Tag Archives: older girls

Girl Scouting at Home: Sonnet Lesson for Older Girl Scouts

Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team developed this sonnet lesson for older Girl Scouts, particularly Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors.

Poetry is lyrical way to tell a story. Special attention is given to the expression of feelings and ideas by using a distinctive style and rhythm. One of the most famous poets is William Shakespeare, who not only wrote plays with poetry, but stand-alone poems as well. You may have heard the one that begins “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day…”  That’s Sonnet 18. Shakespeare used a specific style of poetry called the sonnet. Like most styles of poetry, the sonnet has rules regarding meter (the rhythm) and rhyming patterns.

Meter

Shakespeare’s sonnets are written in iambic pentameter, which is a fancy way of saying there are two specific rules to the rhythm.

Rule One is the beat of the poem. An iambic foot consists of a soft syllable followed by a hard syllable. The emphasis is placed on the second syllable of the foot. Ba Bump, Ba Bump. It sounds like a heartbeat. I’ll repeat our line of poetry above, bolding the heavy, hard syllable.

Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day.

See how every other beat is heavy. That’s the iambic foot!

Rule Two is length of each line. Penta is latin for five, and pentameter means there are five feet in each line of the sonnet. With each foot consisting of two syllables (a soft one, then a hard one), a line in pentameter has ten syllables per line. I’ve separated each foot below with a “//”, so you can see that there are five feet to the line.

Shall I // compare // thee to //a sum//er’s day.

That’s iambic pentameter!

Shakespeare’s sonnets also are written with a specific rhyming pattern. There are 14 lines of poetry. The first 12 are grouped into three groups of four (these groups are called stanzas), with the first and third lines rhyming with each other, and the second and fourth lines rhyming together. See below, the first stanza of our sonnet:

Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?

Thou are more lovely and more temperate.

Rough winds to shake the darling buds of May,

And summer’s lease hath all too short a date.

You see how day and May rhyme together and temperate and date rhyme together (you have to imagine the pronunciation of England 400 years ago.)  Each of the three stanzas have this rhyming pattern. Each stanza’s rhymes are independent of the other stanzas. You can use the same sound to rhyme, but it isn’t required. Stanza One: ABAB, Stanza Two: CDCD, Stanza 3: EFEF.

After the three stanzas of four lines each, there is a rhyming couplet – or a stanza of just two lines which rhyme. Let’s look at the last two lines of our sonnet:

So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see,

So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

See and thee rhyme, and this is a rhyming couplet. With this couplet ending our sonnet, the final rhyming pattern is: ABAB CDCD EFEF GG.

Poems are written to be read out loud, so here is a link of Patrick Stewart, world-reknowned Shakespearean (and Star Trek) actor, reading Sonnet 18. Patrick Stewart is delighting fans during the pandemic by reading a Sonnet every day, and you can find those videos on Twitter at @SirPatStew. You can find more of Shakespeare’s sonnets at: poets.org/poems/William-shakespeare

Below is a sonnet in the style of Shakespeare about the Girl Scout Experience. Give writing a sonnet a try, and share it with us on the GSCO Blog or on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram. Twitter and Instagram users should also use #GSColo.

Juliette found a group of girls in need,

And sold her pearls to keep the dream alive.

Some would say she planted a great seed

In us, she instills courage and a drive

 

To excel, to lead, to change the world we love.

Her legacy empowers us to bring

Our strengths to problems. We are tough!

Girl Scouts do more than sell cookies each spring.

 

Lisa, Sally, Dolores, Venus, Mae

Sandra, Madeleine, Tammy are a few

Who broke the mold, who chose to lead the way.

Girls Scouts all.  Next on the list is you.

 

On my honor, three fingers held up high.

When you bleed green, the limit’s past the sky.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Cookie Captain 2020

Submitted by Sydney T.

Northern & Northeastern

Longmont

This year,  I was a Cookie Captain and I had a lot of fun. I did a cookie rally and pick-up, and I helped a Brownie troop with their first year of cookie sales. I also went door-to-door with a Daisy who was selling cookies for the first time.

While attending the cookie rally, I taught the girls about what to do at a booth and what to do if a customer says no, plus what Hometown Heroes are and how to choose one. At the cookie pick-up, my fellow Cookie Captains and I were a huge help to the adults. We told them what number the car was there to pick up their cookies and got the sheet with the cookie amounts to pick up all ready, so the adults could follow the car that was to be loaded with cookies. This event was actually my favorite. I made a new friend who was also a Cookie Captain and I really enjoyed being helpful for the adults. I learned that it was a very difficult job and I have a new appreciation for the workers at cookie pick-up and what cookie parents have to do to get their girls ready for the cookie season.

With the Brownie troop, I talked about what to do for cookie sales at a booth and what they can do with the cookie money. After that, with the same troop, I helped them with their first booth and helped them get through it, although they were so good I didn’t need to do much. For a Daisy friend, this was her first sale and I helped her by going with her for door-to-door sales. I was able to help with her money management and built her confidence in talking to people. By the last house, she was doing everything, except the cost by herself. The cost was really trying to memorize all the different possible totals due for different numbers of packages sold. That can be tough your first time. I would definitely do this again and I look forward to doing it again. I have a new appreciation for all the parents who help get everyone ready for cookies.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors can Code with Vidcode

To compliment our Coding for Good badge series, we will be giving Girl Scout Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors access to Vidcode, a coding platform for teens and tweens for the month of June 2020. Vidcode uses activities such as creating personalized memes or game avatars to teach girls how to code. Extra bonus- Vidcode was founded by female engineers!

Once in Vidcode, girls will have access to lots of fun activities, but we have outlined which of these activities will help them complete requirements for the Coding for Good badges.

  • Cadette Coding Basics: Video Meme
  • Cadette Digital Game Design: Avatar
  • Cadette App Development: Personal Data
  • Senior Coding Basics: Portraits
  • Senior Digital Game Design: Game Mechanic
  • Senior App Development: Community Map App
  • Ambassador Coding Basics: Karaoke
  • Ambassador Digital Game Design: Jumping!
  • Ambassador App Development: Global App

To participate on Vidcode for free, girls must first register to receive an access code. Girls and caregivers will also receive a “how to” navigate the site. Please note that these activities do require a reliable internet connection.

Looking for a coding event for Girl Scout Daisies, Brownies, and Juniors? Check out our post on how to register your girl for our codeSpark Academy, a learn-to-code app, coding events.

Question? Email GirlExperience@gscolorado.org.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

 

Badge Series: Cadette Science of Happiness

UPDATE: Registration for this event is now full.

What does it really mean to experience happiness? Could we use science to help figure this out? In our new badge series program, girls will dive into understanding their own happiness and how to get happy through helping others. Join us on Wednesday, May 13,2020 for our virtual welcome meeting where we will introduce girls to the badge and explain the activities they need to complete. Girls then have two weeks to complete the activities. We will then all come back together for a virtual reflection meeting on Wednesday, May 27. Cadettes will earn their Science of Happiness badge after they have completed the suggested activities.

To earn the badge, girls will need to complete the following activities:

  • Attend the virtual welcome meeting on Wednesday, May 13 from 4 – 5 p.m.
  • View a mindfulness meditation video
  • Communicate with a friend with an assigned topic
  • Create a happiness journal
  • Attend the virtual reflection meeting on Wednesday, May 27 from 4 -5 p.m.

Ready to sign up your girl? Complete the registration form (https://www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org/en/events-repository/2020/_0531_badge_series_c.html) on our events calendar and we will send you a follow up email with details, including links to our virtual meetings. Registration closes on May 12.

Questions? Email GirlExperience@gscolorado.org.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

 

Cadettes and Poetry – SNAZZY!

Submitted by Nancy Mucklow

Mountain Communities

Steamboat Springs

Cadette Troop 54538 explored poetry as part of the Outdoor Art Apprentice badge. At our virtual meeting, we each shared a haiku poem that we wrote with inspiration from nature. (Such risk-takers – sometimes it’s hard to share your creations/writing with others!)
We moved from haiku to creating a kind of cumulative poem together.

The form of this poem is called Exquisite Corpse. (Innovators because we adapted this to a virtual meeting format – we are realizing that so many things are easier when you can be in the same room with someone!)

There were no rules, just some guidelines to get us going and get inspired. Since the badge is Outdoor Art Apprentice, we started where we each had one line relating to nature. Line Two had a flower reference. Line Three was a line where a sound appeared and we finished with Line Four where we wrote something that made us think differently about our flower line or something that makes our flower line change or become untrue.

Here’s our poem. We titled it SNAZZY!

Time in the sunshine is grand.
There is a chill outside.
The cold is bitter to me.
Winter is when I thrive.
Springtime is my favorite season.

Tulips, Tulips everywhere!
Roses in vases
Roses blooming outside
The pedals are red.
Columbines popping up everywhere!

The buzzing of the bees fly through the air.
Birds chirping in the brisk air.
Tweet Tweet skitter the birds
Waves waving in the water.
The wind whooshes around.

Snow, don’t garnish the red tulips!
Thrones and Roses
I can feel the pokes as I pick the roses
Seasons changing, changing when they bloom like stars in the sky!

~Catherine, Elizabeth, Jacey, Tayla

As go-getters and innovators, we thought some families might like to do a family poem. If you want, you can follow some of our guidelines and ideas!

Family poem idea:  Write a line on a piece of paper and pass it around for everyone to add on. Line one is spontaneous, whatever you want. Be inspired by the person before you.

Line Two refers to fun things outdoors.

Line Three refers to flowers.

Line Four refers to your favorite food.

Line Five refers to something about nature.

Line Six makes you think positive about camping!

Share your fun creation with others to brighten their day!

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouting at Home: Earn your Cadette Trees badge Part Five of Five

In honor of Earth Day, this week (April 20 – 24, 2020) Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team is helping Cadettes earn their Trees badge at home. For Step One, we designed a treehouse. In Step Two, we dug into the amazing science of trees. We made a creative project starring trees for Step Three. We explored the connection between people and trees for Step Four. For the last part, Step Five, we are going to learn how to help trees thrive.

You can take action by planting a tree or helping to tend to an existing tree in a yard or park (make sure to ask permission and practice social distancing). Several organizations allow you to apply for a free tree to plant. However, since most have received a high volume of applications this year, free trees are hard to come by. Check with the National Wildlife Federation in August 2020 when applications may reopen. You can also do a web search for local tree programs in your area. If you get your hands on a tree to plant, make sure you research how best to plant and care for it. Arborday.org has lots of free guides and resources available. If you can’t find a tree to plant, watch our video to learn how to care for an existing tree.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

 

Girl Scouting at Home: Earn your Cadette Trees badge Part Four of Five

In honor of Earth Day, this week (April 20 – 24, 2020) Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team is helping Cadettes earn their Trees badge at home. For Step One, we designed a treehouse. In Step Two, we dug into the amazing science of trees. We made a creative project starring trees for Step Three. We’re now going to explore the connection between people and trees for Step Four.

We’ll start by doing a little research! With your caregiver’s permission and after taking the Girl Scout Internet Safety Pledge, go online and pick a topic. You could choose to learn about logging, clear-cutting, or deforestation. Why do humans cut down trees? What are the pros and cons for people? For the trees? Prepare as if you were planning to debate both sides. Get started with these resources:

Or, you could choose to research trees and gardening. What trees work well in gardens and why? Think about your dream garden. What trees would you include? Check out these websites for ideas on how to design a tree garden layout, and get to work designing your own garden:

Here’s our example of a dream tree garden!

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

 

Girl Scouting at Home: Earn your Cadette Trees badge Part Three of Five

Happy Earth Day! This week (April 20 – 24, 2020), Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team is helping Cadettes earn their Trees badge at home. For Step One, we designed a treehouse. In Step Two, we dug into the amazing science of trees. Moving on to Step Three, let’s make a creative project starring trees!

For this part of the badge, you have options! Pick one, or if you’re feeling really inspired, do both.

Make leaf art. Watch this video to see how to make a wax paper leaf pressing. Or, use this link to learn how to create simple painted leaf prints: https://www.growingajeweledrose.com/2019/08/leaf-painting-for-kids_28.html

OR

 

Make a tree ring autobiography. The way you can tell certain things about a tree’s life year-by-year is through its rings. This is called dendrochronology. Taking inspiration from a tree’s cross-section and its rings, chronicle your life in the rings of a tree. Starting from the middle of the circle at the smallest ring, write down the first thing about yourself or the first thing you can remember (your birth year, where you were born, parents’ names, etc.). As you move out into the larger circles, fill out each ring with moments, people, memories, places, and personality traits for those times. For example, your second ring could be Kindergarten through second grade and could include your friends from that time, favorite things, where you lived, etc. The furthermost ring should be your most recent year or two, or could be things you wish to do/see/accomplish in the future. See the example below for inspiration! You can print out our template or draw your own.

Cadette Trees- Part 3- Tree Ring Template

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouting at Home: Earn your Cadette Trees badge Part Two of Five

Earth Day is April 22! This week (April 20 – 24, 2020), Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team is helping Cadettes earn their Trees badge at home. For Step One, we designed a treehouse. For Step Two, we want you to dig into the amazing science of trees.

On your next neighborhood walk, see how many different types of trees you can identify. If you have a cellphone or camera, take a picture of four to five different trees. You can also sketch the trees in a notebook or on some scrap paper. Bring your images home and see if you can find out what type of tree each was. Check out this website for help identifying trees: https://www.arborday.org/trees/whattree/  Once you’ve identified your trees, pick your favorite one and make a detailed drawing of all its parts and the creatures that may live there or use it.

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.

Girl Scouting at Home: Earn your Cadette Trees badge Part One of Five

Earth Day is April 22! This week (April 20 – 24, 2020), Girl Scouts of Colorado’s Outreach Program team is helping Cadettes earn their Trees badge at home. For Step One, we’re going to design a treehouse.

Start by doing some research into basic architectural drawing and draft the plans for your dream treehouse. Design both the exterior and interior. Is it a multi-story tree house? How do you get into the treehouse- a ladder or stairs? Any special features like a deck or pulley system to bring supplies up? Show your friends and family to see if they’d like living there.

Check out these treehouses for inspiration and to see how people made them: https://morningchores.com/tree-house-plans/

We want to hear how your girl is using her Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, caring for the community, and Girl Scouting at home. She can send in her story here.