Tag Archives: Thornton

Girl Scout Junior helps bunnies to earn Bronze Award

Submitted by Ana Martin Del Campo

Metro Denver

Thornton

Alison E., a Girl Scout Junior, has been in Troop 62816 only this Girl Scout year. When she joined this new troop, she realized all the Girl Scouts had already earned their Bronze Award and she wanted to earn hers as well!

Alison read all the requirements to earn the Bronze Award. Then, she saw a lot examples about what other Girl Scouts had done to become Bronze Award Girl Scouts.  We started the adventure with a visit to animal shelters. Alison visited dog shelters, cat shelters, bunny shelters, etc. all while looking for a problem that she could help solve.

During a visit to the Colorado House Rabbit Society, she noticed they have a lot of bunnies! She came up with an idea for how to help the organization by hosting a class to educate the community about adopting bunnies as pets. After that she told me, “This is it mom! I want to do my Bronze Award project to help bunnies to find a  home!”

This summer, she spent more than 35 hours preparing for this event. She talked with the president of Colorado House Rabbit Society, Nancy LaRoche, who authorized the project. The Colorado House Rabbit Society is in Broomfield. Then, she talked with people at the Anythink York Library in Thornton. She worked as a team with Michele Hawking from the library to make a flyer for the class and upload it on the library’s web-site.

Next, Alison took a four-hour class at the shelter and studied and read many articles to learn about bunnies. She visited the bunny shelter several times to have meetings with LaRoche so everything would be fine with the Colorado House Rabbit Society.

She also made a PowerPoint presentation for her class, and chose and prepared all the materials to do a craft bunny toy for the class. People could decide to keep the toy or donate it to the Colorado House Rabbit Society! She also convinced LaRoche to bring bunnies from the Colorado House Rabbit Society to the class, so people could meet and pet them.

On Saturday, September 1, 2018, Girl Scout Junior Alison earned her Bronze Award by hosting a class to educate the community about how to adopt bunnies from the Colorado House Rabbit Society. It was amazing  and she received a lot of compliments. The Colorado House Rabbit Society even donated stuffed animal bunnies as a gift for children who attended the class. It was a surprise for everybody!

Alison wanted to share her story to show other Girls Scouts that you can earn your Bronze Award as a team in your troop or by yourself. You can do it sometimes in one or two years or sometimes in few months over the summer. And most importantly, if you love your idea about what you want to do as a Bronze Award project, go for it! You can do it! If you work hard and are determined to do it, you will earn your Bronze Award!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Fallen firefighter’s family thanks Troop 63979

Submitted by Dwayne-Katrina Murphy via Facebook

Montgomery, Indiana

We lost our son (Firefighter Kendall Murphy) on November 10, 2017. He was a firefighter responding to an accident and he was hit getting out of his car. I am also on the fire department. Troop 63979 sent out department stars and I wanted to show you how we used them. One of our members made this flag out of old fire house and he used the stars the Girl Scout troop sent. What a thoughtful way to honor those who serve and have lost their lives serving. THANK YOU!

Two Hometown Heroes are better than one

Submitted by Susanne Wallach

Metro Denver

Thornton/Northglenn

Troop 63787 decided they wanted to honor multiple Hometown Heroes this year. The girls delivered half their donations to thank the Thornton Police Department for their service. In return, they were treated to a tour of the police department by two female officers. Girl power!

The girls had also wanted to give Girl Scout Cookies to children with cancer, but Children’s Hospital said they could not give food donations to their patients. As an alternative, we came up with the Ronald McDonald House of Denver. On delivery day, each of our girls invited a friend and teamed up for a friendly baking competition. Along with the HTH cookies, they baked yummy homemade cupcakes and made sandwiches for the staff and residents of RMH. They had a great time and learned how they were able to make someone’s day sweeter–Girl Scout Cookies AND cupcakes are so much sweeter.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Troop 61358 honors first responders

Submitted by Kristin Hurley

Metro Denver

Northglenn/Thornton

Girl Scout Troop 61358 decided to honor first responders in Adams County as their Hometown Heroes this year. There has been an increase of crime in our area of Metro Denver, and we have a history with the North Metro Fire District. Three years ago, the firemen on duty at Station 63 helped our fellow Girl Scout sister when she called about her mom, our leader, who was having an insulin reaction due to diabetes. We have never forgotten their help, so we surprised them with Girl Scout Cookies at their newly-remodeled location!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Troop 2237 donates 290 pounds of kids snacks to Broomfield F.I.S.H.

Submitted by Liz Young

Metro Denver

Thornton

Each year Troop 2237 uses a third of their cookie proceeds for charity. This year, the girls made snack bags for a local food bank. The snack bags are given to kids ages 2-18 that would not normally have a snack for school or after school.

This was something the girls could relate to since they bring their own snacks to school each day. They knew this would make a difference for kids in their area.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Volunteer Spotlight: Jordan Cadena

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Jordan Cadena of Thornton in the Metro Denver region volunteers at both the troop and service unit levels. She is also a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Jordan to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I became a volunteer to spend more time with my daughter and make a positive impact on girls’ lives. 

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I started out just helping at meetings. Last year, I became a co-leader and service unit treasurer. This year, I have my own multi-level troop (with an incredible leadership team and very involved families). I am also the service unit treasurer and service unit product program manager.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

Oh man!! Haha! So much and I never stop learning. I have learned and grown as a mom and woman. 

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope girls have learned how to be a good role model and teacher to younger girls. I hope they have learned how to be patient and compassionate, how to lead other girls, and celebrate others’ accomplishments. I hope they have learned how to set goals and know how to plan the process of achieving those goals. I hope they’ve learned to reflect and see where they can do more or make a positive difference or influence for/on others.  

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Girl Scouts has helped me become a G.I.R.L. on many different levels. I find myself being more outgoing and ready to take on new tasks with a higher level of confidence. Being a troop leader and service unit team member encourages me to be innovative often. I’m always trying to find ways to do things better in my troop and make suggestions where I see fit in the service unit. I will go the extra mile to ensure the success of my girls, my families, and our leaders in the service unit. I hold myself to a higher level of discipline and accountability because of Girl Scouts. Whatever I can accomplish now, I know there is always more and that I am capable of more. I’m constantly looking for ways to learn, improve, make a difference and inspire.  

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Complete the “WOW” Brownie Journey in a Day

Submitted by Andrea Robison

Metro Denver

Thornton

Cadette Troop 60569 is hosting another Brownie Journey event! Our Cadettes are excited to help Brownies complete this fun and essential journey in just ONE half-day session! There are two sessions from which to choose:

-Saturday, May 5, 2018 9 a.m. – 12 p.m.

-Saturday, May 5, 2018 1 p.m. – 4 p.m.

All sessions will be located at Northglenn Christian Church (1800 E. 105th Pl., Northglenn, CO 80233).

The Wonders of Water Journey will be completed in one half-day session by learning Ways of Working (LOVE water, SAVE water, SHARE water) led by our enthusiastic Cadette guides.

LOVE water: Bring your love of water activities to share and learn all about water.

SAVE water: All girls will participate in a community service activity to help promote the conservation of water.

SHARE water: Brownies will be working independently and together to create posters for their schools to spread the news about how to save water.

Cost: $10 per Brownie

This is not a drop-off event. Leaders are expected to adhere to adult to girl ratios. Journey books and badges are not included.

All payments must be made prior to the event (echecks are accepted). No on-site registration will be available. To register or for more information, contact Andrea Robison at troop0569@gmail.com.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Volunteer Spotlight: Carol Lucero

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Carol Lucero of Thornton in the Metro Denver region leads an older girl troop in the Sunset Hills service unit. She and her troop do a very cool service project to send stars from retired flags to retiring service members and families of fallen service members. Carol is also a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Carol to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer? 

I was a Girl Scout for a few years growing up. I remember selling cookies for $1/package, going to Girl Scout Camp, and walking to troop meetings after school. But, I more distinctly remember all the fun and events my three brothers did with Boy Scouts- long camping and hiking trips, service projects, their Eagle Awards. Both of my parents were heavily involved in Boy Scout Leadership roles and it shaped much of the family calendar. Girl Scouts kind of fell by the wayside once I switched schools and was no longer going to school with any of the girls in my troop. To be honest, I signed my daughter up for Girl Scouts in kindergarten, so I would have a cookie hook-up. After six years serving as cookie mom, our troop leader and her daughters quit. Over the years, I had come to know and love the Girl Scouts as my own girls and wanted them to continue growing in scouting and working towards their Gold Awards. So, four years ago, I volunteered to take over as troop leader, so I could continue sharing in Girl Scouts with my daughter and the other girls in the troop. Our Daisy Troop of 27 was six Cadettes with attrition. We’re now at three Seniors and one Cadette. Working with the four girls left in this troop has provided me an opportunity to double-down on efforts to find activities these ‘older girls’ will enjoy, that will keep their attention, that provide learning opportunities and most importantly, inspire selflessness and personal growth.  I’ve pushed my daughter for 10 years to continue in Girl Scouts until she earns the Gold Award. I’ll continue to volunteer, and support her, until she reaches that lofty status.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I served as cookie mom for six years. For the past four years, I have been the troop leader, fall product program coordinator, and troop cookie manager for Troop 63979.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

The biggest lesson I have learned from volunteering with Girl Scouts is it truly takes a village to raise and shape and inspire these girls to be leaders. I’m thankful for my small troop of four girls (sisters, plus two more) because I have their two amazing families supporting our efforts. The parents of our girls coordinate transportation, meeting times, badge curriculum, events, and every other “thing” that comes up. Our troop would not be successful if the parents didn’t help! I can always count on them to step up whenever I need another hand- driving down to the GSCO Shop for supplies, taking a CPR class to attend Cookie Camp, driving the event carpool, etc. Our three families are really one big family, having worked together for the past 10 years to support our girl’s efforts to earn the Gold Award. As troop leader, I’ve found I rely a great deal on the other troop leaders in my Service unit. For ideas, inspiration, encouragement, friendship, and even a kind ear when I need to unload about some trivial frustration. The women in Sunset Hills service unit are like my sisters- given I grew up with only brothers, I appreciate having relationships with women in my shoes. We all work in different career fields, come from varied backgrounds, and wide ranging experience, yet we work together to provide our girls opportunities to explore and wonder.  I appreciate that when I need help, or am hosting an event, or put out a call to support a community service effort- the troop leaders in Sunset Hills respond. We are all vested in the success of each of our troops.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

This is a loaded question. My greatest hope is that I have inspired my girls to push boundaries (appropriately), strive for personal excellence (in whatever path their heart chooses), to treat each other with love and kindness, and to never stop learning. In the past four years, we have done a great deal of badge work. The girls earned 21 Cadette badges and are working on Senior badge number six. Doing so has provided opportunities for them to step outside their comfort zones, respond to community issues by providing solutions, and explore topics they otherwise would not choose for themselves. The girls have planned and carried out three weekend camping trips with monies they’ve earned from selling thousands of packages of cookies. They’ve found common ground in their different hobbies and interests. They’ve asked hard questions of friends, parents, community members, and others. They’ve worked countless hours themselves to create a better world for themselves, their friends, their communities, and others.  For example, we volunteered with the Rocky Mountain National Parks’ Road Hogs, a group of retired volunteers who work year round to keep RMNP going. Our girls worked side by side with the Hogs, shovels, backhoes, tractors, and all, to clear debris from Bear Lake Road one hot day in July.

Our troop founded Stars for Heroes in July 2016 in response to the murder of five Police Officers in Dallas, Texas. We collect retired American flags and repurpose the embroidered stars into pocket sized momentos to thank first responders and veterans for their service. In nearly two years, we have distributed more than 30,000 stars from more than 600 flags. This includes 50 stars each that we have mailed to the agencies of the 429 fallen heroes since Dallas. We meet monthly for our troop meeting, but also usually monthly to process stars.

Additionally, the girls have submitted an entry to the City of Thornton Outside the Box Traffic Mural project based on their work with the Senior Journey, Girltopia. This Journey called upon the girls to imagine, inspire, and create a world perfect for girls and to share that Girltopia with others. We’re on the edge of our seats as we won’t know until the end of the month if their submission was selected. This is just another example of young women creating change and inspiring hope.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L.?

As a classic Type-A extrovert, I’ve always had a tendency to push the limits, speak up for myself, chase dreams and try new things. Being a troop leader has allowed me to model this same thirst for life to the girls in my troop. Being a go-getter means encouraging my girls to pursue their passions, to find their niche and develop it. Two of my girls have their black belt in karate. One of my girls is an accomplished artist. The other a talented dancer. They all do well academically. They get up, and they go. Being the troop leader for Girl Scout Seniors is the biggest challenge to being an innovator. How do I keep their attention? How do I meld their varied interests and talents? How do I keep them engaged in Girl Scouting? By working with the other moms, we brainstorm and then provide outside the box chances for our girls to keep growing, learning, and sharing.  We give the girls a great deal of choice to decide what badges to earn, what SU events to participate in, and what programs to get involved in with the community to make a difference. I believe being a risk-taker and a leader go hand in hand, you can’t really be one and not the other. I have to demonstrate to my girls what it looks like to make hard choices, volunteer my talents, and have a positive work ethic, so they witness first hand that women really can have it all, and cake too. I work full time, I volunteer full time, I drive the carpool and chaperone to activities five nights per week. I think its important to demonstrate to these girls, our future leaders, that everything is possible. I’m excited to watch their talents blossom, their passions cement and their personalities come to life. They are each so unique and different, but have come to love and respect each other through the years. Not only are we building future leaders, we’re solidifying lifelong friendships. I may be super busy, but being a troop leader for these girls means I make them and their best interests a priority.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

“Me & My Guy” western breakfast

Submitted by Andrea Robison

Metro Denver

Thornton

Cadette Troop 60569 is hosting a western-themed “Me & My Guy” breakfast! Come join us in your finest western gear for some delicious food and learn to line dance! Our Cadettes are excited to sponsor, cater, and serve all of our guests!

This yummy and fun event will be held on Saturday, May 12, 2018 at Good Shepherd United Methodist Church (3960 E 128th Ave, Thornton, CO 80241).

You can choose to attend either session:
9 – 10:30 a.m.
11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Breakfast is served the first hour and line dancing will be the last 30 minutes.

Cost is $5 per person for your choice of base meal:
-Scrambled Eggs & Bacon
-Stack of four Pancakes
-Biscuits and Gravy

Other delicious food will be available for additional cost (taken by cash or check).

All payments for the base meal must be made via this link prior to the event (echecks are accepted). No onsite registration will be available.

40963104_me_my_guy_breakfast_flier

For more information, contact Andrea Robison at troop0569@gmail.com.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Thornton Girl Scouts help Food for Hope

Submitted by Heidi Kane

Metro Denver

Thornton

Girl Scout Troop 62816 in Thornton helped bag food with Food for Hope, helping thousands of children in Adams County that are enrolled in nutritional services during the school year. This ensures that these low-resource students eat healthy meals during the weekends, when not at school.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.