Tag Archives: Stephanie Foote

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award recipients honored at Highest Awards celebration in Loveland

More than 300 Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at the Embassy Suites by Hilton in Loveland on April 23, 2017, to honor the more than 1,400 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts are groundbreakers, big thinkers, and role models. Giving back is in their blood. So is standing up to the challenge, no matter how big or small,” she said.

2016 Gold Award recipient and National Young Woman of Distinction Sarah Greichen served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about her journey to earn the Gold Award and how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

“I cannot remember a day when Girl Scout flags, supplies, sashes, cookies, and girls planning events weren’t covering multiple floors of my house. We (the girls in my troop) each earned our Bronze and Silver Awards, while constantly practicing the leadership skills necessary to passionately lead, serve, and change the world,” she said. “Girl Scouts and in particular the Gold Award has given me unique opportunities to become courageous, caring, and confident, while actively practicing leadership skills that greatly impact the world. Girl Scouts also gave me the opportunity to identify and pursue my passion. I found that following your passion is the key to choosing and accomplishing highest awards projects.”

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Before the celebration, Stephanie Foote presented Gold Award recipient and 2017 winner of the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize for Gold Award Excellence Emma Albertoni with an engraved silver medallion from The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards. Emma, from Arvada and senior at Ralston Valley Senior High School, was named one of Colorado’s top youth volunteers of 2017 by The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards. This is a nationwide program honoring young people for outstanding acts of volunteerism. As a State Honoree, Emma will receive $1,000, the medallion, and an all-expense-paid trip in early May to Washington, D.C. She will join top honorees from other states and the District of Columbia for four days of national recognition events. During the trip, 10 students will be named America’s top youth volunteers of 2017.

 

Bronze and Silver Award recipients honored at Highest Awards celebration in Pueblo

Nearly one hundred Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at the Center for American Values in Pueblo on April 21, 2017, to honor the more than 1,400 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2016-17 Girl Scout awards program year, more than 1,000 girls across the state and 24 in Pueblo and Southeastern Colorado earned the Bronze Award. Over the last two years, 18 girls across Pueblo and Southeastern Colorado earned the prestigious Silver Award.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts are groundbreakers, big thinkers, and role models. Giving back is in their blood. So is standing up to the challenge, no matter how big or small,” she said.

2016 Gold Award recipient and National Young Woman of Distinction Sarah Greichen served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about her journey to earn the Gold Award and how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

“I cannot remember a day when Girl Scout flags, supplies, sashes, cookies, and girls planning events weren’t covering multiple floors of my house. We (the girls in my troop) each earned our Bronze and Silver Awards, while constantly practicing the leadership skills necessary to passionately lead, serve, and change the world,” she said. “Girl Scouts and in particular the Gold Award has given me unique opportunities to become courageous, caring, and confident, while actively practicing leadership skills that greatly impact the world. Girl Scouts also gave me the opportunity to identify and pursue my passion. I found that following your passion is the key to choosing and accomplishing highest awards projects.”

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

 

Sarah Greichen awarded Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize

Sarah Greichen, 2016 Gold Award recipient, is the winner of the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize. Sarah from Centennial, Front Range Christian School, officially accepted her award at the Day at the Capitol Celebration for Girl Scouts of Colorado on Monday, May 2, 2016.  Lawmakers in the House of Representatives broke from traditional business to honor the 48 Girl Scouts from across the state who earned their Gold Awards, the highest award in Girl Scouts, this spring.

Inspired by her twin brother who has an Autism Spectrum Disorder, Sarah started a new non-profit organization, Score A Friend, to encourage more schools to offer and have students participate in unified sports teams and clubs. Sarah was selected as the winner of this $1,000 cash prize by an independent panel. Of Sarah’s project, prize committee members said, “We are delighted at the quality of Gold Award projects we reviewed this year and are thrilled to award the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize to Sarah Greichen whose project exemplifies community impact through leadership.”

The Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize was made possible through a generous gift to the Girl Scouts of Colorado Endowment by Girl Scouts of Colorado President & CEO Stephanie A. Foote.

“Sarah’s project is an exceptional example of sustainable impact through leadership. I am proud to present this prize to her and recognize Girl Scouts whose Gold Award projects have made a lasting impact,” Foote said.

In addition to Sarah’s award, the prize committee chose to honor four deserving Gold Award recipients with the title of Honorable Mention. They are: Belle BashawKellyn DasslerCourtney Howell, and Cassidy Klein. Belle from Parker, Douglas County High School, developed a curriculum to teach elementary school students about the importance of bees, which bees they might see, and how they can help the bee population thrive. Kellyn from Parker, Chapparal High School, increased students’ respect for teachers and educators. She also worked to encourage teachers throughout the year and made working conditions better for staff by taking items off their “to-do” lists. Courtney from Niwot, Silver Creek High School, organized a science, math, and engineering exploration day for middle and elementary school students to show them that science can be fun. Cassidy from Highlands Ranch, ThunderRidge High School, collected more than 2,900 children’s books, which she used to create a library for Joshua Station, a transitional housing facility for families.

This year Girl Scouts across the country are celebrating the 100th anniversary of Girl Scouts’ highest award. The Gold Award culminates with a project led by one young woman between 9th and 12th grades who builds a purpose-based team to work with the larger community to meet a need. The focus of a Gold Award project is to identify and research a community issue she is passionate about, develop a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establish a global connection with others and provide sustainability for the project.  Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Christina Bear named Congressional Award Gold Medalist

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Join Girl Scouts of Colorado in congratulating Gold Award recipient Christina Bear of Golden! She was recently named a Congressional Award Gold Medalist for 2016.

The Congressional Award is the United States Congress’ award for young Americans. It is non-partisan, voluntary, and non-competitive. The program is open to all 14- to 23-year-olds; young people may register when they turn 13 1/2 years old and must complete their activities before their 24th birthday. Participants earn Bronze, Silver and Gold Congressional Award Certificates and Bronze, Silver and Gold Congressional Award Medals. Each level involves setting goals in four program areas; Volunteer Public Service, Personal Development, Physical Fitness, and Expedition/Exploration. Earning the Award is a fun and interesting way to get more involved in something you already enjoy or something you’d like to try for the first time. You move at your own pace – on your own or with your friends. This is not an award for past accomplishments. Instead, you are honored for achieving your own challenging goals after registering for the program.

In 2015, Christina earned her Gold Award, the highest award in Girl Scouts, for organizing a week-long summer program for Latino students at Horizons Summer Program at Colorado Academy. Through informal learning in computer and robot programming and mini-science experiments, students were engaged and excited about technology. Christina is the 2015 recipient of the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize. In November 2015, she will be awarded the Outstanding Youth in Philanthropy Award presented by the Association of Fundraising Professionals.

Christina has also won the Gloria Barron Prize for Young Heroes, Jefferson County Public Health Champions, Presidential Environmental Youth Service Award, Prudential Spirit of Community Award, Children’s Environmental Health Network Youth Leadership Award and International Action for Nature Eco-Hero Award.

 

Christina Bear named Outstanding Youth in Philanthropy

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Congratulations to Christina Bear, 2015 Gold Award recipient from Golden! On August 28, 2015, she was named Outstanding Youth in Philanthropy by the Association of Fundraising Professionals. The award comes with a $2,500 prize to be used for education expenses. It is presented to an individual youth volunteer (18 and under) who has demonstrated outstanding commitment to the promotion of philanthropy and volunteerism through his/her work in the community. This commitment and impact is demonstrated specifically through sustained activity over a period of time. The individual acts as a role model for other youth in the community and generates interest in volunteerism in other groups.

In April 2015, Christina was awarded the inaugural Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize for Gold Award Excellence. Christina earned her Gold Award for organizing a week-long summer program for Latino students at the Horizons Summer Program at Colorado Academy. Through informal learning in computer and robot programming and mini-science experiments, students were engaged and excited about technology.

Christina was not only recognized for her project to earn her Gold Award, but also for a project she completed with her younger brother, Eric, in 2010. Their Radon Awareness Project (RAP) was locally- and nationally-recognized as a program to educate the community on the dangers of radon. With input and support from the Colorado Dept. of Public Health and Environment, EPA, American Lung Association, Jefferson County Health Department, Habitat for Humanity, Girl Scouts, 4-H, and CanSAR (Cancer Survivors against Radon), Christina and Eric created a targeted campaign to educate the community about radon and testing. Since inception, RAP has reached over 500,000 people via newspapers, TV, social media and rallies and more than 500 schools are contacted annually to participate in a Colorado radon poster contest. In 2012, Christina and Eric were invited to speak at the White House Summit on Environmental Education and at the Children’s Environmental Health Network (CEHN) where they discussed how youth can collaborate with public health officials to make a difference in environmental health, In addition, RAP has championed a Radon Resistant New Construction building code that has been adopted by 20 Colorado cities and contributed to writing HB 12-1165 which would require radon testing whenever a home is sold.

“Christina exemplifies courage, confidence and character. Her continued pursuit of excellence in all aspects of her life inspires her peers and community members to listen and follow, taking action to make their world a better place,” wrote Girl Scouts of Colorado CEO Stephanie A. Foote, who nominated Christina for this prestigious award.

Christina will officially accept her award at the annual National Philanthropy Day Luncheon on November 13, 2015 at Seawell Grand Ballroom, Denver Center for the Performing Arts.

2015 NPD winner release ALL

Meet Girl Scouts of Colorado’s New President & CEO

I am very excited to join Girl Scouts of Colorado as your new President & CEO. I’ve thoroughly enjoyed volunteering with Girl Scouts of Colorado since 2007 as Chair of the Board of Directors. Now I look forward to partnering with our wonderful staff, volunteers, girls and supporters in continuing to grow Girl Scouts of Colorado into one of the nation’s best Girl Scout councils.

I am a lifelong Coloradan and have served as a leader of many statewide initiatives. I have sons, so Girl Scouts is where I can make my contribution to help girls step up as the future leaders in our state and our world. I believe in Girl Scouting, and I look forward to introducing more Colorado girls to our proven leadership experience.

Watch my welcome video to learn more about me and my vision for Girl Scouts of Colorado.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u-J26nHSuU8?rel=0]

We are on an exciting journey. Thank you for all that you do for Girl Scouts of Colorado!

Historic and memorable Girl Scouts’ 100th in Colorado

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Wow! What a day Girl Scouts of Colorado had on Monday!

I had the pleasure of starting out my day Monday with an interview to celebrate Girl Scouts’ 100th on 9NEWS’ morning show, Colorado’s #1 news station in Denver. Two teenage Denver Metro area Girl Scouts joined me for the interview, and we had a great time! After that interview I quickly moved over to the State Capitol for the Honorary Capitol Troop 2012 festivities with the state’s female legislators.

Roughly fifty Girl Scouts and several dozen Girl Scout alumnae and supporters joined in on the events at the Capitol. Some of these attendees got to sit on the House and Senate floor, and four Girl Scouts led the Pledge of Allegiance to open the House session.

But the “memorable” events of the day took place when both the House and Senate passed Resolutions in honor of Girl Scouts of Colorado, our 100th anniversary celebrations and the lifelong leadership skills Girl Scouts has instilled in girls for generations.

The best part of these Resolutions were after they were read members of the Legislature offered their support of Girl Scouts, many sharing their memories of being involved in the organization. Here are some of my favorite quotes:

“I can still change a tire in 17 minutes because of a Girl Scout badge!”

“I developed a love of camping because of Girl Scouts.”

“It was through Girl Scouts we developed the courage, confidence and character to be standing in front of you today.”

“I believe Girl Scouts is where we got our foundation from.”

“Girl Scouts is the glue that keeps women on track to be great leaders.”

“I learned to face my fears through Girl Scouts.”

After the festivities on the House and Senate floors, the female legislators joined Girl Scouts of Colorado for a lunch, sponsored by AT&T. At the lunch, these legislators were inducted in their Honorary Troop 2012 with a pinning ceremony. Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Board Chair Stephanie Foote, as well as Girl Scout Christina Bear spoke about local Girl Scouting.

“This is a momentous occasion for Girl Scouts, and AT&T is proud to sponsor this induction of Honorary Troop 2012,” commented the president of our sponsoring organization, Bill Soards of AT&T Colorado. “For 100 years the Girl Scouts have made it their mission to teach that next generation to take the reins and drive their own destiny. You have taught that through hard world and perseverance, you can make the world a better place for this and the next generation.”

Troop 2012 symbolizes that the leadership possibilities for girls and women in this country are endless. The Capitol Troop 2012 forms a partnership between Girl Scouts of Colorado and the women members of the state legislature to address issues that impact girls. It also broadens the presence of Girl Scouts of Colorado at the State Capitol to recognize the depth and breadth of our work.

Below we have a video of the event at the Capitol, and there is a link above to the photos taken from the day. We are also excited about the Girl Scouts who visited hospitals around the state to induct the baby girls born on Monday into the Honorary Troop 2012 as well. Check out those blog posts to learn more. (Blog #1; Blog #2) Additionally check our blog and Facebook Page for other posts on Colorado Girl Scouts 100th anniversary festivities.

Girl Scouts of Colorado honored Western Slope Generation Wow! Girl Scouts at a special ceremony with the Mayor of Grand Junction on Monday, March 12th. Here is a quote from one of the attendees of the event, Susan Alvillar, who is a supporter of Girl Scouts:

“Inspirational, impressive and fun! The girls each told the audience what inspired them to make a difference, which included things like being empowered to stop bullying, the honor of being in a troop with awesome sister Girl Scouts and making a difference in their community. The event was attended by two members of the City Council, Mayor Pro Tem Bill Pitts, who is the father of three former Girl Scouts and five granddaughter Girl Scouts, and Councilman Bennett Boeschenstein, who is the father of two former Girl Scouts. Parents and other family members snapped pictures and enjoyed cookies and milk at a reception following the event.”

We are also proud of the recent 100th anniversary media coverage Girl Scouts of Colorado has received. Here are some highlights:

I’ve been a Girl Scout for about as long as I can remember, and this is a day and moment in history I won’t soon forget. I’m glad I had a chance to be part of it!

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_A5zQdhT6iA?rel=0]