Tag Archives: STEM

Girls Lead the Way conference at Colorado School of Mines

Help us spread the word for this year’s Girls Lead the Way leadership conference hosted by the Society of Women Engineers collegiate and professional sections at Colorado School of Mines!

During the conference, high school girls (grades 9-12) will interact with current Mines students and faculty in three, hour-long engineering and/or applied math and sciences activities designed to engage students with Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) majors at Mines. The event also includes a majors panel, where the girls will hear highlights of each major from department representatives, a parents/guardians’ information session hosted by Mines Undergraduate Admissions (optional), and a campus tour (optional).

This year’s theme, “Boldly Go Where No Woman Has Gone Before,” reflects the conference’s goal of empowering young women with the knowledge that they are capable of pursuing and thriving in STEM education and careers.

When:

Saturday, February 2, 2019

9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.

(check-in begins at 8:30 a.m.)

(optional campus tour 3:30 – 4:30 p.m.)

Where: 

Colorado School of Mines

Student Center

1200 16th St.

Golden, CO 80401

Register today! Open until January 14, 2019 or when 200 registrants is reached. A waitlist will be added once capacity is met.

https://apply.mines.edu/register/GLTW2019

Cost – $30 per student

This covers a continental breakfast, lunch, and activities supplies.
There is no charge to parents/guardians for the optional sessions. Lunch is not included for parents/guardians.

We do not want program cost to be a barrier for participation. There are a limited number of scholarships available to cover the cost of this event. If you have a girl(s) in mind who could benefit from this scholarship, please contact Kelly Knechtel at knechtel@mines.edu , SWE Faculty Advisor at Mines, by Friday, December 14, 2018 for a code that can be entered on the registration form.

We look forward to interacting with your high school Girl Scouts on campus in February!

Engineer Badge STEM Program

Submitted Danika Davis

Metro Denver

Denver

Solar Rollers welcomes Colorado Girl Scouts to participate in the 2019 race series.

  1. Teams: 1-2 adult team leaders with up to 10 Girl Scouts ages 14 to 18-years-old per team.
  2. The Challenge: Using hands-on skills and STEM applications, you will design, build, test, and learn to drive a remote controlled, solar powered, race car with speeds up to 35 mph! Build a solar array from scratch, refine the weight to power ratios, and develop strength and endurance using high tech materials to reinforce your vehicle. Complete kits arrive in January and race events begin in April and continue until June.
  3. The Event: Meet other teams from your state and race around a track to compete in various events and win trophies.

Watch the videos at this link to see how it works and to access program information. http://www.solarrollers.org

Solar Rollers: Challenging to build, Empowering to master, and Exciting to drive!

Contact us for more information and sign up a team now! Sponsorship opportunities available.

Danika Davis – Danika@solarrollers.org (970) 977 – 0109 or (970) 425 – 6426.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Cadette troop visits Lockheed Martin CHIL Lab

Submitted by Christi Bontempo

Metro Denver

Littleton

Littleton Cadettes from Troop 62252 toured the Lockheed Martin CHIL (Collaborative Human Immersive Laboratory) on October 30, 2018. In this space, Lockheed Martin uses virtual reality to create and analyze simulations that are used for engineering solutions before manufacturing begins on products used in space exploration, solar arrays, and imaging satellites. These Girl Scouts have been building and creating in virtual reality through the DECTech program at the Colorado School of Mines. This STEM outreach program is designed especially for girls. The leaders are female Mines students with a passion for engineering, who want to engage the next generation of girls by introducing them to hands-on applications via virtual reality, chemistry, computers, and mathematics. The girls from Troop 62252 have ventured into coding and become familiar with the computer and engineering atmosphere at one of the best engineering schools in the country. Their experience has been amazing and their work was extremely fun. They have attended three out of four classes at the School of Mines and are looking forward to finishing their assignments at the last class.

For more information on STEM classes for all girls: https://tech.mines.edu/

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Brownies learn the importance of cybersecurity and STEM

Submitted by Courtney Ryan

Metro Denver

Denver

The internet and media are a daily part of our Girl Scouts’ lives and we felt it was important to arm them with the knowledge and understanding of how to stay safe while engaging with these sources. This is why we selected to pursue the cybersecurity badges and patches for our troop! Please enjoy the story about defending our castles, but tread carefully, you may find an alligator, a bear trap, or a grenade disguised as candy…

One high-energy afternoon, a bunch of Girl Scouts in Troop 65709
eagerly awaited the starting tune to learn how to keep themselves safe
in cyberland, all while running a race from alligators, bears, and secret predators.

They brainstormed and created elaborate defenses to keep out enemies pretenses, creating trap doors, moats, secret entrances, invisible castles, and candy tricks.

They discussed and debated the best shields and learned how it related  to keeping them safe in daily practice fields.

These G.I.R.L.s are armed and ready to take on the world and be safe when it comes to cyberland!

The girls came up with very creative ideas on defending their castles, family, and friends. They learned about how to layer defenses and how that relates to online defenses with passwords and safeguards they use every day. It was a great start to arming them with the knowledge to keep themselves safe while online! Our troop is pursing the cybersecurity trifecta of badges: Basics, Safeguards, and Investigator.

By completing this activity, the girls will earn this special cybersecurity patch. Learn how to earn yours.

Learning about cybersecurity, networking, and STEM

Submitted by Shannon Morris

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

My five Girl Scout Juniors learned about networking and how emails and texts are sent. The relationship between a network and train tracks helped all of them understand the concept clearly. They had so much fun passing messages from the sender to the receiver that they did it over and over three times. They would have kept going if there was more time.

My 4th and 5th grade Juniors are so excited about everything that is presented to them in Girl Scouts. They love to camp, hike, create arts and crafts, learn about important women in history, and are go-getters.

By completing this activity, the girls will earn this special cybersecurity patch. Learn how to earn yours.

Dinosaur Ridge: Winter and spring break camps

Submitted by Fran Taffer

Metro Denver

Morrison

Looking for real science and outdoor fun for your girl over school breaks? Dinosaur Ridge is offering winter break and spring break camps for kids ages 6-10.

Each camp offers exploration of the Dinosaur Ridge fossil sites, hands-on science projects, as well as expert guest presenters in the fields of paleontology, geology, art, earth science, survival skills, and local plants and animals.

Winter Break- January 2, 3, and 4, 2019 (W/Th/F) 9 a.m. – 3 p.m

  • January 2 —Creative in the Cretaceous
  • January 3 —Earth Science: From Crystals to Quakes
  • January 4 —Nature in Your Backyard

Spring Break- March 26, 27, and 28 (T/W/Th) 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.

  • March 26—Creative in the Cretaceous
  • March 27—Earth Science: From Crystals to Quakes
  • March 28—Nature in Your Backyard

Sign up for one day for $70 or register for multiple days for $60 per day.

Registration opens on November 15 at http://www.dinoridge.org/ 

Contact Fran at fran@dinoridge.org with any questions.

40963104_dinoridgecamps

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Badge in a Day at Wings Over the Rockies

Badge in a Day at Wings Over the Rockies is Sunday, November 11, 2018 from 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Register at: https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/content/girlscoutsofcolorado/en/events-repository/2018/badge_in_a_day_at_wi.html

Have you ever wondered how and why your computer works? Have you ever wanted to know what it takes to make a machine listen to you?

Wings Over the Rockies Air and Space Museum is hosting a Badge in a Day event to help you answer those questions and explore the wide world of robotics. Girl Scouts will learn what a robot is, how they function, and why they are so important in our daily lives. Through a series of hands-on stations, girls will get experience in coding, designing, and building their own robots. By the end of the day, Girl Scouts can earn their Robotics 1 badge* (Robotics 3 for Daisies) and all will receive a Wings Over the Rockies Badge in a Day patch.

Questions? Please contact Aimee Artzer at aimee.artzer@gscolorado.org

Juniors learn about cybersecurity and earn special patch

Submitted by Natalie Buike

Metro Denver

Aurora

We took a couple of our girls to a park to learn all about cybersecurity. The adults (senders) put together a message on cards that were sent down through the network (long strings of yarn) to each computer (each girl). Once the girls received the message, they had to send it on to the receiver (tree). Once the message made it to the receiver, we had the girls unscramble the message and put it all together. While doing the activity, we explained to the girls how the process works through a real network, just like how a train travels and makes several stops until it stops at its final destination. The parents also explained to the girls how important it is to be as safe as possible with what is sent through email, text, and other social media sites because you never know what information will stop at a computer that can be or has been compromised.

Some of the lessons our girls learned from this activity was that cybersecurity affects just more than a home computer. It is affects phones, tablets, and any other tech devices that can be connected to a network. One of the biggest lessons our girls realized through this is that nothing is really ever safe and that information can always have the potential to be compromised or stolen. The parents really worked on explaining to them that all of the modern day apps like Snapchat and Facebook are not safe and that whatever is posted will always be out there. At the age of 10, I would say that they now have a better understanding on the importance of doing their best to keep their information safe and to always be cautious about what is shared through email, text, social media, apps, etc.

Learn how you (or your troop) can earn this special cybersecurity patch. 

Brownies earn cybersecurity patch

Submitted by Sheri Wanamaker

Metro Denver

Denver

Girl Scouts from newly formed Brownie Troop 67615, from Denver’s High Tech Elementary School, were introduced to the concept of cybersecurity earlier this month. The girls drew castles and designed security systems. The girls were very creative and included modern biometric security features, such as facial recognition and fingerprint scanning. The girls combined medieval security concepts such as, moats with alligators, dragons, knights, and tall walls with digital security that included usernames, passwords, motion sensors, and video cameras. The girls discussed ways that security affects their daily life when using computers, tablets, smartphones, and keyless entry. The girls are looking forward to more STEM related activities!

Learn how you (or your troop) can earn this special cybersecurity patch. 

Girl Scouts explore aviation with female pilots from the Colorado Ninety-Nines

As many as 45 Girl Scouts learned about aviation from the Colorado Chapter of the Ninety-Nines, an international organization of women pilots. Aviation Patch Day was Saturday, Oct. 12. 2018 at Rocky Mountain Metro Airport. Girls explored different parts of aviation at five different stations:

  • Aircraft Design: Tour Rocky Mountain Metro Airport’s ramp to view and explore different airplanes.
  • Paper Airplane Aerodynamics: Make and race various paper airplane designs.
  • ATC (Air Traffic Control): How airplanes are directed around an airport.
  • Weather: How airplanes are affected by weather.
  • Aviation History: Take a trip through history to the first pilots and their planes.

The Ninety-Nines was established in 1929 by 99 women pilots with Amelia Earhart as its first President. Today, with over 5,600 members worldwide, one of the key missions of the organization is to promote advancement of aviation through education, scholarships, and mutual support. Over the past 75 years the organization has introduced thousands of girls and women to the wonders of aviation and awarded well over 800 scholarships, helping hundreds of women achieve their aviation dreams.