Tag Archives: Silver Award

Highest award for girls 11-14. The Girl Scout Silver Award represents a girl’s accomplishments in Girl Scouting and her community as she grows and works to improve her life and the lives of others.

Gold Award and Highest Awards and Take Action trainings

We are thrilled to be offering both Gold Award and Highest Awards and Take Action trainings at Leadership Summits across the state for the summer and fall of 2018!

You may be asking, “What is a Leadership Summit?” Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Leadership Summits are learning conferences that offer volunteers (and girls!) the opportunity to get energized for the new membership year and check required trainings off the to-do list. In addition to offering trainings for new and experienced volunteers, we are offering “Older Girl Leadership Summit” tracks at each event where older girls can participate in training all day.

Gold Award Training is required for any girl interested in pursuing her Gold Award.

Highest Awards and Take Action is the perfect opportunity to connect with other troop leaders about successful projects and learn how to let girls take the lead in making a difference in their community with Take Action projects that girls will complete in their Journeys, Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award projects.

Colorado Springs, Saturday, August 25
Older Girl Leadership Summit: https://gscolorado.formstack.com/forms/older_girl_leadership_summit_pp_08_25_2018
Leadership Summit (for adults): https://gscolorado.formstack.com/forms/leadership_summit_in_colorado_springs_pp_08_25_2018

Loveland, Saturday, September 8
Registration links coming soon!

Denver, Saturday, September 29
Registration links coming soon!

Grand Junction, Saturday, October 20
Super Saturday event, Gold Award training only.
Registration link coming soon!

Questions about Highest Awards? Email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Silver Award project: Capes with “healing powers”

Submitted by Jennifer Redmond

Metro Denver

Aurora

We are creating “capes with healing powers” for our Silver Award project! We are designing a sewing class in conjunction with JOANN Fabrics where Girl Scouts and community members alike can learn to sew and create capes for sick kids in the hospital. We will hand deliver all of the capes along with care packages of crafty and fun things to do in the hospital.

Make a child’s day! Help them feel strong and have fun. Anyone can help. We created packets with sewing instructions and a pattern to hand out to people in the community who can sew. We will collect all of the capes and deliver them to the hospital. We have a goal of collecting 100 capes by January 1, 2019!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

G.I.R.L.s paint inspirational messages on bathroom stalls for students

Submitted by Adrienne Prince

Metro Denver

Parker

Update: On Wednesday, August 15, 2018, the troop was interviewed by Karen Morfitt of CBS Denver. Watch the story: https://cbsloc.al/2BhY16d 

Girl Scout Cadette Troop 4664 from Parker wanted to send encouraging messages to students at Mammoth Heights Elementary School in Parker, their former elementary school. They painted bathroom stalls with encouraging and inspirational messages, such as “You are brave,” “Good vibes only,” ‘”Dream, strive, become,” “Drive with purpose,” “Be kind,” and “You are enough.” In all, six Girl Scouts painted 42 stalls in a girls’ and boys’ restrooms in May and June of 2018.

This was all part of their project to earn the Girl Scout Silver Award, the highest honor for a Girl Scout Cadette. The girls wanted to do this because they have all experienced bullying and not being included. They wanted to share something encouraging and positive with younger students. The girls are proud to have earned their Silver Award because it allowed them to give back to their school and be role models. They want to show their community that teenagers and girls can be leaders!

Congratulations Lois P., Sophia S., Caitlyn S., Madison G., Eliza A., and Rachel T.!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Silver Award project: Plastic bag ban

Submitted by Girl Scout Cadette Troop 62458

Metro Denver

Littleton

We are Girl Scout Cadettes Ella M., Amanda B., Mia J.,  and Giana A. from the Columbine area in Littleton. As part of our project to earn our Silver Award, today (July 31, 2018), we proposed a ban on the use of disposable plastic bags in Jefferson County before the Jeffco Board of County Commissioners. In Colorado, we see plastic bags littering our rivers and highways, and in trees all over our parks. The plastic bags degrade into our rivers, lakes, and reservoirs polluting our water, therefore damaging our ecosystem.

In addition, disposable plastic bags make our groceries more expensive. Stores pay anywhere from $1 to $6,000 per month on disposable bags. The stores then add that cost into groceries and products. The average hidden cost of bags that consumers pay is $37.50 every year. Consumers use 100 billion plastic bags per year. More than 90% end up in landfills where they are not exposed to elements that would degrade them. We cannot let this go on any longer. Plastic bags continually block drainage systems and put poisons into the water supply. Many animals mistakenly eat plastic bags and as more animals eat each other, the pollutants go up the food chain, and eventually end up on our dinner tables. It’s time we take control of the environmental impact of our actions by getting rid of disposable plastic grocery bags.

On Tuesday, July 31, 2018, the girls were interviewed by Ashley Michels of Fox31/KDVR-TV. Use this link to watch the story. https://bit.ly/2OAvfAo

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too

 

Girl Scout delivers 60 care packages to pediatric diabetes patients

Silver Award Girl Scout Makayla of Arvada delivered 60 care packages to pediatric diabetes patients at the Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes on the CU Anshutz campus on Wednesday, July 25, 2018. The packages were part of her project to earn her Silver Award, but more importantly,  they were in honor of her aunt who died from complications with diabetes and was a patient at the Barbara Davis Center. Each bag is filled with items that newly diagnosed children will need, such as alcohol swabs, but Makalya didn’t stop there. She also included some fun things, like coloring books and crayons.

Jeff Todd, a reporter with CBS4 Denver, was there when Makayla delivered the bags. Click here to watch his story.

To learn more about Makayla and her project, read this blog: http://gscoblog.org/2018/05/one-g-i-r-l-attempting-to-tackle-t1d-costs/

 

G.I.R.L. Stories: Run for Cake

Submitted by Maria C.

Metro Denver

Arvada

I started a 5k road race four years ago called Run for Cake for my Silver Award. Since then, the race has exploded and many people have learned more about the specific needs that are supported by Community Table, previously known as Arvada Community Food Bank. The race supports a small elementary school nearby through the registration fee. We work alongside Community Table’s backpack program. The program supplies kids with food on the weekends in discrete ways. The registration fee is a box of cake mix, candles, and frosting, as well as $5. All is collected and I buy many, many “birthday bags” and donate all the supplies to Community Table. From there, Community Table drops off the donations at Kullerstrand Elementary  to give to students. Each student is called up to the office over morning announcements, receives a birthday bag, and gets their picture taken with the principal. A “birthday bag” consists of a box of cake mix, candles, and frosting. Every kid deserves cake.

I am a G.I.R.L.!

Go-getter: My troop leader Sheryl Blish has been one of the most influential women in my life. She has constantly encouraged me to become versed in everything that comes up in my life. You traveled on a road trip with your family this summer? Where? What places did you go? She never asked, but the way she phrased her questions implored you to want to look on a map, do some research, and figure out where you went. Not only has she pushed us in our knowledge and care for others, but she has also constantly encouraged us to physically go get our dreams. I personally believe that even though she is a very busy women, she never stops dreaming.

Innovator: My troop leaders have always encouraged us to think outside the box! Can’t find that missing tent peg? You’re smart and very intelligent, but you’re also young and a dreamer. Think something up. Look at what’s around you. Maybe you can find something in the camping supplies or a pointy stick that will make it work for the night. Maybe we even have an extra because as Girl Scouts we are always prepared.

Risk-taker: For one of our bridging ceremonies, our troop voted to ride zip lines. That was kind of intense for those of us who do not love heights. The dynamic duo of both Judy Curtis and Sheryl Blish gave us a balance of tough love and kind words. They helped so many of us, especially me, conquer our fears with such audacious boldness we couldn’t help but get excited. They have taught us when it’s appropriate to look back to see if you can help someone out and when to look forward to improve those around you as well as yourself.

Leader: I have become the person I am today mostly through the weekly Girl Scout meeting our troop held. Each week a different girl would be in charge of leading a meeting. She would show up 15 minutes before all the other girls and meet with the head troop leader Sweet Sweet Sheryl Blish. She would give us a good and thorough run-down of what the meeting needed to accomplish. We had a notecard and her sitting next to us but other than that, it was our job to run the whole shebang smoothly while maintaining control of the room. As we proceed to get older she would let us have more and more freedom until we almost did not need her for the meeting at all. But by that time we realized we had become such great friends with our troop leaders we wanted them to be there.
My troop leaders are the best women around.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

G.I.R.L.s build fence for Silver Award project

Submitted by Laura Smith

Metro Denver

Littleton

Over this last year, Troop 3227 planned, designed, and built a fence around a 30’x 60′ garden at Goddard Middle School in Littleton. This was no easy task! The six girls divided the tasks so they could meet with the school, finalize a design, get a supply list, work on getting donations from Home Depots, Lowes, and the Elks in Littleton, and then building the fence over two weekends with the help of their families and parents. The girls learned how to coordinate such a huge project with so many players and they learned how to use tools safely as they built the fence. It was hard work that paid off. This fence will last the school around 25-30 years and it’ll be a legacy the girls can be proud of passing on.

The six girls exemplified what being a G.I.R.L. means. They took on a project that was not easy to accomplish and their go-getting attitude helped them get there. The skills the girls learned will go a long way in helping cement their leadership, risk-taking, and innovation. It was amazing to see the girls grow over this last year as they worked on this project!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award Girl Scouts honored at Highest Awards celebration in Silverthorne

Nearly 100 Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at the Silverthorne Pavilion in Silverthorne on May 11, 2018, to honor the more than 1,300 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2017-18 Girl Scout awards program year, nearly 1,000 girls across the state and 25 in the Mountain Communities region earned the Bronze Award. 10 girls in the region earned the prestigious Silver Award and three became Gold Award Girl Scouts.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts gives girls the skills and experiences they need to thrive and lead in today’s world. The world needs female leaders now more than ever. You’re making a difference,” she said.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

G.I.R.L.s start running club to earn Silver Award

To earn their Silver Award, Girl Scout Cadettes Addison, Adie, and Scarlet of Centennial started an after school running club at their elementary school alma mater, Carl Sandburg Elementary School, in the fall.  The program was such a success that they were instrumental in its continuation this spring. The girls even secured a grant for their club through Kids Run the Nation. They are now serving as volunteers in the program they created.  Their model can also be easily transferrable to other elementary schools wanting to start a running club for their students.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Bronze and Silver Award Girl Scouts honored at Highest Awards celebration in Grand Junction

More than 100 Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at Colorado Mesa University in Grand Junction on May 6, 2018, to honor the more than 1,300 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2017-18 Girl Scout awards program year, nearly 1,000 girls across the state and 40 in the Western Slope and Southwestern Colorado region earned the Bronze Award. 13 girls across the Western Slope and Southwestern Colorado region earned the prestigious Silver Award.

2016 Gold Award Girl Scout Katie Otto served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about her journey to earn the Gold Award and how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

“Girl Scouts is an amazing community and organization. The skills that you learn through Girl Scouts will give you the skills to succeed further in life. Girl scouts teaches girls: courage, confidence, and character,” she said.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.