Tag Archives: Take Action

Girl Scout Junior helps bunnies to earn Bronze Award

Submitted by Ana Martin Del Campo

Metro Denver

Thornton

Alison E., a Girl Scout Junior, has been in Troop 62816 only this Girl Scout year. When she joined this new troop, she realized all the Girl Scouts had already earned their Bronze Award and she wanted to earn hers as well!

Alison read all the requirements to earn the Bronze Award. Then, she saw a lot examples about what other Girl Scouts had done to become Bronze Award Girl Scouts.  We started the adventure with a visit to animal shelters. Alison visited dog shelters, cat shelters, bunny shelters, etc. all while looking for a problem that she could help solve.

During a visit to the Colorado House Rabbit Society, she noticed they have a lot of bunnies! She came up with an idea for how to help the organization by hosting a class to educate the community about adopting bunnies as pets. After that she told me, “This is it mom! I want to do my Bronze Award project to help bunnies to find a  home!”

This summer, she spent more than 35 hours preparing for this event. She talked with the president of Colorado House Rabbit Society, Nancy LaRoche, who authorized the project. The Colorado House Rabbit Society is in Broomfield. Then, she talked with people at the Anythink York Library in Thornton. She worked as a team with Michele Hawking from the library to make a flyer for the class and upload it on the library’s web-site.

Next, Alison took a four-hour class at the shelter and studied and read many articles to learn about bunnies. She visited the bunny shelter several times to have meetings with LaRoche so everything would be fine with the Colorado House Rabbit Society.

She also made a PowerPoint presentation for her class, and chose and prepared all the materials to do a craft bunny toy for the class. People could decide to keep the toy or donate it to the Colorado House Rabbit Society! She also convinced LaRoche to bring bunnies from the Colorado House Rabbit Society to the class, so people could meet and pet them.

On Saturday, September 1, 2018, Girl Scout Junior Alison earned her Bronze Award by hosting a class to educate the community about how to adopt bunnies from the Colorado House Rabbit Society. It was amazing  and she received a lot of compliments. The Colorado House Rabbit Society even donated stuffed animal bunnies as a gift for children who attended the class. It was a surprise for everybody!

Alison wanted to share her story to show other Girls Scouts that you can earn your Bronze Award as a team in your troop or by yourself. You can do it sometimes in one or two years or sometimes in few months over the summer. And most importantly, if you love your idea about what you want to do as a Bronze Award project, go for it! You can do it! If you work hard and are determined to do it, you will earn your Bronze Award!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Brittany Argo, Aurora, “St. Michael’s the Archangel/Philippines Prayer Garden-Prayers Across the Sea”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award project, I decided to build a prayer garden at St. Michael’s the Archangel in Aurora, Colorado, which included remembrance bricks that were engraved with a loved one’s name. I also wanted to help make a difference in another country, so I chose a church in the Philippines that I donated $5,000 to help build a prayer garden there as well. Both of these churches were given two pamphlets that I made that will be handed out for years to come. The St. Michael’s the Archangel/Philippines Prayer Garden-Prayers Across the Sea addressed three main issues: the loss of a loved one through grief; there is no peaceful and quiet place outside the church for prayer; and there is no place in the church to remember a loved one with a personal sentiment.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

The project directly benefited St. Michael’s the Archangel, and helped them to have a space for prayer and solitude. My project focused on teaching the community about grief and how to deal with the loss of a loved one in a healthy way. There are currently more than 3,000 families registered at St. Michael’s the Archangel, and the prayer garden is open to all parishioners. The prayer garden in the Philippines is located beside the Chapel of the Forgiving Lord, in the Tuloy sa Don Bosco Street Children Village. There are 780 students in the Tuloy Foundation that visit the garden throughout the week as well as, daily masses attended by 200-300 people, and a total of about 400 on Sundays.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

St. Michael’s the Archangel Prayer Garden is a project that is designed to continue for many years, so that the garden can grow with the new generations. The flowers and bricks will help to continue the garden to grow, and give the church an area where they can come together as a community for a greater cause. They will be able to keep this garden going as a place of prayer and worship. The preschool has promised to continue planting flowers in the garden in each year and the church will continue to sell the bricks and the youth will be able to give back to their parish by helping to install the bricks. I have also handed out two pamphlets, one on “How To Deal With Grief” and the other one on “How To Build A Prayer Garden,” which well be available at both churches for years to come.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My global connection was helping to build a prayer garden in the Philippines. I was able to help a church in need and give $5,000 to help build a prayer garden. I am so excited and overjoyed that I was able to help another community with such an amazing project. The fact that I was able to donate $5,000 to help another church community build a prayer garden where they can deal with their loss and grief in their own type away is incredible. The Tuloy Foundation, which is a non-profit organization helps underprivileged children, who don’t have a home, food or family. The prayer garden will be able to help them have a place to go to pray.

What did you learn about yourself?

After spending so much time and energy organizing and coordinating my project, I learned that it really takes an entire army of people to make a difference. I wasn’t able to do this project on my own. I needed the help of my volunteers, and the help of my family to complete this project. I have always loved to help others and help my community for the greater good. I have been on three church work camp trips, and even though building my prayer garden might not of been a service trip, I still felt the feeling of gratitude and happiness.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Earning my Gold Award will impact me in the future because it has allowed me to develop many leadership skills. I have developed a strong sense of communication, organization, delegation, and time management skills. This project has taught me that I can make a difference in my community and globally, I have gained so much confidence which will help me to take on more projects in the future that will hopefully reach even more people.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I feel the Gold Award was an important part of my Girl Scout experience because my project has been so personal and meaningful to me. I will be able to look back at my Girl Scout experience and remember my Gold Award as a project that made such a big difference on my community as well as on me. My Gold Award is the last step of my Girl Scout journey and reflects everything that I have learned during my girl scout experience as well as giving me an appreciation for how much work goes into getting the Gold Award.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

My Gold Award helped me become a “G.I.R.L.”  The “G” stands for go-getter.  I learned by building my project I was not able to give up and learned to go after whatever I needed to in order for my project to be completed.  I knew I could achieve whatever I set out to do.  I was ambitious and wasn’t afraid to pursue what I needed to in order to complete my project but also to earn the highest award a girl can earn which is the Gold Award.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Gold Award and Highest Awards and Take Action trainings

We are thrilled to be offering both Gold Award and Highest Awards and Take Action trainings at Leadership Summits across the state for the summer and fall of 2018!

You may be asking, “What is a Leadership Summit?” Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Leadership Summits are learning conferences that offer volunteers (and girls!) the opportunity to get energized for the new membership year and check required trainings off the to-do list. In addition to offering trainings for new and experienced volunteers, we are offering “Older Girl Leadership Summit” tracks at each event where older girls can participate in training all day.

Gold Award Training is required for any girl interested in pursuing her Gold Award.

Highest Awards and Take Action is the perfect opportunity to connect with other troop leaders about successful projects and learn how to let girls take the lead in making a difference in their community with Take Action projects that girls will complete in their Journeys, Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award projects.

Colorado Springs, Saturday, August 25
Older Girl Leadership Summit: https://gscolorado.formstack.com/forms/older_girl_leadership_summit_pp_08_25_2018
Leadership Summit (for adults): https://gscolorado.formstack.com/forms/leadership_summit_in_colorado_springs_pp_08_25_2018

Loveland, Saturday, September 8
Registration links coming soon!

Denver, Saturday, September 29
Registration links coming soon!

Grand Junction, Saturday, October 20
Super Saturday event, Gold Award training only.
Registration link coming soon!

Questions about Highest Awards? Email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Gold Award Girl Scout Bailey Stokes awarded Johanna Farrar Girl Scout Memorial Scholarship

Gold Award Girl Scout Bailey Stokes of Buena Vista is the 2018 recipient of the Johanna Farrar Girl Scout Memorial Scholarship. She earned her Gold Award, the highest honor in Girl Scouts, earlier this summer for creating a nature program that will be sustained by teachers in her community.

Johanna Farrar’s husband and children started this scholarship in 2015 to celebrate all of her accomplishments, particularly those within the Girl Scout community. Born in London, England and raised in a small village on the south coast of England, Johanna was a Girl Guide in her childhood. She was also the youngest ever to have achieved the Queen’s Guide Award at that time, the English equivalent of the Girl Scout Gold Award. After earning a software engineering degree from Loughborough University, Johanna moved to New Jersey to work for Bell Labs. In 1985, she accepted a position with FedEx in Colorado Springs, where she met and married Gene Farrar in 1990. Johanna and Gene lived and worked in the Colorado Springs area, moving to Monument in 1992 when their oldest daughter, Hannah, was born. In 1995, after their second daughter, Rachel, was born, Johanna retired from a successful career as a Technical Advisor at FedEx for an even more successful and rewarding career as a dedicated full-time mother.

Johanna introduced her daughters to Girl Scouts at the first opportunity and became a local leader in Monument, then again after relocating to Buena Vista. When Johanna first arrived in Buena Vista, she learned Girl Scouts had all but disappeared in Chaffee County. Johanna believed so strongly in the values and skills that Girl Scouts develops, it became a passion to reestablish Girl Scouts for girls in the high Rockies. Known to many of her friends as the “Engergizer Bunny” because of her seemingly never-ending energy and indomitable spirit, Johanna provided the leadership and drive to rejuvenate Girl Scouts in the valley. Now, for the first time, there are troops for all ages.  Additionally, Johanna loved the outdoors, including skiing, hiking, biking, mountain climbing, and especially gardening – passions she loved to share and instill in young women.

 

 

G.I.R.L.s deliver thousands of school supplies for low-resource students

Girl Scout Junior Troop 1631 from Highlands Ranch, which has 14 girls, collected thousands of school supplies for low-resource students over the spring and summer. They included pencils, markers, glue, scissors, binders, paper, books, and teaching materials.  On Sunday, August 12, 2018, the girls delivered the supplies to an elementary school in Evans.

They were able to collect the supplies by reaching out to schools in their own community, and asking to place boxes in the lobby to collect supplies.  A dozen schools agreed to participate, and the girls worked with the schools to publicize their project through posters, an e-newsletter to parents, and the schools’ announcements. Additionally, some of the girls reached out to Office Depot in Highlands Ranch, which agreed to place another collection box in the front of the store.

Through this project, the girls will earn the Girl Scout Bronze Award,  the highest honor for a Girl Scout Junior and the third highest honor in Girl Scouts.

All four major TV stations in Denver shared the story of the girls’ project.

Earlier this summer, the girls completed their biggest girl-led project yet! Many of the girls were in the NICU (neonatal intensive care unit) as babies, or have overcome some sort of medical challenge, so when completing the “Agent of Change” Journey, they wanted to do something to help children and families in the NICU at UCHealth. The girls assembled 20 NICU Care Kits and delivered them to the hospital in June. The full story, along with a few photos and thank you letters from parents who received the kits, is here: https://bit.ly/2usUFXc.

Silver Award Girl Scouts special guests at Rockies game

Girl Scout Cadettes from Troop 60789 in Aurora were recently special guests at a Colorado Rockies baseball game. On August 7, 2018, the girls were recognized by UCHealth as part of the organization’s  “Moments to Shine” program.  They were on the field before the game, taking pictures with Dinger and catcher Tony Wolters.  The announcer told the crowd about their project and the girls were shown on the jumbo screen.

“FANS, PLEASE DIRECT YOUR ATTENTION TO THE FIELD.  THE COLORADO ROCKIES WOULD LIKE TO WELCOME A GROUP OF SPECIAL GUESTS WHO ARE HERE AS PART OF U-C-HEALTH’S “MOMENTS TO SHINE” PROGRAM.

TODAY, WE ARE EXITED TO WELCOME AURORA GIRL SCOUT TROOP 6-0-7-8-9. EARLIER THIS YEAR, THIS GROUP OF YOUNG WOMEN WERE ABLE TO ADVOCATE FOR CHILDREN BY WORKING WITH THE AURORA CITY COUNCIL TO PASS AN ORDINANCE BANNING ADULTS FROM SMOKING IN VEHICLES WHEN PASSENGERS YOUNGER THAN 18 ARE PRESENT. THE BAN IS THE FIRST OF ITS KIND IN COLORADO, AND WOULD NOT HAVE BEEN POSSIBLE WITHOUT THE HARD WORK OF MAKENNA, AMELIA, MICAELA, JULIANNA AND SOFIA TO LEND A VOICE TO THE VOICELESS. U-C-HEALTH SALUTES TROOP 6-0-7-8-9 FOR THEIR DETERMINATION, COMPASSION AND INSPIRING JOURNEY TO MAKE A CHANGE.

FANS, LET’S GIVE IT UP FOR THIS GROUP OF YOUNG WOMEN AND WELCOME THEM TO COORS FIELD FOR TODAY’S GAME!”

After the National Anthem, the girls went to their seats to enjoy the game. Unfortunately, the Rockies lost, but the girls were fortunate enough to be recognized for their efforts in passing the law.

Earlier this year, Troop 60789 made headlines around the world for their Silver Award project to pass an ordinance in the city of Aurora that made smoking (whether tobacco, marijuana, or vaping) in a vehicle while a minor is present subject to community service or a fine.

Silver Award project: Capes with “healing powers”

Submitted by Jennifer Redmond

Metro Denver

Aurora

We are creating “capes with healing powers” for our Silver Award project! We are designing a sewing class in conjunction with JOANN Fabrics where Girl Scouts and community members alike can learn to sew and create capes for sick kids in the hospital. We will hand deliver all of the capes along with care packages of crafty and fun things to do in the hospital.

Make a child’s day! Help them feel strong and have fun. Anyone can help. We created packets with sewing instructions and a pattern to hand out to people in the community who can sew. We will collect all of the capes and deliver them to the hospital. We have a goal of collecting 100 capes by January 1, 2019!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

G.I.R.L.s paint inspirational messages on bathroom stalls for students

Submitted by Adrienne Prince

Metro Denver

Parker

Update: On Wednesday, August 15, 2018, the troop was interviewed by Karen Morfitt of CBS Denver. Watch the story: https://cbsloc.al/2BhY16d 

Girl Scout Cadette Troop 4664 from Parker wanted to send encouraging messages to students at Mammoth Heights Elementary School in Parker, their former elementary school. They painted bathroom stalls with encouraging and inspirational messages, such as “You are brave,” “Good vibes only,” ‘”Dream, strive, become,” “Drive with purpose,” “Be kind,” and “You are enough.” In all, six Girl Scouts painted 42 stalls in a girls’ and boys’ restrooms in May and June of 2018.

This was all part of their project to earn the Girl Scout Silver Award, the highest honor for a Girl Scout Cadette. The girls wanted to do this because they have all experienced bullying and not being included. They wanted to share something encouraging and positive with younger students. The girls are proud to have earned their Silver Award because it allowed them to give back to their school and be role models. They want to show their community that teenagers and girls can be leaders!

Congratulations Lois P., Sophia S., Caitlyn S., Madison G., Eliza A., and Rachel T.!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

G.I.R.L.s collect school supplies to earn Bronze Award

Submitted by Melissa Holmberg

Metro Denver

Littleton

Girl Scout Junior Troop 1631 from Highlands Ranch, which has 14 girls, is currently working to earn their Bronze Award by collecting school supplies for low-resource students. The girls identified a need for school supplies an elementary school in Evans. Next, they reached out to schools in their own community, and asked to place boxes in the lobby to collect supplies.  A dozen schools agreed to participate, and the girls worked with the schools to publicize their project through posters, an e-newsletter to parents, and the schools’ announcements.

On July 12, 2018, the girls met to merge and sort the donated supplies. They include pencils, markers, glue, scissors, binders, paper, and books. Additionally, some of the girls reached out to Office Depot in Highlands Ranch, which agreed to place another collection box in the front of the store. The girls hope people buy and donate additional supplies on the spot. On August 12, the girls will deliver the donated supplies to Union Colony Elementary School in Evans.

Earlier this summer, the girls completed their biggest girl-led project yet! Many of the girls were in the NICU (neonatal intensive care unit) as babies, or have overcome some sort of medical challenge, so when completing the “Agent of Change” Journey, they wanted to do something to help children and families in the NICU at UCHealth. The girls assembled 20 NICU Care Kits and delivered them to the hospital in June. The full story, along with a few photos and thank you letters from parents who received the kits, is here: https://bit.ly/2usUFXc.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too

Silver Award project: Plastic bag ban

Submitted by Girl Scout Cadette Troop 62458

Metro Denver

Littleton

We are Girl Scout Cadettes Ella M., Amanda B., Mia J.,  and Giana A. from the Columbine area in Littleton. As part of our project to earn our Silver Award, today (July 31, 2018), we proposed a ban on the use of disposable plastic bags in Jefferson County before the Jeffco Board of County Commissioners. In Colorado, we see plastic bags littering our rivers and highways, and in trees all over our parks. The plastic bags degrade into our rivers, lakes, and reservoirs polluting our water, therefore damaging our ecosystem.

In addition, disposable plastic bags make our groceries more expensive. Stores pay anywhere from $1 to $6,000 per month on disposable bags. The stores then add that cost into groceries and products. The average hidden cost of bags that consumers pay is $37.50 every year. Consumers use 100 billion plastic bags per year. More than 90% end up in landfills where they are not exposed to elements that would degrade them. We cannot let this go on any longer. Plastic bags continually block drainage systems and put poisons into the water supply. Many animals mistakenly eat plastic bags and as more animals eat each other, the pollutants go up the food chain, and eventually end up on our dinner tables. It’s time we take control of the environmental impact of our actions by getting rid of disposable plastic grocery bags.

On Tuesday, July 31, 2018, the girls were interviewed by Ashley Michels of Fox31/KDVR-TV. Use this link to watch the story. https://bit.ly/2OAvfAo

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too