Tag Archives: School in the Woods

Gold Award Girl Scout: Emily Clark, Colorado Springs, “The Art of Being a Naturalist”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I developed a years worth of art lesson plans for fourth graders at School in the Woods. These lesson plans meet the Colorado Department of Education standards for Art for fourth graders, but are unique in that they are tailored towards outdoor education.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I used feedback from School in the Woods and their students as my lesson plans were used to measure the impact of my Gold Award. My lesson plans are now a part of their ongoing classroom curriculum.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project is sustainable because the lesson plans include instructions on how to teach each lesson, so they can be used by anyone. I designed them specifically to be implemented by parents, or adults who have no prior art education. This means they can be used by parents homeschooling their children in addition to parents assisting in the classroom.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I sent .pdf files of the lesson plans to the national parks service, homeschooling groups, and some local art programs. These lesson plans have been shared across the United States, and I know they have been used in California, Colorado, and Ireland.

What did you learn about yourself?

Through my project I learned teaching really isn’t my thing, but I learned a lot about art through teaching art and creating art lesson plans. While I don’t intend to be a teacher, I do plan on pursuing a career in art.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

The lessons I learned through my Gold Award Project will stay with me for the rest of my life. I can use what I learned on future applications for jobs or scholarships. Skills I learned and utilized include time management, leadership, teamwork, collaboration, and how to research and revise my work.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award teaches girls how to organize a project and set goals through a subject they enjoy and are passionate about. I feel I used the skills I learned in teamwork during Reach for the Peak, goal setting I learned through cookie sales, and skills from other Girl Scout events, projects, and workshops all came together to help me achieve success in earning my Girl Scout Gold Award.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

Earning my Gold Award helped me become a G.I.R.L. because it challenged me to take risks. It helped me become a risk-taker because I had to try new things and reach out to people in order for my project to be successful. I couldn’t just rely on the skills I had, but had to ask others for their assistance to make my project successful.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org