Tag Archives: Silver Award

Highest award for girls 11-14. The Girl Scout Silver Award represents a girl’s accomplishments in Girl Scouting and her community as she grows and works to improve her life and the lives of others.

RSVP now for 2018 Highest Awards celebrations

UPDATE: Registration for the Denver Metro Highest Awards celebration on April 29, 2018 and Pikes Peak Highest Awards celebration on May 4, 2018 are now closed. We have reached capacity.

Congratulations to Colorado’s newest Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award Girl Scouts! You have made change in your corner of the world, maybe even beyond, now it is time to celebrate your accomplishment!

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award Girl Scouts who have earned their distinction in the last year are invited to participate in one of Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Highest Awards celebrations across the state. We have several celebrations planned throughout April and May and cannot wait to see you there. Use the information below to see these events on our calendar and RSVP for one of these exciting celebrations. Please note that everyone planning to attend (girls, troop leaders, guests, etc.) must RSVP online ahead of time.

Instructions for how to prepare for the celebration will be included in your confirmation email after you RSVP online.
Questions? Email HighestAwards@gscolorado.org

*Please note that capacity is limited at the Northern CO, Pikes Peak, and Denver Metro events. We ask that each girl bring only four or fewer guests. Additionally, events may reach capacity and close before the posted RSVP deadline.

Friday, April 20, 6 p.m.
Center for American Values
Pueblo, CO
http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/content/girlscoutsofcolorado/en/events-repository/2018/pueblo_southeastern_.html

Sunday, April 22, 2 p.m.
Embassy Suites by Hilton Loveland
Loveland, CO
http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/content/girlscoutsofcolorado/en/events-repository/2018/ne_ha_celebration.html

Sunday, April 29, 2 p.m.
Denver Marriott Tech Center
Denver, CO
http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/content/girlscoutsofcolorado/en/events-repository/2018/denver_ha_celebration.html

Friday, May 4, 6 p.m.
Penrose House Garden Pavilion
Colorado Springs, CO
http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/content/girlscoutsofcolorado/en/events-repository/2018/pp_ha_celebration.html

Sunday, May 6, 2 p.m.
Colorado Mesa University
Grand Junction, CO
http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/content/girlscoutsofcolorado/en/events-repository/2018/ws_ha_celebration.html

Friday, May 11, 6 p.m.
Silverthorne Pavilion
Silverthorne, CO
http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/content/girlscoutsofcolorado/en/events-repository/2018/mc_ha_celebration.html

Aurora Cadettes go silver, lead state’s first vehicle smoking ban

From Girl Scouts of the USA

Five bold Girl Scouts—Makenna, Amelia, Julianna, Micaela, and Sofia—demonstrated the power and voices of a 100-woman army. How? This small but mighty group took on a complex and meaningful challenge to earn their Girl Scout Silver Award. As part of Troop 60789 from Girl Scouts of Colorado, the girls worked closely with their longtime troop leader Kristen Batcho and other community mentors for almost a year to champion and pass an ordinance that made smoking (whether tobacco, marijuana, or vaping) in a vehicle while a minor is present subject to community service or a fine. The ban, passed by the Aurora City Council, is the first of its kind in Colorado and an incredible accomplishment for these determined change-makers who are just 13 and 14 years old.

CH-A-GS-Colorado Smoking Ordinance 2

Amelia, Makenna, Micaela, Julianna, and Sofia present their smoking ordinance to the Aurora City Council on September 25, 2017.

Before starting their Silver Award project, the girls completed the Breathe Journey, part of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience, focusing on how the environment, air, and noise pollution all affect people. After completing the Journey, the girls discussed what they would do with all of the new information they had just learned and then brainstormed how they could apply it to their Silver Award project. During these discussions, they kept coming back to the topic of smoking, mainly the many different ways that it harms adults and children—smokers and nonsmokers alike. The girls researched the topic further and decided to try to ban smoking in cars with minors to minimize the effects of secondhand smoke and to protect young people’s health.

“We wanted to give a voice to the kids who don’t have a voice to tell the adult person to stop smoking,” said Makenna, age 13.

“We chose this project because people smoking in cars might not only get lung cancer themselves, they could also be making their kids sick,” Sophia, age 14, added. “The kids breathe in the smoke and are affected too.”

To begin creating this important change in their community, Kristen and the girls reached out to Aurora City Council member Charlie Richardson for guidance. He was 100 percent on board! Charlie attended one of the troop’s meetings and educated the girls on the ordinance process. He then connected them to city attorney Nancy Rogers, who helped them write the actual ordinance in the most effective way possible. Nancy also came to a troop meeting and engaged in a lively discussion with the girls during which they asked questions and talked through how they wanted the ordinance to proceed.

Initially the girls wanted to make smoking in a vehicle with minors a primary offense. In other words, a police officer could pull someone over for that without any other reason. But when the original ordinance came back with an amendment to make it a secondary offense, meaning a person would have to be pulled over for another offense first before they could be punished for smoking in a car with a minor, the girls realized they had a better chance of getting the legislation passed if they accepted the amendment, so they did.

When it came time for the ordinance to be discussed in detail at a city council meeting, the girls asked several speakers to testify on their behalf, including representatives from the American Lung Association, the American Cancer Society, UCHealth, and National Jewish Health.

Kathleen Moreira, the representative from UCHealth and a tobacco treatment specialist and smoking cessation expert, gave what Kristen calls “quite a compelling testimony” on secondhand smoke and the effects it has kids, especially as they’re still growing. Because Kathleen is a former smoker, the child of a parent who smoked in the car often, a mom, and a proud Girl Scout alum, UCHealth felt she would be the perfect person to represent the hospital and support the girls in their pursuit.

    • CH-A-GS-Colorado Smoking Ordinance 4

      Kathleen Moreira, Kristen Batcho, and Girl Scouts Makenna and Julianna smile for the camera after being interviewed by 9News morning anchor Cory Rose about the girls’ Silver Award project.

    • CH-A-GS-Colorado Smoking Ordinance 5

      Sophia, Amelia, Micaela, Makena and Julianna are recognized by Senator Rhoda Fields at the State Capitol for their efforts and work passing the smoking ordinance.

 

“I was overwhelmed with this powerful message that [the girls] were trying to send and that they were able to advocate for,” Kathleen said. “These girls made health history at 13 and 14 years old, and although I loved being a Girl Scout, I never did anything this important. Interacting with these girls reminded me that the power of girls is alive and well. What the girls are able to do now, utilizing outreach and being able to get so involved in civic matters, there is just a strength and a presence to Girl Scouts now that I think has really evolved over time.”


“These girls made health history at 13 and 14 years old.”


Kathleen explained how she urged council members to use this opportunity to educate parents to make a different choice. “Maybe it’s not about asking parents to quit smoking,” she suggested, “but once they know that doing so in the car with children is really harmful, then they have the information to say, ‘OK, maybe I won’t quit, but I won’t smoke in the car.’ Most of us, when we know better, we do better.”

And it’s not just secondhand smoke that Kathleen is worried about. Thirdhand smoke is also dangerous, especially for babies and toddlers. What is thirdhand smoke? It originates from the particles of a burning cigarette that are left on surfaces, for example, the chemicals and nicotine that stay behind on doors, windows, and everywhere else in a vehicle when someone smokes inside it. This means that even when children aren’t in a car at the time someone is smoking, they can still ingest all those chemicals later on as they touch different parts of the vehicle.

Kathleen revealed that when children are chronically exposed to nicotine and smoke, their chances of becoming a smoker greatly increase. By passing the ordinance, the girls and city council members are helping prevent 2,200 kids in Colorado from becoming daily smokers, she further explained.

To every young girl who wants to make a change in the world but isn’t sure she’s capable of doing so, Kathleen says, “There is power in numbers, and an organization like Girl Scouts can really boost [girls’] confidence in their ability to make change, get things done, and stay motivated through the obstacles. I have a four-year-old daughter, and I can’t wait for her to start as a Girl Scout Daisy. I was so proud to show her that I was working with Girl Scouts and what they were able to do.”


“There is power in numbers, and an organization like Girl Scouts can really boost [girls’] confidence in their ability to make change, get things done, and stay motivated through the obstacles.”


Even with all of the support the girls were able to garner, they also encountered some negativity and opposition. After their first meeting with the city council, a few not-so-nice comments cropped up on social media and in the form of other complaints. Because of this, Kristen and her co-leader, Michele Malchow, were concerned about having the girls attend the final council meeting in which a final vote for or against the ordinance would be made.

“We had been trying to keep the experience positive for the girls,” Kristen said. “But when we talked to them about it, they said, ‘This is part of life, and we have to deal with it.’” Kristen was impressed with the girls’ maturity and courage and decided to let them attend the meeting; they would leave only if things got too heated.

“What I have learned throughout this process is that everyone has an opinion on everything and not everyone will agree with what you’re trying to achieve, but that’s OK,” Makenna said.

“I have seen [the girls] blossom so much throughout this entire process,” Kristen praised. “Here are these young women who are changing the world and doing big things for the community. They’ve asked such good and insightful questions. They’ve embraced the project wholeheartedly, remained focused, and they’ve been willing to listen to feedback and be flexible. They’ve also just been so gracious and grateful with all of the adults and mentors who have helped them along the way. I am so proud of the young women they are becoming.”

Through this process, both the girls and their troop leaders discovered just how much girls can accomplish when they put their minds to it. “This is what Girl Scouts is all about,” beamed Kristen. “The idea of being girl-led, promoting the G.I.R.L. Agenda, and embodying all of the different facets of being a G.I.R.L. I don’t think my girls had truly realized their power until they were able to get this ordinance passed and make history.”


“This is what Girl Scouts is all about. The idea of being girl-led, promoting the G.I.R.L. Agenda, and embodying all of the different facets of being a G.I.R.L.”


Can you imagine what Troop 60789 will be able to accomplish in the years to come? Congratulations, girls, on a job extraordinarily done!

Save the date: 2018 Highest Awards Celebrations

Submitted by Aimee Artzer, GSCO Highest Awards Manager

We are thrilled to announce the dates for the spring 2018 Highest Awards Celebrations!

Friday, April 20, 6 p.m.
Center for American Values
Pueblo, CO

Sunday, April 22, 2 p.m.
Embassy Suites by Hilton Loveland
Loveland, CO

Sunday, April 29, 2 p.m.
Denver Marriott Tech Center
Denver, CO

Friday, May 4, 6 p.m.
Penrose House Garden Pavilion
Colorado Springs, CO

Sunday, May 6, 2 p.m.
Colorado Mesa University
Grand Junction, CO

Friday, May 11, 6 p.m.
Silverthorne Pavilion
Silverthorne, CO

These celebrations are an opportunity to recognize the outstanding Bronze, Silver and Gold Award Girl Scouts who have earned their distinction in the last year. All troops and/or girls who have earned their Bronze, Silver, or Gold since March 2017 are invited to participate in a celebration of their choice. Anyone planning to attend must RSVP online, the RSVP form will be made available on our events page in March 2018.

Gold Award Girl Scouts across the state will also be recognized at the “Gold Award Day at the Capitol” on Monday, April 9. Each Gold Award Girl Scout is encouraged to participate in both regional celebrations as well as the “Day at the Capitol.”

Please note that the deadline to notify GSCO that you have earned your Bronze or Silver Award and participate in celebrations is March 1, 2018. Notify us now that your girls have earned their Bronze or Silver: http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/for-volunteers/forms-and-resources/bronze-and-silver-notification.html

Questions? Email Aimee Artzer at highestawards@gscolorado.org

Planning for Highest Awards

As school kicks in to high gear, you might be planning your year with your Girl Scout troop. If you are a Junior, Cadette, Senior, or Ambassador or a parent or troop leader of a girl in these Girl Scout levels, Highest Awards should be on your brain!

The Bronze, Silver, and Gold Awards are the highest achievements in Girl Scouting and focus on identifying a community issue, researching the issue, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with a team of community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability so the project can continue impacting people even after girls have earned their award.

More than 1,400 girls across the state earned their Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award last year and we hope to see these numbers continue to grow year after year.

To support girls, parents, and troop leaders throughout the Highest Awards process, we have many helpful resources on our website and offer “Highest Awards and Take Action” trainings both in person and online.

In person trainings at upcoming Leadership Summits: http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/events/training-events.html

Online Training October 9, 2017: http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/events-repository/2017/highest_awards_take__1895293302.html

Online Training December 14, 2017: http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/events-repository/2017/highest_awards_take__405167769.html

Questions? Visit www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/highest-awards, http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/content/dam/girlscoutsofcolorado/documents/Highest%20Awards%20Call%20to%20Action.pdf, or email highestawards@gscolorado.org

 

Silver Award project: Jared Box for Children’s Hospital and baby hats for Memorial Hospital

Submitted by Emma C.

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

13-year-old Girl Scout Cadettes from Troop 4523 Emma, Dori, and Kate would like to share our story about our great Silver Award project.  For this mission, we wanted to make a difference in children’s lives. We contacted Children’s Hospital to see how we could help. They told us that the Jared Box program was well needed and appreciated by the children having extended stays in their hospital rooms with no access to any playroom. To find out more about the Jared box project, please visit http://www.thejaredbox.com. We also made baby hats for newborns to be distributed at Memorial Hospital.

We first had to earn funds to purchase the items to put in the boxes. We used the money we earned from selling Girl Scout Cookies to fund part of this project. But, we did not stop there. We made ice cream sandwiches (we baked chocolate chip cookies and added vanilla ice cream in the middle) and sold them at a park during a hot sunny summer day. Then, we all made lists of items we wanted to purchase and each prepared a certain amount of boxes to meet the needs of girls and boys between the age of 3 to 14. We decorated the boxes and also added a nice note to personalize each package.

On September 5, 2017, we delivered 71 boxes to Children’s Hospital and dropped off our handmade baby hats and Baby Clothes to Memorial Hospital. We all learned a lot from this experience from budgeting to time management and accountability. Working in a team was also a great part of this project.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Silver Award project: Family Trail Day

Submitted by Sophia E.

Mountain Communities

Breckenridge

Our Girl Scout Silver Award project was to organize the first-ever Family Trail Day in Summit County to restore a turnpike on a National Forest trail. We partnered with the Friends of Dillon Ranger District and Keystone Science School to achieve this. Our troop organized the day, advertised for the event, and planned fun, educational activities for the children. On June 24 2017, two rangers led the adults to restore the deteriorated turnpike. While the adults were working, our troop led fun activities for the kids to teach them about nature. The day ended with a picnic and the turnpike underwent a major improvement. It was such a success that the ranger district plans on doing it again next year!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Troop 3505 earns Silver Award with community garden project

Submitted by Danica Lucker

Metro Denver

Highlands Ranch

Girl Scout Troop 3505, a group of four Cadettes in Highlands Ranch, earned their Silver Award by creating and completing a community garden at Ranch View Middle School on June 29, 2017. For the four girls: Elise, 14; Emily, 14; Abigail, 14; and Madison, 14; the project was more than a year and a half in the planning, and it will make a lasting contribution to the middle school where they attended in the community of Highlands Ranch. The project included budgeting and raising funds to completely revamp the space; working with a local nursery to design a garden layout; providing 20 xeriscape plants for the garden site; working with Douglas County Schools and Girl Scouts of Colorado to obtain the appropriate approvals to work at the site; and providing and completing all the labor to install the new garden. These tasks included weeding, tilling, planting, and mulching the outdoor garden space. The girls created the space in hopes that it can be used as an outdoor classroom and community space for Ranch View. In addition, the four girls have continued to work with a teacher sponsor at Ranch View Middle School to create a garden club to sustain it into the future.

For more information on the project, contact Troop Leaders Danica Lucker at (303) 791-0835, or Carolee Weitzel at (303) 470-3978.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Highest Awards deadline

Girls bridging from Girl Scout Juniors to Cadettes or Cadettes to Seniors this summer have until Sept. 30 to submit online notification (http://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/for-volunteers/forms-and-resources/bronze-and-silver-notification.html) that they have earned their Bronze or Silver Award.

The Bronze Award is the highest achievement for Girl Scout Juniors and the Silver Award is the highest achievement for Girl Scout Cadettes. Through earning one of these Highest Awards, girls change their corner of the world and maybe even beyond. Through submitting online notification, you can order letters of recognition, certificates, and pins. Girl Scouts of Colorado honors and celebrates girls in a special way at our Highest Awards Celebrations in the spring. See photos from the 2017 celebrations: https://www.flickr.com/photos/gscolorado/sets/72157679203803063

2018 Prudential Spirit of Community Awards: Apply today

Applications are now open for 2018 Prudential Spirit of Community Awards. Girl Scouts who have recently earned Silver and Gold Awards may be particularly good candidates for this exciting award program.

This youth recognition program, sponsored by Prudential Financial in partnership with the National Association of Secondary School Principals, has recognized more than 120,000 middle and high school students – including thousands of Girl Scouts – at the local, state and national level for outstanding acts of volunteerism over the past 22 years.  Top winners receive sizable cash awards, engraved medallions, and an all-expense-paid trip with a parent or guardian to Washington, D.C. for the national awards ceremony in May 2018.

Last year, Gold Award recipient Emma Albertoni, of Arvada, was named a State Honoree, traveled to Washington, D. C. for the national awards ceremony, and received an engraved medallion. In 2015, Gold Award recipient Christina Bear of Golden was named a “Distinguished Finalist” and received an engraved bronze medallion. In 2014, Girl Scout Morgan Hays, a Gold Award recipient from Evergreen, was honored with a Certificate of Excellence. We are thrilled to share this opportunity again and hope to see more girls share this prestigious honor.

Girl Scouts can apply online at http://spirit.prudential.com or www.nassp.org/spirit.   Applications must be submitted to Girl Scouts of Colorado by November 7, 2017.  We will then review applications and select one or more Girl Scouts to represent our council in the state-level judging. If you have any questions or need a paper version of the application, please call 877-525-8491.

We’re excited about this opportunity to re-emphasize the importance of volunteering within our council, and to possibly gain statewide or even national recognition for our Girl Scouts. We hope we can count on your participation.

 

Silver Award project: Sensory Garden

Submitted by Kristy Miller

Metro Denver

Centennial

Three girls from Troop 972 (Katelyn-14, Safiya-14, and Mallory-14) wanted to help the kids with disabilities at Liberty Middle School by building a sensory garden. Two of the three girls went to Liberty and had been thinking of doing it from the beginning of their middle school years. They all joined together and decided to help the school’s ILC (Individualized Learning Center) program. The girls studied and researched on different sensory gardens built from scratch to prepare them to build their own garden. After their research was done, they went out to ask for donations from multiple franchises. Once they got all the materials they needed, they started building. It took about two months to finally get the garden ready for the school. Now in the 2017-18 school year, Liberty Middle School gets to use the garden for their learning. The girls are very glad they got to help the ILC teachers and kids learn to enjoy the outdoors with all senses.

After finishing our Silver Award, we would like to give a special thanks to the people who helped fund this project, including Michael Maroney from Big Horn Landscaping, Jake Henrickson from the Parker Lowes, Jordan from the Southlands Lowes, the employees at the Lowes on Buckley, Mary Adkins from the Parker Home Depot, the employees at Tagawa, our troop leaders Ms. Kristy and Ms. Kerry, and the wonderful principal and vice principal at Liberty Middle School: Mr. Doherty and Ms. Hale. Doing this project has not only allowed us to get more experience volunteering in our community, but has created a beautiful space in the community where students and teachers alike can learn more about nature.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.