Tag Archives: Southwestern CO

Bunk with the Beasts

Submitted by Marie Merrill-Exton

Southwestern CO

Pagosa Springs

Daisy Troop 26237 of Pagosa Springs set a goal to “Bunk with the Beasts” at Denver Zoo with their money earned from the Girl Scout Cookie Program. They did just that in June! The girls made so many memories together from building Girl Scout Thin Mint bears at Build-A-Bear to walking Denver Zoo at night to learn about the different animals and what makes them unique. It was an incredibly memorable experience for all!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Fitness: “Deskercise”

Crossroads Fitness visited the GSCO Western Colorado/Southwestern CO team last month to provide tips on sneaking in fitness and exercise into their day,  an important part of health and wellness. Crossroads Fitness has been a sponsor for the Women of Distinction Breakfast in Western Colorado the last few years, and their president is a Woman of Distinction. Molly Jo Johnson, the instructor in the pictures, serves on the President’s Cabinet.

 

Helping our community

Submitted by Marie Merrill-Exton

Southwestern CO

Pagosa Springs

Daisy Troop 26237 of Pagosa Springs worked on earning a new petal and the “Eco Learner” badge by helping their community with a trash pick-up day. The girls picked up trash with their parents and troop leaders around Pagosa Springs Elementary School and Pagosa Springs Town Park. The girls also placed quilted hearts for “I Found A Quilted Heart” around the trash pick-up locations to show random acts of kindness and to hopefully brighten someone else’s day. The girls said, “It is so much fun working together and helping our community.”

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Volunteer Spotlight: Tressa Jukes

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Tressa Jukes of Mancos in the Southwestern Colorado region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Tressa to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer? 

I became a Girl Scout leader, so that I could provide another age group of girls in our community opportunities through my knowledge and experiences. When we relocated to the area, there was only one troop in our small town with no troops for younger girls. I also like to use the opportunity to be a positive role model and show girls that you can be fearless, dedicated, and determined.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I’ve been volunteering with Girl Scouts for six years. I started as a troop parent volunteer while my husband was stationed in Juneau, Alaska and added troop cookie manager to my resume while there. After we moved to Mancos, I became a troop co-leader. I have also been TCM for our troop, as well as our service unit cookie cupboard manager for the Mesa Verde Service Unit, and within the past two years I have acquired the title of co-director of Camp Conundrum with my partner in crime/friend/mentor, Frieda Knezek.  It is the only volunteer-run Girl Scout Camp in our area, providing our girls with a weekend in July full of of mystery solving shenanigans and fun.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have learned many things over the course of the last six or so years, including improvisation; as nothing really goes as planned. My girls have taught me selflessness, and that no matter how small they are, given the chance, they will move mountains. I have also learned that giving these girls the world and encouraging them in a positive way is the best way to help  them to reach their dreams and goals. 

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope that they take away a lot of things from me, most importantly their conviction to do what is right and to stand up for the people who don’t otherwise have a voice. I hope that they continue to see how important it is to volunteer in their communities, even if it is as simple as doing random acts of kindness and paying things forward. Most important, I hope they have learned that being fearless and determined will help them go far in life and to not back down when they believe strongly in something.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Prior to volunteering, I was happy to sit on the sidelines and follow the crowd, not realizing the impact one person could have. With volunteering, I have learned that if you want something done, the best way to do it is to do it yourself and get the ball moving. Being newer to the area has given me the opportunity to meet and connect with people to enhance my troop’s experiences and pave the way for younger troops to get involved, as well.  Organizing activities with other community organizations has opened many doors for our troop and exposes them to many other positive women, whom they wouldn’t probably have otherwise met.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

World Thinking Day in Southwestern CO

Submitted by Marie Merrill-Exton

Southwestern CO

Pagosa Springs

Daisy Troop 26237 of Pagosa Springs was able to “think” more about the significance of the Girl Scout symbol and about Girl Scouts around the world during a World Thinking Day event in the Southwestern CO region.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Volunteer Spotlight: Becky Woodbridge

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Becky Woodbridge of Durango in the Southwestern Colorado region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Becky to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

My daughter was the main reason why I volunteered for Girl Scouts. However, I became a leader because I wanted to support as many girls as I can in my community. I am an advocate for women to use their voice and live with dignity. Beliefs are formed when we are young and I feel strongly that girls need support early on, so they grow into being a strong leader and to build the belief that they have the right to use their voice and what they say and do matters. I was a Girl Scout and it was a tremendous foundation for my morals, values, and character.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout. 

I am the troop founder and leader of 26243 in Durango. We started in July 2018 and currently have 12 girls: Daisies, Brownies, and a Junior. We are expanding our troop in the fall and adding a third co-leader. I am a very active troop leader and we are very involved in the community events.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

Oh boy where do I start… I had wonderful memories of Girl Scouts, but mostly it was Girl Scout Camp, selling cookies (1970’s), and doing a craft at a meeting. Beyond that, I was not really familiar what a Girl Scout meeting was all about. There was so much to learn and especially all of the new products, learning tools and resources like the Volunteer Toolkit. I have learned how to listen to what the girls want in a meeting, structure a meeting, and manage different age groups. The Daisies operate so differently than the Brownies.

What do you hope girls have learned from you? 

I hope girls have learned by my example. Leadership has many different facets. Listening to concerns and addressing them. Be polite and treat everyone of all ages with respect and follow the Girl Scout Law. To be adventurous, enjoy the journey, and take risks.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

I’ve been a leader of my own real estate company, a lead purser with American Airlines, and now Girl Scouts. Applying it to children with the right degree of go getting, inspiring innovation, taking risk in new territory has pushed me to be better and more effective leader. Without a doubt Girl Scouts is playing a very important role for me as a leader with my new start up business. It’s making me stronger!

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

 

Volunteer Spotlight: Amanda Hanson

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Amanda Hanson of Montrose in the Southwestern Colorado region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Amanda to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I joined Girl Scouts mainly to be able to attend events with my girls and help as needed. After being in our troop for about six months, I was asked to become a leader for Daisies. It worked perfectly because my youngest was a Daisy.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I started out as a support volunteer. With our cookie money from last year, we took the troop on a camping trip to Mesa Verde. I coordinated all the meals, pre-made most of them, shopped for the food and served it while camping. Just before going on our camping trip, I was asked to become the Daisy leader. During this cookie season, I helped get our troop cookie cupboard set up. I also helped parents with booth sign-ups. I was a booth coordinator and helped make sure other booth coordinators had their supplies as well. 

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have learned that the girls really soak in what you teach them. I love seeing and hearing about girls working on service projects and doing things, such as picking up trash even without being prompted. 

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I love how the Girl Scout Law is a foundation for everything in life. I love how as a Daisy leader, I get to teach the Law and how it pertains to every aspect of who we are. Many kids and adults these days lack the basic life skills, such as being honest and fair, respecting authority, and being considerate and caring. My hope as a leader is that these girls will take a stand to be different than the standard “normal” and remember the Law no matter how long they participate in Girl Scouts.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

I am naturally an introverted person. I don’t like to step out of my comfort zone and was extremely hesitant about becoming a leader. Being a volunteer has pushed me to step up and help where I would normally shy away. It’s allowed me to show my girls and others that it is ok to do something new. I’ve learned to be confident in teaching other girls, give the girls tools and resources to learn new things, and help them build on existing skills and ideas. 

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org. 

Volunteer Spotlight: Sheri Coy

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Sheri Coy of Hesperus in the Southwestern CO region is a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Sheri to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

I have a daughter and we moved to a new place where she had to make new friends out in the country. I came across Girl Scouts at her then school and saw it as a great opportunity for her to make new friends and experience new accomplishments that she does not learn from just going to school. I put her in the group and started to volunteer as a way for us to spend time together and make lasting memories.

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I currently volunteer with being the leader of our troop. I have also been a troop cookie manager, as well as active in our service unit. I volunteer with the cookie program, organizing a place for delivery and troop breakdown of cookies. I try to get as much opportunity as I can to give my time to the benefit of the girls. 

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer?

This question is very complex. I have learned so much about personalities, and scheduling, as well as conflict resolution, and fun enriched challenges. Everyday I feel I learn something new within all Girl Scouts has to offer. Implementing badges and teaching our multi-troop with many levels has challenges of its own. I have built lasting friendships from endeavors that the girls and I have learned through. I have learned things that as a girl growing up I didn’t have the opportunity to learn, money management, relationships, decision making, as well as life lessons.

What do you hope girls have learned from you?

I hope the girls learn how be true to the Girl Scout Promise and Law, build lasting friendships, and to make the world a better place, as well as have enrichment skills to last a lifetime. I want them to be proud of themselves and enjoy life to its fullest. I want them to know they make a difference and to have the confidence to do it.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

As I sit here, I am seeing that I started with G.I.R.L. backwards, lol. I became a leader of a wonderful troop and had to take risks with the girls to help them to learn. I became a innovator with the STEM movement and then on to a go-getter. This year during cookie season, we all took a risk to better our cookie sales by innovating a sales pitch. We took all the cookie flavors and put them in a dish filled with epoxy resin to set in front of the cookies on our booth. Our hopes were that it would be eye popping and grab the attention of the customers. Long story short, it worked! It was our most talked about part of the program, and next year, we plan to enhance it more by tweaking the corks we noticed from a first draft project. That used all aspects of  G.I.R.L.

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Celebrate World Thinking Day in Durango

Girl Scouts are invited to celebrate World Thinking Day and learn about Girl Scouts around the world. Girls will “visit” the five Girl Scout World Centers and learn about each Center and do a craft or game from the area.

When: 

Saturday, April 6, 2019

9 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Where:

Florida Mesa Presbyterian Church

Durango

Cost: FREE

This is not a drop-off event. Girl Scouts must attend with a troop leader, parent, or guardian. Adult-to-girl ratios must be met.

Register online by April 1 at: https://gscolorado.formstack.com/forms/world_thinking_day_durango_sw_4_6_2019

GSCO Photo Challenge: Girl Scout Cookies fuel trip to NASA

Submitted by Frieda Knezek

Southwestern CO

Mancos

“What did you do this weekend?”

“Oh, you know. We went to space and touched the moon. We stirred up dirt on Mars. We strolled through the space shuttle and ate lunch with astronaut Mark “Roman” Polansky, who told us what space smells like (hot metal, in case you’re wondering). We made it snow, built a rocket, and, best of all, made some new friends. (Hi, Frisco Cadettes!)”

A few years ago, after a particularly fun overnight trip to the aquarium and zoo in Denver, our troop decided they were ready for something a little bigger. So, we did some research and narrowed it down to a visit to Disney or NASA. The girls chose NASA, so that they could eat lunch with a real astronaut.

Together, we made a plan, a plan to be go-getters. We figured out how much it would cost, and how we’d earn that money. Then, the girls rolled up their sleeves and got busy. They sold cookies, so many cookies, but also wanted to do something more so they could go on their trip sooner. Innovators that they are, they hosted a Fall Color Run and created a mystery troop camp for Girl Scouts all over Colorado and even from Texas!

Right about now, I’d really like to say how grateful I am for the moms in our troop. They are a powerful force all their own, and they lead this troop every bit as much as I do. I call them the magic. They have helped build an atmosphere, community, and energy in our troop that I didn’t know were possible, and it’s because of them that I feel confident in encouraging the girls to dream as big as they want.

Back to the girls. It took them two years, but they did it. They were risk-takers and hard workers, and they made it happen. They paid for their trip…every cent. Friday, March 1, 2019, they boarded a plane to Houston, Texas, and the adventure began. They spent the day at the Johnson Space Center where they saw Mission Control, the astronaut training facility, the Orion capsule mock-up, rode a simulator into a nebula, and so much more.

That night, they got to stay past closing hours for the Girl Scout Camp In, where they built and launched rockets, solved a mystery box, and slept under an astronaut out on a space walk! (Ok, that was an exhibit, but it was still breathtaking and inspiring and magnificent.) They ate space ice cream, hit the gift shop, and walked away with stars in their eyes. We topped off the trip with a “one-a-cure,” their choice of pedicure or manicure, and a movie.

Everywhere we went, we met Girl Scouts of all ages and people who were thrilled to share in the girls’ adventure. We’re so proud to be a part of this magnificent organization that really throws the doors wide-open for girls and encourages them to dream big, work hard, and realize their visions. Thank you, Girl Scouts. Thank you for the G.I.R.L. Agenda, where they’re taught to be go-getters, innovators, risk-takers, and leaders. Here’s to the adventure, to the journey, and to a brighter future because of our girls…

Girl Scouts of Colorado is hosting a photo challenge! Just submit your favorite Girl Scout photo and the story behind it using the Share Your Stories form (www.gscoblog.org/share). Winners will be featured in future GSCO marketing materials, on GSCO’s social media networks, and on the GSCO Blog.