Tag Archives: space science

Girl Scouts earn NEW space science badges with Lockheed Martin

More than 100 Colorado Girl Scouts in grades 6–12 earned NEW STEM badges with the help of Lockheed Martin employees on Sunday, October 6, 2019 at Wings Over the Rockies Air & Space Museum, one of the region’s premier aerospace museums.

These Girl Scouts are among the first in Colorado to earn three NEW space science badges, which were among the 42 badges released by Girl Scouts of the USA in July. Cadettes (grades 6–8) earned the “Space Science Researcher” badge by learning about the properties of light and how we use it to make discoveries about the Universe and space science. Seniors (grades 9 and 10) earned the “Space Science Expert” badge by gaining a deeper understanding of the Universe– her place in it and how light is used to make discoveries about it. Ambassadors (grades 11 and 12) earned the “Space Science Master” badge by discovering how they can be a part of NASA now and in the future. Girl Scouts also had the opportunity to network with female Lockheed Martin employees and learn about high school internships.

A special thanks to CBS4/KCNC-TV and Fox31/KDVR-TV for joining us for this special event and sharing the story with their viewers! Media Stars Alison, Diana, and Tessa did an AWESOME job representing GSCO in interviews about the event.

Power of Cookie: Colorado Springs Girl Scout graduates from Space Camp

Girl Scout Junior Vivienne S. of Colorado Springs recently attended Space Camp at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center, home of Space Camp®, Space Camp® Robotics™, Aviation Challenge®, U.S. Cyber Camp®, and NASA Marshall Space Flight Center’s Official Visitor Center. Her experience was funded entirely by funds earned through the Girl Scout Cookie Program!

The weeklong educational program promotes science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), while training students and with hands-on activities and missions based on teamwork, leadership and problem solving.

This program is specifically designed for trainees who have a passion for space exploration. Vivienne spent the week training with a team that flew a simulated space mission to the International Space Station (ISS), the Moon or Mars. The crew participated in experiments and successfully completed an extra-vehicular activity (EVA), or spacewalk. Vivienne and crew returned to earth in time to graduate with honors.

Now that Vivienne is back home in Colorado Springs, she is looking forward to earning three space science badges, as well as a coding badge. All four are new badges, released by Girl Scouts of the USA in July 2019. Vivienne earned the “Space Science Investigator” and “Designing Robots 1” badges while at Space Camp.

Space Camp operates year-round in Huntsville, Alabama, and uses astronaut training techniques to engage trainees in real-world applications of STEM subjects. Students sleep in quarters designed to resemble the ISS and train in simulators like those used by NASA.

More than 900,000 trainees have graduated from a Space Camp® program since its inception in Huntsville, Alabama, in 1982, including European Space Agency astronaut, Samantha Cristoforetti and NASA astronauts Dottie Metcalf-Lindenburger, Dr. Kate Rubins, Dr. Serena Auñón-Chancellor and Christina Koch, who is serving onboard the International Space Station. Children and teachers from all 50 states and almost 150 international locations have attended a Space Camp® program.

Interested in training like an astronaut?  Visit www.spacecamp.com or call 1-800-637-7223.

About U.S. Space & Rocket Center

The U.S. Space & Rocket Center, a Smithsonian Affiliate, is home to Space Camp® and Aviation Challenge®, the Apollo 16 capsule, the National Historic Landmark Saturn V rocket and world-class traveling exhibits. USSRC is the Official Visitor Center for NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and a showcase for national defense technologies developed at the U.S. Army’s Redstone Arsenal.

To learn more about the exciting programs and activities at the USSRC, go to www.rocketcenter.com.

Change the world with 42 NEW Girl Scout badges

Choose your next adventure and earn one of 42 NEW badges! New programming released by Girl Scouts of the USA on July 16, 2019 enhances existing girl-led activities and offers girls everything from high adventure in the outdoors to learning how to use code to solve problems. Among the 42 new offerings are Outdoor High Adventure badges which feature, for the first time in Girl Scouts’ history, two distinct activity options, letting girls choose how they want to earn each badge.

In addition to existing badge offerings, girls in grades 6–12 can now pursue:

  • Nine Cybersecurity badges, through which girls learn about the inner workings of computer technology and cybersecurity and apply concepts of safety and protection to the technology they use every day. Activities range from decrypting and encrypting messages, to learning proper protection methods for devices, to exploring real-world hacking scenarios (funded by Palo Alto Networks).
  • Three Space Science badges, through which girls explore topics such as the universe and their place in it, properties of light, and inspiring careers in space science (funded by NASA’s Science Mission Directorate and led by the SETI Institute).
  • Think Like a Citizen Scientist, a Girl Scout Leadership Journey during which girls participate in interactive activities to practice observation techniques; collect data; and share their findings with real-world scientists through an online network. As with all of Girl Scouts’ Leadership Journeys, girls use their newly honed skills to take action on a community issue of their choosing (funded by Johnson & Johnson and The Coca-Cola Foundation).
  • To prepare girls in grades 6–12 to pursue computer science careers, Girl Scouts will launch the organization’s first Cyber Challenge on October 19 at sites nationwide, including Arapahoe Community College in Littleton. This program aims to prepare girls to pursue computer science careers in fields such as cybersecurity, artificial intelligence, robotics, and data science. Girls will test their cybersecurity skills, team up with other girls, and meet with cybersecurity professionals!

The new programming for girls in grades K–12 includes:

  • 12 Outdoor High Adventure badges, designed for girls to explore nature and experience exciting outdoor adventures like backpacking, snowshoeing, cross-country skiing, rock climbing, and tree climbing—giving them the confidence to support one another, take healthy risks, and spend dedicated time in nature. These are the first Girl Scout badges that members can earn by choosing one of two self-directed paths (funded by The North Face).
  • 18 Coding for Good badges, which not only teach girls the basics of coding but also detail how every stage of the coding process provides girls with opportunities to use their skills for good. Girls will learn about algorithms through age-appropriate, creative activities, such as coding positive memes to spread a message about a cause they care about, designing a digital game to educate people about an issue, and developing an app to promote healthy habits. Every Coding for Good badge includes a plugged-in and unplugged version, so that all girls can learn the foundations of coding, regardless of their access to technology (funded by AT&T and Dell Technologies).

“Girl Scouts has ignited the power and potential of girls for over a century, and we are committed to ensuring that today’s girls are the future of American leadership,” said GSUSA CEO Sylvia Acevedo. “Girl Scouts is where girls can explore new subjects, discover their passions, learn to take smart risks, and become their best, most confident selves—whether they want to become a NASA astronaut, an entrepreneur, a mountain climber, a coder, or a cybersecurity agent.”

GSUSA works with top organizations in fields that interest today’s girls. Combined with Girl Scouts’ expertise in girl leadership, these organizations and specialists advise and weigh in on content to provide the most cutting-edge programming available to girls. Content collaborators include codeSpark, the National Integrated Cyber Education Research Center (NICERC), SciStarter, and Vidcode. In true girl-led fashion, girls also tested the new offerings.

Girl Scouts of Colorado is 32,000 strong—more than 22,000 girls and 10,000 adults who believe in the power of every G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader)™ to change the world. With Girl Scouts, she’ll discover who she is, what she’s passionate about, and what she wants to achieve—both today and in the future. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org.

New Space Science badges

From Sylvia Acevedo, CEO, Girl Scouts of the USA

I’m so excited about Girl Scouts of the USA’s new Space Science badges for Girl Scout Daisies, Brownies, and Juniors, funded by NASA’s Science Mission Directorate through a multi-party collaboration led by the SETI Institute. GSUSA developed each badge with support from the SETI Institute’s subject matter expert partners from the University of Arizona, ARIES Scientific, and the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, and with the participation of Girl Scouts of Northern California.

Daisies’ Space Science Explorer
Brownies’ Space Science Adventurer
Juniors’ Space Science Investigator badge

Daisies who earn their Space Science Explorer badge examine the sun and moon and look at the night sky. Brownies who pursue their Space Science Adventurer badge dig into the solar system, the phases of the moon, and the constellations, and then share their findings. And Juniors who tackle their Space Science Investigator badge research a planet and develop models that explain celestial motion, the three-dimensional nature of a constellation, and the size and scale of the solar system.

I get so excited thinking about how many girls across the country are right now discovering a passion for space and astronomy just as I did as a young Girl Scout, thanks to Girl Scouts and our incredible partners at NASA!

So on behalf of the entire Girl Scout Movement, I want to congratulate NASA on 60 years of discovery, innovation, and incredible, visionary work. And here’s to the next 60!