Tag Archives: recycling

New Castle Girl Scouts Earn Bronze Award

Submitted by Karen Campbell

Western Colorado

New Castle

It was an exciting time at Alder Park in New Castle on Sunday, April 11, 2021! Gracie, Sylvia, and Abby, three Girl Scout Juniors from Troop 10239,  officially completed the final installation of their Bronze Award project. Many family and community members came to help, including Ron Acee from Trout Unlimited; Tom Skutley and Sheldon Doonan from RFV Flyfishing Club; and Dave Reynolds from the Town of New Castle. The girls worked thru 2020 COVID challenges and winter weather delays. They finished strong with this important environmental project. Job well done, everyone!

If you are in the neighborhood, stop by Alder Park to read these valuable interpretive ecology signs, each written by Bronze Award Girl Scouts. If you are fishing at Alder Pond, please be sure to check out the new Fishing Line Recycle Bins. Recycle bins will be managed thru a partnership with the Town of New Castle and the Girl Scouts. Last, be on the look out for more fishing line recycling opportunities around the valley. With the help of local fishing club chapters, these girls donated three additional bins to the Middle Colorado Watershed Council and look forward to expanding the program. Special thanks to our community volunteers for bringing enthusiastic support, power tools, and great digging skills! Thanks also to Aspen Rent-All for the donation of a valuable generator for the day! We are thrilled to live in a place where our neighbors, businesses. and our city manager care enough to join a few motivated girls to get amazing things done!

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

 

New Castle Girl Scouts Earn Bronze Award

Submitted by Cindy Adams

Western Colorado

New Castle

Troop 10239 in New Castle, Colorado has three girls, Abby, Gracie, and Sylvia, who earned their Bronze Award in 2021. The Bronze Award is the highest award the girls can earn as a Junior. Girl Scout Juniors need to complete a Junior Journey, build a Bronze Award team, explore their community, choose a theme, and design and complete a community Take Action project.  The first step to earning a Bronze Award is completing a Girl Scout JuniorJourney and Take Action project.

Last summer and fall, the Girl Scouts earned their Outdoor Journey and started their Take Action project.  On the Journey, the girls held a clean-up activity at Alder Park, created animal habitats, hiked New Castle local trails, planned a camping trip, and created maps of Alder Park and waterways. The girls decided their Journey Take Action project will be a fishing line recycling program at Alder Park Pond.  This project was born from picking up trash at Alder Park and the girls picked up a lot of old fishing line. Fishing line is a frequent source of litter in ponds and rivers, and can cause injury and death to birds, fish, turtles, and many mammals. Monofilament fishing line takes 600 years to decompose (that’s 150 years longer than a disposable diaper!), but IT IS RECYCLABLE! Berkley Fishing provides free shipping boxes to mail in used fishing line to be recycled.

The girls built two fishing line recycling bins and will install them at Alder Park.  They also received three additional bins from the Roaring Fork Valley Fly Fishing Club, which will be donated to other community groups to install and manage as part of the program.

The girls were set to install their Take Action Project in November 2020, unfortunately COVID-19 regulations stopped them in their tracks, as girls from no more than two households could meet. The girls did not lose faith in their project, they just postponed the installation of their Take Action Project until April 11, 2021 now that COVID-19 regulations have allowed for groups to meet. The troop also has a COVID-19 plan in place with the Garfield County Health to meet in person.

Abby, Gracie, and Sylvia’s Take Action Project involved researching, talking with community members including Trout Unlimited and Roaring Fork Fly Fishing Club, presenting to the New Castle town council, building monofilament recycling bins, and installing them. The girls started their project in October 2020.  The girls received a donation from the Town of New Castle to help offset the cost of the fishing line recycling bins, as well as a donation from Trout Unlimited.

Since finishing the planning and construction of their Take Action project, the girls started to brainstorm ideas for their Bronze Award project. They had come to know Alder Park Pond, a neighborhood hangout, and decided that they wanted to build permanent educational signs for the community about the importance of the animal species, the wetlands, and the human impact on Alder Pond.  The girls said if people know and love a place, they will care for it! Sylvia, Gracie, and Abby presented to the Town Council their idea for both their Take Action project and Bronze Award project in October 2020 and both were approved.

Over the winter, the girls designed and produced three educational signs about Alder Park Pond by the end of February 2021. The girls plan to install both the signs and fishing line recycling bins on April 11.  These girls have learned so much about community involvement, planning, how a project that people get excited about can expand rapidly, and about perseverance.

Cooperating Agencies for the project included: Roaring Fork Valley Fly Fishing Club, Trout Unlimited, Colorado Parks and Wildlife, Roaring Fork Conservancy, Town of New Castle, Berkley Fishing and BoatUS.org.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Safiya Dhunna, Aurora, “The E-Waste Recycling Exposé”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

The E-Recycling Exposé addresses the lack of education for fourth and fifth graders on the importance of e-recycling. Many people have heard of paper, plastic, or glass recycling. But, electronics, as common as they are in our society, are not frequently recycled. They can be harmful to our environment, damaging our water and land with dangerous metals. It struck me as surprising when I found out that only 20% of our electronics are recycled, leaving the rest to be put into the trash and landfills, ultimately polluting our Earth. This fact grew even more shocking to me when I found that paper and plastic products, which are just as important as technology, are recycled more than twice as much as electronics. In fact, in 2017, 46.9% of paper products had been recycled in the United States (epa.gov). These facts spurred me to take action with my Gold Award Project, knowing I could make a difference.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

My audience learned to answer the following questions:

  • What percentage of electronics are currently recycled?
  • Where can you drop off an electronic to recycle?
  • What is the first step in recycling an electronic
  • What type of electronic cannot be recycled?
  • What is the most commonly recycled electronic?
  • What is the most common metal that comes out of recycled electronics?
  • If I recycle a million cell phones, how many pounds of copper will be retrieved?
  • Is it ILLEGAL to put electronics in the landfill in Colorado?
  • What country produces the most electronic waste?
  • What country produces the least electronic waste?

My audience also learned the full cycle of recycling an electron. From taking is to be recycled to having the recycled  electronics be made into new technology.

I measured my impact by creating a quiz game, also known as a Kahoot, as well as a pre and post curriculum survey. These three things all had measurable reports to give me the data in my project.

My impact was measured in the beginning,middle and end of my Gold Award, the E-Recycling Exposé. The pre survey was given before any information. The Kahoot was given while I was teaching the students, and the post survey was given at the end. All three things measured how much the students learned throughout the entire project.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

I have a signed Letter of Commitment from Fox Elementary signed by the fourth grade team/teacher, Ms. Sevy.  In this Letter of Commitment, it states that my e-recycling curriculum will be integrated into the STEM program at the elementary schools that I presented at. This is so that kids in the future years will continue to learn about the important topic of e-recycling. The teachers I talked to were especially interested in using my informational video and my Kahoot game in the future.

With Kyklos, they work on teaching local schools and businesses about environmental sustainability, in Santiago, Chile. They are also partnered with BlueStar Recyclers to learn more about E-recycling. Kyklos is planning to use parts of my curriculum to further their material in teaching about E-recycling.  (https://create.kahoot.it/share/tech-recycling/76a37d2e-a7f3-4ebc-beb8-e14086e160a2).

All the teachers had access to my materials when I shared them through Google Drive or email. Both of these platforms worked well across the board. The video I created was embedded in the PowerPoint I created, and the captions are on that video as well. So, all the materials needed to teach my curriculum are easily accessible. My tools did a really great job of educating the kids while keeping them excited about learning as well.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

The E-Waste Recycling Exposé’s global link was through a company called Kyklos. The main company I worked with, BlueStar Recyclers works with Kyklos in Santiago, Chile. This company creates programs based on environmental sustainability for local schools and businesses in Santiago, Chile. The informational video I created, I put Spanish captions on it and sent it to Kyklos to use for part of their program. I contacted Kyklos, their co-founder Sebastián Herceg, twice during my Gold Award process. I was supposed to meet their founder in-person since they partner with  a company that I worked with in Denver (BlueStar Recyclers) but unfortunately this was right when COVID-19 hit so it was unable to happen. I did, however, email back and forth with them when I had created my video. When I had first sent my video to Kyklos, their response was great. “Tremendo!” They said.  It made me happy to know that this of course translates to tremendous. Sebastian had a couple of editing marks for me which I then fixed. I also added Spanish captions onto the video which was not easy. These captions can be viewed by clicking the “cc” button on my video which is linked above. I had to translate my video and then make permanent captions on the video which was on my private Youtube channel. I made these changes and then I sent the video on its way to Chile.

Later on, in my E-Recycling Exposé experience, I finished the other parts of my curriculum. After this step, I sent my second email to Kyklos. I asked them if they wanted the rest of my curriculum since they already had my educational video. Their co-founder emailed back and said that I should send it over and that they would work on getting it translated into Spanish. I was extremely happy when this happened. I have a bilingual Gold Award. In two different parts of the globe. Although the curriculum here in Colorado and in Chile, it serves the same purpose. Kyklos educates a lot of local schools about recycling so I am hoping that it will help as many boys and girls there learn about E-recycling.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that I am good at teaching elementary school kids and teaching in general because my project was curriculum-based and involved a lot of teaching. I never really taught before this.  I had presented projects and PowerPoints, but it was different for me to have to pioneer an elementary school curriculum and showcase it to kids who had never seen it before. I really got into the whole teaching aspect. I was able to talk to the kids and then you know, stop asking questions and discuss things with them that either they were confused about or simply curious about. I even had one of the teachers whose class you are presenting to comment to me that she wanted me to come back and teach her other class because I was such a good teacher. This was something that really surprised me because I had never taught before. I enjoyed teaching and getting to know the students. Doing this part of my Gold Award made me think that I could use the skill in the future.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

I think earning my Gold Award will impact me in the future because of the skills it has given me. I had gained a lot of confidence in myself as a leader, which is a great way to go into college next year, in my opinion. I also have learned how to create a support system, and be creative in ways I never thought I would learn how to do. These are all skills I can use in the future. Doing this project has allowed me to prepare myself for any future career I might be interested in. I know that with these skills I can handle any workload or challenge that comes my way.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I feel like the Gold Award was an important part of my Girl Scout experience because it allowed me to use all my skills I have learned for one big project. I was able to have something to wrap up my ten years as a Girl Scout and that feeling was incredible.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

Earning my Gold Award helped me become a G.I.R.L. in a lot of ways but the letter that defines me the most is G, go-getter. I hit a lot of walls when I was initially starting my project and it took me a while to find an idea. But I did not give up, I was determined to do my Gold Award. Throughout the project journey, there were a lot of times when it got hard or challenging. I learned to take a break and then regain my motivation. This helped me gain passion and confidence while doing my Gold Award, and through that I learned how to be innovative by creating my own curriculum, a risk-taker by working with companies I had never worked with before and of course, a leader.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Sidney Barbier, Steamboat Springs, “State Park Waste Diversion”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

My project is focused on State Park Waste Diversion. However, a huge part of my project is focused on educating the public on the basics of recycling and waste diversion in hopes to inspire and empower future generations to make a difference and share their knowledge with the world! My project branched into a variety of pieces such as a staff orientation to educate staff at Colorado state parks on the basics of waste diversion so that they can help share their knowledge. I worked to create a Junior Ranger curriculum that includes reduce, reuse, recycle guidelines. I did my own in-person waste sorts with the public in order to bring awareness and get helpful data as an insight into the issue of recycling contamination. To help further knowledge of recycling, I developed and posted signage that is both sustainable and durable that will help educate people and empower them to make the right choice! Every piece of my project aims at sustainability of our amazing state parks for future generations of girls to enjoy.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

My initial plan was to measure my project’s success at Steamboat Lake by doing a beginning and end waste sort, however due to the COVID-19 pandemic, I instead found success in my project based on the number of people I was able to reach and on all levels, from staff, visitors, the public, and Girl Scouts of all ages. I was able to see this based on the number of views on my YouTube Channel, blog, and Facebook. In addition, simply posting the signage made a huge difference in the amount of contamination in the trash and recycling as observed by park employee Eric Young. When I was at Steamboat Lake posting the signage, I had multiple staff members come up to me and say how thankful they were for my presentation at their staff orientation and how much they learned. I was visibly able to see the impact education truly has on people of all backgrounds and ages. People gained new knowledge on the basics of waste diversion, the what, why, and how of recycling, as well as what individuals can do in the community to help reduce their own waste. I taught many young girls how to do their very own waste sort at home and how to set up their own successful recycling systems. My impact was measured throughout my project in less quantifiable means then I had intended, but the overall impact was based on the overall increase in knowledge and education around where our waste is truly going. I started the conversion, and I will continue to help be a part of it.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

In order to ensure the sustainability and longevity of my project beyond my involvement, I created and developed a letter of commitment that was signed by Kelly Cook, my project advisor and the administrative assistant of Steamboat Lake State Park, that ensures commitment by the state park to maintain the vision and goals of my project through a series of detailed and specific commitments. The letter of commitment lays out each part of my project and the resources available in order for the state park to continue my work. For each step of my project, I worked to make it sustainable for future use. For example, I uploaded videos of my staff orientation presentation to YouTube to be available for future use. I created a waste sort kit to be available to each seasonal interpreter for further use in park programs. I created signage that will last for at least two years and can be easily repurchased for continued educational awareness. I provided a PDF of resources from Yampa Valley Sustainability Council as well as the Junior Ranger program to be reprinted, reused, and recycled to continue the use of these resources for both the public, visitors, and young kids. By signing this letter of commitment, Steamboat Lake Park has committed to maintaining my project vision, goals, and mission beyond my involvement in order to increase waste diversion and recycling to make the state parks more sustainable for future generations to enjoy.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I met and coordinated with Girl Scouts of Colorado staff member Anna Danilla in order to find ways to share and integrate my Gold Award Project with the  Girl Scouts Love State Parks Weekend event. I ended up creating a blog post coupled with pictures that share the basics about my project and the relationship to state parks. In addition, I shared my Project Greenify YouTube Channel as online resources for the virtual piece of the Girl Scouts Love State Parks Weekend, September 12 and13, 2020. The blog information and YouTube link was posted on Girl Scouts of Colorado website, Facebook, and sent out in RSVP emails to reach potentially 1,000 girls and their family’s and share my project with Girl Scouts beyond Routt County.

What did you learn about yourself?

One of the biggest things I learned about myself throughout the whole project is that I truly do have the power to make a difference. Through perseverance, patience, passion, and hard work, I was able to make an impact on other people and the environment as a whole. I learned that I have the ability to lead and collaborate with others to create something achievable. I didn’t simply write down lofty goals, I achieved them. I learned that my passion for the environment and the human-environment interaction, is not something that will go away. It is a true passion that I want to continue to learn about, study, and share in my future and beyond. I learned what direction I want my life to take; I want to study environmental science and policy in college and beyond.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Earning my Gold Award has not only given me the confidence that I can change the world, but the tools to continue to make a difference. In my future, I will use my Gold Award experience as a segue into having a more lasting impact and continuing to share my passion for environmental science with the world. Being a Gold Award Girl Scout will help in every application and interview for college and beyond. It has given me the leadership skills that will apply to every situation life throws at me.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The journey towards earning my Gold Award was a truly unique experience and was a perfect cumulative experience of everything I have learned and gained from Girl Scouts since I was in kindergarten. I used the basics of the Girl Scout Promise to “use resources wisely” and turned it into a sustainable and achievable project. I took initiative and worked to serve my community as I had been taught to do throughout my years as a Girl Scout. I feel that earning my Gold Award was an achievement I had always dreamed of. Ever since I saw the Gold Award Girl Scouts as my troop received our Silver Award, I knew I wanted to one day stand up there and present how I used Girl Scouts as a forum for making a difference.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)? 

Throughout my Gold Award journey, I was able to strengthen and develop a multitude of leadership skills. I believe that one of the greatest skills I gained was in collaboration. I learned to practice balancing independence with reaching out to my team for help, support, feedback, and advice. Along with collaboration came innovation. In both dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic and simply working towards sustainability for my project, I was able to demonstrate leadership in using my own confidence and delegation skills to continue my project moving forward. I continue to reach out to organizations and team members, and did not simply stand by idly during the strict period of quarantine. I became a real “go-getter,” as I used my drive and motivation along with a positive mindset to find creative solutions, by creating virtual material such as Project Greenify, finding ways to coordinate with Girl Scouts Love State Parks Weekend, and posting signage in a socially distant way. I developed skills in public speaking as I stepped up to a position of leadership and led waste-sort, staff orientation, public presentations, and Girl Scout events. I continually practiced accountability as I took responsibility for keeping up with my target dates, setting up my own meetings, and focusing on time management in order to accomplish each of my goals. I stepped up to become a coordinator, decision-maker, and active listener, as I became involved in other organizations such as state parks, and Yampa Valley Sustainability Council. The Gold Award experience has truly brought out my initiative and commitment to taking a stand and becoming an influential G.I.R.L.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org.

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: The E-waste Recycling Exposé

Submitted by  Safiya D., Girl Scout Gold Award candidate

Metro Denver

Aurora

* Safiya became a Gold Award Girl Scout, earning the highest honor in Girl Scouts, in January 2021.

I have been a Girl Scout for 10 years. Currently, I am working on my Gold Award, which is the highest honor a Girl Scout can earn. The Gold Award focuses on addressing a community-based problem. My project, The E-waste Recycling Exposé, tackles the lack of education regarding technology recycling (e-recycling) in my city of Aurora. I am developing a curriculum for fourth and fifth graders that teaches them what technology recycling is and why it is important. 

When I was researching my project, I was disappointed to learn that in comparison to paper, plastic,  and glass recycling, only 20% of electronics actually get recycled in the United States. I thought that if I could educate kids and get them excited about e-recycling, it might make them think more about actually recycling their old electronics.

My curriculum is comprised of : 

  • An introductory video that shows me taking an old family computer to be recycled
  • A PowerPoint that explains the technology recycling process 
  • A video I created that shows how to take apart a laptop computer and find the recyclable parts
  • Interactive and hands on games that I created for the kids that will make understanding e-recycling fun
  •  Pre and post surveys to evaluate what the participants have learned from the program

In creating my curriculum, I had a few goals in mind. I wanted students to get excited about electronics recycling.  And most importantly, I wanted them to go home and talk to their families about its importance and encourage them to participate in the recycling of their old electronics. If we care about our planet, participating in technology recycling is important. When you look at the statistics, many landfills are filled with electronics and the more we care about this issue, the easier it will become to have a clean Earth.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouts Love State Parks Weekend: Project Greenify, a Girl Scout Gold Award Project

 

Girl Scouts Love State Parks Weekend is coming up September 12 – 13, 2020! This year, girls can participate virtually or in–person by visiting select Colorado State Parks to participate in self–guided activities like nature trails, junior ranger programs, activity backpacks, and more! RSVP and learn more here: https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/events-repository/2020/girl_scouts_love_sta.html

Leading up to this event, we want to showcase a fantastic Girl Scout Gold Award project related to state parks, “Project Greenify,” from Sidney B.  Read on to learn more about Sidney’s project:

My name is Sidney. I am currently a Junior in high school at Steamboat Mountain School. I have been a Girl Scout since I was in kindergarten and am currently working towards earning my Gold Award, which is the highest honor you can receive as a Girl Scout. My project is focused on state park waste diversion. However, a huge part of my project is focused on educating the public on the basics of recycling and waste diversion in hopes to inspire and empower future generations to make a difference and share their knowledge with the world! My project branched into a variety of pieces such as a staff orientation to educate staff at state parks on the basics of waste diversion so that they can help share their knowledge. I worked to create a Junior Ranger curriculum that includes reduce, reuse, and recycle guidelines. I did my own in-person waste sorts with the public in order to bring awareness and get helpful data as an insight into the issue of recycling contamination. To help further knowledge of recycling, I developed and posted signage that is both sustainable and durable that will help educate people and empower them to make the right choice! Every piece of my project aims at sustainability of our amazing state parks for future generations of girls to enjoy.

As you may know, September 12 and 13 is Girl Scouts Love State Parks Weekend! This is a chance to celebrate our state parks and the amazing opportunities and wild spaces they protect while giving way for changing our environment for the better.

As a piece of my Gold Award project, I have created a YouTube Channel called Project Greenify to share fun and educational videos for Girl Scouts across Routt County and Colorado. I have created a series of three different videos along with attached resources. The first is a general overarching introduction to waste diversion and recycling, and teaches the basics of environmental stewardship. The second video teaches how to do your very own waste sort at home and learn why our waste matters. The third video is a fun activity called “Birds and Worms’ and is designed for young Brownies and Daisies. By watching these videos and completing these activities, Girl Scouts are continuing the legacy of environmental stewardship, using resources wisely, and making the world a better place! In addition, Girls will be able to work towards earning their “eco” badges.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Recycle with the Buffs!

Girl Scouts Flyer

Submitted by Erin Koon

Boulder, CO

Northern and Northeastern Colorado

The University of Colorado Buffaloes take on Arizona State at Coors Events Center, Sunday, February 28th 2016 at 2:30pm! All scouts will participate in a post-game event with Ralphie’s Green Stampede and will earn a unique Ralphie Recycling patch! Scouts of all levels will learn the benefits and importance of recycling/eco-products AND will be introduced to a college campus!

To attend this unique event purchase tickets at www.cubuffs.com/promo and enter the promo code 2016GIRLSCOUTS. The Buffs are looking forward to hosting the Girl Scouts of Colorado!

**Don’t forget $4 of every purchase will directly benefit the Girl Scouts!**

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Gold Award project: Buried in Bottles

Submitted by Kitty Nester
Littleton

Hello my name is Kitty Nester. I have been working on my Gold Award project for the last several months. I was not sure what I wanted to do for my project so I followed the advice I was first given and went with something that really means a lot to me.

I have been a competitive swimmer for many years and am interested in studying Marine Biology and conservation in college. I began with a focus on some sort of marine conservation project and while doing research I discovered a very serious problem that is happening in our oceans today. That problem is, all the plastic trash floating in the oceans.

I did some more research and found out just how much plastic is used and thrown away in our country alone and much of that can end up in the oceans. This problem affects all the marine life; but, it is not just a marine problem. Plastics on land can also affect the wildlife there as well. I think as humans, we have an obligation to take care of the planet we live on and the wildlife we share it with.

So I have put together a Facebook website for people to visit and share with others to get the word out. Part of my project is not just to make people aware of the problem but pledge to help make a change by using reusable water bottles and always recycling when they can’t. I will be taking this message to elementary and middle school classes as well. Please visit my Facebook website and like/share it with all your friends!

http://www.facebook.com/BuriedInBottles

This story was submitted via the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Aurora Girl Scouts hold electronics recycling drive

From Troop 62879

On June 3rd, Girl Scout Troop 62879 hosted an electronics recycling event at three different Denver metro locations. We partnered with Metech Recycling, an e-Stewards recycling company.  We were at Grandview High School in Aurora, Northfield Stapleton in Denver and Sky Ridge Medical Center in Lone Tree.  We kept 14,241 pounds of electronic materials out of landfills!  We also collected nearly $600 in donations for Girl Scouts’ Grants for Girls.

This project took us nine months of planning time. On the day of the event we generated media coverage from 9NEWS, CBS Channel 4 and the Denver Post. In the end, we achieved the highest award a Cadette can receive – the Silver Award.  We are proud to be Girl Scouts and to have the opportunity to engage in compelling leadership activities that make the world a better place.

Certificates of destruction:

GIRL SCOUT TROOP IN AURORA ATTEMPTS TO BREAK WORLD’S RECORD FOR RECYCLING ELECTRONICS

Millions of electronics are carelessly tossed into landfills every year.  Girl Scout Troop 2879, from Aurora, Colorado, recognized this environmentally damaging situation and is striving to change the practice and break a Guinness World Record at the same time.  Aurora Troop 2879, partnered with a national electronics company, Metech Recycling, is spreading the word to other Girl Scout Troops across the country.  On June 3, 2012, Metech Recycling and Girl Scout troops across the United States are attempting to break a Guinness World Record for the most electronics recycled in a day.

In Colorado, Troop 2879 and Metech Recycling will be collecting electronics from 10:00 am to 1:00 pm at three Denver Metro locations:

  • Aurora – Grandview High School, 20500 E Arapahoe Rd, Aurora, CO 80016 (along Arapahoe Road).
  • Denver – The Shops @ Northfield Stapleton (North of Off Broadway Shoes, East of Macy’s)
  • Lonetree – Sky Ridge Hospital (South parking lot near the ER, follow Emergency signs)

Troop 2879 and other Girl Scout troops selected Metech Recycling for this project because they are a Certified e-Stewards recycler.  That means Metech Recycling meets the highest environmental standards and ensures that personal data on electronic devices is securely destroyed to protect your identity.  Over 95% of all materials will be securely recycled for remanufacture.  No recycled materials will be incinerated, landfilled, or shipped abroad to be dumped.  For more detailed information, visit www.metechrecycling.com.

Responsibly recycling electronics requires some fees to cover processing costs. Referring to the appliance chart on https://appliancereviewer.co.uk we see that the fees for smaller computer monitors and TVs will be $10; televisions and monitors larger than 20 diagonal inches will cost $15.  Printers, fax machines, DVD players, VCRs, vacuums and other small appliances will cost $1 each.  Items such as desktop and laptop computers, iPads, iPods, mice, keyboards, VCR tapes, all types of power cords, etc. are recycled at no cost to the consumer.  Residents bringing electronics for secure recycling should be prepared to pay these fees by cash or check.

The Girl Scouts will also be accepting donations for Grants for Girls.  Grants for Girls assist girls who financially cannot join Girl Scouts as well as provide programming materials for girls with financial need.  Girl Scouts of any age are welcome to volunteer to help with this project.  Please contact Troop 2879 for more detailed information at Troop2879@gmail.com.