Tag Archives: Northern & Northeastern CO

Field day fun

Submitted by Ariella Wells

Northern & Northeastern CO

Fort Collins

Cadette Troop 70720 had some field day fun while earning their “Field  Day” badge. We were joined by a younger Brownie troop. The badge was entirely planned by one of our Cadettes. She did a great job and the girls had an amazing time!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

We’re sowing

Submitted by Sharon Manning

Northern & Northeastern CO

Longmont

Just a few short weeks ago, Troop 73392 started out with a 20 by 20-foot garden bed filled with weeds at the 11th Avenue Community Garden. After hours of weeding, a lesson in rototilling, spreading two-cubic yards of garden soil donated by Midwest Landscape Supply in Longmont, the girls are finally ready to plant. So far, the girls have planted onions, potatoes, lettuce, and spinach, but have FAR bigger plans in the next several weeks.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Kicking off the garden season

Submitted by Sharon Manning

Northern & Northeastern CO

Longmont

Troop 73392 is tackling a 20-foot by 20-foot garden bed to help grow food for OUR Center in Longmont. But, before you can grow vegetables, you have to clear the weeds! And, there are a lot of weeds in 400- square feet of garden. Several members of the troop and parents spent two hours preparing the garden bed and learning how to run a tiller.

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Our Journey shenanigans

Submitted by Lisa Herrmann

Northern & Northeastern CO

Longmont

As part of our Breathe Journey, Troop 74447 toured the Celestial Seasonings factory in Boulder (and survived the Mint Room), and then we followed that up with goat yoga. A super fun day!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

OGAB kept me engaged and allowed me to grow

Submitted by Emma Lilly

Northern & Northeastern CO

Longmont

Almost two years ago, I received a postcard in the mail from GSCO announcing that they would be starting an Older Girl Advisory Board, and that they were looking for applicants for the program. I had been involved in Girl Scouts in a troop from 5th through 8th grade, and I became a Juliette in high school after my troop broke up. I loved going to summer camp, and but besides that, I did not know many other older Girl Scouts. I applied to the program because I figured it would be a good way to meet other active Girl Scouts as well as a chance for me to share my opinions and ideas with Girl Scouts.

Being on the OGAB has been a wonderful experience. I have made some really great friends, and not only do we have a ton of fun on our retreats (playing a lot of Spoons and other games), but I also feel we are contributing to some positive changes being made within Girl Scouts. During our retreats and web calls, we have discussed a variety of subjects from the CIT and PA experience, to cookie sales, to how we can keep older girls in the program.

When I came to the first OGAB retreat, I was pretty nervous because I felt like I wasn’t a “real” Girl Scout because I am not in a troop, but it quickly became apparent to me that my opinions and experiences were valuable to the group. As my confidence grew, I became comfortable sharing all of my ideas, and now I am one of the more talkative ones in our group.

Being a part of OGAB has added a lot to my Girl Scout experience because it has given me a group that feels almost like a troop and it has allowed me to reflect on my experiences in Girl Scouts and see how we could improve certain programs. It also has given me another leadership role within Girl Scouts, because we have essentially been representing girls all around the state. Of course, this is an experience that looks great on college applications and resumes, but it is also real experience that I believe has prepared me for college and beyond.

If you are a Girl Scout Senior or Ambassador and have the opportunity to apply to OGAB, I would highly recommend it. It has added so much to my Girl Scout experience, and I have made so many good friends. I have so many fond memories from my time in OGAB, and as I go off to college next year, I will miss it so much.

The Older Girl Advisory Board (OGAB) is a group of Senior and Ambassador Girl Scouts from all regions of Colorado that provide feedback on projects that enrich the experience of Girl Scouts of Colorado.  Make your voice heard by applying today! Applications close on September 18, 2018. https://gscolorado.formstack.com/forms/ogab2018

Questions? Contact Emily Speck, emily.speck@gscolorado.org or 303-607-4811

Bronze, Silver, and Gold Award Girl Scouts honored at Highest Awards celebration in Loveland

More than 300 Girl Scouts, families, and friends gathered at Embassy Suites in Loveland on April 22, 2018, to honor the more than 1,300 Girl Scouts from across Colorado who took the lead in their communities and earned one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, the Bronze, Silver, or Gold Award.

The Gold Award, which is the highest honor in Girl Scouts, is presented to girls in grades 9-12 who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through a project that makes a difference in their community. The Silver Award is the highest award a girl in 6th – 8th grade can earn. The Bronze Award is the highest award a girl in 4th or 5th grade can earn. For the 2017-18 Girl Scout awards program year, nearly 1,000 girls across the state and 190 in Northern and Northeastern Colorado earned the Bronze Award. 32 girls across Northern and Northeastern Colorado earned the prestigious Silver Award. Seven girls across Northern and Northeastern Colorado earned the prestigious Gold Award.

Girl Scouts of Colorado President and CEO Stephanie Foote applauded the girls for having the courage and confidence to try new things and make their world a better place.

“Girl Scouts gives girls the skills and experiences they need to thrive and lead in today’s world. The world needs female leaders now more than ever. You’re making a difference,” she said.

2016 Gold Award Girl Scout, National Young Woman of Distinction, and winner of the 2016 Stephanie A. Foote Leadership Prize for Gold Award Excellence Sarah Greichen served as the celebration’s emcee. She talked briefly about her journey to earn the Gold Award and how Girl Scouts helped her become the leader she is today.

The focus of a Gold Award project is identifying and researching a community issue she is passionate about, developing a plan to address it in cooperation with her team and community members, establishing a global connection with others, and providing sustainability for the project. Of the skills learned through Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards, leadership, organization, and critical thinking are the fundamentals of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Some universities and colleges offer scholarships unique to Gold Award recipients, and girls who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced rank in recognition of their achievements.

Volunteer Spotlight: Jennifer Ayers

Girl Scouts of Colorado is celebrating extraordinary volunteers throughout the state in honor of Volunteer Appreciation Month. Jennifer Ayers of Johnstown in the Northern & Northeastern CO region started as a troop leader, but quickly became a product program volunteer as well. She is also a shining example of the wonderful role Girl Scout volunteers play in the lives of girls and our community.

GSCO asked Jennifer to answer a few quick questions about her volunteer experience. We hope you find her as inspiring as we did.

Why did you become a Girl Scout volunteer?

When we first moved to Colorado from California a few years ago, my daughter wanted to join Girl Scouts and had asked me to be her leader. Knowing it would be beneficial to meeting people in our new community, I registered, but wasn’t able to get a troop formed right away, so she ended up joining a local multi-level troop. The next year, they needed someone to lead the Brownies and I gladly volunteered! Now, that both of my daughters are in Girl Scouts, I love being involved in their troop and doing something with them, instead of watching from the sidelines. I know that Girl Scouts has helped my family find an amazing group of people and I LOVE seeing these girls outside of Girl Scout activities and getting the biggest and warmest hugs! 

Tell us about your different volunteer roles as a Girl Scout.

I started volunteering as a troop leader and fall product program manager. This year, I added the role of cookie program manager and am becoming a service unit manager. We have a multi-level troop ranging from Daisies to Seniors. Although I’m officially leading the Brownies, our leadership team works well together and we all help each other out wherever needed. It is definitely a team effort to make sure we are helping our girls develop their G.I.R.L. skills.

I wasn’t sure where to start as a leader and the flexibility of the Girl Scout Program was kind of intimidating to me, so the volunteer online and in-person training summits have been a huge help. Networking with other leaders has been reassuring and inspiring on how to lead meetings and get ideas for activities so the girls can gain a lot from their time with Girl Scouts.

What have you learned as a Girl Scout volunteer? 

The girls have taught me more than I could have ever imagined. Our troop is full of incredible girls from all different backgrounds with different interests. It’s really been wonderful trying to make sure each girl is getting her own experience, helping them earn all of the badges that they want, and keeping things fun and character building. I have definitely had to learn to let them lead a lot more. Girl-led isn’t something that I excel at because I tend to take charge and over plan, but I am working on stepping back a bit and letting the girls have more opportunities to figure things out for themselves. 

These girls have also taught me the importance of getting outside my comfort zone and having some fun. I’m not exactly the most adventurous person, but leading our girls is pushing me to be a better version of myself and to just try new things. I am excited to see where our troop takes us as they get older! 

What do you hope girls have learned from you? 

As a troop leader, I really love being able to devote my time and energy into helping our girls grow and succeed, not only by earning badges and awards, but also as a valuable member of our community. I hope they have learned that they are fully capable of making the world a better place, no matter what their age is.

I also hope they have learned the Girl Scout Promise and Law is not just something they pledge at the beginning of our meetings and is something that really applies to our daily lives through our actions.

How has your experience as a volunteer helped you become a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader)?

Volunteering has definitely helped me become a G.I.R.L. These girls deserve the best and I absolutely do not want to let any of them down so I have had to push through my own insecurities and hesitations and support our girls wherever I can. Life certainly has been a lot more fun and fulfilling because of volunteering with Girl Scouts and encouraging our troop to be more G.I.R.L. strong!

Want to nominate a volunteer for Girl Scouts of Colorado to spotlight? Please email Public Relations Director AnneMarie Harper at annemarie.harper@gscolorado.org.

Working to earn the “Primitive Camper” badge

Submitted by Ariella Wells

Northern & Northeastern CO

Fort Collins

We got the girls together outdoors to start working on the “Primitive Camper” badge. The girls learned about plants that could be edible in the wild and also primitive shelter building. They built two very different structures based off what they could find around them. They had an amazing time and are talking about more they want to do outdoors!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.

Learning about cars

Submitted by Sharon Manning

Northern & Northeastern CO

Longmont

Troop 73392 recently earned their Senior level “Car Care” badge with the help of Bowen Street Garage in Longmont. The girls learned about the different fluids used in a car, belts, engines, and how to check and add fluids, if necessary. The girls also learned about various motors, parts of the motor, and what happens if you don’t maintain appropriate fluid levels. Andreas, the owner of Bowen Street Garage, showed the troop the damage caused by low oil levels with an engine he was in the process of repairing as a result of low oil in the engine. But, the favorite part of the evening was learning how to change a tire and actually doing it!

This story was submitted using the Share Your Stories form. You can share your Girl Scout moments, too.