Tag Archives: STEM

GIRL SCOUT GOLD AWARD PROJECT: Courtney Howell, Niwot, “STEAM Day”

Courtney Howell

What did you do for your Gold Award project? 

For my Gold Award project, I held a science, math, and engineering exploration day for middle and elementary school kids in my local area at my high school, to show them that science can be fun! The event consisted of 22 hands-on activities and learning displays that were designed to be fun, interactive, and educational, while encouraging kids to get interested and involved in STEM. Activities ranged from a wide variety of different science and engineering topics, and I had 16 different science and engineering organizations involved in the event, either by running a booth or by donating materials for an activity. The impact I had hoped to make, was to share the “wonder” of science and provide the opportunity for elementary and middle school children, to discover a passion or appreciation for science through hands-on activities.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I created a survey and had attendees fill it out rating their experience at the event, as well as specific aspects of the event to quantitatively measure the impact of my project, on my target audience. Comments from the surveys were incredibly positive, with the majority saying that the event was well done and a great opportunity that kids absolutely loved. Even before I tallied and analyzed the data, I could tell by how bustling the event was, how many kids I saw smiling, and deeply engaged in the various activities, that the event was a success.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement? 

My project will be sustained beyond my involvement by a group of leaders at my high school, who will take over the event by running it again next year. To help them get started, I provided a list of contacts and activities I used in my project. I also compiled this information into a “manual” of where to start in organizing the event, and mailed this manual to different schools around the state to allow other schools to run the event, something similar, or just to use its activities for teaching and spreading the fun of science and engineering.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

STEM programs are important in furthering national wellbeing and technology, but there are areas of the U.S., and worldwide, that don’t have as many opportunities to expose kids to STEM and getting them interested in science and engineering. Polls done by the National Science Foundation in 2011,  report that nationwide only 34% of 8th grade students performed at or above the proficient level in math, and only 40% of 4th graders nationwide performed at or above the proficient level. Math and science are important for innovation and progress, yet so many students nationwide struggle because they do not have the opportunities to learn and discover STEM in an engaging way.

My event, STEAM Day, can also link nationally because it will be repeated next year and can also be put on by other schools or organizations. From Silver Creek High School, the STEAM Day can spread to other schools in the district, then from one school district to another. It can grow/spread from Longmont to another town in Colorado, and from other towns in Colorado to another state and later another. I have started a chain of potential STEAM Days that I hope will spread far beyond my local community.

What did you learn about yourself?

By completing my Gold Award project, I realized just how capable I am. Going into the project, I had some doubts about whether I could get it done in time or even if I had the motivation to complete the project, but I learned that I am motivated and capable. While the event came together a little last-minute for some things, I was able to put together a successful event with myself as the leader, proving to myself that I am a capable young woman who can achieve anything, even difficult, if I put my mind to it.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

The practical life skills, such as time management, networking, and project management skills, I gained from doing this project will be invaluable for my future. Both in college and a prospective future career in genetic research, I will have to organize and execute large-scale research projects, which will require many of the same steps and skills as my Gold Award project did. Because of this, my leadership skills will continue to grow and improve as I identify topics of research interest, plan, and execute research, as part of or leading a team, that can hopefully help the greater community.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience? 

The Gold Award was a great way to use and refine the skills I had begun to develop through my 13 years in Girl Scouts. From selling cookies to going to camp, Girl Scouts introduces important skills, like networking, planning, and fundraising and these skills get put to practical use, as well as become improved, when you do your Gold Award.

***IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Teaching STEM & creativity in summer programs

Comet

Submitted by Pam Koschke, Program Associate for Girl Scouts of Colorado

Girl Scouts Outreach Program participated in Youth One Book One Denver (YOBOD) programs this summer. For this program young people across Colorado read a book called “The Comet’s Curse” by Dom Testa.  The book was about a comet that came very close to Earth.  The comet left a virus as it passed by Earth that made everyone sick except people under the age of 18.

Summer learning helps students do better in school and they will be more likely to graduate and be prepared for college. Girl Scouts is excited to be able to contribute to summer programs for YOBOD.

A dramatic and effective way to begin a unit on comets is to make your own comet right in front of the class.  We made a comet in the classroom with dry-ice, sand, water, dark Karo Syrup and ammonia.  As the comet began to melt, the class noticed small jets of gas coming from it.  These are locations where the gaseous carbon dioxide is escaping through small holes in the still frozen water.  This type of activity is also detected on real comets, where the jets can sometimes expel sufficient quantities of gas to make small changes in the orbit of the comet.  The girls were very excited about the activity.  They really enjoyed watching as the comets gas escaped creating a fog that rolled out of the bowl and down off the table.

This activity required a lot of preparation and supplies; however, it was worth it!  The ingredients for a comet are not difficult to find and watching a comet being “constructed” is something the students will remember for a long time.  The kids were so excited and had a great time as well as learning new things about comets.  After the activity, we asked the kids, “What did you learn about comets today”?  One girl said that she learned they are made out of carbon dioxide.

This is a great STEM activity as they are learning science and math. To incorporate some creativity in the lesson, students also got to decorate their own comet! (Pictured here) It was wonderful to watch girls have fun and learn some science.

I would definitely do this activity again!

 

 

Blast Off for Star Quest! Franktown Day Camp

2015 Frktown flyer 001

Submitted by Louise Bashaw

Parker

Denver Metro

Join us for Franktown Day Camp “Star Quest” this June. Become an astronaut, launch rockets, explore a black hole, meet aliens, and eat astronaut food.

As the highest evaluated Colorado day camp, scouts attend as campers, age up into our program aid intern unit, and return as PAs!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Brownies earn Computer Expert Badge

 

Submitted by Tiffany Baker

Lone Tree

Troops 59 & 1226

My Girl Scout daughters chose to work on their Brownies Computer Expert Badge at our local Microsoft retail store on Saturday, April 11, 2015.  Their thinking was that it might be fun to earn this badge while working with the latest technology.  They were right!

The Microsoft tech opened with sharing a little history about the evolution of computers with parent input.  Then, the girls learned how to paint a picture using a computer art program, take a world adventure picking different countries to explore, and how to play Mojang for more computer fun.  Girls learned about fun new computer programs and where some computer experts are that they can speak with if they have any questions.

As a Troop Leader, I would recommend troops with a few girls attend this event together or with their parents.  These classes are free and can have a number of participants requiring girls to share the technology.  Maybe speak with your local Microsoft store to see if they can schedule a private class, if attending with a larger troop.  The Computer Expert Badge was a two-hour class and adults were asked to remain in the store during the session.  Each participating Girl Scout received a completion certificate, Microsoft goodie bag, and fun patch.

Thank you Microsoft for providing these unique learning opportunities for our youth!

GIRL SCOUT GOLD AWARD PROJECT: Linda Baker, Fort Collins, “Attracting Girls to STEM Using Social Media”

Linda Baker pic

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I encouraged girls in Colorado to get involved in FIRST Lego League by implementing Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+, and Twitter functionality on the Colorado FIRST Lego League website, as well as publishing an article on the Girl Scouts of Colorado Blog, encouraging Girl Scouts (both girls and adults) to start Lego Robotics teams. I linked this article to my Facebook page, and asked my contacts to share it on their pages. My project advisor, Ross Parrent, also shared the article on LinkedIn, and asked his network to help spread the word. In May, I participated in a panel discussion for new leaders and volunteers at the Microsoft store in South Denver. This presentation was recorded and posted on the ColoradoFLL website. I have also been responding to email inquiries about how to get involved. Finally, my FRC team continues to do outreach and recruitment at events and exhibits in northern Colorado.

Why did you pursue this Gold Award project?

I am passionate about Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) and chose my Gold Award project to share this passion with young girls in and outside of Girl Scouts. Girls and young women typically lose interest in the STEM subjects, or “dumb themselves down” in order to appear more socially acceptable by their peers. This results in an insufficient number of young women attracted to careers in these fields.

How did your Gold Award project make a difference?

My Gold Award Project made a significant difference in several ways. One of my articles on the Girl Scout of Colorado blog was among the highest read and most favored articles posted in the last several years. My post on the Colorado FIRST Lego League website reached a potential target audience of several thousand young people. A talent scout from Los Angeles contacted me to recruit from both of these target audiences for the television series “America’s Junior Mind Challenge,” giving my readers access to an incredible opportunity. My Gold Award project reached far beyond the GSCO audience.

What skills did you gain through earning your Gold Award?

When I began this project, I was new to web design, and merely a standard user of social media. Through my project, I learned a lot more about programming in HTML and incorporating plugin software components. My communication skills were enhanced by weekly planning meetings with adult partners in FIRST Lego League. I stretched myself quite a bit to take a lead in facilitating discussions among these individuals and consultants from third party software development companies. This experience has taken me far from my comfort zone and given me confidence to be a leader in an adult business world.

How did you make your project sustainable?

The World Wide Web is a persistent and enduring technology that will remain available to everyone. I created controls on the Colorado FIRST Lego League website that allow connections, likes, and shares through Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Google+.

What was your connection to the national or global community?

If COFLL is successful, that will enable USFIRST to leverage those both nationally and internationally. The work I have done should transport seamlessly to other HTML applications. Additionally, news of my project reached Hollywood, and the talent search articles continue to propel information to young audiences everywhere.

What will you most remember about your Gold Award project?

The most memorable aspect of my Gold Award project is my contact with the talent scout of Shed Media that was looking for smart young women. I did not realize that my Gold Award could reach so far from Girl Scouts, so that experience will always remind me of the ripple effect that my actions may have on the world.

How will earning your Gold Award help you in your future?

I have become more confident in my ability to hold my own in business situations, and I have learned how to be more effective in quick response situations. There were times I doubted my ability to finish my Gold Award on time, but I managed to finish my project two days before I left for college, and today I have immense satisfaction that I saw it through to completion.

Why do you feel the Gold Award is an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

My Gold Award Project was a product of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Throughout my experience, I developed a variety of skills such as problem solving and communication.

***IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Explore STEM in Longmont

Submitted by Courtney Howell, Girl Scouts of Colorado Gold Award candidate

Come have fun and explore science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) at a hands-on expo designed especially for kids. Learn to solder, drive a robot, build a rocket, check out the Doppler on wheels weather radar, watch a liquid nitrogen demonstration, learn what it’s like to be an astronaut, and lots more!

“STEAM Day” is open to kids of all ages, and will be held on March 21, 2015 from noon-4pm at Silver Creek High School in Longmont ( 4901 Nelson Road). Admission is free. For more information about the event and its sponsors, check out the Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/steamdaygs

 

STEAM Day Flyer

GIRL SCOUT GOLD AWARD PROJECT: Katherine Ketcham, Gunnison, “STEM Day”

Katherine Ketcham pic

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

My Gold Award project was a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) Day for Gunnison Elementary School students. They learned about biology, chemistry, physics, and STEM at the day. First through fourth graders completed the experiments and learned about those topics for thirty minutes. The STEM Day was two complete school days in October.

Why did you pursue this Gold Award project?

My rural town is weak in Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics (STEM) education. I went the first seven years of my public schooling without STEM. This caused my great interest in
it come high school and helped me decide on pursuing it in college. Other people I know avoided STEM once given the opportunity to pursue it because of its faulty reputation of being challenging. I believe that if students are exposed to it earlier, then they would be more likely to pursue it later in life. Reviewing the school district’s lack of STEM education, I took the initiative and enacted a STEM Day at the Gunnison Elementary School in hopes that the current students would be introduced to STEM at a younger age.

How did your Gold Award project make a difference?

The many students that experienced the day learned about potential future occupations, courses, and subjects. They may ask questions, read books, or view science fairs put on by university students. They may gain a greater appreciation of the world and want to better understand it. In the future, they will most likely take more science classes when the opportunity arises in high school and college. There will also be an increase of people interested in pursuing STEM as adults. I’ve begun the student’s education and shown them potential paths for the future. STEM is an important occupation with many branches that will always be needed. In the future, these students may hold such occupations.

What skills did you gain through earning your Gold Award?

I don’t particularly enjoy talking with people, especially on the telephone. I discovered that I have excellent interpersonal communication skills. I developed and discovered this through my project. I had to communicate with various adults. I had to discuss with my advisor on how to conduct my day and what projects should be used. I had to discuss my idea with teachers in the Gunnison Elementary School to see their willingness to allow their students to participate. I had to communicate continuously with the elementary school principal in order to establish the day. I also had to communicate with teenagers. I needed student volunteers to assist with my STEM Day. I then had to communicate with the elementary school aged students in first through fourth grade. I was nervous for all this at first and practiced my speeches multiple times, and despite the fact I was sick and could barely talk on the day of my project, I was able to effectively communicate to all age groups. It was an exciting and impacting realization that I’m gifted at interpersonal communications. My improved ability to communicate then furthered me as a leader. I also gained organization skills and planning skills.

How did you make your project sustainable?

The approximated 500 students that experienced that day learned about potential future occupations, courses, and subjects. According to my statistics and my prediction, they will most likely take more science classes when the opportunity arises in high school and college. Those students are also more likely to pursue an occupation related to STEM. I’ve begun the student’s education and shown them potential ideas for the future. This will assist with their future success. Teachers at the Gunnison Elementary School saw the great success and effect this day had on the students. They intend to make the STEM Day an annual event. The STEM Day was endorsed by the teachers so much; they invited me to host another STEM Day after school on February 18, 2015. This STEM Day reached many students and shows the endorsement the teachers have for it.

What was your connection to the national or global community?

STEM isn’t only lacking in Gunnison, but also in other towns. Teachers don’t emphasize on such courses or don’t offer them. According to a study done and published on www.usnews.com, by
the time students enter fourth grade, a third of them no longer feel interested in science. By eighth grade, nearly fifty percent of students have lost interest in science and deem it unnecessary for their futures. These statistics largely come from the lack of opportunities regarding such subjects. The undereducated teachers in those areas also ineffectively teach as they are untrained in those subjects. The poor limited opportunities granted cause a nationwide need for supplemental STEM education. The result from limiting STEM courses is limiting the education for the students. STEM should be highlighted upon in younger education and made fun for the elementary school students so they enjoy it and get more out of it. STEM, although highly needed, isn’t emphasized in school districts nationally.

What will you most remember about your Gold Award project?

I’m very proud of my project for so many reasons. I believe this has been the most influential and beneficial project I’ve ever done. I’m so proud to help the community and the future STEM world with my project and interests. I’m also proud that I influenced  students to now appreciate and like STEM when they formerly didn’t. Another part I’m proud of is that the students still, a few months later, recognize me and talk to me about how fun my STEM Day was. They genuinely enjoyed the day and learned a lot. I’m really proud of the success of my project. The impact was significant. I’m always going to remember its great impact on the elementary students. My goal in life is to help others in all ways, and this is the greatest way I’ve helped people so far.

How will earning your Gold Award help you in your future?

Earning my Gold Award helped with my future greatly. It helped me become a better leader, more effective communicator, better organized, and more confident. These are important life skills that will greatly help me in my future.

Why do you feel the Gold Award is an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award was my favorite part of Girl Scouts. Girl Scouts are dedicated to community service. This project allowed me to help my community greatly. Girl Scouts is an amazing experience that provides many opportunities. The Gold Award is another unforgettable and highly revolutionizing part of Girl Scouts that is rewarding and impactful.

***IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scout volunteers as a STEM Student Mentor

Submitted by Christina Bear

Golden

The acronym of S.T.E.M. (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) is creating a buzz in K-Graduate education these days primarily because of the projected job availability, especially in computers and technology. A nationwide effort is happening to motivate younger students toward STEM education and STEM careers, especially for minority students including girls and women.

A recent US News article “Latinos aren’t interested in STEM fields” struck me, a junior at Colorado Academy looking forward to studying Computer Science in college, that there is a distinct a need in my community to change this inequity right here in Colorado.

I developed a project for my Girl Scout Gold Award to benefit the Hispanic students in the Horizons Summer Program, a non-profit that is sponsored by my school Colorado Academy.  I initiated an introduction to STEM for minority elementary students and taught them technology topics of Scratch computer programming and Lego robot construction and programming.  Over the span of a week from June 30 to July 3, 2014, I taught 14 third graders an abbreviated STEM curriculum. Getting the students to enjoy their first experience of computer programming and technology was my main goal.

The students expressed comments such as “Can we program in our free time?” and “Can we do this next summer?” leading me to conclude there is a clear benefit and need for after school and summer program STEM enrichment for minority children. I realized that high school students can develop themselves as STEM mentors in informal teaching using the knowledge they have gained in their schooling. For example, I found it helpful that my coursework in math, sciences, and computer science allowed me to comfortably conduct an informal teaching course in STEM.

Going for a Gold Award with Girl Scouts has been a fulfilling experience and unique from any other project I have done. In particular, the Gold Award process made me carefully think of impact on my community. The immediate impact was hearing the students’ positive comments and getting teacher’s feedback that the students expressed a new found interest in STEM.

The Gold Award also requires that I sustain my project, which is unique and challenging. The concept of sustainability is a real-world necessity especially if you want to bring change to your community. Working with a nurturing mentor, Ms. Rae Ann Dougherty with the Girl Scouts of Colorado, I learned professional tips such as to include an Executive Summary in my manual. It is also my hope to sustain the program at Horizons Colorado Academy depending on funding and student availability.

Given the potential value of high school students teaching younger students on a voluntary basis, I started Project STEM Student Mentors to motivate my peers to give back to their communities by volunteering to educate our younger students. I have prepared a manual from a student’s perspective on my experience and guidelines to initiate a program at your school accessible from my web site www.projectstemstudentmentors.com. Character, commitment and competence are all necessary ingredients to have a successful high school student STEM mentor program.

As for minorities in STEM, I believe that diversity brings out about creativity and that is sure to lead to innovation. This is what our students and really our country needs to become successful on a global scale. I am grateful to Girl Scouts of Colorado to complete a Gold Award project that changes my world for the better.

For more information about Project STEM Student Mentors, contact Christina Bear at cmbear37@gmail.com

*** Earn your Gold Award by Feb. 28, 2015 and you could win the $1,000 Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize! It will be awarded to a Girl Scout who has received her Gold Award in the current year and whose project is selected by an independent panel as an exceptional example of sustainable impact through leadership. To learn more click here.

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Alexandria Bellas, Colorado Springs, “Shooting for the Sciences”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I did a Girl’s Science Event for girls in grades 6-8 that brought together exhibitors around Colorado to present a booth to the girls. Physics, aviation, space, and more were all addressed in the booths. Hands-on activities, as well as experiments, were used by the exhibitors to engage the girls and really interest them in the sciences!

Why did you pursue this Gold Award project?

I pursued this project because I felt that the issue of the number of women in STEM fields needed to be addressed. As a little girl, I had always dreamed of being a scientist, pouring acids into beakers, wearing goggles, and creating chemical reactions. I want the same for every girl. I wanted them to be able to have the confidence and will to be able to aspire to achieve.

How did your Gold Award project make a difference?

My Gold Award project affected girls at an earlier age and influenced them to pursue higher level science and math classes in high school and possibly even in college.

What skills did you gain through earning your Gold Award?

I gained invaluable leadership skills as well as better time management through earning my Gold Award.

How did you make your project sustainable?

I have passed on my project to the Key Club at my school, who will continue the event in future years. I also hope that the information that the girls gained at this event will be ever in their minds. My hope is that they, too have been inspired to inspire others.

What was your connection to the national or global community?

My issue was not only a local issue, but it is also an issue nationally and globally as well. The issue is similar all throughout the nation, and many initiatives have also been taken, such as mine, to resolve that issue.

What will you most remember about your Gold Award project?

I will always remember the girl’s smiling faces at my event. This gave me a feeling that I will never forget, one of accomplishment and success.

How will earning your Gold Award help you in your future?

My Gold Award has provided me with so many  valuable skills that I will be able to employ in the future in college and my future job as well. These skills seem to be unobtainable in any other way. Through my Gold Award, I have been able to achieve more, and gain the confidence that I need to achieve more in the future.

Why do you feel the Gold Award is an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I feel that the Gold Award is essential to the Girl Scout experience because it allows you to take on a massive challenge, and for you to be a leader of it. This, to me, has been the perfect way to signify a change that I have made and a mark that I have left next to my Girl Scout name.

***IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scout creates STEM Day for Gold Award project

Submitted by Katherine

Western Colorado

Girl Scouts is the absolute most amazing experience and opportunity. Not only can you meet amazing people, experience new or abstract activities, pursue values and endeavors you love, but you can also change the world. My greatest goal in life is to improve the world in all ways. I’ve been working towards my Gold Award and my project has impacted me and my community greatly, which has begun my goal of helping people.

I’ve lived in the same rural, isolated town my entire life. In my town, I find education severely lacking. In fact, I went the first seven years of my school life without STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics), that explains my love and obsession with it in grade school, the first time I was exposed to it. I’ve taken every science class offered in my school and compete in extra science activities. I love science and plan on pursuing it in the future. I’ve had many friends that didn’t experience this though. STEM has the reputation of being challenging and frightening. Having never been exposed to it previously, they avoided it completely. My belief is that if they were exposed to it earlier, then they would be more interested in it now. Reviewing the school district’s lack of STEM education, I took the initiative and enacted a STEM day at the elementary school.

It took a lot of coordinating, leadership, planning, and communication. But, I arranged two full days, timing from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., where every class grades first through fourth would experience three different branches of science for thirty minutes. They spent seven minutes learning about physics, chemistry, and biology. At each station the students made a project to keep. This made the learning more fun and interactive. Not only did the students enjoy themselves, but they learned a lot too. They learned about air resistance and parachutes for physics, paint and food chemicals for chemistry, and DNA for biology. More importantly, they learned about possible career options and of the amazing world of STEM.

In order to know what was learned and enjoyed most for future STEM Days that will be continued by the teachers in future years, a survey was distributed to the students. These results showed that no students heard of STEM before that day, but most wanted to learn more about them and possibly pursue that as a career. The survey also compared the numbers of those who liked science in the beginning to those who liked it by the end of the day and there was a seven percent increase. This supports my idea that STEM education at a younger age will result in more students interested in those subjects. I have introduced over 500 students to the wonderful world of science. My hope is that by being introduced to science at a younger age, the classes will appear less intimidating, encouraging students to take science classes and to pursue such careers. Society is reliant on STEM and the related careers. By encouraging and educating the younger generations in STEM they will be more likely to pursue it and to benefit society through their expanded knowledge.

I took the first initiative to educate and offer the students scientific opportunities. Girl Scouts granted me this opportunity to encourage others in exploring my interest in STEM. Through this project I worked with a variety of ages, from the young elementary school students, to the high school volunteer helpers and educators, and to the adults that permitted such a day in the elementary school. Through this I expanded my interpersonal communication ability between all ages. Through this project, coupled with being the oldest and most experienced Girl Scout in Gunnison, I have evolved into being an excellent leader. Girl Scouts is extremely valuable to me and allows me to pursue my interests, achieve my greatest potential, and become a better person.

*** Earn your Gold Award by Feb. 28, 2015 and you could win the $1,000 Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize! It will be awarded to a Girl Scout who has received her Gold Award in the current year and whose project is selected by an independent panel as an exceptional example of sustainable impact through leadership. To learn more click here.