Tag Archives: Northern & Northeastern CO

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Clementine Morisette, Fort Collins, “Food Connects Us”

 

Clementine Morisette

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

For my project, I engineered a community story and sharing board centered around the concepts of food and how it connects us. This was greatly assisted by my mentor, Sierra Tamkun, as well as the management and staff of FoCo cafe.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

I measured the impact in that I was able to see a lot of people add input to the boards as well as share their individual stories. Also, I saw impact in the fact that people will be able to come back and see their stories still up at the permanent display. Some specific note examples include one in which different recipes and their backgrounds were shared, all by a women who felt that these foods were important to her expression of identity. Although her name is not on the notes, you can still see her effect in her input.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

Once my part in the project is over, there will be a lasting impact in the community in the form of the finished final display, as well as the impact that the connection and story sharing had on those involved. The final display is up at Foco cafe, where the boards gathered a huge amount of input from patrons.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

There was a global connection in this project as there were many  displays of in terms of  national heritage and influence throughout the project.

What did you learn about yourself?

Through the course of the project, I learned that there is still a lot to learn; I was able to grow as a leader and this experience has shaped me and my future pathway choices.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

This will impact me because of the changes in my personality and my newfound acknowledgements of strengths and weaknesses that I had over the course of this project.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

This was an important part of my Girl Scout experience because I was able to see it shaping my decisions in the future, as this organization has shaped my personality and ways in the past. My involvement with the Girl Scouts has been a constant feature in my life since I was quite young. The culmination of my Girl Scout experience being the Gold Award project was meaningful and therefore an important part of my experience in Girl Scouting.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Meadow Mountain Ranch Core Camp 2 offers backpacking option: Still lots of space to register July 21 – 24, 2017

 

Submitted by Penny “Pan” Roberts

Northern & Northeastern CO

Meadow Mountain Ranch

Core Camp at Meadow Mountain Ranch is a “sampler” troop camp program designed for troops and their leaders who wish to experience most of the types of programs that Girl Scout camps have to offer.  This year, a group of trained volunteers is offering Core Camp 1 for less experienced troops for two nights and Core Camp 2 for more experienced troops for three nights at the spectacular high country location near Allenspark, CO.

This year, Core Camp 2 will offer 12-15 girls who have had past camping experience an additional progressive option into the world of backpacking.  CC2 runs from July 21 – 24, 2017 and the backpacking group will be gone from main camp from after lunch on Saturday until before lunch on Sunday.  They will not be leaving the MMR property, but will search out a secluded glade in which to pitch tents, cook out, practice outdoor skills, and have a great overnight with the help of experienced backpacking staff.  No, the girls will not need to provide the specialized gear such as tents, packs, stoves, cook kits, or food.  All they will need is their own sleeping bag, rain gear, clothing, and very minor misc. items for such a short trip.

There will be some special orientation given before they take-off about how to pack, cook out, set up camp, and other skills they will need to give them a compact insight into what could come later as they choose to delve further into the world of backpacking.  Rocky Mountain National Park is out the west boundary of MMR, and no more spectacular options anywhere would await girls or troops or groups when they are ready to explore even further afield.  Take it from me – – – I’m still backpacking after about 55+ years, and I never tire of it.  We’ll be sure the girls have the best possible experience out and about in the woods and under the stars.

There is still room for about 50 more registrants for Core Camp 2, and it is possible to split the troop if not all girls choose the backpacking option.  Some financial aid may be available.  Cookie Credits can be used, and for information or to make your registration, contact meadowmountaincorecamp@gmail.com.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

 

 

 

Learn about natural resources at the Forestry Field Day

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Submitted by Bob Sturtevant

Northern & Northeastern CO

Fort Collins

The Society of American Foresters, Colorado State University, and Colorado State Forest Service will host a forestry field day at Ben Delatour Scout Ranch near Red Feather Lakes, Colorado on Saturday, April 22, 2017.

Spend the day learning about the native tree species, how foresters help protect the forest, what are some of the issues our forests are facing, what are some of the many products that come from our forests, and much more. You will see forest management in action as the CSU forestry students cut and having a damaged tree removed from a crowded forest area. Earn your “Tree” Naturalist Legacy badge.

See this attached flyer for more details: 40963104_scout_day_flyer2017-2

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Juliet Spitz, Boulder, “Why Love One and Hurt the Other?”

Juliet Spitz

What did you do for your Gold Award project? 

When I went vegan after learning the conditions animals are forced to endure for human use, I knew I wanted to focus my Gold Award project on educating others to inspire them to take action on this issue as well. I created a lesson for young adults to inform them of the conditions animals are forced to endure in factory farms, animal entertainment industries, and animal testing laboratories and provide them with alternatives to supporting these industries. In my lesson, I introduced the audience to the concept of speciesism (discrimination against other species), and I raised thought-provoking questions to encourage the contemplation of why our society values certain species (such as dogs and cats) above others. I presented my lesson to over 80 teenagers and young adults from various groups and clubs. I then posted a video of one of my presentations on YouTube and it is on AnimalActionNetwork.org, and has been shared on multiple Facebook pages.

I know from personal experience that it can be difficult to transition to a diet with fewer animal products, so the second component of my project was creating an email list that anyone can sign up for to receive one vegan recipe per week for eight consecutive weeks to make incorporating more plant-based meals into one’s life easier.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

At the end of each of my presentations, before answering questions from my audience, I asked them one question: “What actions, if any, will you now implement in your lives to help animals?” I was happy to hear a range of answers, from “I will eat less meat” to “I will look for the cruelty-free symbol on body care products.”

How  is your project sustainable? How  will  your  project  continue to impact after your  involvement? 

A video of one of my presentations is posted on YouTube, the homepage of AnimalActionNetwork.org, and numerous Facebook pages. Not only can people continue to view this video in the future, but I hope that the audience members of my presentation will continue to share the information that they learned and inspire others to take action.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I have contacted 27 different vegan, vegetarian, and animal rights organizations with a description of my project along with a link to my YouTube video of my presentation. These organizations are all over the nation and world, ranging from Hawaii to Singapore to the Netherlands. Although I didn’t ask for a reply, nine organizations have sent me a response to say that they were glad I had done this project.

What did you learn about yourself?

I honestly didn’t expect to learn much about myself over the course of this project, but I did learn that if I have enough passion for something, I can convince myself to do almost anything that I would normally be too afraid to do. As someone that is normally petrified in front of a crowd, I was surprised that I wanted to pursue a project that required public speaking. Throughout my project, I continually reminded myself of my end goal: to inspire others to better the lives of animals. This simple reminder was enough to encourage me to follow through with my project, even when it was uncomfortable.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

With the confidence, public speaking skills, and knowledge that passion can be a strong motivator, I know I will continue to be an activist for causes I believe in. I know that I have the ability to put together and follow through with a large project and that one person really can make a difference.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

Since I became a Girl Scout eight years ago, everything that I’ve done through Girl Scouts has been with my troop— that is, until I pursued my Gold Award. The activities that I had done with my troop, while fun and fulfilling, weren’t necessarily what I would have chosen to do on my own. In addition, when completing a project as a part of a group, I felt less of a responsibility to complete as much of the project, since I felt that the responsibility could be shared among the group members. Completing my Gold Award gave me the opportunity to pursue an issue that I personally had a passion for and that I had full responsibility for.

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

Troop 720 helps at local food bank

Submitted by Ariella Wells

Northern & Northeastern CO

Fort Collins

Some of the girls from Troop 720 spent two and a half hours helping out at a local food bank. We bagged up 1,500 pounds of chocolate in that time for low-resource families. Giving back and service work are so important and a big part of what we do. All the girls love the opportunity to give back to others.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Hometown heroes delivery

Submitted by Ariella Wells

Northern & Northeastern CO

Fort Collins

Thank you so much to all the folks who gave their extra change or just decided to donate to Troop 70720’s Hometown Hero. Girls delivered 238 boxes of Girl Scout Cookies to the Food Bank for Larimer County. This was 125 pounds of food. All of the girls were super excited to give this gift back our community. Thank you Fort Collins customers! We appreciate you and the food bank was very grateful.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

 

Girl Scout Gold Award Project: Molly McPherson, Boulder, “Saving the World One Bottle at a Time”

 

Molly McPherson

What did you do for your Gold Award project?

Bottled water has horrific environmental and health effects, and costs an absurd amount of money for buying water, a liquid that is most often close to free.  An average American uses 167 plastic non-reusable water bottles in one year, however, by being proactive we can reduce our impact on our environment including the air, and oceans specifically.  My role in this issue, was promoting the use of reusable water bottles, as well as uncovering the truth of the harmful effects of bottled water.  I created a 25 minute presentation on the subject that I had researched then I presented in 12 different places, including elementary, middle, and high school classes, as well as clubs, and a business.  I also created a website (www.savingtheworldonebottleatatime.com) and Facebook page. I informed at least 300 people about plastic water bottle pollution, and I gave out stickers with my website domain to people to spread the word about my project.

How did you measure the impact your Gold Award project made on your target audience?

The most rewarding aspect of my project is that I have had numerous people come up to me and tell me that they just bought a reusable water bottle and are no longer using bottled water.  I work in an ice cream shop, and little kids whom I have given my presentation to, will come in and recognize me, and their parents have told me that their kids told them about my presentation and that as a family they have been inspired to eliminate their use of plastic water bottles.  The little successes of people telling me that they are thinking about their use of plastic and being conscious of what they are adding the environment shows that I have truly made an impact in people’s lives.

How is your project sustainable? How will your project continue to impact after your involvement?

I have shared my presentation with over 300 people, and given them stickers with my website address.  People will always be able to view my website, and learn about the issue.  I will also be coming out with a short movie soon that I will share.  In addition, I have several presentations scheduled for the future, so I will continue to reach new audiences.

One of my presentations was for my school’s garden club in which I am involved.  They have agreed to continue my presentation for years after my involvement in the club.  I have shared my presentation with them and my note cards for each slide with all the information so that they will be able to continue the presentation.  In this club, we typically grow a garden, then harvest our crops in the summer, however in the winter we always try to learn more about the subject, and work to become more eco-friendly, and educated on the subject.  So this is something that they can learn about every year as new members join.

What is your project’s global and/or national connection?

I have given my website and Facebook page information to friends and family across the United States, so they can research and also become educated on the subject.  I have involved many of my friends and family members to be a part in sharing my project, so it has been able to reach as far as cousins in England, as well as family in Wisconsin, Florida, Chicago, and California.  My website includes information on all the effects that I teach in my presentation, so anybody can easily learn about the subject.  Therefore, it is accessible to anyone who wants to learn more.

What did you learn about yourself?

I’ve learned that presenting in front of people is not as easy as it looks.  I found that I got really nervous when I started talking in front of people even just family, which is where I practiced first.  I practiced the presentation at least 20 times before I took it to a classroom, and finally my sentences started flowing better and I was able to form coherent sentences without using unnecessary filler words.

For the first three presentations I was very nervous, but by practicing in between them, asking people for constructive criticism, and filming myself, I improved in a short amount of time.  After about five presentations, I no longer got nervous, I felt prepared and confident, and I really felt comfortable. I have gotten really great at public speaking, and learned that practice is really important in projects like these.

How will earning your Gold Award impact you in the future?

Next year, I will be studying education at Fort Lewis College, because I want to become a middle school social studies teacher. Now when I have presentations, I feel that I am really great at leading the classrooms.  I have learned how to keep a classroom engaged in the subject I’m teaching, and how to answer questions that students have in a positive way to not steer away from the subject.  These presentations have taught me leadership and given me a taste of what it’s like to speak in front of classrooms and teach my own lesson, similar to what I will be doing when I’m a teacher.

In addition, I will be continuing with the subject of bottled water pollution.  I am currently in the process of making a movie about the subject, then planning on sharing it with my Facebook page, and website, where I hope it will reach many more people.  I also have scheduled presentations for the upcoming months, so just because I have completed my Gold Award, does not mean that I have finished making an impact with this project.

Why do you feel the Gold Award was an important part of your Girl Scout experience?

This project has inspired me to know that I really can make a difference in the world!  I have learned that if you have a true passion for something, you can make a change!  Knowing that even just one person listened to my ideas, and bought a reusable water bottle, and wants my sticker to put on it, is the best feeling in the world.  Knowing that I can be the one to get someone to choose to not use bottled water at a party, or school, or any sort of event, and instead bring their reusable water bottle around, shows that I am limiting the amount of bottled water being used, even if it’s just one person.  I feel the momentum that I have with this project, and I do not plan on stopping because I know I can make a larger impact! I have learned that change can start as small as you want it to be, but by being passionate, positive and hopeful, that change can turn into anything you want it to be!

**IMPORTANT NOTE: This blog represents only a small fraction of the hard work, dedication and requirements that go into earning a Girl Scout Gold Award. It is simply a brief summary, which is meant to inspire Girl Scouts to Go Gold in the future. For more information on earning your Gold Award, please email highestawards@gscolorado.org

 

Outdoor Skills Day Camp

Submitted by Molly M.

Northern & Northeastern CO

Boulder

Are you looking for outdoor fun and adventure? You are in luck! Senior Girl Scout Troop 7 is running outdoor skills days.

Get ready for camping fun! The Girl Scout Outdoor Skills day camps on April 22, 2017 (Thornton-regular) and April 29, 2017 (Boulder-advanced) prepare girls for camping and outdoors. Each girl will earn an outdoor skills patch, in addition to learning:

  1.  Knife craft and safety
  2. Compass use
  3. Outdoor cooking
  4. Fire building
  5.  Campsite Set-up
  6. Tent pitching
  7. Emergency first-aid and preparation

Regular Camp: April 22 (Thornton)

Who: 1st Graders and up. No experience necessary

When: 9:30 a.m. — 3:30 p.m.

Price: 1 Girl – $17 includes hot lunch and Outdoor
Skills patch

Additional adults: $5/day

Advanced Camp: April 29 (Boulder)

Who: 4th Graders and up. Must have prior camping
experience

When: 9:30 a.m. — 3:30 p.m.

Price: 1 Girl – $18 includes hot lunch and Outdoor
Skills patch

Additional adults: $5/day

Register early. A sell-out is expected.

Advanced Payment Required

Website link to register both scouts and adults:
https://sites.google.com/site/gsoutdoorskillsdayscolorado/

Contact Senior / Ambassador Girl Scout Troop 7
at

Girlscouttroop70007@gmail.com

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Girl Scout University

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Submitted by Payton Buhler

Northern & Northeastern CO

Boulder

At CU Boulder, we have traditionally hosted GSU, Girl Scout University. Come and join us, we have a maximum of 200 girls. Come hang out. It’ll be lots of fun. It is a day to be on campus and you can earn two badges while you’re at it. You’ll come in the morning and earn the first badge. Then, you’re served lunch on campus, and spend the rest of your day earning your second badge.

It will be hosted on April 22, 2017 and it is $35. To register please click here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/6HGMJHY

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments too.

Cookie costume contest winners

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Way to go Kai from Colorado Springs! She is the winner of the first-ever GSCO contest for Best Cookie Costume and will receive $200 in Cookie Credits.

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Ashla from Greeley came in second place and plans to use her winnings ($100 in Cookie Credits) to go to Girl Scout Camp.

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Troop 76119 in Firestone came in third place and will receive $50 in Cookie Credits.