Tag Archives: Stephanie Foote Leadership Prize

2021 Gold Award Scholarship Ceremony

Girl Scouts of Colorado CEO Leanna Clark presented the 2021 Debbie Haskins Spirit of Girl Scouting Award and the 2021 Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize to Gold Award Girl Scouts on April 5, 2021. Watch it here. This year’s ceremony was a virtual celebration due to COVID-19. In past years, this special ceremony has been part of Gold Award Day at the Colorado State Capitol.

  • Inspired by her own experience with bullying, Lily Goudreau from Monument, Lewis Palmer High School, wanted to encourage self-confidence and self-worth in middle school students. She did this by painting positive affirmations around a local school and worked with the no-bully club to maintain and add to the affirmations each year. She also created a “lunch bunch” group that helps watch out for bullying and does not allow any student to eat alone. Lily is recognized with this year’s Debbie Haskins Spirit of Girl Scouting Award for her confidence, resilience, and courage in succeeding in life.
  • Elizabeth Gumper from Colorado Springs, Coronado High School, created a rich online resource website, mycareerconnections.com, that gives high school students a personal, insightful look at numerous careers available throughout society through personal interviews with professionals. Elizabeth is the 2021 Stephanie Foote Leadership Prize winner and will receive $1,000 cash gift to recognize her sustainable impact through leadership.
  • Charlotte Blish from Arvada, Arvada West High School, started a nonprofit, Watering Communities, to teach elementary-aged students about how the lack of clean water impacts socio-economic and education resources in developing countries. Charlotte was named 2021 Stephanie Foote Leadership Prize Honorable Mention and will receive a $250 cash prize for her project’s impact.

Each year, Gold Award Girl Scouts are eligible to earn the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize. This award was made possible through a generous gift to Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Endowment by former Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie A. Foote. “I am proud to recognize Girl Scouts whose Gold Award projects have made a lasting impact,” Foote said.

In addition, the Debbie Haskins Spirit of Girl Scouting Award is given in memory of Girl Scout Gold Award Mentor Debbie Haskins, who had a passion for working with older Girl Scouts. It recognizes one outstanding Gold Award Girl Scout from Colorado who exemplifies the Girl Scout spirit through courage, confidence, and character.

“Gold Award Girl Scouts don’t just change the world for the better, they change it for good—and these Girl Scouts embody everything this achievement stands for,” said Leanna Clark, Chief Executive Officer of Girl Scouts of Colorado. “Each of these young women addressed an issue that’s important to her in order to earn her Gold Award, and we congratulate each of these Gold Award Girl Scouts on this momentous accomplishment.”

Open only to girls in high school, the Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls—and the most difficult to earn. The Gold Award project involves seven steps: 1. Identify an issue, 2. Investigate it thoroughly, 3. Get help and build a team, 4. Create a plan, 5. Present the plan and gather feedback, 6. Take action, 7. Educate and inspire. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Be sure to join us on the GSCO Facebook page on May 16 for a virtual, statewide Highest Awards Celebration honoring Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award Girl Scouts from the past Girl Scout Awards Program year. Aren’t on Facebook? That’s OK. Email highestawards@gscolorado.org for an alternate link.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Sarah Greichen awarded Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize

Sarah Greichen, 2016 Gold Award recipient, is the winner of the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize. Sarah from Centennial, Front Range Christian School, officially accepted her award at the Day at the Capitol Celebration for Girl Scouts of Colorado on Monday, May 2, 2016.  Lawmakers in the House of Representatives broke from traditional business to honor the 48 Girl Scouts from across the state who earned their Gold Awards, the highest award in Girl Scouts, this spring.

Inspired by her twin brother who has an Autism Spectrum Disorder, Sarah started a new non-profit organization, Score A Friend, to encourage more schools to offer and have students participate in unified sports teams and clubs. Sarah was selected as the winner of this $1,000 cash prize by an independent panel. Of Sarah’s project, prize committee members said, “We are delighted at the quality of Gold Award projects we reviewed this year and are thrilled to award the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize to Sarah Greichen whose project exemplifies community impact through leadership.”

The Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize was made possible through a generous gift to the Girl Scouts of Colorado Endowment by Girl Scouts of Colorado President & CEO Stephanie A. Foote.

“Sarah’s project is an exceptional example of sustainable impact through leadership. I am proud to present this prize to her and recognize Girl Scouts whose Gold Award projects have made a lasting impact,” Foote said.

In addition to Sarah’s award, the prize committee chose to honor four deserving Gold Award recipients with the title of Honorable Mention. They are: Belle BashawKellyn DasslerCourtney Howell, and Cassidy Klein. Belle from Parker, Douglas County High School, developed a curriculum to teach elementary school students about the importance of bees, which bees they might see, and how they can help the bee population thrive. Kellyn from Parker, Chapparal High School, increased students’ respect for teachers and educators. She also worked to encourage teachers throughout the year and made working conditions better for staff by taking items off their “to-do” lists. Courtney from Niwot, Silver Creek High School, organized a science, math, and engineering exploration day for middle and elementary school students to show them that science can be fun. Cassidy from Highlands Ranch, ThunderRidge High School, collected more than 2,900 children’s books, which she used to create a library for Joshua Station, a transitional housing facility for families.

This year Girl Scouts across the country are celebrating the 100th anniversary of Girl Scouts’ highest award. The Gold Award culminates with a project led by one young woman between 9th and 12th grades who builds a purpose-based team to work with the larger community to meet a need. The focus of a Gold Award project is to identify and research a community issue she is passionate about, develop a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establish a global connection with others and provide sustainability for the project.  Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Colorado House of Representatives honors Gold Award recipients

On Monday, May 2, Colorado’s House of Representatives broke from traditional business to honor 48 Girl Scouts from across the state who received the Gold Award, the highest honor in Girl Scouts.  Approximately half of this year’s honorees from along the Front Range were at this recognition, which will took place shortly after the session opened at 10 a.m.  As Girl Scout Gold Award recipients, these girls’ accomplishments reflect extraordinary leadership and citizenship skills that mark them as valuable contributors to their communities and world.

In addition to honoring these Girl Scouts and their extraordinary Gold Award projects that benefited communities across the world, Girl Scouts of Colorado also introduced the 2016 winner of the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize. Inspired by her twin brother who has an Autism Spectrum Disorder, Sarah Greichen from Centennial, Front Range Christian School, started a new non-profit organization to encourage more schools to offer and have students participate in unified sports teams and clubs. The Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize was made possible through a generous gift to the Girl Scouts of Colorado Endowment by Girl Scouts of Colorado President & CEO Stephanie A. Foote. “Sarah’s project is an exceptional example of sustainable impact through leadership. I am proud to present this prize to her and recognize Girl Scouts whose Gold Award projects have made a lasting impact,” Foote said.

Sarah was honored along with four other Gold Award recipients, who the selection committee for the Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize determined were deserving of Honorable Mention. They are: Belle BashawKellyn DasslerCourtney Howell, and Cassidy Klein. Belle from Parker, Douglas County High School, developed a curriculum to teach elementary school students about the importance of bees, which bees they might see, and how they can help the bee population thrive. Kellyn from Parker, Chapparal High School, increased students’ respect for teachers and educators. She also worked to encourage teachers throughout the year and made working conditions better for staff by taking items off their “to-do” lists. Courtney from Niwot, Silver Creek High School, organized a science, math, and engineering exploration day for middle and elementary school students to show them that science can be fun. Cassidy from Highlands Ranch, ThunderRidge High School, collected more than 2,900 children’s books, which she used to create a library for Joshua Station, a transitional housing facility for families.

“Earning the Girl Scout Gold Award designation is truly a remarkable achievement, and these young women exemplify leadership in all its forms,” said Stephanie Foote, Chief Executive Officer of Girl Scouts of Colorado. “They saw a need and took ownership of helping to develop a solution and took action to make it happen. Their extraordinary dedication, perseverance and leadership is making the world a better place.”

This year Girl Scouts across the country are celebrating the 100th anniversary of Girl Scouts’ highest award. The Gold Award culminates with a project led by one young woman between 9th and 12th grades who builds a purpose-based team to work with the larger community to meet a need. The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.