Tag Archives: Pikes Peak

Why our dad is the best Cookie Dad ever!

 

Submitted by Claudine Shank

Colorado Springs

Pikes Peak

We have the best cookie dad ever! Why? First of all, Martin Reichwein is in his second year as our troop’s Cookie Dad. He took initiative to take that role as a Cookie Dad. He’s a Pro! He took the time to talk to the parents about cookie sales, as well as educating the troop about cookie sales and safety. There was never any pressure on the number of boxes to sell, yet he gave us guidance and helped each girl achieve their personal goal and beyond. He also goes out of his way to cookie cupboards out of our county, just to help us in a timely manner. He is very easy to get a hold of and is practically at our back and call for cookies. On top of being the best cookie dad, he is very much involved with our Brownie Troop as a whole. He’s at meetings, ceremonies, outings, carpool, etc. Our troop is very lucky to have such an involved dad!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Troop 864 blesses 2 children from their school wish tree

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Submitted by Nicole Niles

Colorado Springs

Pikes Peak

The girls of Troop 864 wanted to help a young boy have a great Christmas, they took up a collection and parents went out and bought some presents. They collected enough presents and money to be able to bless 2 young boys from their school’s Christmas wish tree.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

En Garde to Experience Fencing!

Submitted by Kathryn Lewis-Salem

Colorado Springs

Pikes Peak

Girl Scouts! Do you want the thrill of experiencing an Olympic Sport? Yes, the Olympics are coming up and Fencing will be a part of it. Learn the basics and impress your family and friends with your knowledge as you watch the fencing events at the Summer Olympics. Front Range Fencing Club offers a Fencing Experience to all Girl Scouts at which you will receive a fun patch and you will work towards the requirements of a badge.

The Experience is 1 and a half hours long and contains the preliminary instruction on form and feel of Fencing. Front Range Fencing provides all of the equipment needed as well as certified instruction (certified by USA fencing, the US Fencing Coaches Association and Safe Sport). The classes are offered at our practice space: Chinook Trails Elementary School just off of Powers and Union in the North East region of Colorado Springs. The list of current classes by age group can be found on our website, http://frontrangefencing.tripod.com/girl-scout-fencing-experiences.html.

We promote skills and safety so we ask that all scouts wear long athletic pants and sneakers (no jeans or shorts, no boots or sandals) to the experience. We have quite a few Girl Scouts who are fencers in our Club. They often participate in the class instruction. This is a sport that is particularly good for girls, improving physical and intellectual strengths as well as critical thinking and success. En Garde! Touche! Come and learn about this fascinating sport that combines the grace of dancing with the excitement of an action puzzle with the thrill of competition while cultivating the Girl Scouts traits of courage, character and confidence!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Spaces Available in Upcoming Power Up Classes

Submitted by Jody Clair

Colorado Springs

Pikes Peak

Our troop is offering Power Up, the peer-led anti-bullying class for Brownies and Juniors over the next few weeks. We still have room for more girls at both classes. If you register, please comment the girl’s name, grade and email for confirmation and I will email you about payments. We hope to see you there!

The Brownie class will be held on Sunday, 12/13:
http://www.signupgenius.com/go/8050d4eada72da57-power

The Junior class will be held on Saturday, 1/9:
http://www.signupgenius.com/go/8050d4eada72da57-junior

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

GIRL SCOUT GOLD AWARD PROJECT: Sarah Depew, Colorado Springs, “Making Chemistry Fun! A STEM Education Project”

Sarah Depew low res

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Gold Award Project, I addressed the noticeable lack of easy to use, inexpensive, and well-written STEM materials really made available to upper-elementary homeschool educators and students. To positively and meaningfully address this issue, I wrote, tested with homeschool students and parents, and distributed an almost 80-page booklet that includes ten, original chemistry experiments for students along with a parent manual for homeschool educators.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

In order to measure project impact, I can review the SurveyMonkey survey link I set up for this project and incorporated in the final pages of the parent booklet. Additionally, I can measure my impact from looking at the number of booklets I have distributed over Amazon using Kindle Direct Publishing’s “Reports” feature.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

By partnering with Colorado’s Academy School District 20, posting my booklet on Amazon using their Kindle Direct Publishing service, and sending a digital copy to the Assistant Director of Youth Education at the Houston Museum of Natural Science, I ensured local and national availability of the project materials. As a result, the project will be sustained beyond my involvement through these three outlets.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

Two national project connections came in the form of self-publishing the booklet in two parts on Amazon, as eBooks. Additionally, the Houston Museum of Natural Science received a copy of the books and a flash drive for use in their education department. As a result, my project is available on a national eBook distribution website, Amazon, and for use at the Houston Museum of Natural Science, located in Houston, TX, with  robust educational outreach to homeschool students as well as private and public school students in one of the five largest cities in our nation.

What did you learn about yourself?

This project reinforced my passions for learning, teaching, and STEM subjects. Moreover, I discovered I am capable of developing clearly written, engaging, hands on, pertinent, and practical curriculum. This was my first curriculum design experience and completing this project allowed me to round out my communication skills, leadership capabilities, and interpersonal skills, before I went to college.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

This project gave me new confidence in my leadership abilities. Confidence provided by positive project experiences, I feel, is a vital step on the path towards becoming a capable leader. Through the practice my Gold Award project gave me, I now have developed leadership capabilities I will use my entire life. Skills such as seeking meaningful opportunities to make a positive difference, goal setting, project planning and development, listening to others, seeking partnership and feedback, creativity, commitment, and communication skills. As I go through college and eventually enter the workplace, I will have the chance to apply those capabilities, honing and refining them more completely.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

As a fourth-generation Girl Scout who has participated in Girl Scouts since I was a Daisy, earning my Gold Award represents my ultimate scouting capstone experience. My Gold Award project grew into so much more than an eighty-hour leadership and service project; rather, this Gold Award capped over a decade of scouting and became a poignant reflection of just how much Girl Scouts has taught me over the years. From leading groups of students to embracing my unique capabilities, from newfound self-confidence in my abilities to make the world a better place to the self-actualization of a personal dream, my Gold Award completed my understanding of what it means to be a Girl Scout and allowed me to thrive as one.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

GIRL SCOUT GOLD AWARD PROJECT: Kelsey McKenna, Colorado Springs, “Junior Golf Mentorship”

Kelsey McKenna

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

In order to spread publicity for nonprofit junior golf organizations, promote the game of golf, and allow for anyone to pursue golf, I organized a junior golf scramble where older high school golfers came as mentors for younger girls to inspire and exemplify leadership to the younger golfers. Also, I raised enough money for the LPGA/USGA Girls Golf association to afford permanent golf clubs and bags, so that girls who cannot afford clubs can still pursue the game of golf. Last of all, I created a junior golf brochure highlighting the best junior golf organizations in the region as well as the tournaments to promote the game of golf.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured the impact my Gold Award made on my target audience by witnessing the enjoyment and admiration the younger girls had for their mentors on the tournament day. Also, through the grateful parents that eagerly took my brochures and were made aware of various junior golf organizations they previously didn’t know existed. Not only this, but my impact was clear when the LPGA/USGA Girls Golf Association used their new junior set of golf clubs for the first time at the scramble where a family otherwise wouldn’t have been able to let their children play.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project is sustainable in the golf clubs that can be used by the LPGA/USGA Girls Golf Association season after season for girls who cannot afford clubs. Additionally, I made a “How to Run a Junior Golf Scramble” guide in order for my tournament to easily be run long after I am out of the picture. Last of all, the organization has my Junior Golf Brochure that promotes the major local organizations and can be passed out to promote the game year after year.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

The global link is the fact that in my project I promoted a lifelong game and encouraged these girls to network, make new friends, meet older girls successful at this game pursuing collegiate college golf, and learn about the game while ensuring that every girl has the ability to partake in it regardless of their family income. Also, the LPGA/USGA Girls Golf Association is a national organization as well as the First Tee and several other organizations that I promoted through the brochure ensuring that no matter where these junior golfers are taken they will always be able to play the game of golf.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned so much about networking and organization from this project. I learned that most people want to see you succeed and will help you out and large organizations, like golf courses, are just made up of people who want to set you up for success. I learned that places like Cherokee Ridge and organizations like the LPGA/USGA Girls Golf Association will help you out and all you needed to do was ask. I developed the ability to make lists of everything that needs to be done for a major project with lots of moving pieces and successfully bring them all together. Also, I learned to trust in the work that I’d done and not stress out the night before because I had planned it well enough to not worry too much. I learned there is nothing more on the planet that I love to do more than help others out and do something for the benefit of others.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Earning my Gold Award helps give me the confidence that I can tackle larger tasks and that seemingly impossible projects are doable especially if broken down into smaller steps. This experience will benefit me in the future, because of the lifelong skills I have learned and all the obstacles I was able to overcome to complete this project. Mainly, I know that in the future I will not shy away from a challenge, but am much more able to take on the task and accomplish the goal.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

The Gold Award was not only an important part of my Girl Scout experience, but an essential part of it, because it encouraged me to step out of my comfort zone and make an impact. It taught me so much and I am extremely grateful for the opportunity to positively impact the world. As a minor, there aren’t many times in your life that you feel you have made an enormous impact on the world, but the Girl Scout Gold Award experience has molded me into the leader I am today and truly helped me make an impact.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

GIRL SCOUT GOLD AWARD PROJECT: Stephanie Huisingh, Colorado Springs, “Adaptive Party Planning Guide”

Stephanie Huisingh

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

Unfortunately, many teens with special needs are not invited to as many social events as their peers. I decided to write a detailed guide that laid out the specific steps for how to throw a high school party and include students with special needs. I used the methods in my book to throw a summer barbecue for the students, both special needs and able-bodied, at my high school. After writing this book, I distributed it to several schools in two school districts and some local teenagers as well.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

The impact was pretty obvious from the start. I was able to see how happy it made the children when they were invited to a party. I also spoke with the parents of some of the children with special needs and they also expressed that they saw a difference as well. Some other students at my high school were able to become closer and more connected with the special needs population there. Everyone showed a more positive attitude and higher level of acceptance following my project.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

I wrote a book for my project, so it can be easily reproduced and sent across the country. I have distributed the book to two Colorado school districts and friends and family across the nation. It is also being implemented at my high school in their Peer Partner program. The lasting impacts on all of the students will last a lifetime.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I hope to see an increase in overall acceptance amongst the special needs and able-bodied populations. I feel that by inviting children to high school parties offers them the opportunity to make new friends and lasting memories. Over time, I hope to see a general trend of acceptance and I believe my book is a great tool to inspire this change. I was ale to distribute the book to schools both within and outside of my personal school district. I distributed to manual to a Washington school district as well. The schools are looking into using the manual to inspire inclusion amongst teens.

What did you learn about yourself?

I learned that I can make something happen even if the odds are against me. My project had an extremely limited timeline, only about two months. Many girls spend upwards of a year on their projects and I had to achieve the same level of execution. In two months, I was able to write and distribute a book. I also learned that it is ok to ask for help from time to time, but I also have to rely on myself. My Girl Scout troop was extremely helpful when it came to coming up with ideas and execution of the project. I was able to organize and accomplish my Gold Award in two months and now other projects seem a lot less daunting.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Immediately, my Gold Award will help me in college. There are so many scholarships that are applicable to Gold Award recipients. Long term, having “Gold Award Recipient” on my resume can only benefit me. This achievement shows that I am a leader, organized, thoughtful, persistent, and hardworking. Those qualities can help present me in the best possible light to potential employers.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I have been in Girl Scouts for 14 years. Ever since I was a Daisy in Fort Monroe, Virginia, to when I was an Ambassador in Colorado Springs, Colorado, I knew that I wanted to go all the way and achieve my Gold Award. Having achieved the highest award in Girl Scouts means that I have distinguished myself amongst my peers. I have and will receive countless benefits from achieving my Gold Award.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Girl Scout Troop 4140 earns Bronze Award

Submitted by Cathy Steiglitz

Colorado Springs

Pikes Peak

The Girl Scout Bronze Award is the highest honor a Girl Scout Junior can achieve.  Earning the award involves completing a Journey and then a minimum of 20 hours on a project that will have a positive impact on the community.

Several girls from Troop 4140 at The Vanguard School earned the prestigious award.  Their project was centered on the environment and ways to help and protect our natural resources. After numerous hours of research, the girl created a video communicating what they had learned in a fun and educational manner.  This video, entitled “One Small Step for Kids; One Giant Leap for Planet Earth”, can be seen on YouTube.  Their message is that everyone, no matter how old or young, can take steps that will have a positive impact on the environment.

The following girls earned the Girl Scout Bronze Award:

Alexandra C.

Kianna G.

Ciera H.

Tailynn P.

Elleana P.

Aspen S.

Cady S.

Aurora T.

Izabella V.

 

 

 

GIRL SCOUT GOLD AWARD PROJECT: Emily Mohlis, Elizabeth, “Band Room Organization”

Emily Mohlis

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my Girl Scout Gold Award project, I addressed the disorganized mess of music, school-owned instruments, and accessories scattered throughout the entire band room and director’s office at Elizabeth High School. I created an electronic filing system. It included list of school-owned instruments and equipment with their specific accessories and it placed labels on the shelf with the proper instrument name where each instrument belongs. Included in the spreadsheet was the instrument type, brand, serial number, and accessories that were included in the case. I also created an electronic spreadsheet, detailing every piece and score of music that Elizabeth High School owned, separating them by ensemble in alphabetical order with a corresponding number in the spreadsheet.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured the impact of my Gold Award project to years past. Compared to past years, when school got out this year, the band room was much more organized and students had returned everything, so nothing was missing! All music was filed alphabetically in a neat and orderly fashion, in approximately 10 filing cabinet drawers.  All school-owned instruments were in their proper homes on top of the band lockers. Our band director had a checkout sheet to be used by students who needed to check out instruments. Mouthpieces and other miscellaneous accessories had been counted and stored in one central location, and were to be checked out when needed for use. All percussion equipment, including marching band drums, had been inventoried and inspected to ensure they were in working order. All percussion equipment had a proper storage location in the drum closet. When you looked around the band room, it was very neat and orderly – a big improvement from the past!

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

My project can be sustained beyond my involvement because I established this user-friendly, electronic system that can be used by anyone. This system can easily be transferred from one director’s computer to the next.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

As for a national or global connection, my project includes a user friendly system that could spread beyond the walls of my high school. If our current director were to leave Elizabeth High School, she may take a copy of the filing system with her and establish it at other schools. Word of mouth could inspire other directors to implement a similar system in their own schools. I also created a small packet including a letter explaining the background on my project, examples of how to format the music and instrument inventory spreadsheets, and finally a cost outline. This packet was emailed to the Colorado Bandmaster’s Association to pass onto other first year instrumental music directors to help them get organized during their first few years.

What did you learn about yourself?

I developed many skills while completing my Girl Scout Gold Award. I was able to improve my time management skills, planning around my family, work, school and social life, finding time to work with my band directors on the music filing system. My organizational skills greatly improved, especially when trying to find a proper space for everything. I also improved my computer skills, since I used Google Document Spreadsheet for my organizational music filing system.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

The bulk of my project was organization and I feel this will really help me with my future career goals. My dream is to become an elementary school teacher and I plan to use my improved organizational skills in my classroom, benefiting both my students and myself.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

I feel that earning my Gold Award was just another step in my Girl Scout experience. I have been in Girl Scouts since kindergarten and step by step I went from being the cute little Daisy Girl Scout all the way to a Girl Scout Ambassador,  ready to start the next journey in life. My Gold Award was just another step in helping me become who I am today.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Blessing Bags for the homeless

Submitted by Kaela Emmons

Colorado Springs

Pikes Peak

Girl Scout troops 40289, 40837, and 43616 from French Elementary assembled blessing bags filled with water, hygiene items and snacks at their meeting. Leaders, the girls and their families will be meeting at a downtown park to give to our Colorado Springs homeless citizens.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.