Clair

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Jody Clair of Colorado Springs in the Pikes Peak region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Jody to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

My Daisy daughter. We could not find a troop, so we started one. There were very few in our area.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I have been a leader 17 years this Girl Scout year. I have also had the pleasure of being a council trainer many years, and a council delegate twice.

Then, I have worked with girls on the Power Up program and PA training. I have worked for many years in our service unit and on our Region Four Cookie Committee. Whew!

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

To not take everything for granted. I have had a Girl Scout lose her mom and we assisted in helping her work through it; Girl Scouts on my door step that had been abused; Girl Scouts from homes with no money; Girl Scouts from homes with drug addicted parents; and so much more in 17 years. To see any Girl Scout smile and to say “I have your back” has made me realize you just never know what someone needs in their life. It could be a simple smile!

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

To be great humans! I also hope they have learned to try something before they give up.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I was outgoing before Girl Scouts, but now it is about me and the Girl Scouts and what that means in my heart, not “just” my daughter. She works year-round at Tomahawk Ranch and to see that makes me the proudest mom and leader out there! Seeing her thrive, reminds me every day to keep striving for those things in G.I.R.L and to share it with as many Girl Scouts as possible! Them becomeing better people makes my life full.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

The nomination deadline for 2020 Volunteer Recognition Awards is April 30. GSCO invites members statewide to take this opportunity to recognize an outstanding volunteer by nominating them for a Volunteer Recognition Award. Nominators are responsible for ensuring enough endorsements are submitted to support their nomination of a volunteer for an award. Your volunteer support specialist can check nomination and endorsement submissions for you. Learn more.

 

Volunteer Spotlight: Liz Duke

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Liz Duke of Greenwood Village in the Metro Denver region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Liz to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

The honest truth is that my sons were doing Cub Scouts, and my daughter wanted to do Girl Scouts. There wasn’t a troop at her school and I knew that if a troop was going to get started, I would have to be a big part of making that happen. SO, it comes down to not wanting to tell my daughter “no.”

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I have been a troop leader for the past four years. I have been a cupboard manager for the past two years. This is my first year as service unit cookie manager.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have learned to step outside my comfort zone on issues that are important to me and my troop.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope they have learned that they need to be the positive change they want to see in their community.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Risk-taker: I have met a lot of positive role models in the Girl Scout community. I try to take their ideas and attitudes back to the troop and show the girls that it is okay to try something new and fail at it, so long as you learn from the process.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

The nomination deadline for 2020 Volunteer Recognition Awards is April 30. GSCO invites members statewide to take this opportunity to recognize an outstanding volunteer by nominating them for a Volunteer Recognition Award. Nominators are responsible for ensuring enough endorsements are submitted to support their nomination of a volunteer for an award. Your volunteer support specialist can check nomination and endorsement submissions for you. Learn more.

 

 

 

Ways to Honor Your Favorite Girl Scout volunteers

 

 

 

Are you looking for a way to show your favorite Girl Scout volunteers how much they mean to you? Here are a few ways to show you care even if you can’t see them in person:

  • Call or video chat with them!
  • Send an e-card
  • Personalize one of our pre-designed card templates, one for younger girlsand one for older girls. Add a straight-from-the-heart message then text or email it to your volunteer(s). They’ll love hearing how they’ve made a difference in your life!

Looking to get everyone in on the fun? Consider sending a digital group thank-you via Kudoboard! Each troop member and her family can share a message, photo, or video on your volunteer’s thank-you board. Kudoboard has been officially licensed for a limited time by Girl Scouts of the USA . Use promo codegirlscouts2020 to unlock unique Girl Scout backgrounds—like this one —and get the following discounts:

  • Mini board (up to 10 signers, FREE)
  • Premium board (up to 100 signers, $4.99)
  • Milestone board (unlimited signers, can play as slide show, $6.99)

Follow our easy instructions to get started!