Tag Archives: Senior badge

Senior Sky Badge: Step Five of Five

The sky is a masterpiece. Every day it graces us with living art, whether through a glorious sunset, shifting cloud formations, or the stunning display of night stars. No wonder we take every opportunity to spend time outdoors. Girl Scout Seniors can earn their Sky badge at home with the help of GSCO’s Outreach Program.

Create a Moon Phase Wall Hanging

Check out this link to learn about the moon’s eight phases.

Supplies Needed:

  • String (enough for eight pieces, PLUS one longer one to hang)
  • Sick/Dowel Rod to tie the moon phases onto
  • Paper/Cardstock/Scrapbook Paper/Thin Cardboard from the recycle bin
  • Scissors
  • Glue/ Glue Stick
  • Markers/Crayons/Paint/Nail Polish to decorate your moons
  • OPTIONAL: Washi Tape or colorful yarn or embroidery floss to wrap around the stick for decoration. You may also want to add beads to the hanging strings.

Making the moon phase wall hanging:

  1. Draw and cut out the moons
    • Fold paper/ cardstock/ scrapbook paper/ thin cardboard in half.
    • Draw out eight circles onto your folded paper using a pencil and an empty tp-roll or any circle shape that is the size you want for your moons. Using the same template, draw over one of the two of the circles to make two crescent moons, then draw over two more to make the gibbous moons. 
    • Cut the moons out- to start, fold your paper in half if you didn’t do so before drawing the moon templates. You will have two of each moon phase that you will glue together (16** total). As you are cutting, keep those that you cut together ,so that when you glue them they fit together easily.
  2. PRE-CUT eight hanging string/ twine/ yarn for your wall hanging. Make sure you cut an extra two to allow for tying onto the stick and for ½”-3/4” to be glued in between the moons. They can be all one length, or you may choose to cut them varying lengths so that the moons will hang at graduating positions across the hanger stick. For this example, I cut my strings at graduating lengths and then played around with their positioning on the stick, so they’d all be a little bit different once the project was finished. 
  3. Place glue across the surface of your moons. On one side, add a little bigger glob of glue for the string. Put the string on the glue glob before pressing the two sides together to sandwich the string in between the two pieces. 
  4. Tie the strings onto the stick or wooden dowel rod.
  5. Once all the moon phases are tied on, add the “hanger string” onto the dowel tying it on either end of your stick. 
  6. Hang your beautiful finished project on a door, wall or in your garden.                                                              

**Optional: IF you prefer a smaller wall hanging you can choose a smaller stick and hang only some of the moon’s phases on it. For example, make one crescent and one gibbous moon to represent both the waxing and waning of these two phases and one quarter moon to represent both the first and last quarter moons. 

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Senior Sky Badge: Step Three of Five

The sky is a masterpiece. Every day it graces us with living art, whether through a glorious sunset, shifting cloud formations, or the stunning display of night stars. No wonder we take every opportunity to spend time outdoors. Girl Scout Seniors can earn their Sky badge at home with the help of GSCO’s Outreach Program.

Step One: Watch the Skies

Step Two: Investigate the Science of the Skies

Step Three: Explore the Connection Between People and Flight

We have two fun videos to help you complete this step!

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

 

Senior Sky Badge: Step Two of Five

 

The sky is a masterpiece. Every day it graces us with living art, whether through a glorious sunset, shifting cloud formations, or the stunning display of night stars. No wonder we take every opportunity to spend time outdoors. Girl Scout Seniors can earn their Sky badge at home with the help of GSCO’s Outreach Program.

Step One: Watch the Skies

Step Two: Investigate the Science of the Skies

A constellation is a group of visible stars that form a pattern when viewed from Earth. Most constellations take the shape of an animal, mythical creature, person, or object. Let’s go outside and see what constellations we see!

If you have access to a smartphone, download the free app SkyView Lite. It will show you the constellations in the night sky. If you don’t have access to a smartphone, you’re going to need a pen and paper.

On a clear night sky, grab a pen and paper, and if you’re using SkyView Lite app, pull that out. What constellations do you see? If you can, draw them.

Go outside on a second night. What do you see now? Do you see anything that you couldn’t see on the previous night? Once again, draw what you see.

Make sure you watch out for shooting stars, which are actually meteors burning in the Earth’s atmosphere.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Senior Sky Badge: Step One of Five

The sky is a masterpiece. Every day it graces us with living art, whether through a glorious sunset, shifting cloud formations, or the stunning display of night stars. No wonder we take every opportunity to spend time outdoors. Girl Scout Seniors can earn their Sky badge at home with the help of GSCO’s Outreach Program.

Step One: Watch the Skies

Part A: Watch the skies- Day time

  • After you’ve done your research and learned about clouds (see *BEFORE heading out below), on a partly cloudy day lay on a patch of grass, towel, or blanket outside and look up! Watching the clouds go by, notice clouds that look like different shapes, characters, animals, etc. Also, allow yourself to just enjoy seeing the clouds and how they move with the wind currents.
  • Next, identify different types of clouds. Are they a type of cloud that produces rain?

*BEFORE heading out to look at the clouds, take Girl Scouts of USA’s Internet Safety Pledge and research at least three types of clouds. After you’ve earned this badge, you will have learned the name of at least three types of clouds and know which type of clouds produce rain.

BONUS: Create a cloud field journal, photo journal, drawing, or painting of what you saw on your cloud viewing.

Here’s an example of an Internet search:

Google:

  • What type of clouds are rain clouds?
  • How many types of clouds are there?

Search Results: UCAR Center for Science Education

Part B: Watch the skies -Nighttime

Choose a mostly clear, moonless* night and head to your backyard, local park, or another dark area to gaze at the stars and planets. Depending where you live, you will see stars differently than people in other parts of the country and world. If you live in a city, you will have to find a place without many streetlights and look harder to see stars due to light pollution. Those living outside of the city will be able to see more of the night sky due to it being darker. The author of this post lives in Mesa County and can see the Orion constellation and Milky Way most nights. This difference of visibility is known as the limiting magnitude.

Have you noticed how bright and amazing the stars are when you go camping? This is because we generally camp in the wilderness or desert where there are no streetlights and little to no light pollution.

*The brightness of the moon also determines how many stars you can see. Pay attention to the moon’s phases and look at the sky when the moon is either a new moon or in the waxing or waning crescent phase.

Challenge yourself: Do research beforehand so that you can recognize and identify a particular constellation and a planet or two. Some planets are extra visible at different times of year. If the moon is out, what phase is it in? Learn about the moon’s phases and be able to identify which moon phase you are viewing.

Good website for night sky viewing tips: https://www.nps.gov/subjects/nightskies/stargaze.htm

Also:

Google: Stargazing near me

Sources:

(1). nineplanets.org    Sep 29, 2019 – Limiting magnitude is used to evaluate the quality of observing conditions. It tells the magnitude of the faintest star visible to the unaided eye.

(2). Moon phases: https://www.farmersalmanac.com/understanding-phases-moon-20606

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Senior Behind the Ballot Badge Step Five of Five

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In a few years, you will be 18-years-old and able to vote. It is also a presidential election year, and a year in which Colorado chooses a new U.S. Senator, and all the seats we hold in the House of Representatives are on the ballot as well. In American history, women and 18-year-olds have not always had the right to vote (or run as a candidate for office), but now they do, and you will. It will not only be your right to vote, but a wonderful way to honor the women who fought for our right to vote in every election. Voting is also the best (and easiest) way to tell the government where you stand on the issues and whom you think is best able to make decisions that will affect you and your sister Girl Scouts. In the Senior Behind the Ballot Badge, we will explore the way people get elected to office, and the importance of voting both here at home and around the world.

Step One: Find out more about elections

Step Two: Investigate the Ins and Outs of Voting

Step Three: Get Out the Vote

Step Four: Plan a Campaign

Step Five: Explore Voting in Other Countries

America isn’t the only place that votes their leaders into office. In this step you will take a look at what democracy looks like around the world. Complete one or more of the following activities.

Explore voting procedures abroad. Look at the voting process in three different countries on three different continents. Is pre-registration required? Do they vote on machine, paper or computers? How many polling places are there, and what are the rules? Who can vote and who cannot?  Make a chart comparing the three countries voting processes.

OR

Follow a foreign campaign. Find a country that is currently undergoing an election. Who are the front-runners and what are their platforms? Follow the campaigns through election day. Who won?

OR

Learn about women voting or female leaders abroad. Track elected female heads of government abroad. How many are there? What are their roles? How much power do they have?  Look through history – where do most of the female leaders come from? Alternatively, look at women suffrage worldwide. Where can women still not vote, and why? What countries have the highest level of female voter turnout?

Share what you learned on the GSCO Blog, or on FacebookTwitter, or Instagram. Twitter and Instagram users should also use #GSColo.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouts at Home: Senior Collage Artist Badge Part Three of Five

Earn the Senior Collage Artist badge at home with the help of GSCO’s Outreach Program team! This badge is an opportunity make art as unique as you are, so get ready to see the creative possibility in everyday objects.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouts at Home: Senior Collage Artist Badge Part Two of Five

Earn the Senior Collage Artist badge at home with the help of GSCO’s Outreach Program team! This badge is an opportunity make art as unique as you are, so get ready to see the creative possibility in everyday objects.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouts at Home: Senior Voice for Animals badge Part Five of Five

Girl Scouts can earn the Senior Voice for Animals badge at home with help from our Outreach Program team. By earning this badge, you will find out about the complex relationship between animals and humans, so you can make informed choices and help others make them too.

Choose an issue that affects animals and find out more. Don’t forget to take Girl Scouts of the USA’s Internet Safety Pledge first!

Some example issues are below. Feel free to choose one from the list, or one of your own.

  • The need for dog and cat neutering
  • Hunting and fishing – some is for sport, some for commerce, and some for food
  • Pet food recalls– How is pet food developed and made healthy for pets?
  • How to assist pets in natural disasters
  • How are shelters and zoos being affected by the stay-at-home orders, and what do they need most
  • Animals in labs for cosmetic testing
  • The role of zoos in animal conservation and endangered species protection
  • Bully breed bans
  • Animal hoarding
  • Treatment of farm animals
  • Exotic animals as pets
  • Emotional support animals vs. service animals
  • How the increased use of ingredients such as palm oil are affecting animals in the wild
  • Adopting shelter pets instead of buying from breeders
  • Any other topic related to animal welfare that you can think of!

Two Options – Choose one!

Compose an editorial. Present your issue in an opinion article and send it to the local newspaper. You can also post it in your own blog, or on a website devoted to your issue.

OR

Create a public service announcement. Put your audiovisual skills to work and create a two-minute video or slideshow to get your message across.

Whichever one you choose, we want to know about it. Share it on the GSCO Blog, FacebookTwitter, or Instagram. Twitter and Instagram users should also use #GSColo.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

 

Girl Scouts at Home: Senior Voice for Animals badge Part Four of Five

Girl Scouts can earn the Senior Voice for Animals badge at home with help from our Outreach Program team. By earning this badge, you will find out about the complex relationship between animals and humans, so you can make informed choices and help others make them too.

Every year, at county fairs and the National Western Stock Show, animals are used for sport and entertainment. From dog agility shows, Mutton-bustin contests, rodeos, and 4-H projects, children and adults are entertained statewide by animals as small as birds and rabbits and as large as bulls and horses. We also have several zoos and aquariums in Colorado, where animals are put on display for entertainment and education.

Choose an animal to research. It might be a farm animal being raised as a 4-H project, lives in a zoo, or travels across the country competing in rodeos. Write a short story, poem, article, or create a blog post or video from the point of view of the performing animal. What would you imagine a day in their life is like? What would that animal want its owners or handlers or keepers to know? How has its daily life changed due to the stay-at-home orders? Is it happier or sadder?

Share your creative piece on the GSCO Blog, FacebookTwitter, or Instagram. Twitter and Instagram users should also use #GSColo.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouts at Home: Senior Voice for Animals badge Part Three of Five

Girl Scouts can earn the Senior Voice for Animals badge at home with help from our Outreach Program team. By earning this badge, you will find out about the complex relationship between animals and humans, so you can make informed choices and help others make them too.

Husbandry is a fancy word that means the science of taking care of animals. One specific area of husbandry is breeding, which is the decisions that go into making baby animals. We are going to look into domestic pet breeding today. To do this, we are going to research responsible dog breeding.

After taking Girl Scouts of the USA’s Internet Safety Pledge, find out what is involved in responsible dog breeding. Here are some topics you can explore:

  • What testing is done before breeding two parents?
  • Are there breeds of dogs and cats that have been overbred too much, and therefore have difficult health problems (like pugs and breathing or English bulldogs and giving birth)?
  • How do responsible breeders find good homes for their puppies?
  • What are the laws of pet breeding in your area?
  • Which breeds that are bred too often and therefore there are an abundance that wind up in animal shelters?
  • What constitutes a “puppy mill” and what can be done to eliminate them?
  • What are Bully Breed Bans, why do they exist, and does the science of breeding back them up?
  • Explore a new crossbreed, labradoodles, for example. Why was it developed?
  • How have the breed standards evolved over time? How are new breeds developed and recognized? How are breeds that are dying out being reintroduced?
  • Any other topic related to dog breeding you can think of.

Some resources to get you started (but there are plenty of others):

With your research, write a law that further protects dogs in the area of breeding. Share it on the GSCO Blog, FacebookTwitter, or Instagram. Twitter and Instagram users should also use #GSColo.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.