Tag Archives: Pikes Peak

Gold Award Girl Scout: Kimberly Jones, Colorado Springs, “Project B.A.R.K.”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

In order to earn my Gold Award, I worked with the Humane Society of the Pikes Peak Region to create a volunteer training program for an already existing Pets Day for children. After much collaboration, I created a handbook, which I shared with other humane societies around the United States and one shelter in Germany. I decided to do this project because as a volunteer for Pets Day in the past, I had noticed the difference in volunteers, specifically the inconsistency between volunteers on different Pets Days and the lack of volunteers on Pets Day. I wanted to change this. After talking with Lynda Grove, the Education Manager at HSPPR, about my ideas, she agreed that a training program would be necessary.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured the impact of my project using a Kahoot, electronic quiz, for the trainees after the training session. Using this, I was able to find out what needed to be tweaked within the training program in order to make it more effective. In addition, I created a survey for volunteers to fill out after they volunteered for Pets Day, in order to receive their feedback. Based on this, I changed the structure of the training program. Finally, I created a small game for the kids to play. This allowed me to find out what the kids at Pets Day think.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project will be sustained by HSPPR for many years to come by Lynda Grove, who is the Education Manager. Additionally, a handbook was created that can be referenced. It is planned to be run every year with one training on a Saturday and one training on a Friday in the same month as a Pets Day. My project will also be sustained by other humane societies, who have decided the implement Pets Day and training program. The handbook also helps with this. In this way, there will be plenty of volunteers for years to come.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

Since my project address the inconsistency of volunteers as well as the lack of volunteers at humane societies, I created a handbook, which was sent to multiple humane societies, who had interest in the program. I sent handbooks to shelters in Colorado, Tennessee, Germany, and the National Humane Education Society and all have agreed to take on the program. Therefore, my project trains volunteers to help at their local humane societies and helps educate young children about the importance of humane societies and proper care of animals around the country and internationally. Additionally, I have created a website with “digital materials” and a questions/comments form is located on the home page which allows other organizations to submit any feedback or questions they have.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that I am a bit impatient, but with waiting and proper timing I can overcome impatience. In addition, I learned that I am more creative than I thought and am quite tech savvy.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

As a Gold Award Girl Scout, I will carry the accomplishment with me for the rest of my life. Earning the Gold Award will help me with not only college and job applications, but also the knowledge I gained from earning my award is priceless.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

Growing up with a troop of older girls as mentors, inspired me to earn my Gold Award. Now, I get to say that I also earned my Gold Award and have a stronger bond with them. In addition, I was able to impact the community in such a way that I could not have done with out the push to do my Gold Award project.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

My Gold Award helped me become all four of the aspects of G.I.R.L. I became a go-getter because I had the drive to get my Gold Award and do a project that retains to something I love. I became an innovator when I started problem solving in order to create the training program. I had to think outside the box in order to create a fun training with hands-on materials. I also became a risk-taker because I jumped in to create the program without having any experience in training people. I had to try things that had a possibility of not working. Finally, I also strengthened my leadership skills because I lead three trainings full of volunteers. I was responsible for teaching them all of the items they needed to know. The training also taught the trainees to become leaders and equipped them with life-long skills.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Happiness is infectious

Submitted by Tracy E.

Pikes Peak

Canon City

This is our Daisy, Hailey! Hailey is one of our youngest members in our troop. Whether we are in a meeting or selling cookies in the snow, she is always smiling! Bad days do not exist when she’s around! She is the life of the party and always makes everyone laugh!

We are a new troop (46325) in Canon City. We have an amazing group of girls who want to have while changing the world!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Still room to explore Costa Rica

Submitted by Jody Clair

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

If you or your Girl Scout will be entering 6th grade or higher at travel time in June of 2020, there is still room for you! Check out the amazing, educational itinerary by emailing Jody Clair at girlscoutjody@gmail.com. I am so excited we have eight people signed up at this time and would love to get to 14 or more! Please email me BEFORE registering with EF Tours.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

GSCO Photo Challenge: Swimming is my favorite

Submitted by Jordan Cook

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

Our troop had a swim party with our service unit. I love to swim. It is my favorite thing to do. Swimming is great exercise. When it is winter in Colorado, we have to swim at indoor pools because it is too cold outside. In the summer, we go to outdoor pools.

Girl Scouts of Colorado hosts a pool party at Pirates Cove each year. We try to go every time. The games we play in the lazy river are my favorite. It is the best when we are able to meet friends or bring a group because we have more girls to play with.

Girl Scouts of Colorado is hosting a photo challenge! Just submit your favorite Girl Scout photo and the story behind it using the Share Your Stories form (www.gscoblog.org/share). Winners will be featured in future GSCO marketing materials, on GSCO’s social media networks, and on the GSCO Blog.

GSCO Photo Challenge: Building our future

Submitted by Katie Gribble

Pikes Peak

Peyton

Our troop is a small group of 12 girls, who only want to work to help others. Last year, our girls recognized that Colorado was in a huge drought. They wanted to do something to help, but knew they had to start small. They decided to work with the elementary school in our community to help them with their summer garden.

For their Take Action Project, they built a water irrigation system that was used in ancient China called Olla. This system is one of the most efficient systems you can use, and actually is pretty easy to build. The girls started with clay pots and glued them together. Once they were dry, the girls buried them into the ground in strategic locations, leaving the tops out. Then, they filled a pot with water and it naturally released the water into the ground without under/over watering.

Once their Take Action Project was complete, they decided to continue working with the school on their Bronze Award. The girls then built a water collection barrel. It collects water from rain and snow holding it for later use. The girls had to learn to use engineering and power pools. I watched as these girls learn skills they could take on and LOVE what they were doing.

Not only were they able to help our community, but they learned what hard work gained. I am over the moon and proud of my girls! One of the photos above is of some of the girls while we were building our water barrel. It shows them working hard and LOVING IT!!! I have so many favorites, but this is one that shows them doing good for our community and having fun. The girls’ personality wrapped into one photo.

I was not involved in Girl Scouts until my daughter asked to join. I had the opportunity to join as a leader a year later. These young ladies have been SUCH an inspiration to me. I am so proud to be part of this organization, giving opportunities to young girls that they normally would never get. AMAZING group of women and girls!

Girl Scouts of Colorado is hosting a photo challenge! Just submit your favorite Girl Scout photo and the story behind it using the Share Your Stories form (www.gscoblog.org/share). Winners will be featured in future GSCO marketing materials, on GSCO’s social media networks, and on the GSCO Blog.

Gold Award Girl Scout: Mackenzie Block, Colorado Springs, “Treasure Closets and Boredom Buster Kits”

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

I created a treasure closet and toy check-out system at the Ronald McDonald House to give residents a more positive and developmental atmosphere.  The pre-assembled kits directed towards different age groups in the treasure closet and gifts new residents receive, provide long term entertainment, comfort, and growth. These systems made the Ronald McDonald House more home-like to scared residents. I also painted the area with fish and marine life to display a kid-friendly under-the-sea feeling which gave immediate comfort to new residents.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

The Ronald McDonald House has handed out 463 toys since my project began.  The kits are checked out daily.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project is being sustained at the current Southern Colorado Springs Ronald McDonald House.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

My project is addressing the comfort of patients and the healthcare crisis currently happening in the United States, as millions are insecure with constant care and comfort in their daily lives. To reach others across the country, I had my advisor at the Ronald McDonald House send the brochure of my project to all RMH volunteer coordinators across the nation in order to show how this project made a big impact to her location.  My project is also currently being implemented into the new North Colorado Springs Ronald McDonald House and at TESSA, a battered women’s shelter in Colorado Springs.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned many things about myself and how to differently approach the world through my project. I had to think critically to overcome the storage issues in the treasure closet, as well as gained time management skills, and how to relate my time management skills to my team in order to complete the “construction” phase of my project.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Earning my Gold Award will continue to impact my life until I can no longer remember my project. I have proved to myself what I am capable of, and how to find and to address the needs of anyone and everyone I can.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I believe that the Gold Award was essential to my Girl Scout career, applying all the principles I had learned about from Daisies to Ambassadors. I also felt it necessary to give back to my community, and found that my Gold Award was the perfect opportunity.

How did earning your Gold Award help you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

My Gold Award has helped me become a go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, and a leader as I worked through my project. I became a leader on day one as I lead my team of over 20 people in order to complete my project. I became a go-getter on that same day as it was a huge leap of faith I was taking. Innovation was essential to the logistics and “construction” of my project and was gained as I worked through my project. I was a risk-taker through those innovations as well, using non-conventional solutions, proving myself a Gold Award recipient.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication, and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

G.I.R.L. Stories: First year in Girl Scouts

Submitted by Rhiannon M.

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

This is my daughter Khloe! This is her first year in Girl Scouts. She is 9-years-old and a Brownie from Troop 45189. She was a little nervous when it came to setting her goal for cookie sales, so we went conservative and set it at 125 packages! She sold that on her very first day! We set up two My Sites at our local Walgreens where she sold over 40 packages at each booth! We’ve had an awesome time selling cookies. It’s been such an amazing learning experience for her getting to do the math with money, handling money, and learning people skills she’ll have for the rest of her life!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame: History of Women

Submitted by Jordan Cook

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

I want to be a pilot. I appreciate that Girl Scouts provides the opportunities for me to learn about women who are already pilots and working in the industry.

I am looking forward to attending a program given by the Colorado 99’s again. Hope there is another one soon.

The Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame is excited to partner with Girl Scouts of Colorado to provide girls across the state an opportunity to learn the stories of women who have shaped our state and the nation’s history with courage, leadership, intelligence, and creativity. Girl Scouts are future female leaders of Colorado and the Hall of Fame recognizes and preserves the accomplishments of past and present Colorado women. – M.L. Hanson, Founder of the Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame

Uniform to Uniform: Local law enforcement loves Girl Scout Cookies

Submitted by Conni Jensen

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

Maddie from Troop 551 had her dad help her attract customers to her booth. It worked! One of our local law enforcement officers stopped by to say hi and try some Thin Mints.

Invite uniformed personnel, such as law enforcement, firefighters, EMTs, etc., to visit you at your cookie booth as part of Uniform to Uniform! Learn all about this new patch program on the GSCO Blog: https://bit.ly/2VaYX1a

Troop 46327 accepts the Colorado Women Inspire challenge

Submitted by Erin Wogaman

Pikes Peak

Colorado Springs

Our troop of 33 Girl Scouts (Daisy-Senior) divided into teams and completed the requirements on the scavenger hunt, researched Susan Helms, and watched Marion Downs’ film. The girls had so much fun learning about these strong leaders and it gave them hope about their own futures. My troop knows that they can overcome obstacles and push themselves to be the best they can be. We really enjoyed this fun patch and do recommend that younger girls partner with older girls.

The Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame is excited to partner with Girl Scouts of Colorado to provide girls across the state an opportunity to learn the stories of women who have shaped our state and the nation’s history with courage, leadership, intelligence, and creativity. Girl Scouts are future female leaders of Colorado and the Hall of Fame recognizes and preserves the accomplishments of past and present Colorado women. – M.L. Hanson, Founder of the Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame

Thanks to Erin for sharing her story earning this special patch with Girl Scouts of Colorado!