Tag Archives: Take Action

Girl Scouts earn Bronze Award by giving back to veterans in need

IMG_2963Giving back to those who have sacrificed so much for our country during their time of need was on the minds and in the hearts of six members of 5th grade Girl Scout Troop 2510 this holiday season. The Wheat Ridge girls chose to help homeless veterans in Denver to earn their Bronze Award, the highest award Girl Scout Juniors can earn.

The girls learned about the homeless veteran population in the Denver area and went out into the community to see overnight shelters and day shelters. They saw permanent housing programs for homeless veterans and learned that there are solutions to homelessness. The majority of homeless veterans are single men who suffer from mental illness or alcohol and/or substance abuse. About one-third of the adult homeless population are veterans. Nearly half of homeless veterans served during the Vietnam era. Many more veterans are considered at risk of homelessness due to poverty, lack of support networks, and dismal living conditions in overcrowded or substandard housing.

The Girl Scouts took action by holding a warm clothing drive at Prospect Valley Elementary School to collect hundreds of jackets, hats, gloves, sweatshirts, socks and shoes. They also created 27 care packages for homeless veterans that included toiletries, warm items, basic food items, candy and handmade cards expressing support and thanks. All items were distributed through the Community Resource and Referral Center in the VA’s Health Care for Homeless Veteran’s program. The Girl Scouts who learned about this important social issue and made a difference are Hannah F., Makayla K., Julia R., Daisy S., Julia T. and Kaylin V.

A Girl Scout Brownie Journey

Girl Scout Troop 4445 from Dolores has just completed their Girl Scout Journey, The Quest. This Brownie story is meant to inspire their own Take Action projects. Along the way they will earn three keys.

The Discover Key – To earn this award, each Girl Scout Brownie will discover herself and her values—as a Girl Scout and a member of her family.

The Connect Key – To earn this award, each Girl Scout Brownie will connect as a member of a Brownie team, with her family on a healthy-living activity, and, as a group with their community to increase healthy-living opportunities.

The Take Action Key – To earn this award, Girl Scout Brownies will team up to identify a community place where the team can Take Action. Then they join together to make a plan to Take Action and carry out their Take Action Project to improve their world.

The Brownie Quest Award – At the end of the Quest, the girls also earn the journey’s culminating award, the master lock that needs all three of their keys in order to open. Through this award, the Brownies will see that, together, their three keys—Discover, Connect, and Take Action—unlock the meaning of leadership.

They all successfully earned this award. Their Take Action project was to collect items and send them to troops overseas.

The Quest

Pictured left to right:
Nobel Traweek, Akima Edwards, Hailey Melvin, Alana Coley, Lizabeth Likes, Sharma Chaffee, Hazel Smith, Katalina Moran and Alana Nowlin

Story Submitted by Troop Leaders Amy Melvin & Susan Likes

Girl Scout carries on a family tradition of earning her Gold Award

Kim Crawford, a Girl Scout from Brighton, has earned Girl Scouts’ highest honor, the Gold Award, for a project she did to collect 600+ toothbrushes and toothpaste for those in need in Africa. What makes this accomplishment even more special is Kim, who is a junior in high school, is developmentally delayed (she only reads at 1st grade level), but hasn’t let her disability hold her back. Additionally Kim’s inspiration for her project came from her cousin, Kerry, who earned her Gold Award when she was a Girl Scout and worked for the Peace Corps in Africa.

Kim spent months on her project and received a lot of support from her Brighton community. Everyone who donated to the project signed a poster, which Kim sent to Africa with the donations. And all the people who received her donations in Africa also signed the poster and returned it at the end of the project. When talking to Kim, she uses the words “happy and proud” to describe how it made her feel to help others through this project. In fact, helping others is one of the main reasons she likes being a Girl Scout.

Kim is part of the Special Olympics and other organizations in her community, but Girl Scouts by far is her favorite where she’s been able to interact with peers who are not like herself. Her mother, Jayne, has been with her every step of the way on her Girl Scout journey and currently serves as an organizer for Girl Scout groups in their community (or a service unit manager).

Kim and her mother Jayne were interviewed on 9NEWS on Monday, Dec. 10th, about this project. Watch the interview here.

Montrose Girl Scout earns Gold Award

Congratulations to Montrose Girl Scout Elizabeth Giles, who earned Girl Scouts’ highest award, the Gold Award over the summer of 2012. To earn the Gold Award Elizabeth made 13 quilts for the Bright Beginnings Preschool and Childcare Center, who was very excited to receive the finished project which they plan to use in their infant room. Elizabeth said the quilts “will remind the kids they were thought of and cared for.” Elizabeth learned to quilt when she was 8-years-old from her Grandma. Elizabeth is currently a freshman at Colorado Mesa University in Grand Junction. Through Girl Scouts, Elizabeth said she learned many valuable things and gained lifelong friends.

The Girl Scout Gold Award represents the highest achievement in Girl Scouting; it recognizes girls in grades 9 through 12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through sustainable and measurable Take Action projects. Since 1916, girls have successfully answered the call to Go Gold, an act that indelibly marks them as accomplished members of their communities and the world.

Pictured is Elizabeth with Daycare Center Directors, Amber Gardner and Casey Best. The Montrose Daily Press also ran a story about Elizabeth’s Gold Award project on Nov. 22nd.

Junior Girl Scouts learn about rabbits

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Submitted by Tina Saunders

Westminster

Some of the girls from Junior Troop 2569 are trying to earn the Summit Award. Over the summer they worked on the Agent of Change Journey. All the girls had left was to do was their Take Action. They wanted to do something related to animals, but finding an organization that will work with girls under the age of 13 or 14 was our biggest challenge. We learned of the Colorado House Rabbit Society and were able to schedule a tour, learn about rabbits, make toys for them and learn how we can spread the word for protecting, caring for and adopting of the bunnies. To learn more, please visit http://www.coloradohrs.org/.

This story was submitted via the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Sign up for Littleton’s Woof Walk Sept. 16 — idea of Girl Scout Troop 2198

9news 2

Earlier this spring it was announced that Littleton Girl Scout Troop 2198 had won a Disney Friends for Change grant, which was going to help the troop with their Girl Scout Silver Award project. (Read the earlier story.) Their story was featured on Denver’s 9NEWS (pictured above) as well.

Troop 2198 is passionate about helping end animal abuse. Their Silver Award project is centered around raising awareness of responsible pet ownership. After collecting items in the spring for Adoptions Angels, Troop 2198 is taking their Silver Award project a step further by helping initiate the first-ever Woof Walk during the Summerset Festival in Littleton’s Clement Park on Sept. 16th. The troop has been busy this summer organizing their efforts, and invites all Girl Scout dogs and their owners across the state to join them for a morning of fun! Registration materials can be downloaded here: 2012 Woof Walk Brochure-final.

Congratulations, Troop 2198, on a great project!

Posted by Amanda Kalina, PR Director, Girl Scouts of Colorado

Troop 42 makes a difference for wild animals

Sumbitted by Madelynn Orr
Littleton

Girl Scout Troop 42 members recently earned their Bronze Award, which is the highest honor a Junior Girl Scout (grades 4th and 5th) can earn. For their Bronze Award “Take Action” project, the girls decided to make the world a better place by helping animals in their community. They researched different shelters, explored ways they could help, and chose The Wild Animal Sanctuary (TWAS) in Keenesburg, Colorado. The girls learned about TWAS’s mission: “to prevent and alleviate cruelty to animals which are abandoned or that are subject to deprivation or neglect by providing care and boarding for such animals.”

At Troop meetings, the girls shared some of TWAS’s animal rescue stories. They decided to help TWAS by donating money they earned from cookies sales to sponsor two animals and also gathering items from TWAS’s “wish list.” Some of the girls earned money around their homes or at lemonade stands and purchased things like laundry detergent, trash bags and paper products as well as lots of food items and some gathered donations from the community like towels and blankets.

The Girl Scouts reached out to Ken Caryl pet supply store Woofs and Hoofs. Tamara Lenherr, the owner of Woofs and Hoofs, was extremely generous in donating over 180 pounds of dog food for the bears and other animals at TWAS. Lenherr is very well versed when it comes to quality animal nutrition, and a lot of her products are all natural or organic. Lenherr says, “animals continually teach me and remind me every day to live in the moment and make the most of life.”

Troop members visited TWAS and learned about the dangerous problem of “captive wildlife,” where lions, tigers, leopards, bears, wolves and other wild species are kept as pets or in exploitive conditions. The girls were sad to learn far more tigers are kept privately (not in licensed facilities) in the United States than remain in the wild.

Troop #42 Members:

Mary Frances Blatter
Kate Bohan
Megan Cherrey
Hannah Fort
Kenzie Frye
Erin Giles
Kiera Hess
Katie Koch
Lexi Howard
Amanda Howery
Caitlin James
Lainey Orr
Lexi Orr
Carissa Scott
Hailey Thompson
Alex Watson
Kaleigh Weigum

 

Girls build playhouse for cats for Bronze Award

Written by Aspen P., and Taylor W.

For my Girl Scout troop’s Bronze Award project, we are building a sort of ‘play house’ for the cats and kittens at our local humane society. We decided to do this, of all other things, because we have worked for the Humane Society before and it was very fun. The people are very nice, understand our good intentions, and help us as much as they can so that we can succeed.

We also choose to do this for our project, because we love animals- especially cats- and want to help these homeless animals as much as we can.

We have discussed it, and found that building this play house would not come cheaply. Our troop went to speak with a local hardware store and they said that the only way they could donate materials to us would include us filling out paperwork, and would take about a couple weeks, which was after we needed to get the Bronze Award done so that we may bridge to be Cadettes.

Instead, we bought some of the ‘scraps’ from the hardware store, which were much cheaper than actual measured pieces of wood. Other than that, the other things we have used have all been generously given to us by our troop leader- such as paint, nails and other such tools. We thank our Troop leaders so much for the effort they had put in to help us with completing our award.

Girl Scout Troop 70239 publishes a book about bullying

Submitted by Lisa Wellington
Troop 70239 leader

Girl Scout Troop 70239 has published a book for their GirlTopia Take Action project. After doing research on issues facing girls and interviewing experts, the troop members decided that “girls being mean to each other” and “girls bullying each other” were the issues they cared most about addressing.

It so happens that this troop has also been teaching Power Up Bully Prevention workshops for three years. And the Power Up curriculum was in need of some updating. One part of the Brownie Power Up curriculum in particular needed updating: the coloring book that was used for the curriculum was out of print and more copies could not be obtained. Troop 70239 girls decided they would write a new book, even better than the old one, built up from their own childhood experiences and using their teenage wisdom. The first workshop using the new curriculum and the new book was held on Sept. 10 in Fort Collins and received great reviews. 100% of participants said they learned how to be a better friend, and learned ways to help a friend who is bullied. You can buy this 80-page book for $8 from CreateSpace.com via this link: https://www.createspace.com/3676197. (P.S. we wish we could offer the book to you all for less money, but the CreateSpace people keep 90% of the proceeds. We’d just like to earn enough to cover the cost of the proof copies we’ve had printed for ourselves throughout the publishing process. )

Back cover of book:

After Hannah says she doesn’t want to be Claire’s friend anymore, Hannah begins to bully Claire using a handshake that used to be theirs. Claire, distressed by the situation, doesn’t know what to do. I Don’t Want To Be Your Friend Anymore explores four different ways for Claire to deal with the bullying. Including multiple scenarios, tips for bullies, and paper dolls, this book is great for any grade school girl or her adult mentors looking to learn more about friendship bullying and how to deal with it.