Tag Archives: Silver Award

Highest award for girls 11-14. The Girl Scout Silver Award represents a girl’s accomplishments in Girl Scouting and her community as she grows and works to improve her life and the lives of others.

Silver Award project: Installing Little Free Libraries at community parks

Submitted by Hailey and Megan T.

Western Colorado

Grand Junction

We love reading and wanted to share that with our community. As Girl Scouts, we decided to make this our Silver Award project and partnered with Grand Junction Parks and Recreation. We started with a Little Free Library at Lincoln Park playground. We designed, built, and installed the Little Free Library on Earth Day 2018. The theme was trees because it went with the tree theme at Lincoln Park playground. Then, Grand Junction Parks and Rec asked us to build another Little Free Library at another city park, Canyon View, and we agreed. We kept the same design for the most part, but had a sports theme for this library because it fits in with the theme of sports at this park. We learned a lot from this experience including woodworking skills, patience, and time management. We really enjoy reading, so this was a great opportunity for us to help the community read more and earn our Silver Award.

News Channel 11/KKCO-TV in Grand Junction even featured our project on one of their broadcasts.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VwA_-jxga-E

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Gold and Silver Award changes from GSUSA

Effective October 1, 2018, Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA) has decided girls may do Silver and Gold Award projects for the benefit of the Girl Scout community.

In order to make sure that this change doesn’t dilute the prestige, leadership efforts, or impact of each girl’s project, Silver and Gold Awards must still meet the requirements that are key to taking sustainable action, the project must:

  • Make a lasting difference in the local community, region, or beyond
  • Put the Girl Scout Promise and Law into action
  • Include provisions to ensure sustainability
  • Identify national and/global links to the selected issue
  • Inspire others

For Girl Scouts of Colorado, our focus will continue to be on the interests of girls when choosing a highest awards project. This means if a girl identifies a need within the GSCO community and feels passionately about it, she will be allowed to pursue that project by working directly with GSCO’s highest awards manger.

In addition to this policy, the GSCO Outdoor Program team will still not allow projects to be done on camp properties.

If you or your troop is interested in a Highest Awards project that you believe will now be allowed under this new policy, please reach out to highest awards manager Kaitie LoDolce at  highestawards@gscolorado.org prior to starting your project.

 

Helping the hungry and homeless

Submitted by Kristin Hurley

Metro Denver

Northglenn

Hello from Girl Scout Troop 61358! For our Silver Award project, we created a Care Cabinet in Northglenn to help the homeless and hungry. We are hoping for community participation in keeping it filled, and hoping that we can spread the word to people who need help.

From their leader/project advisor: These two Girl Scouts have worked so hard this summer to secure a location for their Care Cabinet so they can help the hungry and homeless, working with the cities of Thornton and Northglenn and the Rotary Clubs of those cities.

If you would be interested in making a donation, please contact GSCO public relations director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org and she will connect you with the troop leader.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Little Lending Library in Monument

Submitted by Melissa Hinton

Pikes Peak

Monument

We are Hannah B. and Chloe W. from Cadette Troop 43107 in Monument.

Our Silver Award project was creating a Lending Library to bring more reading into the community. Our goal was to share our love of reading with others and hopefully get others to enjoy reading as well. Our steps were to get permission to build the library, plan a structure, ask for donations, build the structure, and supply it with books. Overall, our project went pretty well; however, we did have some problems along the way.

While doing the project, many things worked well in the process. Our steps that went really well were getting permission to build the library, planning the structure, and of course being able to finish the project on time. We were able to quickly set up a meeting with Tom Tharnish and Sadie Ernst, who work for the town of Monument. They promptly gave us to permission to build the Lending Library in Lavalette Park. When planning the structure, we used the Free Little Lending Library website, which had dozens of easily accessible plans we could have chosen from to build our library. We ended up combining two of their plans into one structure and making it our own. Having the opportunity to work in a woodshop at Mountain Ridge Middle School really helped us be able to have an easier experience building the library. We were also very lucky to have finished the project on time and for it to have turned out so well.

Although our project had many things that went well, it was not without things that didn’t go as planned. When we were looking for donations and building the structure, things didn’t go as we would have thought. It took us more time than expected to get donations; we ended up having to go to three stores before receiving the majority of our donations. While building, we ended up having to put on more layers of paint than what we had thought. We also had to do a second layer of shingles because we didn’t put on the first layer correctly.

During the project, we learned many lessons. One of the lessons that we learned was to ask for donations from a store, and to also host a money-earning activity to earn more money for the project. We also learned a couple of lessons about building and woodworking such as: how to cut big pieces of plywood and how to install plexiglass. We also learned to take our time on painting and do more than one layer. We learned to plan proper placements for shingles before nailing them onto the roof of the Lending Library.

Overall, we immensely enjoyed doing our Silver Award project and although not everything went as planned, we still took away many lessons. We learned not only how to build a Lending Library, but huge life lessons that we can use in future experiences that come our way. In the end, we accomplished our goal to bring more reading into our community.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Gold Award and Highest Awards and Take Action trainings

We are thrilled to be offering both Gold Award and Highest Awards and Take Action trainings at Leadership Summits across the state for the summer and fall of 2018!

You may be asking, “What is a Leadership Summit?” Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Leadership Summits are learning conferences that offer volunteers (and girls!) the opportunity to get energized for the new membership year and check required trainings off the to-do list. In addition to offering trainings for new and experienced volunteers, we are offering “Older Girl Leadership Summit” tracks at each event where older girls can participate in training all day.

Gold Award Training is required for any girl interested in pursuing her Gold Award.

Highest Awards and Take Action is the perfect opportunity to connect with other troop leaders about successful projects and learn how to let girls take the lead in making a difference in their community with Take Action projects that girls will complete in their Journeys, Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award projects.

Colorado Springs, Saturday, August 25
Older Girl Leadership Summit: https://gscolorado.formstack.com/forms/older_girl_leadership_summit_pp_08_25_2018
Leadership Summit (for adults): https://gscolorado.formstack.com/forms/leadership_summit_in_colorado_springs_pp_08_25_2018

Loveland, Saturday, September 8
Registration links coming soon!

Denver, Saturday, September 29
Registration links coming soon!

Grand Junction, Saturday, October 20
Super Saturday event, Gold Award training only.
Registration link coming soon!

Questions about Highest Awards? Email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Silver Award project: Capes with “healing powers”

Submitted by Jennifer Redmond

Metro Denver

Aurora

We are creating “capes with healing powers” for our Silver Award project! We are designing a sewing class in conjunction with JOANN Fabrics where Girl Scouts and community members alike can learn to sew and create capes for sick kids in the hospital. We will hand deliver all of the capes along with care packages of crafty and fun things to do in the hospital.

Make a child’s day! Help them feel strong and have fun. Anyone can help. We created packets with sewing instructions and a pattern to hand out to people in the community who can sew. We will collect all of the capes and deliver them to the hospital. We have a goal of collecting 100 capes by January 1, 2019!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

G.I.R.L.s paint inspirational messages on bathroom stalls for students

Submitted by Adrienne Prince

Metro Denver

Parker

Update: On Wednesday, August 15, 2018, the troop was interviewed by Karen Morfitt of CBS Denver. Watch the story: https://cbsloc.al/2BhY16d 

Girl Scout Cadette Troop 4664 from Parker wanted to send encouraging messages to students at Mammoth Heights Elementary School in Parker, their former elementary school. They painted bathroom stalls with encouraging and inspirational messages, such as “You are brave,” “Good vibes only,” ‘”Dream, strive, become,” “Drive with purpose,” “Be kind,” and “You are enough.” In all, six Girl Scouts painted 42 stalls in a girls’ and boys’ restrooms in May and June of 2018.

This was all part of their project to earn the Girl Scout Silver Award, the highest honor for a Girl Scout Cadette. The girls wanted to do this because they have all experienced bullying and not being included. They wanted to share something encouraging and positive with younger students. The girls are proud to have earned their Silver Award because it allowed them to give back to their school and be role models. They want to show their community that teenagers and girls can be leaders!

Congratulations Lois P., Sophia S., Caitlyn S., Madison G., Eliza A., and Rachel T.!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Silver Award project: Plastic bag ban

Submitted by Girl Scout Cadette Troop 62458

Metro Denver

Littleton

We are Girl Scout Cadettes Ella M., Amanda B., Mia J.,  and Giana A. from the Columbine area in Littleton. As part of our project to earn our Silver Award, today (July 31, 2018), we proposed a ban on the use of disposable plastic bags in Jefferson County before the Jeffco Board of County Commissioners. In Colorado, we see plastic bags littering our rivers and highways, and in trees all over our parks. The plastic bags degrade into our rivers, lakes, and reservoirs polluting our water, therefore damaging our ecosystem.

In addition, disposable plastic bags make our groceries more expensive. Stores pay anywhere from $1 to $6,000 per month on disposable bags. The stores then add that cost into groceries and products. The average hidden cost of bags that consumers pay is $37.50 every year. Consumers use 100 billion plastic bags per year. More than 90% end up in landfills where they are not exposed to elements that would degrade them. We cannot let this go on any longer. Plastic bags continually block drainage systems and put poisons into the water supply. Many animals mistakenly eat plastic bags and as more animals eat each other, the pollutants go up the food chain, and eventually end up on our dinner tables. It’s time we take control of the environmental impact of our actions by getting rid of disposable plastic grocery bags.

On Tuesday, July 31, 2018, the girls were interviewed by Ashley Michels of Fox31/KDVR-TV. Use this link to watch the story. https://bit.ly/2OAvfAo

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too

 

Girl Scout delivers 60 care packages to pediatric diabetes patients

Silver Award Girl Scout Makayla of Arvada delivered 60 care packages to pediatric diabetes patients at the Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes on the CU Anshutz campus on Wednesday, July 25, 2018. The packages were part of her project to earn her Silver Award, but more importantly,  they were in honor of her aunt who died from complications with diabetes and was a patient at the Barbara Davis Center. Each bag is filled with items that newly diagnosed children will need, such as alcohol swabs, but Makalya didn’t stop there. She also included some fun things, like coloring books and crayons.

Jeff Todd, a reporter with CBS4 Denver, was there when Makayla delivered the bags. Click here to watch his story.

To learn more about Makayla and her project, read this blog: http://gscoblog.org/2018/05/one-g-i-r-l-attempting-to-tackle-t1d-costs/

 

G.I.R.L. Stories: Run for Cake

Submitted by Maria C.

Metro Denver

Arvada

I started a 5k road race four years ago called Run for Cake for my Silver Award. Since then, the race has exploded and many people have learned more about the specific needs that are supported by Community Table, previously known as Arvada Community Food Bank. The race supports a small elementary school nearby through the registration fee. We work alongside Community Table’s backpack program. The program supplies kids with food on the weekends in discrete ways. The registration fee is a box of cake mix, candles, and frosting, as well as $5. All is collected and I buy many, many “birthday bags” and donate all the supplies to Community Table. From there, Community Table drops off the donations at Kullerstrand Elementary  to give to students. Each student is called up to the office over morning announcements, receives a birthday bag, and gets their picture taken with the principal. A “birthday bag” consists of a box of cake mix, candles, and frosting. Every kid deserves cake.

I am a G.I.R.L.!

Go-getter: My troop leader Sheryl Blish has been one of the most influential women in my life. She has constantly encouraged me to become versed in everything that comes up in my life. You traveled on a road trip with your family this summer? Where? What places did you go? She never asked, but the way she phrased her questions implored you to want to look on a map, do some research, and figure out where you went. Not only has she pushed us in our knowledge and care for others, but she has also constantly encouraged us to physically go get our dreams. I personally believe that even though she is a very busy women, she never stops dreaming.

Innovator: My troop leaders have always encouraged us to think outside the box! Can’t find that missing tent peg? You’re smart and very intelligent, but you’re also young and a dreamer. Think something up. Look at what’s around you. Maybe you can find something in the camping supplies or a pointy stick that will make it work for the night. Maybe we even have an extra because as Girl Scouts we are always prepared.

Risk-taker: For one of our bridging ceremonies, our troop voted to ride zip lines. That was kind of intense for those of us who do not love heights. The dynamic duo of both Judy Curtis and Sheryl Blish gave us a balance of tough love and kind words. They helped so many of us, especially me, conquer our fears with such audacious boldness we couldn’t help but get excited. They have taught us when it’s appropriate to look back to see if you can help someone out and when to look forward to improve those around you as well as yourself.

Leader: I have become the person I am today mostly through the weekly Girl Scout meeting our troop held. Each week a different girl would be in charge of leading a meeting. She would show up 15 minutes before all the other girls and meet with the head troop leader Sweet Sweet Sheryl Blish. She would give us a good and thorough run-down of what the meeting needed to accomplish. We had a notecard and her sitting next to us but other than that, it was our job to run the whole shebang smoothly while maintaining control of the room. As we proceed to get older she would let us have more and more freedom until we almost did not need her for the meeting at all. But by that time we realized we had become such great friends with our troop leaders we wanted them to be there.
My troop leaders are the best women around.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.